Category Archives: Agricultural Exports News

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3 Big Things Today, April 19

Byline:

1. Grain Markets Closed For Good Friday

Grain markets were closed in observance of Good Friday. Overnight trading will resume on Sunday.

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2. Corn Sales Jump Week-to-Week While Beans, Wheat Mixed

Export sales of corn to overseas buyers jumped week-to-week while bean and wheat sales were mixed, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Corn sales in the week that ended on April 11 totaled 947,600 metric tons, up 73% from the prior week and 33% from the previous four-week average, the USDA said in a report.

Japan was the big buyer at 365,200 metric tons, Mexico was in for 309,700 tons and Colombia bought 144,600 tons. South Korea was in for 66,800 tons and El Salvador purchased 54,800 tons. An unknown buyer canceled a shipment for 51,800 tons.

Sales in 2019-2029 totaled 18,400 tons, the USDA said.

Analysts had pegged corn sales from 500,000 to 950,000 metric tons.

Soybean sales last week were reported at 382,100 metric tons, which was up 41% week-to-week but down 46% from the prior average, according to the government.

An unknown buyer purchased 170,600 tons, South Korea was in for 48,700 tons, Indonesia took 46,600 tons, Japan bought 45,700 tons and Colombia took 23,100 tons from U.S. supplies. Sales for the 2019-2020 year that starts on Sept. 1 totaled 21,100 tons.

Analysts expected sales from 350,000 to 850,000 tons.

Wheat sales also were mixed at 317,700 metric tons, up 16% from the previous week but down 28% from the prior four-week average.

Nigeria was the big buyer at 77,800 tons, followed by an unknown customer at 69,300 tons. Algeria was in for 60,000 tons, Japan bought 31,300 tons and Colombia purchased 25,100 tons, the USDA said. Sales in the 2019-2020 year that starts on June 1 totaled 227,800 tons as the Philippines and Algeria each bought 60,000 tons, Japan took 35,100 tons and unknown buyers bought 30,700 tons.

Analysts had forecast sales from 350,000 to 700,000 tons.

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3. Flooding Still the Dominate Feature as Red, Missouri, Mississippi Rivers All Over Their Banks

Flood warnings continue to dominate weather maps in the Midwest as the Red River along the North Dakota-Minnesota border, the Missouri River between Nebraska and Iowa and the Mississippi River from Iowa to the Gulf of Mexico all continue to run over their banks.

In North Dakota, the Red River continues to rise due to runoff from recent rainfall and melting snow, according to the National Weather Service. The good news is the waters are expected to recede next week.

“The trend of a secondary rise continues from Fargo up to Grand Forks with continued major flooding in the northern basin,” the NWS said in a report. “Several of the tributaries have slowed or started to fall, and there is an overall improving trend for the next seven-day period.”

The Missouri River at St. Joseph, Missouri, meanwhile, was at 19.2 feet as of late Thursday night, above flood stage of 17 feet, the agency said. The river is expected to continue rising to 19.6 feet by Sunday morning before beginning to fall.

Along the Missouri-Illinois border, heavy rains in the past 24 hours have exacerbated flooding along the Mississippi River. At Cape Girardeau, Missouri, the river is expected to crest at 39 feet on Friday.

Flood stage at that location is 32 feet. At 8:30 p.m. Thursday evening, the river was at 38.6 feet, according to the NWS.

3 Big Things Today, April 18

Byline:

1. Wheat Declines Overnight on Favorable Conditions

Wheat futures declined overnight as more precipitation is in the forecast for the southern Plains where the bulk of hard-red winter wheat is grown in the U.S.

Low temperatures will keep heat stress down from newly growing plants that recently emerged from the ground, while a round of thunderstorms is likely starting Sunday, according to the National Weather Service.

Some 60% of the U.S. winter wheat crop was in good or excellent condition as of Sunday, up from 31% at the same time last year, according to the Department of Agriculture. In Kansas, the biggest grower, 59% earned top ratings while in Oklahoma, 74% was good or excellent, the USDA said.

Corn and beans, meanwhile, were again little changed in overnight trading as investors and hedgers continue to wait for news from the U.S.-China trade negotiations.

Wheat futures for May delivery fell 3 1/4¢ to $4.47 a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade, while Kansas City wheat declined 2 1/2¢ to $4.23 ¾ a bushel.

Corn futures for May delivery were up 1/4¢ to $3.58 ½ a bushel overnight.

Soybeans for May delivery gained 1 3/4¢ to $8.80 ¾ a bushel. Soy meal rose 60¢ to $304.50 a short ton and soy oil added 0.03¢ to 28.49¢ a pound.

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2. Ethanol Production Last Week Hits Highest in Six Weeks, Stockpiles Plunge

Ethanol production last week rose to the highest level in six weeks while stockpiles dropped to the lowest since September, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Output of the biofuel increased to 1.016 million barrels a day, on average, in the seven days that ended on April 12, the EIA said in a report. That’s the highest since the week that ended on March 1.

In the Midwest, by far the largest producer of ethanol, production rose to an average of 945,000 barrels a day from 931,000.

Also rising was output in the Gulf Coast, which saw an increase of 2,000 to an average of 15,000 barrels a day. West Coast production increased by 1,000 to 20,000 barrels a day, the agency said.

Rocky Mountain producers made 14,000 barrels a day, unchanged from the previous week, while East Coast production fell by 1,000 to an average of 23,000 barrels a day.

Stockpiles, meanwhile, decline to 22.676 million barrels in the week through April 12. That’s down from 23.193 million the previous week and the lowest level since the seven days that ended on Sept. 21, according to the EIA.

In other news, the U.S. Department of Agriculture will release its export sales report this morning.

Analysts are expecting corn sales from 500,000 to 950,000 metric tons, soybean sales from 350,000 to 850,000 tons and wheat sales from 350,000 to 700,000 metric tons, according to data from researcher Allendale.

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3. Storms Hitting Parts of Several States Including Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois

A set of strong storms expected to last for days is hammering most of Arkansas, parts of southeastern Missouri, southern Illinois and western Indiana, according to the National Weather Service.

The storm, which is also hitting Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky, is expected to be a “multi-day weather event” that’s capable of tornadoes, strong winds and rain.

A flash flood warning is in effect for several counties in Arkansas this morning including the cities of Little Rock, Conway and Arkadelphia, the NWS said in a report early this morning. As of 5:31 a.m. local time, as much as 2 inches of rain had already fallen, prompting the flash flood warning.

Several roads already were flooded with more rain on the way.

Further north along the Missouri-Illinois border, flood warnings are already in effect as the Mississippi River remains over its banks in several place. This new storm may bring scattered thunderstorms this morning.

“Widespread showers with embedded thunderstorms will accompany a cold front as it slowly moves southeast across the region from late morning through mid-evening,” the NWS said. “Heavy rainfall will be the primary concern, and that may lead to flooding of low-lying and poor-drainage areas.”

3 Big Things Today, April 17

Byline:

1. Grains, Beans Higher Overnight on Bargain Hunting

Grains and soybeans were higher in overnight trading as bargain hunters seek supplies after yesterday’s sell-off.

Corn lost almost 4¢, wheat dropped about 15¢, and soybeans declined more than a dime yesterday on the Chicago Board of Trade, bringing some buyers off the sidelines, according to analysts.

The decline on Tuesday was mostly technical in nature, but adverse weather in much of the Midwest has kept farmers out of fields.

