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Australia plans to double mango exports to U.S. in 2016-17

While Australian mangoes only represent a tiny percentage of the U.S. market, the relative newcomer is set to expand its presence in North America this year.

Speaking with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), Australian Mango Industry Association (AMIA) CEO Robert Gray said hopes were high the sector could double U.S.-bound shipments this year from last season’s 100 metric tons (MT).

In addition, Northern Territory mangoes are expected to be exported to the market for the first time with four businesses registered from the Katherine region.

“Last year we only used Queensland fruit, which meant we only had half the season to supply,” Gray told the broadcaster.

“The aim this year is to start in October and have product going into the US for the full four or five months of the Australian mango season.”

In June, Gray told www.freshfruitportal.com the industry would also be testing new trade routes into the U.S. market this year.

Australia currently has a testing protocol for mango exports to the country.

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

Machinery hiccup hits Colombian pitahaya exports to Korea, Japan

Despite a free trade agreement (FTA) coming into effect between Colombia and South Korea, a machinery deconfiguration has put dragon fruit exports to the country and Japan on hold along with U.S. negotiations. Grower group Asoppitaya is seeking investments to rehabilitate its vapor heat treatment (VHT) equipment to get back on track with these prospective markets. 

pitahaya zoom

When www.freshfruitportal.com visited Asoppitaya’s packing plant in Pereira in August last year, the group’s general manager Sandra Garcia was excited for an upcoming inaugural shipment to South Korea.

But it did not come to pass.

“Last year we managed to have everything ready to export to Korea, but unfortunately we had an electrical failure and the machine was deconfigured,” she says.

The VHT machinery is supposed to keep the fruit, also known as pitahaya, at 46°C (115°F) for approximately three hours to meet the East Asian country’s specifications.

The treatment is also required for exports to Japan, and forms a vital part of negotiations for U.S. access.

“We didn’t manage to configure it because it has to be done by a Japanese technician, so our attempt failed.

“It cost us a lot of money but we’re still going to try again and we’re looking for foreign investment to bring a Japanese technician.

“It’s a large investment that has to be made in repairs, we’re talking about US$ 50,000 and as small growers for us that’s a lot of money.”

Garcia says discussions are underway with a South Korean company to provide the capital necessary to get the machine back on track, but she is open to further support.

She hopes the funding can be secured for repairs by the end of this year, getting the machine operational for the 2017 season.

In the 2015-16 deal, Asoppitaya exported 28 metric tons (MT) of pitahayas worldwide, to markets including Hong Kong, Singapore, Brazil, Canada.

When asked about the FTA with South Korea, Garcia says tariffs will be gradually reduced to zero over the next five years, and she will also try to use the agreement to improve some aspects of the export protocol.

“Specifically for pitahaya, the phytosanitary rules are not negotiated as it’s a sovereign right of every country. But what can be negotiated in line with the FTA would be the reduction of some costs to be able to comply with the rules,” she says.

“In this case it’d be about organizing the feesof the inspector which are very high, between transport, food, overseas calls. It cost us almost 30 million pesos (US$ 10,230).

“An important message is that as small growers and business, we want to know the opportunities of every agreement very well. A lot of the time growers don’t make the most of these agreements because they’re not known in the productive sector.”

What else could benefit from the Colombia-South Korea FTA?

In a search of Korea International Trade Organization (KITO) statistics, bananas appeared as the main fruit crop Colombia has shipped to the country in the past.

However, the last registered exports were in 2013 when 164MT were shipped, down from 360MT in 2011 and a much higher figure of 908MT almost two decades prior in 1993.

www.freshfruitportal.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

FreshFruitPortal.com

Chile expects to double China-bound avocado exports

The Chilean Hass avocado industry is looking to build on last season’s exports of around 90,000 metric tons (MT), particularly in China where volumes are still small but are growing very quickly.

Chilean Hass Avocado Committee managing director Juan Enrique Lazo told www.freshfruitportal.com the industry only shipped one container when the market was opened for the 2014 season, but shipments have increased significantly since then.

“Last year we reached 5,300 [metric] tons, and this season we expect to at least double that,” Lazo said.

He said the sector would be undertaking much larger promotion campaigns in China to keep up with the extra volume.

“We will hit points of sales, we’ll do cooking activities, and we’ll have a presence on social media,” Lazo said, adding the promotions would take place during the Northern Hemisphere fall through to November.

