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India backs incentives to export 1.4 mln T raw sugar – govt source – Business Standard


Global Government Forum
India backs incentives to export 1.4 mln T raw sugar – govt source
Business Standard
NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India will give its cash-strapped sugar mills an incentive to produce and export raw sugar, a senior government official said on Thursday, to help cut stocks after five straight years of surplus output. The government will provide
Sugar price drops as India agrees export subsidyAgrimoney.com
CCEA may take up sugar export subsidy issue todayZee News
India to give sweet incentiveGlobal Government Forum

all 96 news articles »

Is this a good time to buy gold? – Business Standard


Business Standard
Is this a good time to buy gold?
Business Standard
Gold prices in India are now down over 20% from their peak over a year ago, while globally prices are down nearly 40% in three years. Should you consider buying gold now? Global investors are not buying, and instead have been consistent sellers as they …

Is this a good time to buy gold? – Business Standard


Business Standard
Is this a good time to buy gold?
Business Standard
Gold prices in India are now down over 20% from their peak over a year ago, while globally prices are down nearly 40% in three years. Should you consider buying gold now? Global investors are not buying, and instead have been consistent sellers as they …

Will Ethanol Ride the GOP Wave?

Bruce Braley the Iowa Democrat who lost his bid to be a U.S. Senator Tuesday, famously told a group of lawyers in Texas that if Republicans gained control of the Senate, the next chair of the Judiciary committee would be “a farmer from Iowa,” Senator Chuck Grassley. The video clip of that comment, played often in attack ads, may have doomed his chances of winning against Iowa’s new Republican Senator-elect, Joni Ernst.

Maybe Braley should have pointed out that the next chair of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee is likely to be Senator James Inhofe, an Oklahoma Republican who is a strong critic of the renewable fuel standard. Last year Inhofe called for “Repealing Obama’s Ethanol Mandate.”

So, does the shift in power in the Senate mean that corn-based ethanol will be weakened?

Those who lead the nation’s three leading ethanol groups don’t think so, but they’re hardly complacent, either.

“I don’t think it has that much impact at all,” Bob Dinneen, president of the Renewable Fuels Association in Washington said of the election results Wednesday. “The mathematics of ethanol hasn’t changed.”

“They’ll still need 60 votes on the floor of the Senate to repeal the Renewable Fuel Standard,” he told Agriculture.com. That’s the number needed to break a filibuster that would block any legislation to repeal the RFS. The Democrats, who control the Senate until next year, don’t have 60 votes. And, even after Tuesday’s wave election, Republicans won’t have a 60-vote majority in 2015.

Dinneen points out that new senators from Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota are all supporters of ethanol, as are GOP veterans from the Midwest, Senators John Thune of South Dakota and Grassley from Iowa.

“These folks will come to town and support the Grassleys and John Thunes of the world,” Dinneen said.

Dinneen added that the first RFS passed in an energy bill in 2005 was under a Republican President, George W. Bush, and Republican Congress. The 2007 energy bill, which created a larger mandate for biofuels in its RFS, passed when Bush was still in office and after Democrats had taken control of the Senate. 

Brian Jennings, executive vice president of the American Coalition for Ethanol in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, agrees that ethanol’s support is bipartisan.

“I’m going back to the principal that has been true for ethanol forever, that ethanol has been a bipartisan issue,” Jennings said Wednesday. “We expect that this remaining bipartisan support will keep big oil from reducing or eliminating the RFS.” 

That doesn’t mean ethanol groups won’t be busy. Under Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, committees have held hearings that featured oil industry critics of the RFS and members from both parties backed bills to weaken the RFS that ultimately went nowhere.

Both Dinneen and Jennings expect Inhofe to hold hearings attacking the RFS. 

Like many issues in agriculture, support or opposition to the RFS is regional, with critics coming from oil states like Oklahoma, or Texas and Virginia, where cattle feeders and poultry producers have blamed the mandate for creating high prices for corn – when prices were high.

Jennings believes that the development of cellulosic ethanol could expand that regional support for biofuels.

“Hopefully, what we can do is expand that playing field so that other members of the country join that bipartisan caucus” that supports ethanol, he said.

Another factor that could moderate efforts to repeal the RFS is that the new Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell will be under pressure to pass legislation, Dinneen said. That includes other measures desired by the oil industry, such as the Keystone XL pipeline to bring Canadian crude to the U.S. Gulf, and ending the U.S. ban on domestic crude oil exports. McConnell has a better chance of doing that if he leaves out an issue as divisive as repeal of the RFS, Dinneen said. 

Jennings pointed out that the views of some of the successful candidates for the Senate “have offered a range of responses when it comes to the RFS.”

