Category Archives: Agricultural Exports News

agricultural export

Grass fire burns 20,000 acres in northwest South Dakota

Smoke could be smelled for miles and the sky blazed red through the night in northwest South Dakota on Thursday, January 14. A grass fire broke out just after 4:30 p.m. in Adams County, North Dakota, just across the border from Lemmon, South Dakota. Wind speeds in Lemmon at the time were 30 to 40 mph with gusts as high as 56 mph, with low humidity around 68%. Those high wind speeds and dry conditions combined with an unusual lack of January snow cover caused the fire to quickly spread to the southeast.  “We had a high of 58°F. to 60°F. on Wednesday. It has been great all winter – like Kansas weather,” says Lemmon Fire Marshal Shane Penfield. “Ultimately it was dry and windy, and that was the perfect storm.”  Penfield says in addition to sending 40 of its own firefighters to the blaze, the Lemmon Fire Department immediately requested and received aid from nearly 20 area fire departments from as far as 100 miles away.  “When I first responded and made it out to the main anchor point, there were 20- to 25-foot flames,” he says. “It was unbelievable.” Several farms and ranches were evacuated and the fire departments set to work with structure protection measures. Other agencies and individuals offered assistance hauling water and plowing fire brakes. Around 11:00 p.m. Thursday, the south-spreading fire was stopped about 12 miles south of Lemmon when it reached the Grand River. A few hours later, a section of fire to the west reignited. As of midmorning Friday, January 15, Penfield says the fire is 50% contained and is no longer spreading. The fire, which traveled more than 20 miles and was at some points 4 miles wide, burned an estimated 20,000 acres on 19 occupied farms and ranches. Fortunately, no homes were lost, although one ranch headquarters received extensive damage. Two firefighters received non-life-threatening injuries and were taken to a nearby hospital, but no other injuries were reported. Most of the people who were evacuated have returned home. Penfield says he has not heard reports of loss of livestock at this point. Fences were cut and other measures were taken to allow livestock to escape if needed. The cause of the fire is not yet known. Penfield says the community response has been overwhelming. “People are calling and wanting to give hay to ranchers who have lost hay,” he says. “We’ve gotten so much food and so many offers, it’s unbelievable.” Photo: Josh Olson captured the photo above from his home. “To give you an idea of how large the fire is, we live 10 to 20 miles northwest of it and it spans as far as my camera could see right to left, and this was in the middle of the night,” he says. “Such a sad situation.”

President Trump to pardon Iowa turkeys

U.S. President Donald Trump will be issuing the annual ‘Presidential Pardon’ to a turkey flock next week. This year, the turkeys come Iowa farmer, Ron Kardel. Mike McGinnis, Successful Farming’s Markets Editor,  recently visited with the Walcott, Iowa, corn, soybean and turkey grower. Because of the coronavirus, there is a higher demand for turkeys in 2020.