He said the first harvests were expected in the first week of August, and it was possible that would also coincide with the first shipments to China.

From a production perspective, Lazo said while Chile had been experiencing a cold winter, there had not yet been reports of frost damages from orchards.

“We haven’t had any serious frosts, but the cold always has an effect, for example in delays for starting harvests – sizing takes a bit more time, and the metabolism is slowed during these months,” he said.

Last season Chile produced 180,000 metric tons (MT), and Lazo expected this figure to rise to 200,000MT in 2016-17, provided no unexpected weather events occur.

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

www.freshfruitportal.com

 

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Turkish citrus exports up, shift east

Turkish citrus exports up, shift east

Short lemon crops in South America and South Africa has generated good opportunities for Turkish citrus exporters this season. Total lemon exports have been up this year, and prices have been good – though decreasing demand from Europe means more of Turkey’s exports are going to the Middle East and Asia.
 
“Our lemons have enjoyed high demand and good prices all over the global market,” said Ayse Ozler of Ozler. “Demand from the Middle East, Europe and Asia has been quite good, higher than in previous seasons, in fact.” Turkish lemon suppliers typically start exporting their fruit during September, about a month and a half before Spanish lemons edged them out of Europe. While prices at the beginning of that export window typically start at 0.70 Euro, prices this season were around 1.20 Euro at the outset of the season.
 
“Volumes from the Southern Hemisphere were low this year because of a frost in Argentina that cut their volumes by about 40 percent,” explained Ayse. “South African supplies of lemons also ran out early, so the gap in supplies was big, and prices for Turkish lemons were the highest we’ve seen.” Last year’s Turkish lemon crop was also affected by frost, so local demand was already strong when the export window came around, further driving up prices. The early boon resulted in 30 percent more lemon export volume out of Turkey, when compared to the previous season.
 
The situation is now different, with Spanish and Italian supplies driving Turkish citrus out of Europe for the year and bringing down prices. But Ayse explained that the importance of Europe is diminishing for Turkish growers. Competition from Spanish fruit and tightened regulations concerning maximum residue limits has steadily decreased the amount of fruit that Turkish exporters ship to Europe. Russia used to be a big market, but problems there, both recent and long-standing, have made it an unattractive destination for Turkish traders. The major areas of expansion are now the Middle East and Asia.
 
“Demand from Europe is reducing, which could be due to prices and the promotion that Spanish fruit gets,” said Ayse. “But the Middle East and Asia have been accepting of this and are curious about our citrus, so the demand there has been increasing as they are happy with the quality of our fruit.”

For more information:


Ayse Ozler
Özler Ziraat
Tel: +90-322-454-77-41
Email: ayseozler@gmail.com
www.hasat.net
 

Author: Yzza Ibrahim / Carlos Nunez


 

Publication date: 12/12/2014
Author: Yzza Ibrahim
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Chinese Demand for Dairy Products Spurs U.S. Exports

What happens when 1.36 billion people in China migrate toward cities, draw middle-class wages and shift toward “Western” foods such as ice cream, cheese pizza and strawberry-flavored milk? One result: larger profits for U.S. dairy processors, who, like dairy exporters in other countries, are charging record prices for their products at home and abroad, according to Bloomberg News.

China’s growing thirst for milk helped push American dairy exports to a record $ 6.7 billion in 2013, according to the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC). January U.S. dairy exports were 35 percent higher than a year earlier, putting the month’s exports ahead of the staggering 30-percent annual growth Bloomberg News reported in 2013.

According to the 2014 Tetra Pak Dairy Index, China is just one plane of opportunity. The $ 3.69 price tag on the average gallon of whole milk sold in April 2014 is 7.5 percent more than just a year before, the highest since September 2011. In just three years, when Tetra Pak’s research predicts global dairy demand will overtake production, prices could be even loftier — especially in China, the world’s top dairy importer.

This does not mean all is rosy with U.S. dairy exports; sales to China declined 24 percent during August. However, year-to-date (January-August) exports by volume for 2014 are still 21-percent greater than last year, prices remain high, and there are still reasons to retain a positive long view.