Three percent of the U.S. corn crop was in the ground as of Sunday, down from the prior five-year average of 5% for this time of year. Only 2% of spring wheat was planted, well behind the average of 13%, the USDA said.

That’s giving some buyers a reason to be bullish.

Still, the winter wheat crop, however, was 60% good or excellent, almost double last year’s tally for this time of year, according to the government, which could keep a lid on price gains.

Corn futures for May delivery were up ½¢ to $3.59½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Wheat futures for May delivery rose 3¼¢ to $4.48¼ a bushel, while Kansas City wheat added 4¢ to $4.26½ a bushel.

Soybeans for May delivery gained 1¾¢ to $8.89¾ a bushel. Soy meal rose 40¢ to $306.90 a short ton, and soy oil added 0.15¢ to 28.87¢ a pound.

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2. Trade Talks Drone on as China Pushes Back on Allowing Ractomine

The seemingly never-ending trade talks between the U.S. and China continued this week, with Washington continually seeking improved access into the Asian nation for agricultural products.

The U.S. has asked Beijing to lift its ban on the growth drug ractomine used by hog and poultry producers, Reuters reported, citing two people familiar with the situation.

While China has been seemingly agreeable during the talks, or at the very least amenable to some suggestions from the U.S., the government is pushing back against allowing ractomine, the report said.

Still, pork demand isn’t going away, and Chinese hog production is being devastated by African swine fever that could cull its herd by up to 200 million. That may make negotiations a bit easier as the Asian country will need to import pork in the absence of domestically grown meat.

While African swine fever is bad news for Chinese agriculture, it not only could give hog prices a boost in the U.S. but also could help corn futures.

Todd Hubbs, with the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois, said in a report this week that the bearish information out of the recent Department of Agriculture reports has left the corn market looking for positive news.

“A significant switch away from corn acres or a production shortfall seems necessary to move corn prices higher,” he said in his report this week. “Corn prices look to remain subdued and range-bound over the near term.”

The USDA’s World’s Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates Report last week showed ending stocks of corn may rise year over year to 2.035 billion bushels. Livestock producers are set to use 5.5 billion bushels as feed.

A bump in demand for pork in China, however, certainly would mean increased hog production in the U.S., which, in turn, could lead to more of the grain used as feed.  

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3. Strong Storms May Bring Hail, 70 mph Winds to Southern Plains

Strong storms are possible in parts of the Southern Plains starting today that includes hail and high-wind speeds, according to the National Weather Service.

In parts of southwestern Kansas, severe storms are likely that could bring hail that’s 2 inches or more in diameter and wind gusts up to 70 mph, the NWS said in a report early this morning.

“An isolated tornado and heavy rain will all be possible,” the agency said.

Flooding continues along major waterways in the central U.S., as well. The Red River along the North Dakota-Minnesota border is over its banks in some places and nearing flood stage in others.

More rain is on the way.

“The last of the snowmelt runoff continues to make its way into the river system,” the NWS said. “Rain moving into the region tonight and tomorrow will bring an additional ¼ to ½ inch of precipitation. The lingering snowmelt and additional rainfall will bring a secondary rise or stall the decline of area rivers this week.”

3 Big Things Today, April 16

Byline:

1. Wheat Lower Overnight as Crop Conditions Remain High

Wheat futures were lower in overnight trading as the condition of the winter crop continues to be much better than it was last year.

The crop as of April 14 was rated 60% good or excellent, on par with the previous week but easily topping the 31% that earned top ratings at the same time last year, according to the USDA.

In Kansas, the biggest winter-wheat grower, 59% of the hard red crop was rated good or excellent, the USDA said in a report. Only 10% of the state’s crop was poor or very poor.

Some 74% of Oklahoma wheat earned top ratings, while only 3% was poor or very poor.

About 6% of the U.S. winter-wheat crop was headed as of Sunday, down from 9%, on average, in the past five years, the government said.

Wheat futures for May delivery fell 2¾¢ to $4.56¾ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade, while Kansas City wheat lost 3½¢ to $4.30 a bushel.

Soybeans and corn were little changed overnight as negotiations between the U.S. and China drag on without an end date yet set.

The sides have met several times in the past few months to attempt to hammer out a trade deal between the world’s two largest economies.

About 3% of the U.S. corn crop was planted, down from the prior five-year average of 5% for this time of year, but up from 2% the previous week, the USDA said.

Soybeans for May delivery fell 1¢ to $8.97¾ a bushel. Soy meal fell 40¢ to $310.60 a short ton, and soy oil lost 0.07¢ to 28.74¢ a pound.

Corn futures declined 1¢ to $3.61¾ a bushel in Chicago.

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2. Export Inspections of Corn Up Week to Week, Soybean Assessments Drop

Export inspections of corn were up week to week, while assessments of soybeans and wheat were lower, according to the USDA.

Corn inspections in the seven days that ended on April 11 totaled 1.18 million metric tons, the government said in a report. That’s up from 1.06 million tons the previous week, but down from the 1.58 million tons during the same week in 2018.

Soybean inspections, meanwhile, plunged week to week to 460,667 metric tons from 888,650 tons the previous week, the agency said. Still, the total was up from 446,455 tons at the same time last year.

Wheat inspections through April 11 were reported at 511,400 metric tons, down from 554,883 tons seven days earlier but up from the 504,956 tons during the same week 12 months earlier, the USDA said in its report.

On an annual basis, inspections of corn for overseas delivery are still up, while soybean and wheat assessments lag the year-earlier pace.

Export inspections of corn since the start of the marketing year on September 1 are now at 31.9 million metric tons, ahead of the 28.1 million tons inspected during the same period a year earlier, the government said.

Soybean assessments since the start of September were reported at 30.6 million metric tons, well behind the year-ago pace of 42.4 million tons.

Inspections of wheat since the grain’s marketing year started on June 1 are now at 19.9 million metric tons, down from 20.9 million tons at this time last year, the USDA said.

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3. Flood Warnings Issued For Red River Along North Dakota-Minnesota Border

Flooding along the North Dakota-Minnesota border is quite pronounced on weather maps this morning, as the Red River is over its banks in several areas.

The river near Fargo was at 29.6 feet as of late Monday, nearing major flood stage of 30 feet, according to the National Weather Service. Water levels will rise to near 32 feet on Saturday before beginning to fall, the NWS said in a report.

At East Grand Forks, the Red River was at 44.8 feet as of late Monday, well above flood stage of 40 feet. The river is expected to top out in the city at 45.2 feet on Saturday before receding, the agency said in its report.

Flooding also continues throughout eastern South Dakota and along the Nebraska-Iowa border as the Missouri River is over its banks in several areas. The Mississippi River is flooding from Iowa south to the Gulf of Mexico.

3 Big Things Today, April 15

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Grains Higher Overnight on Trade Optimsim

Soybeans and corn were higher in overnight trading amid optimism about negotiations between the U.S. and China.

The U.S. reportedly eased its demand that China curb some subsidies in a bid to come to an agreement, according to media reports. CNBC reported that industrial subsidies are part of China’s long-term industrial plan, making it difficult for them to halt subsidies.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said over the weekend he hopes negotiations end soon and that negotiators were near a final round of talks, according to Reuters.

The sides have met several times in the past few months to attempt to hammer out a trade deal between the world’s two largest economies.