USDA data shows smaller corn crops, tighter ending stocks

The U.S. is leaking corn and soybeans, as ending stocks tighten, according to the USDA. On Tuesday, the USDA released its November Supply/Demand Report. At the close, the Dec. corn futures finished 15 1/4¢ higher at $4.23. March corn futures ended 15 1/2¢ higher at $4.31.  January soybean futures closed 35 3/4¢ higher at $11.46 1/4. March soybean futures closed 35 1/2¢ higher at $11.44. Dec. wheat futures closed 11¢ higher at $6.08 1/2.  Dec. soymeal futures settled $10.70 per short ton higher at $394.80. Dec. soy oil futures closed 0.58 cent higher at 36.06¢ per pound. In the outside markets, the NYMEX crude oil market is $1.10 per barrel higher (2.73%) at $41.39. The U.S. dollar is higher, and the Dow Jones Industrials are 241 points higher (+ 0.83%) at 29,399 points. 2020/21 U.S. Ending Stocks For corn, the USDA pegged the U.S. 2020/21 ending stocks at 1.702 billion bushels vs. the trade’s estimate of 2.03 billion and the USDA’s October estimate of 2.167 billion. For soybeans, the USDA sees the U.S. 2020/21 ending stocks at 190 million bushels vs. the trade’s expectation of 235 million bushels and the USDA’s October estimate of 290 million. For wheat, the USDA pegged ending stocks at 877 million bushels vs. the trade’s estimate of 881 million and the USDA’s estimate last month of 883 million bushels. 2020/21 Crop Production In its report Tuesday, the USDA pegged the U.S. crop size at 14.50 million bushels vs. the trade’s expectation of 14.65 million bushels and the USDA’s October estimate of 14.72 million. On yield, the USDA sees the U.S. raising a corn crop at an average yield of 175.8 bushels per acre vs. the trade’s expectation of 177.7 bu./acre and the USDA’s October estimate of 178.4 bu./acre. For soybeans, the USDA sees this year’s crop totaling 4.17 billion bushels vs. the avg. trade estimate of 4.25 billion and the USDA’s October estimate of 4.26 billion. Regarding yield, the USDA sees the U.S. farmers averaging 50.7 bu./acre vs. the trade’s estimate of 51.6 bu./acre and the USDA’s October estimate of 51.9. Trade Reaction Sal Gilbertie, Teucrium Trading, says that today’s report, overall, is another market-friendly report. “Today’s WASDE makes for two reports in a row that are supportive for the grain complex, particularly for corn and soybeans. Corn and bean domestic usage is at record levels and ending inventories are headed toward lows not seen in several years. This sets the stage for an acreage fight between beans and corn, which will be determined by futures price movements,” Gilbertie says. Britt O’Connell, cash Adviser, ever.ag, says that today’s report could push soybeans to even higher price levels. “Corn and soybean bulls have found renewed reasons to push markets higher. The USDA came in today and shocked the market by lowering corn and soybean yield to 175.8 bpa and 50.7 bpa respectively,” O’Connell says.   She added, “As a natural result, ending stocks were also lowered with corn projected at 1.702 billion bushels – this is the lowest ending stocks we’ve seen in the corn market since 2014 and 2015.  That year the USDA’s average corn price for the year was published at $3.60-3.70. Soybean ending stocks projections likewise mirror those we experienced back in 2014 and 2015.” With Brazil now slightly ahead of its traditional five-year planting pace, the funds and others will be closely monitoring yield expectations, she says.   “With the cupboards bare in SA, the U.S. is the only game in town until harvest come Jan/Feb on soybeans. Traditionally, China is winding down on U.S. purchases, but it is 2020, so all things are possible,” O’Connell says.   O’Connell added, “It’s interesting that carry is starting to build back into the corn market. The soybean contracts are building some carry month to month as well and will likely play it that way for the foreseeable future.”  Jason Roose, U.S. Commodities, says that the report was no eye opener. “No surprises in today’s November WASDE crop report if you are in production agriculture. Yields and ending stocks were sharply reduced in corn and soybeans, sending soybeans to contract highs. Lowering production in soybeans and the increased exports in corn were the key elements in the drop in ending stocks. The investors’ focus will shift to South America weather in next few weeks,” Roose says. 