Demand for Dairy Products Grows in China

What’s behind this trend and how can U.S. processors benefit? Milk and cheese are relatively new to the Chinese diet, says Todd Shilk, dairy category manager at Tetra Pak U.S. and Canada, but consumers’ taste for them is growing. A wave of Western culture has swept into the country, bringing with it dairy-based foods. Baskin-Robbins and Pizza Hut have ambitious Chinese expansion plans; drinking milk is increasingly viewed as healthy — especially for kids — and has caught on with an increasingly affluent middle class.

Tetra Pak research shows that most liquid milk consumed in China (76 percent) is ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated, which holds advantages over traditional pasteurization. When pasteurized traditionally, dairy products are heated and then packaged. This milk must be continuously refrigerated and still has a brief shelf life (5-15 days).

UHT dairy products are briefly heated to high temperatures, then filled into aseptic, shelf-stable cartons, lasting up to a year without refrigeration or preservatives. Traditionally, most milk exports to Asia have been powder; over the past 15 years, however, UHT milk exports have grown steadily and should continue to climb by 3.1 percent CAGR from 2013 to 2016, according to the Dairy Index.

UHT milk suits China’s transport infrastructure, which cannot support quick delivery of chilled dairy. And Chinese consumption of UHT milk jumped from 18 million pounds in 2010 to about 331 million pounds in 2013. The USDEC suggests this could quadruple again to 1.3 billion pounds by 2020. UHT milk also empowers use of renewable packaging materials and offers lighter weight and independence from refrigeration. This type of packaging delivers benefits throughout the supply chain.

Ross Christieson, USDEC senior vice president of market research and analysis, says that rapid growth in China’s shelf-stable milk market is a gold mine for U.S. dairy exporters.

“The U.S. industry produces large volumes of UHT-treated milk annually, yet we have played only a minor role in serving booming Chinese consumption,” he says. “Chinese buyers have expressed growing interest in U.S. supply to meet spiraling demand.”

The U.S. Dairy Products Market is Mature

Meanwhile, in the U.S., fluid milk consumption continues a decades-long slide. Bright spots include value-added innovations such as flavored, organic and nutraceutical products. Last year, American milk sales were the lowest since 1984; culprits include fewer people eating breakfast at home (when more than half of fluid milk in the U.S. is consumed). Fewer than 50 percent of adults now drink milk, and whole-milk consumption is half what it was 30 years ago.

U.S. dairy producers should still focus on opportunities in their homeland. Dairy innovation could likely abate the slide in consumption here. As novel milk flavors grabbed Chinese consumers and pushed sales up in that country, similar innovations could work magic in the U.S.

The Tetra Pak Dairy Index shows that the globe is dotted with areas of opportunity, especially in developing areas. U.S. export sales to Mexico, for example, increased 18 percent in August. Most U.S. producers, however, are targeting China, where exports were up 21 percent in the first half of 2014 compared with a year ago and prices are high.

Expansion in Chinese dairy production can’t keep up with demand, Shilk says, adding dairy production there will likely continue lagging for years to come. Eventually, entrepreneurial dairy farmers could close the gap, but, he adds, “in the meantime, the opportunity is there to sell a lot of milk.”

Producers entering the market now can get a jump on building brand loyalty and creating long-term sales opportunities. As U.S. retailers (such as Walmart and Costco) and European counterparts (Tesco, ALDI and Carrefour among them) enter China, they offer a natural path to market for their partner dairies, Shilk says.

Tetra Pak Insights on Chinese Milk Consumption

• Milk isn’t a cultural norm: Nearly all Chinese have some level of lactose intolerance or lactase deficiency, making lactose-free products a must — especially for the kids’ market.

• Consumption tends toward single serve: Most milk in China is consumed in single-serve portion packs, Shilk says. Consumers finish packs in one sitting, so storage isn’t necessary.

• UHT milk is 76 percent of the market: Refrigeration remains relatively uncommon in the country; shelf-safe UHT-processed milk is the norm. Seventy percent of chilled milk is home-delivered or sold in specialty shops.

• China is the world’s largest flavored milk market: Chinese consumers are on track to consume 4.13 million liters in 2014, according to a Tetra Pak report commissioned from Compass Products and Packages. Flavored milk is considered an area of competitive advantage for the U.S. (the top flavored milk consumer) over New Zealand (the top dairy exporter) to China, the report says.