Ernst, for example, told The Des Moines Register last spring that philosophically she opposes mandates and government subsidies, but her campaign responded to criticism from Braley by pointing out that Ernst, as a member of the Iowa Senate, voted to support the RFS. (The Iowa legislature doesn’t control the RFS, of course, but was part of a strong Midwest campaign against an EPA proposal to weaken the ethanol mandate in the RFS.) Ernst has pledged to continue to “passionately defend the RFS in the U.S. Senate.”

Jennings said citizens need to make sure campaign promises are kept.

“Now is the time we have to hold newly-elected officials accountable for the promises made on the campaign trail,” he said.”In other words, I don’t think anyone should be complacent.”

Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy, another ethanol group, agrees that “biofuels policy is bipartisan and always has been.”

But he also looks for more pressure on ethanol in the Senate – not from new Republicans from midwestern states, but some of the new senators from other regions who got backing from the oil industry.

“Oil doesn’t invest all this money in these campaigns out of the goodness of their hearts,” Buis said. 

The change in leadership of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee to ethanol foe Inhofe is dramatic. Its chair under the Democrats, Senator Barbara Boxer of California, said “that as long as she held this gavel, there will be no changes to the RFS,” Buis recalled.

In the new Senate, “we expect there to be attempts [to weaken the RFS]. Whether any succeed, I highly doubt it,” Buis said.

Ethanol’s strongest support may be in the Corn Belt, but Buis pointed out that “we have supporters on both coasts as well as the Midwest.”

“We don’t think we had any net losses in the Senate – if they had a vote on the RFS,” Buis said of the tally of supporters.

Will Ethanol Ride the GOP Wave?

Bruce Braley the Iowa Democrat who lost his bid to be a U.S. Senator Tuesday, famously told a group of lawyers in Texas that if Republicans gained control of the Senate, the next chair of the Judiciary committee would be “a farmer from Iowa,” Senator Chuck Grassley. The video clip of that comment, played often in attack ads, may have doomed his chances of winning against Iowa’s new Republican Senator-elect, Joni Ernst.

Maybe Braley should have pointed out that the next chair of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee is likely to be Senator James Inhofe, an Oklahoma Republican who is a strong critic of the renewable fuel standard. Last year Inhofe called for “Repealing Obama’s Ethanol Mandate.”

So, does the shift in power in the Senate mean that corn-based ethanol will be weakened?

Those who lead the nation’s three leading ethanol groups don’t think so, but they’re hardly complacent, either.

“I don’t think it has that much impact at all,” Bob Dinneen, president of the Renewable Fuels Association in Washington said of the election results Wednesday. “The mathematics of ethanol hasn’t changed.”

“They’ll still need 60 votes on the floor of the Senate to repeal the Renewable Fuel Standard,” he told Agriculture.com. That’s the number needed to break a filibuster that would block any legislation to repeal the RFS. The Democrats, who control the Senate until next year, don’t have 60 votes. And, even after Tuesday’s wave election, Republicans won’t have a 60-vote majority in 2015.

Dinneen points out that new senators from Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota are all supporters of ethanol, as are GOP veterans from the Midwest, Senators John Thune of South Dakota and Grassley from Iowa.

“These folks will come to town and support the Grassleys and John Thunes of the world,” Dinneen said.

Dinneen added that the first RFS passed in an energy bill in 2005 was under a Republican President, George W. Bush, and Republican Congress. The 2007 energy bill, which created a larger mandate for biofuels in its RFS, passed when Bush was still in office and after Democrats had taken control of the Senate. 

Brian Jennings, executive vice president of the American Coalition for Ethanol in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, agrees that ethanol’s support is bipartisan.

“I’m going back to the principal that has been true for ethanol forever, that ethanol has been a bipartisan issue,” Jennings said Wednesday. “We expect that this remaining bipartisan support will keep big oil from reducing or eliminating the RFS.” 

That doesn’t mean ethanol groups won’t be busy. Under Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, committees have held hearings that featured oil industry critics of the RFS and members from both parties backed bills to weaken the RFS that ultimately went nowhere.

Both Dinneen and Jennings expect Inhofe to hold hearings attacking the RFS. 

Like many issues in agriculture, support or opposition to the RFS is regional, with critics coming from oil states like Oklahoma, or Texas and Virginia, where cattle feeders and poultry producers have blamed the mandate for creating high prices for corn – when prices were high.

Jennings believes that the development of cellulosic ethanol could expand that regional support for biofuels.

“Hopefully, what we can do is expand that playing field so that other members of the country join that bipartisan caucus” that supports ethanol, he said.

Another factor that could moderate efforts to repeal the RFS is that the new Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell will be under pressure to pass legislation, Dinneen said. That includes other measures desired by the oil industry, such as the Keystone XL pipeline to bring Canadian crude to the U.S. Gulf, and ending the U.S. ban on domestic crude oil exports. McConnell has a better chance of doing that if he leaves out an issue as divisive as repeal of the RFS, Dinneen said. 

Jennings pointed out that the views of some of the successful candidates for the Senate “have offered a range of responses when it comes to the RFS.”