Soybeans for May delivery rose 3¼¢ to $8.98½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal added $1.60 to $309.50 a short ton, and soy oil lost 0.07¢ to 28.88¢ a pound.

Corn futures rose 2¢ to $3.63 a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery fell 2½¢ to $4.62 a bushel overnight, while Kansas City wheat gained lost 3½¢ to $4.37¾ a bushel.

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2. Money Managers Raise Bearish Bets on Corn, Soybeans in Week Through April 9

Money managers increased their bearish bets on corn and soybeans in the week that ended on April 9, according to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

Speculators held 289,859 net-short positions, or bets on lower prices, in corn futures contracts last week, up from 263,768 net-shorts seven days earlier, the CFTC said in a report. That’s the biggest bearish position in at least five years, government data show.

Investors held 70,734 net-short positions in soybean futures contracts last week, the agency said. That’s up from 69,153 contracts the previous week and the largest such position since March 12.

The ongoing trade talks between the U.S. and China have dragged on, leading some market-watchers to worry about when such an agreement will be signed. The USDA on April 9 raised its forecasts for global stockpiles of both corn and soybeans from its March projections.

In wheat, money managers reduced their net-short positions to 48,997 futures contracts in hard red winter varieties last week, down from 50,554 contracts the previous week.

Investors were net-short by 58,958 soft red winter wheat futures contracts as of April 9, down slightly from 57,883 such positions seven days earlier, the CFTC said.

The Weekly Commitment of Traders Report from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission shows trader positions in futures markets.

The report provides positions held by commercial traders, or those using futures to hedge their physical assets; noncommercial traders, or money managers (also called large speculators); and nonreportables, or small speculators.

A net-long position indicates more traders are betting on higher prices, while a net-short position means more are betting futures will decline.

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3. Frost Advisory in Effect For Parts of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana; Flooding Continues

A frost advisory is in effect for parts of eastern Missouri, southern Illinois, and southern Indiana this morning as temperatures remain in the low-30s, according to the National Weather Service.

While some agricultural products could be affected by the frost, the NWS said in a report early this morning, it’s unlikely any wheat in the area will be damaged as temperatures generally have to be at least below freezing for a sustained amount of time to hurt crops.

Flooding continues in the region, meanwhile, as the Mississippi River continues to flood from Iowa south all the way into the Gulf of Mexico.

Adding to the woes in the region, there’s another chance for thunderstorms late Tuesday night through Thursday. Some of the storms may become severe on Wednesday and Thursday, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, April 12

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Grains Slightly Higher in Overnight Trading

Soybeans and corn were a touch higher in overnight trading on optimism about the ongoing trade talks between the U.S. and China.

China said it would further open its cloud computing sector to foreign investment as a way to encourage the U.S. to make a trade deal, the Wall Street Journal first reported.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in an interview on CNBC that negotiators reached a deal on a mechanism to enforce whatever trade pact is signed, which had been a sticking point in the ongoing negotiations.

Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer are scheduled to travel to Beijing next week to continue the talks.

Soybeans for May delivery rose 1¢ to $8.96¼ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal added 50¢ to $307.70 a short ton, and soy oil gained 0.07¢ to 29.05¢ a pound.

Corn futures rose ¾¢ to $3.60¾ a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery gained 2½¢ to $4.63 a bushel overnight, while Kansas City wheat gained 1¾¢ to $4.39¼ a bushel.

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2. Export Sales of Soybeans, Wheat Drop Week to Week, While Corn Sales are Up Slightly

Export sales of soybeans and wheat plunged week to week, while corn sales to overseas buyers were up slightly.

Soybeans sales in the seven days through April 4 were down 86% from the prior week and 76% from the previous four-week average as China was conspicuously absent, according to the USDA.

Indonesia was the biggest customer last week at 73,700 metric tons, followed by Mexico at 71,000 tons, and the Netherlands at 66,300 tons, the USDA said in a report. Egypt bought 54,700 tons and Japan was in for 48,700 tons.

Unknown customers canceled deliveries for 99,300 metric tons.

Wheat sales also were down for the week, declining 61% from the previous week and 37% from the prior average to 273,000 metric tons, the government said.

Mexico was the biggest buyer at 89,100 metric tons, followed by South Africa at 49,900 tons, Japan at 49,400 tons, the Philippines at 40,400 tons, and Peru at 40,200 tons. Unknown buyers canceled cargoes of 111,600 tons.

Corn sales were reported at 548,000 metric tons for the 2018-2019 marketing year, up 2% from the previous week but down 18% from the prior four-week average, the USDA said.

Colombia was the biggest buyer last week, taking 181,500 metric tons. An unknown buyer took 169,900 tons, South Korea was in for 138,900 tons, Mexico bought 76,600 tons, and Saudi Arabia purchased 71,600 tons, according to the government.

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3. Blizzard Conditions in Upper Midwest Wind Down Slowly Today as Storm Moves Northeast

Blizzard conditions that include heavy snow and strong winds are starting to slowly wind down in the Upper Midwest today as the storm moves across Lake Superior and into Ontario, Canada, according to the National Weather Service.

A blizzard warning remains in effect for eastern South Dakota until 1 p.m. local time as another 3 inches of snow will fall on top of what has already fallen. Winds in the area are expected to gust up to 40 mph, the NWS said in a report this morning.

That likely will lead to blowing snow that could “significantly” reduce visibility.

A winter storm warning is in effect for much of northern Minnesota, where snow will linger throughout the day as the low-pressure system responsible for the storm moves toward Lake Superior.

Additional snowfall from 1 to 4 inches or more is expected along the north shore of the lake, though temperatures may be warm enough for the precipitation to turn to rain, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, April 11

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Grains Again Little Changed Overnight

Soybeans and corn were again little changed, which seems to be a common theme in recent weeks, as traders, producers and analysts all await news on a trade deal between the U.S. and China.

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He met with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin last week, and sat down with President Donald Trump to discuss an agreement between the world’s two largest economies.

All sides reportedly said the negotiations were fruitful, leading many to believe a deal was close.

Still, no news has come out of either camp. Trump and his counterpart Xi Jinping have yet to schedule a meeting where they’re expected to sign a final agreement.

Soybeans for May delivery fell 3/4¢ to $9.01 ¼ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal lost 20¢ to $309.90 a short ton and soy oil declined 0.1¢ to 28.97¢ a pound.

Corn futures were unchanged at $3.61 ¾ a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery rose 1 1/2¢ to $4.59 ½ a bushel overnight while Kansas City wheat gained 2 1/4¢ to $4.35 a bushel.

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2. Ethanol Production Breaks Million-Barrel Mark, Rises to Highest in Three Weeks

Weekly ethanol production rose to the highest level in three weeks in the seven days that ended on April 5, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Output last week averaged 1.002 million barrels a day, topping the million-barrel mark for the first time since the week that ended on March 15, the EIA said in a report. That’s up from 999,000 barrels a day, on average, the previous week.

In the Midwest, by far the biggest producer, production averaged 931,000 barrels a day, up from 925,000 a day in the prior seven-day period.

The gains in the region were partially offset by a decline in the East Coast, where output fell by 2,000 barrels a day to 24,000, in the Gulf Coast, where production declined by 1,000 barrels a day to 13,000, and in the West Coast where output fell by 1,000 barrels to an average of 19,000 a day, the EIA said.