Food Safety News

Chinese Demand for Dairy Products Spurs U.S. Exports

What happens when 1.36 billion people in China migrate toward cities, draw middle-class wages and shift toward “Western” foods such as ice cream, cheese pizza and strawberry-flavored milk? One result: larger profits for U.S. dairy processors, who, like dairy exporters in other countries, are charging record prices for their products at home and abroad, according to Bloomberg News.

China’s growing thirst for milk helped push American dairy exports to a record $ 6.7 billion in 2013, according to the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC). January U.S. dairy exports were 35 percent higher than a year earlier, putting the month’s exports ahead of the staggering 30-percent annual growth Bloomberg News reported in 2013.

According to the 2014 Tetra Pak Dairy Index, China is just one plane of opportunity. The $ 3.69 price tag on the average gallon of whole milk sold in April 2014 is 7.5 percent more than just a year before, the highest since September 2011. In just three years, when Tetra Pak’s research predicts global dairy demand will overtake production, prices could be even loftier — especially in China, the world’s top dairy importer.

This does not mean all is rosy with U.S. dairy exports; sales to China declined 24 percent during August. However, year-to-date (January-August) exports by volume for 2014 are still 21-percent greater than last year, prices remain high, and there are still reasons to retain a positive long view.

Demand for Dairy Products Grows in China

What’s behind this trend and how can U.S. processors benefit? Milk and cheese are relatively new to the Chinese diet, says Todd Shilk, dairy category manager at Tetra Pak U.S. and Canada, but consumers’ taste for them is growing. A wave of Western culture has swept into the country, bringing with it dairy-based foods. Baskin-Robbins and Pizza Hut have ambitious Chinese expansion plans; drinking milk is increasingly viewed as healthy — especially for kids — and has caught on with an increasingly affluent middle class.

Tetra Pak research shows that most liquid milk consumed in China (76 percent) is ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated, which holds advantages over traditional pasteurization. When pasteurized traditionally, dairy products are heated and then packaged. This milk must be continuously refrigerated and still has a brief shelf life (5-15 days).

UHT dairy products are briefly heated to high temperatures, then filled into aseptic, shelf-stable cartons, lasting up to a year without refrigeration or preservatives. Traditionally, most milk exports to Asia have been powder; over the past 15 years, however, UHT milk exports have grown steadily and should continue to climb by 3.1 percent CAGR from 2013 to 2016, according to the Dairy Index.

UHT milk suits China’s transport infrastructure, which cannot support quick delivery of chilled dairy. And Chinese consumption of UHT milk jumped from 18 million pounds in 2010 to about 331 million pounds in 2013. The USDEC suggests this could quadruple again to 1.3 billion pounds by 2020. UHT milk also empowers use of renewable packaging materials and offers lighter weight and independence from refrigeration. This type of packaging delivers benefits throughout the supply chain.

Ross Christieson, USDEC senior vice president of market research and analysis, says that rapid growth in China’s shelf-stable milk market is a gold mine for U.S. dairy exporters.

“The U.S. industry produces large volumes of UHT-treated milk annually, yet we have played only a minor role in serving booming Chinese consumption,” he says. “Chinese buyers have expressed growing interest in U.S. supply to meet spiraling demand.”

The U.S. Dairy Products Market is Mature

Meanwhile, in the U.S., fluid milk consumption continues a decades-long slide. Bright spots include value-added innovations such as flavored, organic and nutraceutical products. Last year, American milk sales were the lowest since 1984; culprits include fewer people eating breakfast at home (when more than half of fluid milk in the U.S. is consumed). Fewer than 50 percent of adults now drink milk, and whole-milk consumption is half what it was 30 years ago.

U.S. dairy producers should still focus on opportunities in their homeland. Dairy innovation could likely abate the slide in consumption here. As novel milk flavors grabbed Chinese consumers and pushed sales up in that country, similar innovations could work magic in the U.S.

The Tetra Pak Dairy Index shows that the globe is dotted with areas of opportunity, especially in developing areas. U.S. export sales to Mexico, for example, increased 18 percent in August. Most U.S. producers, however, are targeting China, where exports were up 21 percent in the first half of 2014 compared with a year ago and prices are high.

Expansion in Chinese dairy production can’t keep up with demand, Shilk says, adding dairy production there will likely continue lagging for years to come. Eventually, entrepreneurial dairy farmers could close the gap, but, he adds, “in the meantime, the opportunity is there to sell a lot of milk.”