The Farmall 560: Bad news travels fast

This one-owner Farmall 560 lives on a Wyoming hay farm until November 10, 2020 … maybe it needs to come live at YOUR place? Our friends at Musser Bros. Auction & Real Estate are handling this auction.  They say that bad news travels at the speed of light, and in 1959, International Harvester found that out the hard way with the Farmall 560. It resulted in one of the first major tractor recalls in history! That said, this particular tractor doesn’t have anything wrong with it. I literally just hung up the phone with the seller out in Wyoming. It’s a one-owner tractor that’s never had any major issues. Obviously it’s slept outside a few nights, but mechanically it’s pretty sound. The hour meter was replaced a couple of times, so the hours aren’t accurate, but it starts right up and drives just fine! [embed:render:node:307178:left:picture|image_embed_full] Sadly, that wasn’t the way it worked out for some of these tractors, though. If you ask an older farmer about the Farmall 560, some of ’em will tell you that they were the worst thing that Harvester ever built (even if they never owned one).  For a few years during the late ’40s and early ’50s, International Harvester was broadening its horizons. Management felt like the ag equipment market was hitting a saturation point, so they set their sights on other markets. Development dollars went toward residential products like fridges and freezers, trucks, and lots of other things. The tractor division of IHC wasn’t making great strides in development; they were sort of set on cruise control. They made some incremental improvements here and there, but other than that and some minor cosmetic refreshes, the tractors remained essentially unchanged from the stuff in the late 1940s. In the mid-1950s, though, they got back on track as farmers began expanding their operations and asking for more capability. The 60-series was a new, modern looking machine with six-cylinder power. They were cutting-edge tractors poised to take the market by storm. Except for one thing. They broke a cardinal rule of product development. Never release a product until you’ve beaten it to death … twice. International Harvester made a late-stage decision to put a bigger motor in the Farmall 560 so it could compete with Deere’s 730, and they didn’t test the drivetrain hard enough. The rear end was a legacy piece from the 400/450 model tractors. The extra power from the new motor accelerated bearing wear in the bull gear assembly. Basically the ball bearings deteriorated enough that they fell out of the cage and jammed in between the bull gear and the cast rear end housing. At that point, the housing would go kablooey! [embed:render:node:307176:left:picture|image_embed_full] Here’s what that bearing failure looks like. At the end of the day, though, I want to be clear. The failure was NOT a widespread thing. In all actuality, the failures were pretty regional. They usually happened in areas where farmers were pulling five-bottom plows in sticky, gumbo-y soil. BUT… the failures were catastrophic, and two-thirds of American households had telephones at this point. Bad news travels fast. Word traveled from the field to the feed store, and then to the phone. It didn’t take long before it became pretty highly publicized, and Harvester had to do something about it. In mid-1959, they issued a full recall of all 460s, 560s, and 660s whether they’d blown out the rear end or not. Dealerships would then replace the rear end parts, and IHC would eat the bill for it all. It was a costly lesson for Harvester, too. It’s rumored that they spent $19 million to fix those tractors, which was an enormous amount of money at the time (in 2020 dollars, that’s over $167 million). In a tremendous stroke of luck, though, IH had its best sales year ever in 1959! At the end of the day, the Farmall 560 was – and still is – a great tractor. Dealerships fixed the tractors with issues, and Harvester implemented those fixes on the assembly line as well. If you’ve got a 560 today and it runs and drives, you’ve got nothing to worry about. I doubt there’s more than a hundred tractors out there that haven’t had the fix already applied! Fun fact: Want to know how to spot a tractor that was part of the recall and fixed at the dealership? Look at the serial number. There’s a triangle after the serial number that the dealership added to each one they fixed. [embed:render:node:307177:left:picture|image_embed_full] Here’s a Farmall 560 serial tag. That triangle signifies that a dealership replaced the rear end under the recall. One more thing; if you need a gift idea for the IH fans in your life, I’ll bet they don’t have Paul Wallem’s book! Paul was an IHC executive in the ’50s and then owned several successful Illinois IHC dealerships into the late ’80s. He recently published The Breakup: What Really Happened. It’s a terrific insider’s look at the multiple problems that came together at the wrong time to take down a farm equipment giant. It’s a great read! [embed:render:node:307181:left:picture|image_embed_full] If you are looking for a Farmall 560 at auction, go to https://tractorzoom.com/search-result/?keyword=farmall%20560 [embed:render:node:302433:right:picture|image_embed_1_4_width] Hi! I’m Ryan, and I love tractors. It doesn’t matter if it’s a showpiece, an oddball, or seen its share of life . . . if it’s unique and it’s listed by one of our auctioneer partners at Tractor Zoom (tractorzoom.com), I’m going to show it off a little bit! This equipment is all up for auction RIGHT NOW so you can bid on them! I think they’re cool, and I hope you will, too. This is Interesting Iron!