Ernst, for example, told The Des Moines Register last spring that philosophically she opposes mandates and government subsidies, but her campaign responded to criticism from Braley by pointing out that Ernst, as a member of the Iowa Senate, voted to support the RFS. (The Iowa legislature doesn’t control the RFS, of course, but was part of a strong Midwest campaign against an EPA proposal to weaken the ethanol mandate in the RFS.) Ernst has pledged to continue to “passionately defend the RFS in the U.S. Senate.”

Jennings said citizens need to make sure campaign promises are kept.

“Now is the time we have to hold newly-elected officials accountable for the promises made on the campaign trail,” he said.”In other words, I don’t think anyone should be complacent.”

Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy, another ethanol group, agrees that “biofuels policy is bipartisan and always has been.”

But he also looks for more pressure on ethanol in the Senate – not from new Republicans from midwestern states, but some of the new senators from other regions who got backing from the oil industry.

“Oil doesn’t invest all this money in these campaigns out of the goodness of their hearts,” Buis said. 

The change in leadership of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee to ethanol foe Inhofe is dramatic. Its chair under the Democrats, Senator Barbara Boxer of California, said “that as long as she held this gavel, there will be no changes to the RFS,” Buis recalled.

In the new Senate, “we expect there to be attempts [to weaken the RFS]. Whether any succeed, I highly doubt it,” Buis said.

Ethanol’s strongest support may be in the Corn Belt, but Buis pointed out that “we have supporters on both coasts as well as the Midwest.”

“We don’t think we had any net losses in the Senate – if they had a vote on the RFS,” Buis said of the tally of supporters.

Will Ethanol Ride the GOP Wave?

Bruce Braley the Iowa Democrat who lost his bid to be a U.S. Senator Tuesday, famously told a group of lawyers in Texas that if Republicans gained control of the Senate, the next chair of the Judiciary committee would be “a farmer from Iowa,” Senator Chuck Grassley. The video clip of that comment, played often in attack ads, may have doomed his chances of winning against Iowa’s new Republican Senator-elect, Joni Ernst.

Maybe Braley should have pointed out that the next chair of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee is likely to be Senator James Inhofe, an Oklahoma Republican who is a strong critic of the renewable fuel standard. Last year Inhofe called for “Repealing Obama’s Ethanol Mandate.”

So, does the shift in power in the Senate mean that corn-based ethanol will be weakened?

Those who lead the nation’s three leading ethanol groups don’t think so, but they’re hardly complacent, either.

“I don’t think it has that much impact at all,” Bob Dinneen, president of the Renewable Fuels Association in Washington said of the election results Wednesday. “The mathematics of ethanol hasn’t changed.”

“They’ll still need 60 votes on the floor of the Senate to repeal the Renewable Fuel Standard,” he told Agriculture.com. That’s the number needed to break a filibuster that would block any legislation to repeal the RFS. The Democrats, who control the Senate until next year, don’t have 60 votes. And, even after Tuesday’s wave election, Republicans won’t have a 60-vote majority in 2015.

Dinneen points out that new senators from Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota are all supporters of ethanol, as are GOP veterans from the Midwest, Senators John Thune of South Dakota and Grassley from Iowa.

“These folks will come to town and support the Grassleys and John Thunes of the world,” Dinneen said.

Dinneen added that the first RFS passed in an energy bill in 2005 was under a Republican President, George W. Bush, and Republican Congress. The 2007 energy bill, which created a larger mandate for biofuels in its RFS, passed when Bush was still in office and after Democrats had taken control of the Senate. 

Brian Jennings, executive vice president of the American Coalition for Ethanol in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, agrees that ethanol’s support is bipartisan.

“I’m going back to the principal that has been true for ethanol forever, that ethanol has been a bipartisan issue,” Jennings said Wednesday. “We expect that this remaining bipartisan support will keep big oil from reducing or eliminating the RFS.” 

That doesn’t mean ethanol groups won’t be busy. Under Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, committees have held hearings that featured oil industry critics of the RFS and members from both parties backed bills to weaken the RFS that ultimately went nowhere.

Both Dinneen and Jennings expect Inhofe to hold hearings attacking the RFS. 

Like many issues in agriculture, support or opposition to the RFS is regional, with critics coming from oil states like Oklahoma, or Texas and Virginia, where cattle feeders and poultry producers have blamed the mandate for creating high prices for corn – when prices were high.

Jennings believes that the development of cellulosic ethanol could expand that regional support for biofuels.

“Hopefully, what we can do is expand that playing field so that other members of the country join that bipartisan caucus” that supports ethanol, he said.

Another factor that could moderate efforts to repeal the RFS is that the new Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell will be under pressure to pass legislation, Dinneen said. That includes other measures desired by the oil industry, such as the Keystone XL pipeline to bring Canadian crude to the U.S. Gulf, and ending the U.S. ban on domestic crude oil exports. McConnell has a better chance of doing that if he leaves out an issue as divisive as repeal of the RFS, Dinneen said. 