Producers entering the market now can get a jump on building brand loyalty and creating long-term sales opportunities. As U.S. retailers (such as Walmart and Costco) and European counterparts (Tesco, ALDI and Carrefour among them) enter China, they offer a natural path to market for their partner dairies, Shilk says.

Tetra Pak Insights on Chinese Milk Consumption

• Milk isn’t a cultural norm: Nearly all Chinese have some level of lactose intolerance or lactase deficiency, making lactose-free products a must — especially for the kids’ market.

• Consumption tends toward single serve: Most milk in China is consumed in single-serve portion packs, Shilk says. Consumers finish packs in one sitting, so storage isn’t necessary.

• UHT milk is 76 percent of the market: Refrigeration remains relatively uncommon in the country; shelf-safe UHT-processed milk is the norm. Seventy percent of chilled milk is home-delivered or sold in specialty shops.

• China is the world’s largest flavored milk market: Chinese consumers are on track to consume 4.13 million liters in 2014, according to a Tetra Pak report commissioned from Compass Products and Packages. Flavored milk is considered an area of competitive advantage for the U.S. (the top flavored milk consumer) over New Zealand (the top dairy exporter) to China, the report says.

Food Safety News

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

This year has been difficult in most markets for South African citrus producers, particularly the EU, with the CBS issue. Justin Chadwick, of South Africa’s Citrus Growers Association, explains that “we’ve had to implement a series of measures that are making citrus shipping to the EU more difficult and costly and people are already considering alternatives.”

Justin says that “fortunately, the eastern markets are starting to grow with volumes almost doubling this year. This includes China, which has strict requirements, but where we are shipping a lot of oranges and other citrus fruits, but some soft citrus and lemons are sensitive to cold treatments which limits what we can send.” He affirms that “there seems to be a shortage in the supply of lemons all around the world, and in China they are in high demand, so we’ve had an amazing year overall, we probably could have sold our lemon crop twice.”


Justin Chadwick at China FVF(right), with Anton Rabe, HortGro and Richard Owen, PMA

Meanwhile, at the other side of the scale, grapefruit continues to disappoint. Justin believes that “consumers don’t currently favour that kind of fruit. The only exception is South Korea, where our exports have considerably increased, from 60,000 cartons last year to 400,000 this year.”

Regarding oranges, South Africa has achieved a record crop this year, reaching 15.2 million 15kg cartons. The market conditions have been very difficult, firstly in the EU but also the US had a large crop.

According to Justin, “the main issue is that we ship 45 million cartons a year to the EU, and there’s no market that will take that sort of volume; the EU also demands very specific sizes and quality, which the eastern markets don’t want, so finding alternative markets is not easy.”

He states that a couple of weeks ago, export figures to the EU were 14% down, and production from its competitors in the Southern Hemisphere, like Australia and South America, is also on the rise. “Competition in the U.S. market, for example, based on quality and service, is huge, but it also offers opportunities for us all to expand.”

Publication date: 11/25/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

This year has been difficult in most markets for South African citrus producers, particularly the EU, with the CBS issue. Justin Chadwick, of South Africa’s Citrus Growers Association, explains that “we’ve had to implement a series of measures that are making citrus shipping to the EU more difficult and costly and people are already considering alternatives.”

Justin says that “fortunately, the eastern markets are starting to grow with volumes almost doubling this year. This includes China, which has strict requirements, but where we are shipping a lot of oranges and other citrus fruits, but some soft citrus and lemons are sensitive to cold treatments which limits what we can send.” He affirms that “there seems to be a shortage in the supply of lemons all around the world, and in China they are in high demand, so we’ve had an amazing year overall, we probably could have sold our lemon crop twice.”


Justin Chadwick at China FVF(right), with Anton Rabe, HortGro and Richard Owen, PMA

Meanwhile, at the other side of the scale, grapefruit continues to disappoint. Justin believes that “consumers don’t currently favour that kind of fruit. The only exception is South Korea, where our exports have considerably increased, from 60,000 cartons last year to 400,000 this year.”

Regarding oranges, South Africa has achieved a record crop this year, reaching 15.2 million 15kg cartons. The market conditions have been very difficult, firstly in the EU but also the US had a large crop.

According to Justin, “the main issue is that we ship 45 million cartons a year to the EU, and there’s no market that will take that sort of volume; the EU also demands very specific sizes and quality, which the eastern markets don’t want, so finding alternative markets is not easy.”