Barry Flinchbaugh, Ag Policy Expert, dies at 79

Barry Flinchbaugh, ag policy specialist at Kansas State University, died November 2. He was 79 years old.  A renowned agriculture policy expert, Flinchbaugh worked behind the scenes to cultivate federal farm policy from 1971 to his retirement from Extension in 2004. He was a legendary speaker, packing meeting halls to discuss agriculture policy, his trademark cigar often nestled between his thumb and forefinger when he needed emphasis. He touted fairness in public policy, imploring democrats and republlicans alike to set aside differences and work together. Finchbaugh met every president from Harry Truman to George W. Bush, he was most proud of the students he met during 49 years of teaching Agricutural Policy to KSU students. He taught more 5,000 students in all, many of whom are now leaders in agriculture policy development, trade negotiations and business. He was a tough teacher, but fair. His essay tests challenged studentst to "think," one Twitter user noted Monday. At every speaking engagement, Flinchbaugh proclaimed "this group of students is the best I ever had," assuring his audience that the future was in good hands with the students who eagerly took his class.  Kansas State University's department of agricultural economics posted this statement on Twitter: "Well-known for his contributions to U.S. ag policy, Dr. Flinchbaugh always had a great passion for teaching and his students. He will be deeply missed and leaves a hole in the AgEcon Dept that can’t be filled." On Twitter, scores of people responded to the news of Flinchbaugh's death. His former colleague at KSU, Joe Janzen (now at the University of Illinois), noted: "When I started  I had an office next to Barry Flinchbaugh. After teaching his ag policy class, he would hold court with the students who worked as his TAs. He'd give what was basically a second lecture on the political economy of US agriculture. I got to listen in." Flinchbaugh served on numerous boards of directors and advisory groups. At his urging, the Kansas Agricultural and Rural Leadership group was formed in 1989 and he served as one of its board members since the begininng.  In a statement posted to Twitter, KARL wrote: "With a heavy heart, we pass along the news that Dr. Barry Flinchbaugh passed away this morning. A fervent supporter of this program serving on the board of directors since our beginning. Our thoughts are with the Flinchbaugh family." Kansas Farm Bureau President Rich Felts issued a statement also. "We are deeply saddened by the recent loss of Dr. Barry Flinchbaugh. For more than 50 years Dr. Flinchbaugh was a voice of reason and a counselor to agriculture and the leaders of our nation. His wisdom and insight on farm policy and international trade will not be easily replaced. His quick wit and abundance of humor made even the most mundane topics interesting. Dr. Flinchbaugh’s legacy also includes teaching thousands of students about agricultural policy in his 49-year tenure at Kansas State University. Kansas Farm Bureau sends its heartfelt condolences, thoughts and prayers to Cathy and the Flinchbaugh family." Read More: Q & A With Barry L. Flinchbaugh Flinchbaugh often worked with U.S. Senator Pat Roberts (R-KS) on ag policy issues. He released a statement on Flinchbaugh's passing:  "Franki and I are deeply saddened by the news of Dr. Barry Flinchbaugh’s passing earlier today. Dr. Flinchbaugh was nothing short of a legend in his field. His expertise made him one of the most coveted and trusted advisors for agricultural policy for decades. "Dr. Flinchbaugh’s legacy as an educator and advocate will live on through his work at K-State and his lifetime of dedication to agriculture. I will not only miss his guidance, but I will also miss his friendship, wit and humor. "I have many special memories of Barry, in particular our times together on the “Pat and Dan Show,” where he moderated lively discussions between former Congressman Dan Glickman, our state agriculture groups and myself." Ironically, Roberts retires from the U.S. Senate in 2020, his successor to be determined in the November 3 election. Successful Farming caught up with Flinchbaugh four years ago, prior to the presidential election that ended with a Donald J Trump victory. In our interview, he lamented the discourse that has become politics as usual: "This Make America Great Again line is not based on fact; it is a political slogan. I believe this country is still the greatest country in the world." A native of Pennsylvania Dutch country, Flinchbaugh earned his PhD in agricultural economics at Purdue University, studying under future ag secretary Earl Butz. He was hired as an Extension agricultural economist at KSU in 1974, where he was charged with developing a state tax plan that was more equitable to landholders. His plan for a mix of sales, property and income tax remains in place today.   