Rocky Mountain production was unchanged at 14,000 barrels a day, on average.

Ethanol stockpiles, meanwhile, declined for a second straight week to 23.193 million barrels a day, the lowest level since Dec. 28, the agency said.

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3. Blizzards in Nebraska, South Dakota Bring Up To 17 Inches of Snow, Make Travel Impossible

A blizzard warning is in effect for two-thirds of western and central Nebraska, almost all of South Dakota and parts of western Minnesota this morning.

In central Nebraska, total snow accumulations are expected to top out around 12 inches, according to the National Weather Service.

Wind gusts as high as 50 miles an hour will reduce visibility and make travel difficult, the NWS said in a report early this morning.

“Falling and blowing snow with strong winds and poor visibilities are likely,” the agency said. “This will lead to whiteout conditions, making travel extremely dangerous. Do not travel. “

In eastern South Dakota and western Minnesota, meanwhile, up to 17 inches of snow and sleet is expected with ice accumulations of around a tenth of an inch. Wind gusts as high as 50 miles an hour are expected.

Power outages and tree damage are expected due to the ice buildup, and travel will be nearly impossible, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, April 10

Byline:

1. Beans, Corn Little Changed as World Awaits Trade Deal

Soybeans and corn were little changed overnight as traders continue to wait for news on trade talks between the U.S. and China.

By all accounts, last week’s meeting in Washington, the latest in a series of negotiations, went well with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He wrapping up his time in the U.S. by meeting President Donald Trump.

Still, very little news has come out of the talks, other than China state-run newspapers reporting that the sides came to some new fundamental understandings on some issues last week. Still, Reuters reported earlier this week that the U.S. is “not satisfied yet” on a proposed deal.

Negotiations, however, are ongoing and both sides seem eager to find common ground.

Soybeans for May delivery fell 1¢ to $8.97¾ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal lost 50¢ to $308.60 a short ton, and soy oil declined 0.21¢ to 28.83¢ a pound.

Corn futures gained ¾¢ to $3.60¾ a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery declined ¼¢ to $4.59¼ a bushel overnight, while Kansas City wheat dropped ¼¢ to $4.27¼ a bushel.

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2. Corn Ending Stocks Outlook Bumped Up Slightly, Bean Inventories Down in Latest WASDE

The USDA released its monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates Report yesterday, and there were a few notable changes.

Corn ending stockpiles are now expected to be around 2.035 billion bushels at the end of the 2018-2019 marketing year that ends on August 31, up from the previous projections of 1.835 billion bushels, the government said.

Forecast production this year was left unchanged at 14.42 billion bushels, but the amount used for feed and ethanol declined slightly, as did the outlook for exports. Total use is pegged at 14.565 billion bushels, down from the March forecast for 14.765 billion, the USDA said.

Soybean inventories on August 31, meanwhile are now pegged at 895 million bushels, down slightly from the outlook for 900 million last month.

Production was left unchanged at 4.544 billion bushels, but there was a slight uptick in the amount used for seed and a small decrease in the amount imported that accounted for the change, according to government data.

Wheat inventories at the end of the grain’s marketing year on May 31 is pegged at 1.087 billion bushels, up considerably from the March projection for 1.055 billion bushels.

Production is still seen at 1.884 billion bushels, but the USDA downgraded its outlook for the amount used for animal feed by 10 million bushels and the amount exported by 20 million bushels. Total use is now seen at 2.042 billion bushels, down from last month’s outlook for 2.073 billion bushels, the government said.

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3. Blizzard Will Start as Rainfall Today in Parts of South Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska

Almost all of South Dakota, western Minnesota, and the western half of Nebraska are still in a blizzard warning as up to 18 inches of snow are expected in some areas, according to the National Weather Service.

Rain is expected to turn to snow this morning in south-central South Dakota, the NWS said in a report early this morning.

“Very heavy snow will continue across the rest of the area today before gradually ending Thursday,” the agency said. “Breezy northerly winds will result in areas of blowing and drifting snow and significantly reduced visibility at times.”

In central South Dakota, 12 to 18 inches of snow is expected along with wind gusts of up to 55 mph, the NWS said.

The storm also will dump snow on much of southwestern Minnesota that will start as rain and sleet this morning. The precipitation will turn to snow starting tonight and continue through Friday morning. Snowfall rates of an inch to 2 inches per hour are possible.

In central Nebraska, 4 to 11 inches of snow are forecast along with 110  inch of ice and 55 mph winds, the NWS said.

“Falling and blowing snow with strong winds and poor visibility are likely,” the agency said. “This will lead to whiteout conditions, making travel extremely dangerous.”

3 Big Things Today, April 9

Byline:

1. Wheat Futures Again Lower on Crop Prospects

Wheat futures were again lower in overnight trading after the USDA’s Crop Progress Report showed the winter crop was in much better condition than last year.

Some 60% of winter wheat was rated good or excellent as of April 7, up from 56% seven days earlier and 30% during the same week in 2018, the USDA said. In Kansas, the biggest grower of winter wheat, 58% earned top ratings.

About 3% of the crop was headed, down a tick from the prior five-year average of 4%.

Two percent of the corn crop was in the ground as of Sunday, on par with the average. The bulk was in Texas where just over half the crop was planted.

Some 1% of the spring wheat crop was planted, down from 5% on average for the past five years, the USDA said. Snowy and wet weather has kept farmers in the Dakotas out of fields thus far.

Wheat futures for May delivery declined 4¾¢ to $4.60½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade, while Kansas City wheat dropped 4¢ to $4.27½ a bushel.

Soybeans for May delivery rose ¼¢ to $8.99 a bushel overnight. Soy meal fell 50¢ to $308.70 a short ton, and soy oil added 0.02¢ to 28.90¢ a pound.

Corn futures fell ¼¢ to $3.59¾ a bushel in Chicago.

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2. Export Inspections of Soybeans, Wheat Rise Week to Week, Corn Declines

Export inspections of soybeans and wheat rose week to week, while corn assessments declined, according to the USDA.

The government said it inspected 888,160 metric tons of soybeans for overseas delivery in the seven days through April 5, up from 731,590 tons seven days earlier and 381,191 tons during the same week in 2018.

Wheat examinations last week totaled 538,808 metric tons, up from 454,287 the previous week and 431,876 tons at the same time last year, the agency said.

Corn inspections, meanwhile, declined to 1.035 million metric tons from 1.26 million tons in the prior seven days and 1.94 million tons the previous year.

Since the start of the marketing year on September 1, the USDA has inspected 30.7 million metric tons of corn for offshore delivery. That’s up from 26.5 million tons during the same time frame a year earlier.

Soybean inspections are well behind the year-ago pace at 30.2 million metric tons. At this point last year, the government had inspected 41.9 million tons, according to the agency.

Wheat assessments since the start of the grain’s marketing year on June 1 stand at 19.4 million metric tons, just behind the previous year’s pace of 20.4 million tons, the USDA said.

**

3. Strong Blizzard Expected in Parts of Nebraska, South Dakota; Up to 26 Inches Possible

Just when you thought winter was over, it makes another appearance.

A blizzard warning is in effect for western Nebraska, much of South Dakota, and parts of western Minnesota, according to the National Weather Service.

In South Dakota, a “potent spring storm” is set to move across the state starting today, the NWS said in a report early this morning.