He states that a couple of weeks ago, export figures to the EU were 14% down, and production from its competitors in the Southern Hemisphere, like Australia and South America, is also on the rise. “Competition in the U.S. market, for example, based on quality and service, is huge, but it also offers opportunities for us all to expand.”

Publication date: 11/25/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

This year has been difficult in most markets for South African citrus producers, particularly the EU, with the CBS issue. Justin Chadwick, of South Africa’s Citrus Growers Association, explains that “we’ve had to implement a series of measures that are making citrus shipping to the EU more difficult and costly and people are already considering alternatives.”

Justin says that “fortunately, the eastern markets are starting to grow with volumes almost doubling this year. This includes China, which has strict requirements, but where we are shipping a lot of oranges and other citrus fruits, but some soft citrus and lemons are sensitive to cold treatments which limits what we can send.” He affirms that “there seems to be a shortage in the supply of lemons all around the world, and in China they are in high demand, so we’ve had an amazing year overall, we probably could have sold our lemon crop twice.”


Justin Chadwick at China FVF(right), with Anton Rabe, HortGro and Richard Owen, PMA

Meanwhile, at the other side of the scale, grapefruit continues to disappoint. Justin believes that “consumers don’t currently favour that kind of fruit. The only exception is South Korea, where our exports have considerably increased, from 60,000 cartons last year to 400,000 this year.”

Regarding oranges, South Africa has achieved a record crop this year, reaching 15.2 million 15kg cartons. The market conditions have been very difficult, firstly in the EU but also the US had a large crop.

According to Justin, “the main issue is that we ship 45 million cartons a year to the EU, and there’s no market that will take that sort of volume; the EU also demands very specific sizes and quality, which the eastern markets don’t want, so finding alternative markets is not easy.”

He states that a couple of weeks ago, export figures to the EU were 14% down, and production from its competitors in the Southern Hemisphere, like Australia and South America, is also on the rise. “Competition in the U.S. market, for example, based on quality and service, is huge, but it also offers opportunities for us all to expand.”

Publication date: 11/25/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US (WA): Port dispute slows apple exports

A large apple crop in Washington means that the state’s growers will look to export a big portion of their crop this season. But a labour dispute between port operators and longshoreman has slowed the handling of containers through the ports, and could potentially lead to supply gaps for countries in Central America, South America and Asia, where Washington fruit is sent this time of year.

“The situation is a huge mess,” said Randy Steensma of Honey Bear Tree Fruit. “We’ve got containers full of apples that have been sitting at the port for a week because they haven’t been loaded yet. If things are running normally, the vessel is loaded and gone in 72 hours.” Refrigerated containers and the high quality nature of fruit destined for export means that apples in limbo at the port likely won’t spoil, but the delay in getting fruit out quickly could lead to supply gaps in some markets abroad.

“Buyers book on a weekly basis, so they will miss a week or two,” said Steensma. “We ship to Colombia, Honduras and Panama, so there will be gaps there, and also in some Asian markets, like Hong Kong, India and Jakarta, which is a big destination for us right now.” Shippers are hoping for a quick resolution to the labour dispute, which has intensified as the Pacific Maritime Association and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union have tried to agree on a new contract. The spillover from those negotiations has resulted in delays at the port. Though a resolution is urgently sought because of the broad commerce ramifications, Washington’s apple growers, who are sitting on a large crop, have been counting more on exports this year than in previous years.

“In a normal year, about a third of the state’s apple crop goes overseas,” explained Rebecca Lyons, international marketing director for the Washington Apple Commission. “However, this year, with the large crop we have and with the large apple crops in other states, we’re thinking upwards of 50 percent of our crop will have to go to export.” Up to now, Washington was on course to have a strong export season, with the state’s apple exports up 50 percent over the previous year. The state’s growers also gained direct access to China for their Red and Golden Delicious varieties, but the port problems haven’t allowed growers to fully take advantage of that.

“This is a big issue, not just for us, but for others as well,” said Lyons. “We just hope this will be quickly resolved.”

FreshPlaza.com

Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

77 million dollars
Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

Peruvian tangerine exports between January and August this year amounted to US $ 77 million, 23.1% more than in the same period of 2013, when they totalled $ 62.5 million, stated the management of ADEX Agro. 