Commodity Classic 2021 goes digital

Commodity Classic has announced it will transition its annual conference and trade show, originally scheduled for March 4-6, 2021, in San Antonio, Texas, to an alternative digital format. The change was necessary due to restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The new format is expected to be offered the first week in March 2021. “This is about doing the right thing for our farmers, exhibitors, stakeholders, and the broader community in terms of health and safety — which is our top priority,” said Anthony Bush, an Ohio corn farmer and co-chair of the 2021 Commodity Classic representing the National Corn Growers Association.  “After careful deliberation among our farmer-leaders and industry partners, the COVID-19 restrictions would prevent us from delivering the type of high-quality experience Commodity Classic attendees and exhibitors have come to expect and enjoy for the past 25 years.” According to Brad Doyle, an Arkansas soybean farmer and co-chair of the 2021 Commodity Classic representing the American Soybean Association, directed health measures due to the evolving COVID-19 pandemic such as social distancing guidelines would prevent Commodity Classic from conducting the trade show, educational sessions, and farmer networking – each of which is a hallmark of Commodity Classic.   “Farmers and agribusiness companies rate Commodity Classic highly because of its unique energy, excitement, and one-on-one engagement with agribusiness companies and fellow farmers,” he said. “The health and safety restrictions required will simply not allow us to provide a productive in-person event that is in keeping with our 25 years as the nation’s best farmer-led, farmer-focused ag experience.” The transition of the 2021 Commodity Classic offers an attractive opportunity for farmers who have never attended Commodity Classic, Doyle added. “Now farmers from across the nation and even around the world can get a taste of the Commodity Classic experience without ever leaving their farms,” he said. Jerry Johnson, ag sector chair of the Association of Equipment Manufacturers said, “Agribusiness companies put Commodity Classic at the top of the list when it comes to opportunities to engage with farmers from across the nation. However, our concern for the health and safety of our customers and our employees takes precedence, so all of us in agribusiness will work with the farmer-leaders at Commodity Classic to find innovative ways to connect in 2021.” Commodity Classic is now redirecting its efforts to developing alternative methods of connecting farmers and agricultural stakeholders.  “We realize the total Commodity Classic experience cannot be completely replicated online. Yet, a key benefit of Commodity Classic is the educational sessions and presentations from agricultural thought leaders, which are even more important in today’s challenging environment,” said Bush. “We are already exploring ways in which we can deliver high-quality content in unique ways that allow farmers to get the information they seek from the experts they trust.”     The transition to an alternative experience is already underway. More information on the transition will be available in the coming weeks. To keep up to date, sign up for email updates at CommodityClassic.com. More information on the 2021 Commodity Classic will also be available on the website. The 2022 Commodity Classic will be held in New Orleans March 10-12, 2022. “Like everyone else in agriculture, we are really looking forward to reconnecting with everyone face-to-face,” Doyle added. “We urge everyone to get these dates on their calendar and plan to join us in person in New Orleans in 2022.” Established in 1996, Commodity Classic is America’s largest farmer-led, farmer-focused educational and agricultural experience. Commodity Classic is presented annually by the American Soybean Association, National Corn Growers Association, National Association of Wheat Growers, National Sorghum Producers, and the Association of Equipment Manufacturers.