Jennings pointed out that the views of some of the successful candidates for the Senate “have offered a range of responses when it comes to the RFS.”

Ernst, for example, told The Des Moines Register last spring that philosophically she opposes mandates and government subsidies, but her campaign responded to criticism from Braley by pointing out that Ernst, as a member of the Iowa Senate, voted to support the RFS. (The Iowa legislature doesn’t control the RFS, of course, but was part of a strong Midwest campaign against an EPA proposal to weaken the ethanol mandate in the RFS.) Ernst has pledged to continue to “passionately defend the RFS in the U.S. Senate.”

Jennings said citizens need to make sure campaign promises are kept.

“Now is the time we have to hold newly-elected officials accountable for the promises made on the campaign trail,” he said.”In other words, I don’t think anyone should be complacent.”

Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy, another ethanol group, agrees that “biofuels policy is bipartisan and always has been.”

But he also looks for more pressure on ethanol in the Senate – not from new Republicans from midwestern states, but some of the new senators from other regions who got backing from the oil industry.

“Oil doesn’t invest all this money in these campaigns out of the goodness of their hearts,” Buis said. 

The change in leadership of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee to ethanol foe Inhofe is dramatic. Its chair under the Democrats, Senator Barbara Boxer of California, said “that as long as she held this gavel, there will be no changes to the RFS,” Buis recalled.

In the new Senate, “we expect there to be attempts [to weaken the RFS]. Whether any succeed, I highly doubt it,” Buis said.

Ethanol’s strongest support may be in the Corn Belt, but Buis pointed out that “we have supporters on both coasts as well as the Midwest.”

“We don’t think we had any net losses in the Senate – if they had a vote on the RFS,” Buis said of the tally of supporters.

Will Ethanol Ride the GOP Wave?

Bruce Braley the Iowa Democrat who lost his bid to be a U.S. Senator Tuesday, famously told a group of lawyers in Texas that if Republicans gained control of the Senate, the next chair of the Judiciary committee would be “a farmer from Iowa,” Senator Chuck Grassley. The video clip of that comment, played often in attack ads, may have doomed his chances of winning against Iowa’s new Republican Senator-elect, Joni Ernst.

Maybe Braley should have pointed out that the next chair of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee is likely to be Senator James Inhofe, an Oklahoma Republican who is a strong critic of the renewable fuel standard. Last year Inhofe called for “Repealing Obama’s Ethanol Mandate.”

So, does the shift in power in the Senate mean that corn-based ethanol will be weakened?

Those who lead the nation’s three leading ethanol groups don’t think so, but they’re hardly complacent, either.

“I don’t think it has that much impact at all,” Bob Dinneen, president of the Renewable Fuels Association in Washington said of the election results Wednesday. “The mathematics of ethanol hasn’t changed.”

“They’ll still need 60 votes on the floor of the Senate to repeal the Renewable Fuel Standard,” he told Agriculture.com. That’s the number needed to break a filibuster that would block any legislation to repeal the RFS. The Democrats, who control the Senate until next year, don’t have 60 votes. And, even after Tuesday’s wave election, Republicans won’t have a 60-vote majority in 2015.

Dinneen points out that new senators from Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota are all supporters of ethanol, as are GOP veterans from the Midwest, Senators John Thune of South Dakota and Grassley from Iowa.

“These folks will come to town and support the Grassleys and John Thunes of the world,” Dinneen said.

Dinneen added that the first RFS passed in an energy bill in 2005 was under a Republican President, George W. Bush, and Republican Congress. The 2007 energy bill, which created a larger mandate for biofuels in its RFS, passed when Bush was still in office and after Democrats had taken control of the Senate. 

Brian Jennings, executive vice president of the American Coalition for Ethanol in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, agrees that ethanol’s support is bipartisan.

“I’m going back to the principal that has been true for ethanol forever, that ethanol has been a bipartisan issue,” Jennings said Wednesday. “We expect that this remaining bipartisan support will keep big oil from reducing or eliminating the RFS.” 

That doesn’t mean ethanol groups won’t be busy. Under Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, committees have held hearings that featured oil industry critics of the RFS and members from both parties backed bills to weaken the RFS that ultimately went nowhere.

Both Dinneen and Jennings expect Inhofe to hold hearings attacking the RFS. 

Like many issues in agriculture, support or opposition to the RFS is regional, with critics coming from oil states like Oklahoma, or Texas and Virginia, where cattle feeders and poultry producers have blamed the mandate for creating high prices for corn – when prices were high.

Jennings believes that the development of cellulosic ethanol could expand that regional support for biofuels.

“Hopefully, what we can do is expand that playing field so that other members of the country join that bipartisan caucus” that supports ethanol, he said.