According to them, shipments of this product were divided into two batches, fresh or dried mandarins, with shipments that amounted to $ 54 million (70.3% of the total exports), and fresh or dried tangelo tangerines, with shipments that amounted to $ 22.8 million (29.6% of total exports). 

According to the Business Intelligence System ADEX Data Trade, Peruvian tangerines were sent to 27 countries. The main target was the United States, which accounts for 30.4% of total exports with orders worth USD $ 23 million, i.e. a 62.4% increase. 

The UK ranked second with $ 18.4 million, +17.5% and 23.8% of total exports, followed by the Netherlands ($ 12.9 million), Canada (11.1 million) Ireland (2.9 million), Russia, Colombia, Sweden and Finland, among others. 

It’s worth noting that, even though Russia didn’t present a significant amount of orders ($ 2.3 million), exports to that country in the first half of 2014 increased by 30.1% over the same period last year. Exports to Colombia and Sweden also increased by 54.8% and 52.7%, respectively. 

The management of ADEX Agro stressed that the increase in tangerine exports was due to the increase in production caused by the alternating production this year. 

They also noted that this year the fruit had a great taste and quality, which is the one that has the most demand. They also stated that the tangerine harvest lasted all year, but that there was a peak between April and August. 

44 companies, led by Laran SAC Processing, Fruit Products Consortium SA, Agricultural Norsur SAC, Chincha Fruit Corporation SAC, Procesadora Torre Blanca SA, Camposol SA and Huamaní SAC, export the tangerines 

Source: agraria.pe

Publication date: 10/31/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Chile looking forward to better year for fruit exports

ANAHEIM, CA — An early-October freeze in fruit-growing regions in Chile is not expected to have a significant impact on export volume, according to officials at the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association and the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, known commonly by the acronym ASOEX.

Meeting with The Produce News during the Produce Marketing Association’s Fresh Summit Convention & Exposition, here, Ronald Bown, chairman of ASOEX, said he expects a full recovery after last year’s challenging season, when a freeze severely limited export volume and strikes at Chilean ports further exacerbated difficulties in the fruit trade.ChileRonald Bown, chairman of ASOEX, with U.S. Department of Agriculture Undersecretary Edward Avalos, at the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association booth.

“We expect a much better year this year,” said Bown. “Every year it is something, but the recent freeze was not as bad as last year, and we don’t expect the same difficulties with the strikes at the ports.”

The freeze last year was the biggest in 50 years, according to Bown, and it was the main factor in the 11.4 percent decrease in fruit exports, affecting mostly grapes, kiwifruit, stone fruit and cherries. Bown believes Chilean growers can make up for last year by virtue of the planned 5-15 percent increase in production.

Further, he said, “We are working very hard with the [Chilean] government to analyze problems in the past related to the port strike, and we expect to solve those problems, which were mostly labor issues.”

ASOEX is ramping up its efforts to reach additional markets, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, according to Bown. It also wants to ship more product to Russia and other European markets. But he said the North American market remains a key destination for fruit exports.

“Global markets are increasingly more important for us, but the North American market remains the largest by far,” he said. For example, “70 percent of our blueberries go to North America.”

For its part, ASOEX does a good deal of outreach to maintain its preferred status among retailers in North America.

“Reliability and consistency are the key aspects that retailers seek,” said Bown. “Chile has been working with the trade for many years to establish solid relationships, and it has paid off. One of our strengths is that we have an excellent marketing staff to reach out to our customers. We meet with retailers of all sizes — from 10-store chains to 1,000-store chains — and they appreciate that we can offer the quality and volume they need.”

Prior to the wide acceptance of fruit from Chile, Bown recalled that there was pushback when shipments began to increase.

“But as we gained acceptance in the marketplace, people came to realize that more fruit on the market had the positive benefit of offering an opportunity to increase consumption,” he said. “Also, we offer a wide range of products that spans the entire fruit category, not just one or two items.”

Growth potential for kiwifruit

One area of focus for Chilean fruit exports this season is kiwifruit, according to Carlos Cruzat, president of the Comité del Kiwi, which promotes Chilean kiwifruit. His main quest is to offer preconditioned fruit that is sweet, flavorful and ready to eat.

“Growers and importers need to work together to give consumers a good eating experience so they come back to buy more,” he said. “It is important that consumers receive fruit that is ready to eat within one to two days.”