“Rain will develop across the area today and this evening, then transition to snow late tonight into Wednesday morning,” the agency said. “Very heavy snow will then continue through the area during the day Wednesday, gradually ending Wednesday night and Thursday.”

Total snow accumulations of 9 to 15 inches are expected in the area with winds gusting up to 55 mph, the NWS said.

In central and western Nebraska, 20 to 26 inches of snow are in the forecast. The storm will hit the area starting tomorrow and continue through Friday. A light glaze of ice along with wind gusts of up to 50 mph also are expected, the agency said.

Travel is not advised in the affected areas.

3 Big Things Today, April 8

Byline:

1. Wheat Futures Lower on Crop Prospects

Wheat futures were lower in overnight trading, while corn and beans were little changed.

The outlook for the U.S. winter wheat crop has improved year over year, pushing prices of the grain down for what would be a third straight sessions if declines hold.

Some 56% of winter wheat was in good or excellent condition as of last week, up from 32% at the same time in 2018, according to the USDA.

Corn and beans were little changed as traders await news concerning a trade deal between the U.S. and China. Reports have come out that negotiations have gone well and the sides are close to an agreement, but so far, a meeting between presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping hasn’t been announced.

The two are expected to meet to conclude negotiations and sign a trade deal.

Wheat futures for May delivery declined 5¢ to $4.62¾ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade, while Kansas City wheat dropped 2½¢ to $4.28¾ a bushel.

Soybeans for May delivery rose ¾¢ to $8.99¾ a bushel overnight. Soy meal gained 50¢ to $308.60 a short ton, and soy oil lost 0.19¢ to 28.96¢ a pound.

Corn futures fell ½¢ to $3.62 a bushel in Chicago.

**

2. Money Managers Increase Bearish Bets on Corn, Bean Futures Through April 2

Money managers increased their bearish bets on corn and soybean futures in the seven days that ended on April 2, according to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

Speculators held 263,768 net-short positions in corn last week, up from 218,427 contracts the prior seven-day period, the CFTC said in a report.

Investors were net short by 69,153 soybean futures contracts, up from 47,700 contracts the previous week, and the largest such position since March 12, government data show.

In wheat, fund managers were net short by 50,554 hard red wheat futures contracts as of April 2, up from 49,570 contracts seven days earlier.

They held 57,883 net-short positions in soft red winter wheat, down from 64,550 contracts the previous week and the smallest bearish position since February 19, according to the CFTC.

The Weekly Commitment of Traders Report from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission shows trader positions in futures markets.

The report provides positions held by commercial traders, or those using futures to hedge their physical assets; noncommercial traders, or money managers (also called large speculators); and nonreportables, or small speculators.

A net-long position indicates more traders are betting on higher prices, while a net-short position means more are betting futures will decline.

**

3. Fires a Risk in Much of Iowa Due to Higher-Than-Normal Temperatures, Strong Winds  

Fire risks are elevated in much of Iowa this morning as a combination of above-normal temperatures and high winds make conditions favorable for wildfires, according to the National Weather Service.

Temperatures are expected to be in the 70s and possibly 80 in spots, and west winds gusting as high as 35 mph will increase the risk of fires, the NWS said in a report earlier this morning.

Farther south in southern Arkansas and parts of Mississippi, thunderstorms are possible that may become strong to marginally severe are in the forecast.

Quarter-size hail and isolated damaging winds are the main hazards in the region today, the agency said.

“Additionally, heavy rainfall today may lead to a continued flash flood threat across southeastern sections of” Arkansas, the NWS said. “We may also see increased flooding concerns on area rivers in response to this weekend’s heavy rainfall.”

3 Big Things Today, April 5

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Corn Decline in Overnight Trading

Soybeans and corn were lower in overnight trading amid concerns about trade and on some profit-taking after prices rose this week.

President Donald Trump said the U.S. and China are close to a trade deal but wouldn’t give a date for his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping, despite what reports had said. He said while the sides are near an agreement, “if it’s not a great deal, we’re not doing it.”

Investors also may be taking some profits overnight after soybean prices rose 22 cents in the four days heading into Friday.

With uncertainty over trade and rising stockpiles, investors don’t want to be too long the market just yet.

Soybeans for May delivery fell 6 1/4¢ to $9.00 ¼ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal fell $2.90 to $309.10 a short ton and soy oil added 0.05¢ to 29.25¢ a pound.

Corn futures lost 2 1/4¢ to $3.63 a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery declined 6¢ to $4.64 ¾  a bushel overnight while Kansas City wheat dropped 6¢ to $4.33 ½ a bushel.

**

2. Soybean, Wheat Export Sales Surge Week-to-Week While Corn Declines

Export sales of soybeans and wheat jumped week-to-week while corn sales plunged, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Soybean sales to overseas buyers in the marketing year that ends on Aug. 31 totaled 1.97 million metric tons, up “noticeably” from the previous week and the prior four-week average, the USDA said in a report.

China stepped back in and bought 1.7 million tons of the total, followed by Indonesia, which took 91,500 tons, an unknown buyer bought 65,200 tons, South Korea was in for 59,600 tons and Taiwan purchased 30,600 tons. Argentina canceled an order for 40,000 tons.

Analysts had pegged sales from 800,000 to 1.8 million, according to researcher Allendale.

Wheat sales also surged, rising 48% week-to-week to 704,700 metric tons, the government said.

Iraq was the big buyer at 200,000 metric tons, followed by Egypt at 119,500 tons and Indonesia at 115,000 tons. The Philippines took 70,000 tons and Mexico bought 62,500 tons. An unknown customer canceled a shipment for 28,700 tons.

Net sales in the marketing year that starts on June 1 totaled 312,800 tons as the Philippines and Iraq made large purchases, the USDA said.

Analysts had pegged combined sales of wheat from 300,000 to 800,000 tons.

Corn sales, meanwhile, dropped 41% from the previous week and 31% from the prior four-week average to 537,300 metric tons, the government said.

Japan was the biggest buyer at 258,300 tons, followed by Mexico at 229,900 tons and Colombia at 114,900 tons. Peru bought 93,800 tons and Honduras purchased 29,4500 tons. An unknown buyer canceled shipments for 215,700 tons.

Sales in the marketing year that starts on Sept. 1 totaled 93,000 tons, all to Japan, the USDA said.

Analysts had pegged combined sales from 700,000 to 1.25 million metric tons, Allendale said.

**

3. Dense Fog Advisory Issued This Morning From Dakotas to Oklahoma, Flooding Continues  

A dense fog advisory is in effect this morning from northern South Dakota south into east Texas, according to the National Weather Service.

Visibility in parts of eastern Oklahoma and western Arkansas is down to less than a quarter-mile, the NWS said in a report early this morning.

Much of the fog will dissipate by mid-morning. Until then, drivers are advised to slow down and leave distance in front of their vehicle to avoid potential collision.

Flooding is still the main weather issue this morning. Several counties in North Dakota and Minnesota are under a flood warning still. The Missouri River is still over its banks from the Nebraska-Iowa border through central Missouri, the NWS said.

The Mississippi River also is over its banks from Minnesota down to the Gulf of Mexico, according to weather maps. Flooding likely will continue throughout the weekend into next week.

Farm Counties Lose Population

Byline:

Over one third of rural counties are experiencing protracted and significant population loss, and the trend is pronounced in agricultural counties. “More than 80% of all rural farm counties are depopulating,” say demographer Kenneth Johnson and policy fellow Daniel Lichter in a University of New Hampshire brief. “Depopulation…reflects the historical impact of employment declines in agriculture resulting from mechanization and farm consolidation.”