Another factor that could moderate efforts to repeal the RFS is that the new Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell will be under pressure to pass legislation, Dinneen said. That includes other measures desired by the oil industry, such as the Keystone XL pipeline to bring Canadian crude to the U.S. Gulf, and ending the U.S. ban on domestic crude oil exports. McConnell has a better chance of doing that if he leaves out an issue as divisive as repeal of the RFS, Dinneen said. 

Jennings pointed out that the views of some of the successful candidates for the Senate “have offered a range of responses when it comes to the RFS.”

Ernst, for example, told The Des Moines Register last spring that philosophically she opposes mandates and government subsidies, but her campaign responded to criticism from Braley by pointing out that Ernst, as a member of the Iowa Senate, voted to support the RFS. (The Iowa legislature doesn’t control the RFS, of course, but was part of a strong Midwest campaign against an EPA proposal to weaken the ethanol mandate in the RFS.) Ernst has pledged to continue to “passionately defend the RFS in the U.S. Senate.”

Jennings said citizens need to make sure campaign promises are kept.

“Now is the time we have to hold newly-elected officials accountable for the promises made on the campaign trail,” he said.”In other words, I don’t think anyone should be complacent.”

Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy, another ethanol group, agrees that “biofuels policy is bipartisan and always has been.”

But he also looks for more pressure on ethanol in the Senate – not from new Republicans from midwestern states, but some of the new senators from other regions who got backing from the oil industry.

“Oil doesn’t invest all this money in these campaigns out of the goodness of their hearts,” Buis said. 

The change in leadership of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee to ethanol foe Inhofe is dramatic. Its chair under the Democrats, Senator Barbara Boxer of California, said “that as long as she held this gavel, there will be no changes to the RFS,” Buis recalled.

In the new Senate, “we expect there to be attempts [to weaken the RFS]. Whether any succeed, I highly doubt it,” Buis said.

Ethanol’s strongest support may be in the Corn Belt, but Buis pointed out that “we have supporters on both coasts as well as the Midwest.”

“We don’t think we had any net losses in the Senate – if they had a vote on the RFS,” Buis said of the tally of supporters.

Will Ethanol Ride the GOP Wave?

Bruce Braley the Iowa Democrat who lost his bid to be a U.S. Senator Tuesday, famously told a group of lawyers in Texas that if Republicans gained control of the Senate, the next chair of the Judiciary committee would be “a farmer from Iowa,” Senator Chuck Grassley. The video clip of that comment, played often in attack ads, may have doomed his chances of winning against Iowa’s new Republican Senator-elect, Joni Ernst.

Maybe Braley should have pointed out that the next chair of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee is likely to be Senator James Inhofe, an Oklahoma Republican who is a strong critic of the renewable fuel standard. Last year Inhofe called for “Repealing Obama’s Ethanol Mandate.”

So, does the shift in power in the Senate mean that corn-based ethanol will be weakened?

Those who lead the nation’s three leading ethanol groups don’t think so, but they’re hardly complacent, either.

“I don’t think it has that much impact at all,” Bob Dinneen, president of the Renewable Fuels Association in Washington said of the election results Wednesday. “The mathematics of ethanol hasn’t changed.”

“They’ll still need 60 votes on the floor of the Senate to repeal the Renewable Fuel Standard,” he told Agriculture.com. That’s the number needed to break a filibuster that would block any legislation to repeal the RFS. The Democrats, who control the Senate until next year, don’t have 60 votes. And, even after Tuesday’s wave election, Republicans won’t have a 60-vote majority in 2015.

Dinneen points out that new senators from Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota are all supporters of ethanol, as are GOP veterans from the Midwest, Senators John Thune of South Dakota and Grassley from Iowa.

“These folks will come to town and support the Grassleys and John Thunes of the world,” Dinneen said.

Dinneen added that the first RFS passed in an energy bill in 2005 was under a Republican President, George W. Bush, and Republican Congress. The 2007 energy bill, which created a larger mandate for biofuels in its RFS, passed when Bush was still in office and after Democrats had taken control of the Senate. 

Brian Jennings, executive vice president of the American Coalition for Ethanol in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, agrees that ethanol’s support is bipartisan.

“I’m going back to the principal that has been true for ethanol forever, that ethanol has been a bipartisan issue,” Jennings said Wednesday. “We expect that this remaining bipartisan support will keep big oil from reducing or eliminating the RFS.” 

That doesn’t mean ethanol groups won’t be busy. Under Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, committees have held hearings that featured oil industry critics of the RFS and members from both parties backed bills to weaken the RFS that ultimately went nowhere.

Both Dinneen and Jennings expect Inhofe to hold hearings attacking the RFS. 

Like many issues in agriculture, support or opposition to the RFS is regional, with critics coming from oil states like Oklahoma, or Texas and Virginia, where cattle feeders and poultry producers have blamed the mandate for creating high prices for corn – when prices were high.

Jennings believes that the development of cellulosic ethanol could expand that regional support for biofuels.

“Hopefully, what we can do is expand that playing field so that other members of the country join that bipartisan caucus” that supports ethanol, he said.

Another factor that could moderate efforts to repeal the RFS is that the new Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell will be under pressure to pass legislation, Dinneen said. That includes other measures desired by the oil industry, such as the Keystone XL pipeline to bring Canadian crude to the U.S. Gulf, and ending the U.S. ban on domestic crude oil exports. McConnell has a better chance of doing that if he leaves out an issue as divisive as repeal of the RFS, Dinneen said. 

Jennings pointed out that the views of some of the successful candidates for the Senate “have offered a range of responses when it comes to the RFS.”

Ernst, for example, told The Des Moines Register last spring that philosophically she opposes mandates and government subsidies, but her campaign responded to criticism from Braley by pointing out that Ernst, as a member of the Iowa Senate, voted to support the RFS. (The Iowa legislature doesn’t control the RFS, of course, but was part of a strong Midwest campaign against an EPA proposal to weaken the ethanol mandate in the RFS.) Ernst has pledged to continue to “passionately defend the RFS in the U.S. Senate.”

Jennings said citizens need to make sure campaign promises are kept.

“Now is the time we have to hold newly-elected officials accountable for the promises made on the campaign trail,” he said.”In other words, I don’t think anyone should be complacent.”

Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy, another ethanol group, agrees that “biofuels policy is bipartisan and always has been.”

But he also looks for more pressure on ethanol in the Senate – not from new Republicans from midwestern states, but some of the new senators from other regions who got backing from the oil industry.

“Oil doesn’t invest all this money in these campaigns out of the goodness of their hearts,” Buis said. 

The change in leadership of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee to ethanol foe Inhofe is dramatic. Its chair under the Democrats, Senator Barbara Boxer of California, said “that as long as she held this gavel, there will be no changes to the RFS,” Buis recalled.

In the new Senate, “we expect there to be attempts [to weaken the RFS]. Whether any succeed, I highly doubt it,” Buis said.

Ethanol’s strongest support may be in the Corn Belt, but Buis pointed out that “we have supporters on both coasts as well as the Midwest.”

“We don’t think we had any net losses in the Senate – if they had a vote on the RFS,” Buis said of the tally of supporters.

Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

77 million dollars
Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

Peruvian tangerine exports between January and August this year amounted to US $ 77 million, 23.1% more than in the same period of 2013, when they totalled $ 62.5 million, stated the management of ADEX Agro. 

According to them, shipments of this product were divided into two batches, fresh or dried mandarins, with shipments that amounted to $ 54 million (70.3% of the total exports), and fresh or dried tangelo tangerines, with shipments that amounted to $ 22.8 million (29.6% of total exports). 

According to the Business Intelligence System ADEX Data Trade, Peruvian tangerines were sent to 27 countries. The main target was the United States, which accounts for 30.4% of total exports with orders worth USD $ 23 million, i.e. a 62.4% increase. 

The UK ranked second with $ 18.4 million, +17.5% and 23.8% of total exports, followed by the Netherlands ($ 12.9 million), Canada (11.1 million) Ireland (2.9 million), Russia, Colombia, Sweden and Finland, among others. 

It’s worth noting that, even though Russia didn’t present a significant amount of orders ($ 2.3 million), exports to that country in the first half of 2014 increased by 30.1% over the same period last year. Exports to Colombia and Sweden also increased by 54.8% and 52.7%, respectively. 

The management of ADEX Agro stressed that the increase in tangerine exports was due to the increase in production caused by the alternating production this year. 

They also noted that this year the fruit had a great taste and quality, which is the one that has the most demand. They also stated that the tangerine harvest lasted all year, but that there was a peak between April and August. 

44 companies, led by Laran SAC Processing, Fruit Products Consortium SA, Agricultural Norsur SAC, Chincha Fruit Corporation SAC, Procesadora Torre Blanca SA, Camposol SA and Huamaní SAC, export the tangerines 

Source: agraria.pe

Publication date: 10/31/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

77 million dollars
Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

Peruvian tangerine exports between January and August this year amounted to US $ 77 million, 23.1% more than in the same period of 2013, when they totalled $ 62.5 million, stated the management of ADEX Agro. 

According to them, shipments of this product were divided into two batches, fresh or dried mandarins, with shipments that amounted to $ 54 million (70.3% of the total exports), and fresh or dried tangelo tangerines, with shipments that amounted to $ 22.8 million (29.6% of total exports). 

According to the Business Intelligence System ADEX Data Trade, Peruvian tangerines were sent to 27 countries. The main target was the United States, which accounts for 30.4% of total exports with orders worth USD $ 23 million, i.e. a 62.4% increase. 

The UK ranked second with $ 18.4 million, +17.5% and 23.8% of total exports, followed by the Netherlands ($ 12.9 million), Canada (11.1 million) Ireland (2.9 million), Russia, Colombia, Sweden and Finland, among others. 