A Red Green kind of tractor

This Case 1470 lives in northwest Nebraska until the team at Kraupie Real Estate & Auction (farmauction.net) sends it home with someone new. Maybe you ought to give it a good home! Click the photo to see the details and get a link to bid! Remember the Red Green shop? Remember how Red always ended the “Handyman Corner” segment? “If the women don’t find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.” Yeah… that’s the Case 1470. It didn’t look too handsome, but man alive, it did a bunch of things right. It’s a sure-footed tractor that’s heavy enough for tillage, but incredibly maneuverable as well! It kept all of the things that were successful in its predecessor (the Case 1200 Agri King seen below), and fixed the bad things. (More on that in a minute…) [embed:render:node:306937:left:picture|image_embed_full] When Case got into the four-wheel-drive (4WD) tractor market in 1963, they did it in the typical Case way. They’d always produced a quality product with reasonable features at an affordable price. They drew a box around what they wanted, and they built a tractor that fit within those parameters. In this case, that meant using pieces and parts that were already sitting on the shelf to keep costs down. Had they wanted to, they could’ve built something that was super-robust and had a ton of power. But that would’ve been overkill. They had the components to build a 200-horse tractor that probably would’ve tipped the scales at 20,000 pounds, but that would’ve been more than what was necessary for the time. The one mistake they made when they built the 1200 was in the choice of powerplant. The 451-cubic-inch Lanova cell diesel didn’t respond well to turbocharging, which was what Case had to do to be competitive in the market. At the end of the day, the turbo’d 451 was a very fragile motor that ran pretty hot. (Hot enough that Case put a pyrometer on the dash with a warning about running it too hot for too long!) That was one of the issues that Case addressed in the 1470. Instead of trying to stretch the inferior 451 even further, they chose a direct-injected 504-cubic-inch motor. The 504 responded very well to turbocharging and nipped the reliability issues in the bud. Not only that, it made 146 PTO horsepower, and even set a fuel economy record that stood for 13 years! Talk about an improvement! This particular Case 1470 is a 1971 model, and it lives in northwest Nebraska. As with quite a few tractors out in that part of the country, this one doesn’t have a PTO (most 1470s didn’t have PTOs, from what I gather). That said, though, it does have great rubber (20.8×34 wtih 90% tread left), 2 SCVs (hydraulic outlets), a three-point hitch, and a cab to keep the elements out! It’s only got about 8,500 hours on it, too, and it runs like a champ! Our friends at Kraupie’s Real Estate & Auction are handling the sale, which ends at about noon tomorrow (October 29, 2020). At the end of the day, these tractors don’t come up for sale very often. This one is in better shape than most, I’d say, and I think the price will probably reflect that. I’d be surprised if it didn’t hit $6,000 to $7,000 by the time the hammer fell. Maybe a little more if a couple of bidders got into it. I know that there are a few pretty diehard Case 1470 fans out there (one in particular doesn’t live too far away, either), so if a few of those guys start letting their wallets duke it out, who knows where it could go? Happy bidding! Need parts for your Case tractors? Click here. I can just about guarantee that Elmer’s Repair has what you need. The Haugs have been friends of mine for 10 years and they’ll take very good care of you! (Tell ’em that Ryan from Tractor Zoom sent you!) [embed:render:node:302433:right:picture|image_embed_1_2_width] Hi! I’m Ryan, and I love tractors. It doesn’t matter if it’s a showpiece, an oddball, or seen its share of life . . . if it’s unique and it’s listed by one of our auctioneer partners at Tractor Zoom (tractorzoom.com), I’m going to show it off a little bit! This equipment is all up for auction RIGHT NOW so you can bid on them! I think they’re cool, and I hope you will, too. This is Interesting Iron!

15 minutes with Wisconsin farmer, Doug Rebout

In south-central Wisconsin, Doug Rebout farms 4,000 acres with his brothers, Dan and David. The Rebouts grow corn, soybeans, winter wheat, and alfalfa. They raise Holstein and cross-bred steers and custom-raise heifers for neighbors, yet they sold their dairy cattle this year. It’s not only on the farm where Rebout puts in hard work and expresses his dedication to agriculture. Healso spends hours in boardrooms (now gone virtual) as a member of government task forces. His goal is to ensure farmers’ voices are heard in the development of policy and accessibility of resources. SF: How did you come to the decision to sell your dairy cows? DR: One of the main reasons was we were just tired of milking cows. We had a hired man for the past nine years who took a job somewhere else; we either had to find someone to hire who wouldn’t mind the long hours or sell the cows. Help is hard to find, and no one on our farm really had that love of cows like my father, Roger, did when he was in charge. Instead of trying to hire someone new, we asked ourselves why we should even continue doing something we didn’t love. We love working with animals and still have our barns full, but we love the crop work even more. SF: How are you walking the walk of soil health? DR: We plant soybeans all no-till and at 7.5-inch spacing. We use no-till drills in wheat, and we’ve been strip-tilling our corn for over 20 years. When we first started strip-tilling, no one in the area knew anything about it, but it’s gradually getting more popular. I’ve always said that just because it works on our farm doesn’t mean that’s what everyone should do because every farm is a little different. However, we want to be a good example to others, to share what we’re doing and why. It goes both ways. We learn a lot from other farmers and hopefully they learn from us. SF: What do you think will change about farming in the next  five to 10 years? DR: I think farmers are going to become more efficient because of technology in both equipment and seed. It seems like a lot of new technology in the past was more useful for the bigger farms, but it’s working its way down to even the smallest farms. I see farmers reducing their inputs, especially here in Wisconsin, where we deal with groundwater issues. I also think we’ll see a lot more farmers implementing practices to deal with the impacts of climate change.  SF: What organizations do you advise when you’re not working on the farm? DR: I was recently appointed to the Wisconsin Department of Ag Trade and Consumer Protection and the Governor’s Task Force on Climate Change. We have three subcommittees that look at everything climate-related, from environments like inner cities to farmland. I’m part of the land subcommittee, and we help evaluate different practices like cover crops, no-till, and minimum-till. Then we try to figure out how to promote those on Wisconsin farms. SF: Why do you spend your time on task forces and committees? DR: Specifically in the climate change task force, the legislature is looking into policies that will encourage farmers to do better for the environment. A couple of other farmers and I advise and give feedback on how to educate or create incentives because it isn’t easy for farmers to make big changes, especially if it will cost money and mean changing equipment. I’m always eager to get involved and spend time with elected officials who are getting policies to work for all stakeholders. What legislators are doing at their levels impacts what we’re doing on the farm, so why not have a voice in it? I really enjoy it and just like how, in the way I didn’t have a passion for the dairy cows on our farm, I do have a passion for doing this, and that drives me.