Depopulation is greatest in the Plains but also affects north-central Iowa, southern Iowa, northern Missouri, and western Illinois. Yet, depopulation is far from universal since roughly as many counties enjoy growing populations as suffer depopulation. For their work, Johnson and Lichter looked at Census data since 1900 and say a “depopulation county” reached peak population by 1950 and declined by at least 25% by 2010.

One of the major factors in depopulation is the loss of young adults, who move elsewhere for work. When they leave, there are fewer children born to offset aging adults. Six in 10 depopulating counties had more deaths than births from 2000 to 2010.

This article was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, an independent, nonprofit news organization producing investigative reporting on food, agriculture, and environmental health.

FERNlogo

3 Big Things Today, April 4

Byline:

1. Soybean, Corn Futures Again Slightly Higher Overnight

Soybeans and corn were again higher overnight on optimism that the U.S. and China are close to a trade agreement.

Negotiators from both sides will meet again today as Chinese Vice Premier Liu He is in Washington for another round of talks. He’s scheduled to meet with President Donald Trump today to discuss the potential trade deal.

That could be a positive sign that negotiations are nearing an end.

Soybeans for May delivery rose 2 3/4¢ to $9.01 ½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal fell 20¢ to $310.80 a short ton and soy oil added 0.16¢ to 28.96¢ a pound.

Corn futures rose 1¢ to $3.63 ¾ a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery added 2 1/2¢ to $4.73 ½ a bushel overnight while Kansas City wheat gained 3¢ to $4.39 ¾ a bushel.

**

2. Ethanol Production Rises in Week Through March 29, Still Below 1 Million-Barrel Average

U.S. ethanol production rose in the seven days that ended on March 29 but was still just below the 1 million-barrel-per-day average, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Output last week average 999,000 barrels a day, up from 975,000 barrels the previous week, the EIA said in a report.

Production in the Midwest, by far the biggest region in terms of output, jumped to 924,000 barrels a day, on average, according to the report.

East Coast production rose by 1,000 barrels to 26,000 last week, Rocky Mountain output increased by 2,000 barrels to an average of 14,000 a day and West Coast production was reported at 20,000 barrels, on average, up by 1,000 a day.

Gulf Coast output was unchanged week-to-week at an average of 14,000 barrels a day, the EIA said.

Stockpiles, meanwhile, fell from a record in the seven days through March 29.

Inventories in storage totaled 23.992 million barrels last week, down from 24.448 million seven days earlier, which was the highest ever, according to the government.

In other news, the weekly export sales report is due from the U.S. Department of Agriculture at 8:30 a.m. in Washington. Corn sales are pegged from 700,000 to 1.25 million metric tons, researcher Allendale said in a morning note to clients. Soybean sales are forecast from 800,000 to 1.8 million tons and wheat sales are seen from 300,000 to 800,000 tons.

**

3. Flooding Still Dominates Weather Maps as Flooding Expected to Worsen in North Dakota  

Flooding is still the predominate concern on today’s weather maps as warnings are in effect for several counties in North Dakota and Minnesota and along the Missouri and Mississippi rivers all the way to the Gulf of Mexico.

 In North Dakota and Minnesota, increased river levels are expected as warmer weather accelerates snowmelt and runoff, according to the National Weather Service.

Tributaries are being blocked by ice dams that’s preventing water from moving downstream, the NWS said in a report early this morning. That makes the timing of any increase in river levels uncertain at this point, the agency said.

Further south near Cape Girardeau, Thebes and New Madrid, Missouri, the Mississippi River continues to rise slowly.

At New Madrid, the river was at 33.4 feet as of late last night, just below flood stage of 34 feet. The river is expected to rive to almost 34.5 feet by Saturday afternoon, which will affect only low-lying areas, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, April 3

Byline:

1. Soybean, Corn Futures Modestly Higher Overnight

Soybeans and corn were modestly higher in overnight trading on optimism about trade talks between the U.S. and China.

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He is in Washington for yet another round of talks with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

The sides are supposedly close to an agreement as the talks enter another round. A U.S. delegation was in Beijing last week for negotiations, which Mnuchin said were “constructive.”

President Donald Trump again threatened to close the U.S.-Mexico border yesterday after earlier seeming to back off his promise to do so.

In a rare clash with the president, Kentucky Republican Mitch McConnell said closing the border would have a “potentially catastrophic impact” on the U.S. Still, Trump said security is more important than trade and doubled down on his treat to close the border.

Soybeans for May delivery rose 1¼¢ to $9.01¼ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal gained 10¢ to $310.70 a short ton, and soy oil added 0.10¢ to 29.06¢ a pound.

Corn futures rose 2½¢ to $3.64 a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery added 5¾¢ to $4.69¾ a bushel overnight, while Kansas City wheat gained 2½¢ to $4.35¾ a bushel.

**

2. U.S., China Officials Reportedly Close to Agreement, With a Couple Sticking Points

U.S. and Chinese officials are reportedly close to closing a trade deal, though there are a few items that still need to be ironed out.

The Financial Times said in a story overnight that the sides have reached agreements on most of the issues that were holding up negotiations but still aren’t sure how to implement and enforce the deal, citing people briefed on the talks.

Negotiators including U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He also are reportedly still trying to nail down details on the fate of existing U.S. tariffs on goods from the Asian country and some way for Washington to ensure China keeps its promises, the FT said.

President Donald Trump said last week that the U.S. would remove some tariffs but not all as a way to ensure Beijing complies with its side of the agreement, if one is reached.

Negotiators will meet again this week to try to come to a final agreement.

There’s optimism that the talks will eventually result in a deal. Commodity and stock markets are all higher in early trading Wednesday morning.

**

3. Flooding May Get Worse as Rain Forecast in Parts of North Dakota, NWS Says  

Melting snow continues to contribute to river flooding in several parts of the Midwestern U.S.

In eastern North Dakota, flood warnings already in effect may get worse as temperatures warm starting tomorrow, according to the National Weather Service.

“Warmer temperatures late this week will increase the rate of snowmelt in the areas where snow remains,” the NWS said in a report early this morning. “There is a good chance for showers over the area this weekend, possibly even some thunder Saturday night. This will bring more widespread runoff into area rivers and tributaries and cause additional overland flooding.”

Meanwhile, the Missouri and Mississippi rivers continue to overrun their banks throughout Missouri and along the state’s border with Illinois.

The Mississippi River is flooded all the way to the Gulf of Mexico, and more rain is on the way starting tomorrow afternoon in parts of southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana, which could worsen flooding, the agency said.

3 Big Things Today, April 2

Byline:

1. Soybean, Corn Futures Little Changed Overnight

Soybeans and corn were little changed overnight as traders again focus on international trade.

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He is reportedly in Washington to continue high-level trade talks with his U.S. counterparts Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. The sides have been negotiating for months in a bid to end tariffs they have on the others’ goods.

Little news has come from the talks, but progress is reportedly being made. A U.S. delegation was in Beijing last week for negotiations, which Mnuchin said were “constructive.”

President Donald Trump has threatened to close the U.S. border with Mexico unless the country does something to stop illegal immigration into the U.S., which also could have an effect on trade. Mexico is the biggest importer of U.S. corn and third-largest buyer of soybeans.