It’s worth noting that, even though Russia didn’t present a significant amount of orders ($ 2.3 million), exports to that country in the first half of 2014 increased by 30.1% over the same period last year. Exports to Colombia and Sweden also increased by 54.8% and 52.7%, respectively. 

The management of ADEX Agro stressed that the increase in tangerine exports was due to the increase in production caused by the alternating production this year. 

They also noted that this year the fruit had a great taste and quality, which is the one that has the most demand. They also stated that the tangerine harvest lasted all year, but that there was a peak between April and August. 

44 companies, led by Laran SAC Processing, Fruit Products Consortium SA, Agricultural Norsur SAC, Chincha Fruit Corporation SAC, Procesadora Torre Blanca SA, Camposol SA and Huamaní SAC, export the tangerines 

Source: agraria.pe

Publication date: 10/31/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

77 million dollars
Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

Peruvian tangerine exports between January and August this year amounted to US $ 77 million, 23.1% more than in the same period of 2013, when they totalled $ 62.5 million, stated the management of ADEX Agro. 

According to them, shipments of this product were divided into two batches, fresh or dried mandarins, with shipments that amounted to $ 54 million (70.3% of the total exports), and fresh or dried tangelo tangerines, with shipments that amounted to $ 22.8 million (29.6% of total exports). 

According to the Business Intelligence System ADEX Data Trade, Peruvian tangerines were sent to 27 countries. The main target was the United States, which accounts for 30.4% of total exports with orders worth USD $ 23 million, i.e. a 62.4% increase. 

The UK ranked second with $ 18.4 million, +17.5% and 23.8% of total exports, followed by the Netherlands ($ 12.9 million), Canada (11.1 million) Ireland (2.9 million), Russia, Colombia, Sweden and Finland, among others. 

It’s worth noting that, even though Russia didn’t present a significant amount of orders ($ 2.3 million), exports to that country in the first half of 2014 increased by 30.1% over the same period last year. Exports to Colombia and Sweden also increased by 54.8% and 52.7%, respectively. 

The management of ADEX Agro stressed that the increase in tangerine exports was due to the increase in production caused by the alternating production this year. 

They also noted that this year the fruit had a great taste and quality, which is the one that has the most demand. They also stated that the tangerine harvest lasted all year, but that there was a peak between April and August. 

44 companies, led by Laran SAC Processing, Fruit Products Consortium SA, Agricultural Norsur SAC, Chincha Fruit Corporation SAC, Procesadora Torre Blanca SA, Camposol SA and Huamaní SAC, export the tangerines 

Source: agraria.pe

Publication date: 10/31/2014


FreshPlaza.com

How falling crude oil prices will benefit India – Economic Times


Economic Times
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India's net imports of crude oil amount to about a billion barrels every year. So, if crude oil prices average about $100 per barrel in the current fi scal (vs about $106 per barrel in the fi rst six months of the fi nancial year), the country's import

Vote for BJP to allow me to work for Haryana, Modi tells voters – Times of India


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Bravo Turkey and Chicken Pet Foods Recalled for Potential Salmonella Contamination

Bravo of Manchester, CT is recalling select lots of Bravo Turkey and Chicken pet foods for dogs and cats because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

The recalled product was distributed nationwide beginning on November 14, 2013 to distributors, retail stores, internet retailers and directly to consumers. The product can be identified by the batch ID code (best used by date) printed on the side of the plastic tube.

These products are being recalled because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella:

RAW FOOD DIET BRAVO! TURKEY BLEND FOR DOGS AND CATS
Product Number: 31-102
Size: 2 lb. (32 OZ) plastic tubes
Best used by date: 11-05-15
UPC: 829546311025
Keep Frozen

Bravo! Blends All Natural Chicken Blend diet for dogs & cats
Product Number: 21-102
Size: 2 lb. (32 OZ) plastic tubes
Best used by date: 08-11-16
UPC: 829546211028
Keep Frozen

These products are being recalled out of an abundance of caution because they were manufactured in the same manufacturing facility or on the same day as products that tested positive:

Premium Turkey Formula BRAVO Balance RAW DIET
Product Number: 31-405
Size: 5 lb. (80 OZ) 2.3KG plastic tubes
Best used by date: 11-05-15
UPC: 829546314057
Keep Frozen

Bravo! Blends All Natural Chicken Blend diet for dogs & cats
Product Number: 21-105
Size: 5 lb. (80 OZ) 2.3KG plastic tubes
Best used by date: 08-11-16
UPC: 829546211059
Keep Frozen

The recall was initiated after routine testing by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture revealed the presence of Salmonella in two lots of product. This batch tested negative by a third party independent laboratory prior to release for distribution to consumers. The company has received no reports of illness in either people or animals associated with these products to date.

In addition to the voluntary recall of the above products, Bravo has chosen to voluntarily withdraw the following poultry products from the marketplace to provide its customers with the certainty of safety. Those products include all sizes (2 lb., 5 lb. and 10 lb.) of Bravo Chicken Blend(s), Bravo Turkey Blend(s), Bravo Balance Chicken Balance and Bravo Balance Premium Turkey Formula frozen raw diet products with best used by dates between June 20, 2016 and September 18, 2016. This is being done out of an abundance of caution despite no evidence of any manufacturing defect or distribution problem. None of these products are known to have tested positive for the presence of pathogens. This market withdrawal has not been requested by the FDA, but is being done voluntarily by Bravo.

The recalled product should not be sold or fed to pets. Pet owners who have the affected product at home should dispose of this product in a safe manner (example, a securely covered trash receptacle). Customers who have purchased the recalled pet food can return to the store where purchased.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Food Safety News

Bravo Turkey and Chicken Pet Foods Recalled for Potential Salmonella Contamination

Bravo of Manchester, CT is recalling select lots of Bravo Turkey and Chicken pet foods for dogs and cats because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

The recalled product was distributed nationwide beginning on November 14, 2013 to distributors, retail stores, internet retailers and directly to consumers. The product can be identified by the batch ID code (best used by date) printed on the side of the plastic tube.

These products are being recalled because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella:

RAW FOOD DIET BRAVO! TURKEY BLEND FOR DOGS AND CATS
Product Number: 31-102
Size: 2 lb. (32 OZ) plastic tubes
Best used by date: 11-05-15
UPC: 829546311025
Keep Frozen

Bravo! Blends All Natural Chicken Blend diet for dogs & cats
Product Number: 21-102
Size: 2 lb. (32 OZ) plastic tubes
Best used by date: 08-11-16
UPC: 829546211028
Keep Frozen

These products are being recalled out of an abundance of caution because they were manufactured in the same manufacturing facility or on the same day as products that tested positive:

Premium Turkey Formula BRAVO Balance RAW DIET
Product Number: 31-405
Size: 5 lb. (80 OZ) 2.3KG plastic tubes
Best used by date: 11-05-15
UPC: 829546314057
Keep Frozen

Bravo! Blends All Natural Chicken Blend diet for dogs & cats
Product Number: 21-105
Size: 5 lb. (80 OZ) 2.3KG plastic tubes
Best used by date: 08-11-16
UPC: 829546211059
Keep Frozen

The recall was initiated after routine testing by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture revealed the presence of Salmonella in two lots of product. This batch tested negative by a third party independent laboratory prior to release for distribution to consumers. The company has received no reports of illness in either people or animals associated with these products to date.

In addition to the voluntary recall of the above products, Bravo has chosen to voluntarily withdraw the following poultry products from the marketplace to provide its customers with the certainty of safety. Those products include all sizes (2 lb., 5 lb. and 10 lb.) of Bravo Chicken Blend(s), Bravo Turkey Blend(s), Bravo Balance Chicken Balance and Bravo Balance Premium Turkey Formula frozen raw diet products with best used by dates between June 20, 2016 and September 18, 2016. This is being done out of an abundance of caution despite no evidence of any manufacturing defect or distribution problem. None of these products are known to have tested positive for the presence of pathogens. This market withdrawal has not been requested by the FDA, but is being done voluntarily by Bravo.

The recalled product should not be sold or fed to pets. Pet owners who have the affected product at home should dispose of this product in a safe manner (example, a securely covered trash receptacle). Customers who have purchased the recalled pet food can return to the store where purchased.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Food Safety News

How to read the competition: Look @shoppers

When a retailer is struggling to generate real “same store” sales increases, what should they do? The obvious answer is to operate the stores better and improve the shopping experience, but is that enough to respond to new competition?

Just who is the competition?

Online grocery gets a lot of attention today — some are excited about it and others are not. “I don’t know a grocer who’s selling much online, and if they are, they’re losing money,” a senior grocery executive said to me recently. “I’m not going to spend anything now on it.” It’s an understandable perspective — and pretty broadly held — but I challenge this dismissal.

Online sales may not be very visible yet, but they are very real. Four percent of grocery spending takes place online today according to Brick Meets Click research. Look closer, and you find that online spending isn’t just taking sales away from supermarkets; it’s also taking sales away from specialty stores and farmers’ markets. Often, those dollars are spent on products that “were not available or at least pretty hard to get.” Understanding this changes the way you “read the competition.”

Change with shoppers

A decade or two back, when alternative formats started attracting sales that used to go to supermarkets, we learned something important. We learned that we had to look shoppers — not just the competition — if we wanted to understand what was happening and how to respond effectively. Today, everyone can see that smartphones and digital technology are changing the way we live. So doesn’t a retailer need to build digital connections with their customers, even if online shopping isn’t an immediate priority?

What are your customers looking for to make grocery shopping better and easier? How much are they spending online and for what? Are you connecting with them the new-fashioned way, digitally?

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