15 minutes with Wisconsin farmer, Doug Rebout

In south-central Wisconsin, Doug Rebout farms 4,000 acres with his brothers, Dan and David. The Rebouts grow corn, soybeans, winter wheat, and alfalfa. They raise Holstein and cross-bred steers and custom-raise heifers for neighbors, yet they sold their dairy cattle this year. It’s not only on the farm where Rebout puts in hard work and expresses his dedication to agriculture. Healso spends hours in boardrooms (now gone virtual) as a member of government task forces. His goal is to ensure farmers’ voices are heard in the development of policy and accessibility of resources. SF: How did you come to the decision to sell your dairy cows? DR: One of the main reasons was we were just tired of milking cows. We had a hired man for the past nine years who took a job somewhere else; we either had to find someone to hire who wouldn’t mind the long hours or sell the cows. Help is hard to find, and no one on our farm really had that love of cows like my father, Roger, did when he was in charge. Instead of trying to hire someone new, we asked ourselves why we should even continue doing something we didn’t love. We love working with animals and still have our barns full, but we love the crop work even more. SF: How are you walking the walk of soil health? DR: We plant soybeans all no-till and at 7.5-inch spacing. We use no-till drills in wheat, and we’ve been strip-tilling our corn for over 20 years. When we first started strip-tilling, no one in the area knew anything about it, but it’s gradually getting more popular. I’ve always said that just because it works on our farm doesn’t mean that’s what everyone should do because every farm is a little different. However, we want to be a good example to others, to share what we’re doing and why. It goes both ways. We learn a lot from other farmers and hopefully they learn from us. SF: What do you think will change about farming in the next  five to 10 years? DR: I think farmers are going to become more efficient because of technology in both equipment and seed. It seems like a lot of new technology in the past was more useful for the bigger farms, but it’s working its way down to even the smallest farms. I see farmers reducing their inputs, especially here in Wisconsin, where we deal with groundwater issues. I also think we’ll see a lot more farmers implementing practices to deal with the impacts of climate change.  SF: What organizations do you advise when you’re not working on the farm? DR: I was recently appointed to the Wisconsin Department of Ag Trade and Consumer Protection and the Governor’s Task Force on Climate Change. We have three subcommittees that look at everything climate-related, from environments like inner cities to farmland. I’m part of the land subcommittee, and we help evaluate different practices like cover crops, no-till, and minimum-till. Then we try to figure out how to promote those on Wisconsin farms. SF: Why do you spend your time on task forces and committees? DR: Specifically in the climate change task force, the legislature is looking into policies that will encourage farmers to do better for the environment. A couple of other farmers and I advise and give feedback on how to educate or create incentives because it isn’t easy for farmers to make big changes, especially if it will cost money and mean changing equipment. I’m always eager to get involved and spend time with elected officials who are getting policies to work for all stakeholders. What legislators are doing at their levels impacts what we’re doing on the farm, so why not have a voice in it? I really enjoy it and just like how, in the way I didn’t have a passion for the dairy cows on our farm, I do have a passion for doing this, and that drives me.

Cover girl of a tractor

[embed:render:node:306662:left:picture|image_embed_full] There’s something about the proportions of the International Harvest 1256 Wheatland that just looks right to me. I’m pretty sure it has something to do with the curvy wide fenders that I really love. Since this auction has gone live, I’ve had a few people ask me what I would choose to own if I could only have one tractor out of Jerry Mez’s Farmall-Land USA collection. The answer? This one. Man, I love this 1256. IH was riding high on a wave of popularity with the 1206 they’d released a few years earlier. They’d been extraordinarily good sellers, and IH wanted to keep the momentum rolling into the future. So, in 1967, they released the 1256. The list of improvements wasn’t super long, but there was one pretty noteworthy item. The most major improvement was to the motor. The power rating went up by 4 hp. That might not seem like much, but when coupled with the increase in cubic inches displacement (CID) in the motor (361 CID) the 12-oh vs. 407 CID in the 1256), that was a pretty big deal. The bigger DT407 motor had more grunt in the low end. At the end of the day, that meant that the 1256 would be more likely to power through when the going got tough. In contrast, when running a 1206 in the same ground, you’d have probably found yourself pulling the torque amplifier­ to get through it. IHC’s engineers set out to provide more useful power, and they accomplished that goal quite nicely! Overall, the 1256 sold well. IH produced 7,125 of them in total (including the Farmall-branded models) between 1967-1969. Jerry Mez’s tractor is an early 1967 model, and it’s been very nicely restored. It’s a true Wheatland as far as I can tell, although there were a bunch of different option packages on these tractors. This one does have a TA, a PTO, and two hydraulic lines out the back, but no three-point hitch. Collectors will argue until the cows come home about whether or not that’s a “true” Wheatland model, but I’m with Jerry on this one. He says it’s a Wheatland. I do, too. So why did I call this one “The Cover Girl”? [embed:render:node:306668:left:picture|image_embed_full] Well, that’s because I’m not the only one with an affinity for this tractor. This exact tractor was Lee Klancher’s pick for the cover photo of the latest edition of Octane Press’s Red Tractors book (seen above)!  Lee is an incredibly talented photographer and author. The things that guy can do with a camera will blow your mind! The Red Tractors series of books are his brainchild, and if you don’t have a 1256 like the one on the cover? You’ve got a chance to bid on it!  Click below to pick up a copy of this book for yourself – I guarantee you’ll be glad you did. https://bit.ly/redtractors_newedition My friend Ken Girard at Girard Auctions is handling Jerry & Joyce’s auctions, and thus far, the response has been pretty good on this tractor. Bidding currently sits at about $6,000. But it won’t stay that way for long. The auction doesn’t close until November 9, and my guess is that we’ll go north of $20,000 by the time the hammer drops. [embed:render:node:306669:left:picture|image_embed_full] Side story: There’s one particular 1256 that’s not quite like the rest of ’em, and my friends at Heritage Iron magazine spent some time talking with the man who made it a little different. Jon Kinzenbaw, the man who repowered all of those John Deeres with Detroit Diesels? Well, he only did ONE red one like that … a 1256 that was originally from mid-Missouri. Here’s the video…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVt0JFmzzEQ&feature=emb_title Now, before all of you purists start sending me (or Sherry) hate mail about wrecking a perfectly good 1256 with a loud, obnoxious Detroit … this one wasn’t a perfectly good one when Jon got his hands on it. As I understand it, the tractor had been burned in a fire and it was destined to be melted down for scrap. For lack of a better term, he resurrected it! Pretty cool! Makes 238 hp. on the dyno, too! By the way, if you’re looking for a more complete history on the 1256, Heritage Iron had one in issue #31. I believe it is still available as either a back issue or a reprint! If you’d like to see all of the tractors on the first Farmall-Land auction, click here!  [embed:render:node:302433:right:picture|image_embed_1_4_width] Hi! I’m Ryan, and I love tractors. It doesn’t matter if it’s a showpiece, an oddball, or seen its share of life . . . if it’s unique and it’s listed by one of our auctioneer partners at Tractor Zoom (tractorzoom.com), I’m going to show it off a little bit! This equipment is all up for auction RIGHT NOW so you can bid on them! I think they’re cool, and I hope you will, too. This is Interesting Iron!

6 – APEDA

REPORT - 6 18th Dec 2017 Basmati Acreage & Yield Estimation in Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh, Western Uttar Pradesh and Parts of Jammu & Kashmir Basmati Export Development Foundation APEDA, New Delhi Basmati Survey – Final Report - 6 (Season 2017) ...