It’s not yet known how serious Trump is about closing the border.

Soybeans for May delivery rose 2¢ to $8.97 ½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal gained 70¢ to $310.10 a short ton and soy oil added 0.14¢ to 28.71¢ a pound.

Corn futures fell 1/4¢ to $3.61 ½ a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery dropped 2 1/4¢ to $4.60 ½ a bushel overnight while Kansas City wheat lost 4¢ to $4.30 ½ a bushel.

**

2. Corn, Wheat Inspections Rise in Week Through March 28, Soybean Assessments Decline

Inspections of corn and wheat for overseas delivery rose in the week that ended on March 28 while soybeans declined, according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture.

Corn assessments rose to 1.26 million metric tons last week, the USDA said in a report. That’s up from 996,165 tons seven days earlier, but still down from 1.45 million tons the same week a year earlier.

Examinations of wheat for offshore delivery rose to 418,424 metric tons from 384,943 tons the previous week, government data show. Still, that’s down from the 424,880 tons inspected during the same week in 2018.

Soybean inspections were reported at 730,806 metric tons last week, down from 859,708 tons the previous week, but up from the 583,586 tons inspected the same week last year.

Since the start of the marketing year on Sept. 1, the government has inspected 29.7 million metric tons of corn for overseas delivery. That’s up from the 24.6 million tons inspected during the same period a year earlier.

Soybean inspections since Sept. 1 are now at 29.3 million tons, still well behind the year-earlier total of 41.5 million tons for the same timeframe last year.

Wheat assessments since the start of the grain’s marketing year on June 1 totaled 18.8 million metric tons, down from 19.9 million at this time last year, the USDA said.

**

3. Late Snow Falling in Iowa Through This Morning, Flooding Continues in Missouri  

A band of “moderate” rain is falling in central Iowa this morning while some snow is included in the precipitation in Adair, Guthrie and Greene counties, according to the National Weather Service.

Light snow also is falling in some northern Iowa counties this morning, the NWS said in a report released at about 4 a.m.

“If traveling this morning, be aware that you may encounter a brief period of wet, heavy snow within the band of heavier rain showers moving over portions of Central Iowa” through about 7 a.m. central time, the agency said. “As the area of precipitation moves east along the I-35 corridor, temperatures may remain just warm enough to keep most of the precipitation as rain. Be extra cautious if snow that reduces visibility is encountered early today.”

In Missouri, meanwhile, runoff and snowmelt from further north has kept the Missouri and Mississippi rivers flooded.

More precipitation in some areas could exacerbate the flooding. The Mississippi River at St. Louis was at 37.6 feet as of yesterday evening. Flood stage is at 30 feet. The river will crest at about 38 feet in the next 24 hours, the NWS said.

Elvis Presley’s Life, Journey and His Career

Elvis Presley is one of the legends in music and entertainment. His songs and other works are still famous until now. Even, his iconic style still can be seen in some opportunities.

He made a lot of achievements in his life. His music and movies already become great masterpiece. Of course, these all are great things to see.

Early Interest in Music

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Presley was born on January 8, 1935. His parent gave him name Elvis Aron Presley. Later, he changed the spelling into Aaron so it was based on the biblical form. He grew up in Tupelo, Mississippi.

His parent educated him to have strong faith. Even, gospel music had great influence in his life. Then, he received first appreciation in music when he became winner in talent show. It was held at Humes High School located in Memphis.

He also had interest in music and wanted to pursue career in it. Then, he got his first single in 1954. It was song titled with “That’s All Right.”

His First Hit and Early Career

After he got his first single, he started to develop his career. In 1955, he signed a deal with RCA Record. Colonel Tom Parker was appointed as his manager.

After that, 1956 became important year in his career. He released the first hit titled “Heartbreak Hotel. He also launched his first album by using his name, “Elvis Presley.” Because it, he obtained popularity and he signed his first movie contract with Paramount Pictures.

Surely, 1956 was his important steps of achievement. He got popularity because of his song. Moreover, he also had unique sexy dances. Because of his popularity, Elvis Presley also guests in many variety shows.

Military Service

Military service became important moments in his life. It I not only about the service, but there is also other important things happened on the period of time.

His popularity got boosted and his first film, Love Me Tender became hit in the box office. However, he should break for the military service. He joined in 1957 and he was sent to Germany.

Before he went to Germany, his mother passed away. Luckily, he got a permission to attend the funeral. Then, the spent the services for around a year and a half.

His Movies and Works

Elvis Presley finished his service and left the army in 1960. Because of his popularity, he could come back soon and he reached the chart again with the soundtrack of GI Blues.

He had many movies and soundtracks. There are also songs and albums to create after he left the army. Even, he could prove that he was worthy to be called as “King of Rock n’ Roll.”

One of the great works was done in 1968. He made “68 Comeback” and it successfully made people stunned by skills as singer and guitarist.

The Last Steps of His Career

Popularity does not mean that he could have perfect life. In fact, he faced divorce. His marriage with Priscilla had to break in early 1973. He also had addiction to drugs and other bad lifestyle.

He passed away on August 16, 1977 caused by heart failure. He was buried in Graceland property, so he was near the gravesite of his mother and other relatives.

He had great legacy in rock n’ roll genre. Because of him, the genre can be popular in America. His awards and achievements also received great appreciation. These all make Elvis Presley a real legend.

 

Charles Darwin Biography and His Great Works in Evolution

People know Charles Darwin as one of the famous figures in biology. Specifically, he is famous for his theory of evolution.

There are many theories talking about evolution, but Darwin’s theory is the most popular theory and it has great influence even until now. Of course, it is also interesting to know more about him.

Darwin’s Early Life

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Darwin was born in February 12, 1809. He spent his childhood in Shrewsbury, England. His father was a doctor, but Darwin hated medical education a lot.

He was not considered as brilliant student, but he could study at University of Edinburg in Scotland. At first, he wanted to become an Anglican minister.

He had no idea that he would become botanist. However, it changed when he studied at Cambridge. He got the title for his degree in 1831.

Darwin and Beagle

H.M.S. Beagle became the name of ship for his voyage. Based on the recommendation of his professor, he joined the scientific expedition to South America in 1831.

Darwin’s presence on the ship gave benefit for the captain of the ship. The captain wanted to have scientist on the ship to record and note the whole discoveries. Moreover, it was considered great to have intelligent companion on the ship.

Darwin could collect many specimens from the journey. He also read books of Thomas Malthus and Charles Lyell that gave him insights in evolution.

Darwin’s Writings

With those specimens, Darwin started to conduct research. At first, he did not share his finding. However, he met Alfred Russell Wallace who became his partner. His first publication was “Journal of Researches.”

He also contributed in the contents of “Zoology of the Voyage of the Beagle.” It was made my many scientists and Darwin made and edited some parts in there.

Charles Darwin also read the writing of Thomas Malthus. Essay on the Principle of Population became the important references for him in formulating his own ideas on natural selection and survival of the fittest.

Charles Darwin’s Masterpiece

Darwin already formulated his idea and findings in natural selection and evolution. However, he published some years after his friends encouraged him to do so. In November 1859, “On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection” was published.

Darwin already predicted that it would be controversial, especially for those who believe in religion and bible. Actually, it did not talk specifically about human evolution. The topic was then brought in “The Descent of Man.”