He cited a decline in consumption of green kiwifruit, as many countries have switched to gold-flesh fruit to meet the rising demand, especially in the Asian markets.

“Global volume of green kiwi is declining and will continue to do so,” he said. “So we have a challenge of maintaining that business, and to do that we need to add value, not just increase production. Offering preconditioned fruit is one way to add value.”

He said that it is important to please consumers in order to increase the category.

“We see big potential for green kiwi, but we need everyone to be on the same page,” said Cruzat. “We have been convincing growers that they should invest in green kiwi again, since it is not as labor-intensive and can be stored for a while, so the season can be extended. Virtually no other country is planting new green acreage. While it is not the most profitable item, it is good overall for the category and is a stable product for the entire ‘fruit basket.’“

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chile looking forward to better year for fruit exports

ANAHEIM, CA — An early-October freeze in fruit-growing regions in Chile is not expected to have a significant impact on export volume, according to officials at the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association and the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, known commonly by the acronym ASOEX.

Meeting with The Produce News during the Produce Marketing Association’s Fresh Summit Convention & Exposition, here, Ronald Bown, chairman of ASOEX, said he expects a full recovery after last year’s challenging season, when a freeze severely limited export volume and strikes at Chilean ports further exacerbated difficulties in the fruit trade.ChileRonald Bown, chairman of ASOEX, with U.S. Department of Agriculture Undersecretary Edward Avalos, at the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association booth.

“We expect a much better year this year,” said Bown. “Every year it is something, but the recent freeze was not as bad as last year, and we don’t expect the same difficulties with the strikes at the ports.”

The freeze last year was the biggest in 50 years, according to Bown, and it was the main factor in the 11.4 percent decrease in fruit exports, affecting mostly grapes, kiwifruit, stone fruit and cherries. Bown believes Chilean growers can make up for last year by virtue of the planned 5-15 percent increase in production.

Further, he said, “We are working very hard with the [Chilean] government to analyze problems in the past related to the port strike, and we expect to solve those problems, which were mostly labor issues.”

ASOEX is ramping up its efforts to reach additional markets, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, according to Bown. It also wants to ship more product to Russia and other European markets. But he said the North American market remains a key destination for fruit exports.

“Global markets are increasingly more important for us, but the North American market remains the largest by far,” he said. For example, “70 percent of our blueberries go to North America.”

For its part, ASOEX does a good deal of outreach to maintain its preferred status among retailers in North America.

“Reliability and consistency are the key aspects that retailers seek,” said Bown. “Chile has been working with the trade for many years to establish solid relationships, and it has paid off. One of our strengths is that we have an excellent marketing staff to reach out to our customers. We meet with retailers of all sizes — from 10-store chains to 1,000-store chains — and they appreciate that we can offer the quality and volume they need.”

Prior to the wide acceptance of fruit from Chile, Bown recalled that there was pushback when shipments began to increase.

“But as we gained acceptance in the marketplace, people came to realize that more fruit on the market had the positive benefit of offering an opportunity to increase consumption,” he said. “Also, we offer a wide range of products that spans the entire fruit category, not just one or two items.”

Growth potential for kiwifruit

One area of focus for Chilean fruit exports this season is kiwifruit, according to Carlos Cruzat, president of the Comité del Kiwi, which promotes Chilean kiwifruit. His main quest is to offer preconditioned fruit that is sweet, flavorful and ready to eat.

“Growers and importers need to work together to give consumers a good eating experience so they come back to buy more,” he said. “It is important that consumers receive fruit that is ready to eat within one to two days.”

He cited a decline in consumption of green kiwifruit, as many countries have switched to gold-flesh fruit to meet the rising demand, especially in the Asian markets.

“Global volume of green kiwi is declining and will continue to do so,” he said. “So we have a challenge of maintaining that business, and to do that we need to add value, not just increase production. Offering preconditioned fruit is one way to add value.”

He said that it is important to please consumers in order to increase the category.

“We see big potential for green kiwi, but we need everyone to be on the same page,” said Cruzat. “We have been convincing growers that they should invest in green kiwi again, since it is not as labor-intensive and can be stored for a while, so the season can be extended. Virtually no other country is planting new green acreage. While it is not the most profitable item, it is good overall for the category and is a stable product for the entire ‘fruit basket.’“

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.