These two works made Charles Darwin so famous. The books were used as references. There were also great impacts on science, society, and religion. Although Darwin was not the first one to talk about evolution, his works create biggest impact.

Darwin’s Later Life

In the remaining days of his life, Darwin still worked on other books and published them.  He also edited and revised the improved version of the “On the Origin of Species.”

Although there were many controversies, especially the religious ones, he still continued his botanical research. He lived in the countryside in quiet and peaceful life.

On April 19, 1882, he died and he was honored by societies of scientists, so he was buried in Westminster Abbey in London. Instead of many controversies, he was considered as grand figure in science. Even, Charles Darwin was considered as national hero.

Watch: 5 Tips for Navigating Flooded Midwest Roads

Flood waters have forced the closure of thousands of miles of roadways across the Midwest this spring. Here are five tips for navigating roadways during flood season. For more detailed information read this article.

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3 Big Things Today, April 1

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Corn Rise Overnight on Bargain Hunting

Soybeans and corn were higher in overnight trading as bargain hunters snap up contracts after Friday’s losses.

Bean futures on Friday dropped by more than 5¢, while corn plunged more than 17¢. The declines came after the USDA said March 1 stockpiles of soybeans hit the highest-ever while corn inventories were at their third-highest level on record.

A separate report showed U.S. farmers are expected to increase corn acreage this year while lowering soybean seedings.

Wheat futures fell more than 6¢ on Friday.

Hedgers and investors seeking a bargain became buyers overnight, partly on optimism that the U.S. and China will be able to finalize an agreement on a trade deal after months of negotiations.

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He is expected in Washington to continue talks this week after a U.S. delegation that included Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer last week went to Beijing.

Soybeans for May delivery rose 5¾¢ to $8.90 a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal gained $1.10 to $307.60 a short ton, and soy oil added 0.14¢ to 28.50¢ a pound.

Corn futures added 4¢ to $3.60½ a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery gained 2¢ to $4.59¾ a bushel overnight, while Kansas City wheat rose ¼¢ to $4.30¼ a bushel.

**

2. Speculative Investors Reduce Net-Short Positions in Corn, Beans

Money managers reduced their net-short positions, or bets on lower prices, in corn and soybeans in the week that ended on March 26, according to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

Speculators held 218,427 net-short positions in corn futures last week, down from 282,845 futures contracts seven days earlier, the CFTC said. That was the second straight decline.

Investors were net short by 47,700 soybean futures contracts as of March 26, down from 62,204 contracts the previous week. That also was a three-week low, according to the government.

Fund managers and other large investors have become less bearish on corn and beans in the past few weeks amid optimism that the U.S. and China will eventually be able to hammer out a trade agreement, though talks have been dragging on for months.

In wheat, speculators held 49,570 net-short positions in hard red winter futures, down from 52,693 contracts, the CFTC said.

Investors were net short by 64,550 soft red winter wheat futures contracts as of last week, down from 78,699 contracts seven days earlier. That’s the smallest such position in soft red winter wheat since February 26, government data show.

The Weekly Commitment of Traders Report from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission shows trader positions in futures markets.

The report provides positions held by commercial traders, or those using futures to hedge their physical assets; noncommercial traders, or money managers (also called large speculators); and nonreportables, or small speculators.

A net-long position indicates more traders are betting on higher prices, while a net-short position means more are betting futures will decline.

**

3. Freeze Warning in Effect From Oklahoma to West Virginia, Arkansas Crop Only 1% Headed  

A freeze warning is in effect for a wide stretch of land from northeastern Oklahoma into West Virginia, according to the National Weather Service.

Most of Arkansas and several counties in Oklahoma likely saw freezing or near-freezing weather overnight, the NWS said in a report early this morning. The freeze warning in the area is in effect until 9 a.m. local time.

“Near or subfreezing temperatures could damage crops or other sensitive vegetations,” the agency said in its report.

The good news for Arkansas is that the winter wheat crop in the state was only 1% headed as of March 24, according to the USDA. Still, 34% of the state’s crop was rated poor or very poor as of last week, while 32% was considered good or excellent, the USDA said in a report.

3 Big Things Today, March 29

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Corn Little Changed as Talks Continue

Soybeans and corn were again little changed overnight as the latest round of talks between the U.S. and China moves into a second day.

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are in Beijing for high-level negotiations that started yesterday. Little news is flowing from the talks, as usual, though Chinese Vice Premier Liu He is scheduled to visit Washington next week.

The sides have been talking for months in a bid to end the tit-for-tat trade war between the world’s two largest economies.

Traders are cautiously optimistic that the sides will eventually reach a deal, though negotiations have dragged on longer than expected.

Soybeans for May delivery rose 1¢ to $8.90½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal gained a dime to $306.60 a short ton, and soy oil added 0.02¢ to 28.65¢ a pound.

Corn futures fell ¾¢ to $3.73¼ a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for May delivery dropped 2½¢ to $4.62 a bushel overnight, while Kansas City wheat declined 1¾¢ to $4.37 a bushel.

**

2. Corn, Wheat Sales Rise Week to Week While Soybean Sales Plunge

Sales of corn and wheat in the seven days through March 21 were up week to week while soybeans plunged, according to the USDA.

Corn sales totaled 904,500 metric tons, up 6% from the prior week and 5% from the previous four-week average, the USDA said in a report.

China was the big buyer at 300,000 metric tons, Japan followed with 228,800 tons, and Mexico was in for 191,500 tons. Taiwan bought 136,000 tons, and Colombia purchased 84,100 tons of U.S. corn. An unknown buyer canceled shipments for 128,900 tons.

Sales for the 2019-2020 marketing year that starts on September 1 totaled 85,400 tons.

Wheat sales came in at 475,700 metric tons last week, up 59% from the prior seven-day period and 15% from the four-week average, the USDA said.

Mexico bought 153,300 tons, Japan was in for 75,500 tons, and Indonesia took 67,000 tons. The Philippines purchased 50,000 tons, and Uganda took 44,000 tons, the agency said. Sales for the 2019-2020 year that starts on June 1 were reported at 35,400 tons.

Soybean sales, meanwhile, plunged 52% to 181,800 metric tons last week, government data show. That’s down 85% from the four-week average. China was conspicuously absent.

Egypt bought 123,600 metric tons, the Netherlands took 82,400 tons, South Korea was in for 63,500 tons, Japan purchased 45,600 tons, and Mexico bought 27,200 tons, the USDA said. Unknown customers canceled cargoes for 259,900 tons.

Sales of U.S. soybeans for the 2019-2020 year starting September 1 were reported at 17,100 tons.

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3. Flood Watch Issued For Much of Central Missouri as Rainfall Expected Into Saturday  

The National Weather Service has issued a flood watch for much of central Missouri and counties in east-central Kansas starting at 1 p.m. this afternoon and stretching into Saturday morning.

“Several rounds of showers and thunderstorms are expected across the area today and tonight,” the NWS said in a report early Friday morning. “The heaviest rain is expected across portions of central Missouri this evening and tonight.”

An inch or two of rain is expected with higher amounts locally, the report said. Soils are already saturate, which will likely lead to flooding of creeks, streams, and low-water crossings, the NWS said.

The Missouri River stretching from the Nebraska-Iowa border along the Kansas-Missouri border is still over its banks. The river also is flooding throughout central Missouri.

The Mississippi River also is still above flood stage in several spots from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico.