Category Archives: Agricultural Exports News

agricultural export

3 Big Things Today, June 14

Byline:

1. Corn, Beans Higher Overnight on Wet Weather Forecasts

Corn and soybeans were higher in overnight trading amid threats of further wet weather this weekend.

About 83% of U.S. corn was seeded as of Sunday, behind the prior five-year average of 99% for this time of year, while 60% of soybeans were in the ground, well behind the normal 88%, the USDA said earlier this week.

Growers likely accelerated planting throughout the week, which was dry in much of the Corn Belt. Still, rain is expected to start today from Kansas to Michigan, though reports say the precipitation will be scattered.

As much as six times the normal amount of rain has fallen in parts of the Midwest in the past 30 days, according to the National Weather Service.

Corn futures for May delivery rose 5¼¢ to $4.47¼ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Wheat for May delivery added 2¢ to $5.37½ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat gained 2½¢ to $4.70¾ a bushel.

Soybeans for May delivery rose 3¼¢ to $8.91¼ a bushel overnight. Soy meal added $2.80 to $324.50 a short ton, while soy oil fell 0.07¢ to 27.95¢ a pound.

**

2. Export Sales of Corn Rise Week to Week, Still Low; Soybean Sales Decline

Export sales of corn rose week to week but were still fairly low, while soybean sales plunged, according to the USDA.

Corn sales for delivery in the 2018-2019 marketing year that ends on August 31 totaled 168,500 metric tons. That’s up from a net loss the previous week, but down 64% from the prior four-week average, the USDA said.

Japan was the big buyer at 164,900 metric tons, followed by Colombia at 94,600 tons ,and Taiwan at 58,300 tons. Canada took 13,600 metric tons and Costa Rica bought 11,100 tons.

An unknown customers canceled a shipment for 184,500 tons. For 2019-2020, sales totaled 94,100 tons.

Conspicuously absent from the tally was Mexico, which is the largest buyer of the U.S. corn. The country was, at the time, involved in a trade spat with the U.S. after the Trump administration threatened to impose import tariffs on Mexican goods.

Soybean sales last week totaled 255,900 metric tons, down 50% from the previous week and 44% from the four-week average, the USDA said.

Egypt was the biggest buyer at 110,000 tons, followed by Japan at 87,500 tons, and Taiwan at 77,900 tons. China took 74,700 tons and the Netherlands bought 38,500 tons. The total would’ve been higher but an unknown country canceled a shipment for 185,200 tons, the government said.

For 2019-2020, sales totaled 275,200 metric tons.

Wheat sales for the 2019-2020 marketing year that started on June 1 were reported at 47,600 metric tons as Japan bought 112,100 tons, Mexico took 75,300 tons, Taiwan was in for 56,700 tons, Iraq purchased 55,000 tons, and Vietnam bought 30,000 tons.

Reductions included an unknown customer who nixed a cargo for 189,200 tons, the Philippines, which canceled a shipment for 50,000 tons, and South Korea, which canceled a purchase of 48,600 tons, the USDA said.

**

3. Storms Expected in Parts of Southern Plains Today, Into the Weekend

Storms are expected in parts of the Southern Plains today and tomorrow, while some precipitation is forecast for the Midwest, according to the National Weather Service.

Afternoon and evening storms are forecast in eastern Colorado into Kansas throughout the evening, the NWS said in a report early this morning. Hail from 1½ to 2½ inches is possible, as are stronger winds with smaller hail.

More thunderstorms are expected to follow into next week.

Farther north, in Iowa and northern Illinois, it’ll be breezy this afternoon before thunderstorms roll into the area.

The NWS is forecasting a “marginal risk” for severe storms later tonight that will contain large hail. At times, heavy downpours are possible, as scattered thunderstorms are expected after midnight.

Area rivers are already flooding, so any rain could worsen conditions, the agency said. The storms are expected to carry into the weekend, with some turning severe.  

Considered Healthier, These are 4 Plus Minus Facts about Imitation Meat

Along with the growing development of healthy lifestyle, the more diverse choices there are. For those of us who decide to be vegan, strict rules for not using animal-based products are a limitation to our food choices. No wonder if we feel fed up with that and that.

Actually, you can still eat meat! The latest technology creates meat products sourced from vegetable ingredients. However, before trying, find out the minus plus about the following imitation meat, let’s!

1. Before starting, first identify the history of the creation of imitation meat

Long before the vegan lifestyle was created, food used to substitute meat had long existed. Precisely, since the Han dynasty in China. At that time, tofu was the most popular meat substitute food. Tofu was still consumed until the Tang dynasty and was widespread in Japan in the Song dynasty.

Meat substitutes are also popular in medieval Europe. There are rules that prohibit the consumption of warm-blooded animals, eggs and milk. As a substitute, chopped almonds and grapes are used instead of meat, while diced bread is made as an imitation of meat.

2. What ingredients are used to substitute meat?

There are many ingredients used to substitute meat. Among them are mushrooms, legumes, tempeh, sweet potato flour, tofu and rice. Then, add flavor to taste similar to chicken, beef, lamb or seafood.

Mushrooms are one of the most popular ingredients to replace meat. This is because they have a meaty texture and a savory flavor. In addition, mushrooms also contain mineral selenium, an antioxidant that can play a role in reducing the risk of chronic diseases.

3. Imitation meat is sold commercially

From high market demand, imitation meat has finally become popular. In 2013, the Beyond Meat company began selling imitation chicken at a Whole Foods store in the United States. This meat is made from a mixture of soy protein and peas, fiber and other ingredients. Beyond Meat then started making beef and artificial pork sausages from vegetable ingredients.

This success was followed by the Impossible Foods company in 2016 which made imitation beef. They claim appearance and taste similar to real meat.

Impossible Foods use synthetic compounds produced by yeast and are genetically modified. Meanwhile, to mimic meat fat, they use coconut oil mixed with wheat and potato protein.

4. Even so, imitation meat turns out to be no healthier, you know!

Even though it is made from vegetable ingredients, it turns out it doesn’t make imitation meat healthier than real meat. This was stated by Desiree Nielsen, dietician from Vancouver, Canada on the Global News page.

“Imitation meat is enriched with minerals, unsaturated fats and cholesterol. However, imitation meat is higher in salt and processed ingredients as a substitute for natural ingredients,” he explained.

Not only that, dietician from Los Angeles, United States, Vandana Sheth also said the same thing. According to him, imitation meat can help people switch to a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle, but not be consumed every day, you know!

“Imitation meat is higher in fat, sodium and calories than real meat,” he said.

 

7 Tips for Blood Donation During Fasting You Can Practice, Don’t Worry!

While still young and the body is in good health, it doesn’t hurt to donate blood. In addition to helping fellow humans, blood donors also have benefits for ourselves.

Because this is the fasting month, there are those who think that there is no need to donate blood first. In fact, blood demand remained high even during Ramadan. Don’t get me wrong, you can still donate blood during the fasting month, how come! Check out the tips, let’s go!

1. Do a blood donor after breaking the fast

Blood donors are recommended not to be done on an empty stomach. Therefore, choose the right time for blood donation during the fasting month. The best, donors when breaking the fast.

Energy intake from food can be a powerful weapon to restore our blood sugar levels to normal numbers. Blood donation after breaking the fast to avoid the possibility of weakness and fainting afterwards.

2. Enough of your fluid needs

Lips and throat dry all day? When breaking fast, don’t forget to fill your fluid needs. Of course with mineral water, don’t drink too much sweet, huh! This also applies to blood donors when fasting. Make sure you drink enough water, at least 500 ml before and after donating blood.

3. Eat more meat and animal protein

Pay attention to your food choices when breaking fast. Make sure that what you eat contains enough nutrients. This nutrient can be obtained from meat, such as red meat, fish, chicken to the liver. Indeed, nutrients are also found in several types of vegetables, but will be more effective if you get nutrients from meat or animal protein sources.

4. Get enough rest before

Naturally, when the fasting month of our time becomes a little reduced, the result of having to wake up sahur and must remain active as usual. However, make sure you have enough sleep, huh! Because lack of sleep will affect when blood donors. Lack of sleep will make blood pressure results rise.

In addition, lack of sleep also makes hemoglobin levels in the blood drop. No wonder, if you are suddenly rejected by a donor because it does not meet the requirements of blood pressure and hemoglobin.

5. Take blood booster supplements

To avoid the risk of anemia, it’s a good idea to take blood boosting supplements before donors. This supplement can be from corovite, sangobion, hufabion, to the sacatonic liver.

Its function is to overcome iron deficiency and deficiency of red blood cell formation. Blood supplement supplements can also be consumed occasionally while fasting. For the sake of avoiding anemia and symptoms of weakness, lethargy and weakness!

6. Avoid heavy activity before donors

Heavy physical activity will make us tired. Moreover, if we do it while fasting and want to donate blood too. Preferably, reduce heavy physical activity and replace it with a light workout such as walking or just stretching. Avoid strenuous exercise at least 6 hours before the donor.

7. We recommend that we stay blood donors while fasting because …

The amount of blood supply during fasting is predicted to decline dramatically. At PMI Yogyakarta for example, it is estimated that there is a decline of up to 60-70 percent during the month of Ramadan. In fact, the needs and demand for blood remain high at all times.

To get around the decline, PMI urges us to keep on doing routine blood donations. Can be done by doing mass blood donation at night. This is to keep blood stocks safe.

Well, that’s the tip so that we can still be blood donors even though we are fasting. So, don’t hesitate to donate your blood, huh!

 

5+ Trendy Minimalist Bookends Designs (2019 TREND)

Are you a bookworm with hundreds of book collections? Chances are that you have shelves full of book.

To make sure the books are stored securely, you might need to consider bookends.

Today, the model and design of bookends vary widely, one of which is minimalist bookends.

This kind of item serves not only function but also beauty at the same time.

Bookends are usually made from stone, wood, or other heavy material.

You can also find one made from metal that comes with variety of shapes and forms as well as color.

The heavy material allows the book to stay in place, while the interesting design makes your bookshelves stand out.

Are you looking for trendy bookends with edgy design?

Here are some recommendations that can be taken into account.

5 Trendy Minimalist Bookends Designs

1. White marble bookends

design clinic bookends
etsy.com

Having classy nuance, marble is able to elevate the value of any room.

When it comes to bookends, white marble can also be used as high class material to bring your bookshelves one lever higher.

From its appearance, white marble bookends look minimalist and elegant.

From the side of functions, the bookends are effective to keep your book secure from falling.

2. Curvy wooden bookends

design geode bookends
thegadgetflow.com

To evoke minimalist nuance, the following modern bookends will do.

The small pieces are simply designed from wooden material combined with vinyl or other flexible material to create the curve.

This kind of bookends look futuristic, making it a great addition for bookshelves with modern or minimalist concept.

Not to mention it is also functional to secure your book.

3. Modern bookends with circle

design toscano bookends
imgix.com

These bookends will satisfy your need of elegant and minimalist nuance.

The L-shaped bookends are designed with white circle, creating artistic touch that is one of a kind.

This will be a recommended designs to complement your bookshelves.

Not only does it serve well in bookshelves, the bookends will also be impressive table decoration to be combined with similar nuance of chair or kursi.

4. Gilded marble bookends

designer bookends australia
amazon.com

This is another choice if you want to bring bookends into more serious decoration for bookshelves.

The bookends are made from black marble stone with artistic design.

Being gilded, the piece looks shiny to elevate the value of your bookshelves.

Either you have modern or contemporary bookshelves, the following bookends will be a great option to go.

5. Slim edgy bookends

wood bookends designs
marthastewart.com

Anytime you need bookends, just say the words!

The following bookends are made from metal with edgy shape of Book words.

It makes your book storage looks more fascinating than before.

Furthermore, your book will be securely kept inside the shelves.

Simply put the piece to the end of your book collections and let it do its job.

The minimalist bookends are suitable for any bookshelves concepts.

Bring your reading hobby to the next level.

These bookends are recommended to secure your book, at the same time provide style to the entire bookshelves appearance.

No matter which material you choose, make sure to match with the nuance of your book storage.

Do you need more references?

Now you can access https://www.thespruce.com/ and get any interesting information about bookends.

3 Big Things Today, June 13

Byline:

1. Grains, Soybeans Higher Overnight on Weather Concerns

Grains and soybeans were higher in overnight trading amid renewed concerns about wet weather in the Midwest.

It’s been dry in most parts of the Corn Belt this week, but more precipitation is forecast for this weekend, according to the National Weather Service.

Growers likely sped planting, taking advantage of the dry weather, and while most of the corn crop is planted, much of the soybean crop still needs to be put in the ground.

About 83% of U.S. corn was seeded as of Sunday, behind the prior five-year average of 99% for this time of year, while 60% of soybeans were in the ground, well behind the normal 88%, the USDA said earlier this week.

As much as six times the normal amount of rain has fallen in parts of the Midwest in the past 30 days, government data show.

Corn futures for May delivery rose 5½¢ to $4.35½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Wheat for May delivery added ½¢ to $5.26¾ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat gained ½¢ to $4.63¼ a bushel.

Soybeans for May delivery rose 1¾¢ to $8.79¾ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal added 90¢ to $320.40 a short ton, while soy oil gained 0.08¢ to 27.64¢ a pound.

**

2. Ethanol Production Jumps to Highest Since August While Stocks Fall to 10-Month Low

Ethanol production in the week that ended on June 7 jumped to the highest since August, while stockpiles dropped to the lowest in more than 10 months.

Output of the biofuel in the U.S. averaged 1.096 million barrels a day last week, up from 1.044 million the previous week, according to the Energy Information Administration. The total was the third highest on record.

In the Midwest, by far the biggest producer, production jumped to an average of 1.014 million barrels a day, the EIA said in a report.

East Coast output was up to 28,000 barrels a day, on average, from 26,000 the previous week. Gulf Coast production rose to 26,000 barrels from 19,000 barrels a day.

West Coast production dropped to 16,000 barrels a day from 20,000 barrels, while Rocky Mountain output declined to 13,000 barrels from 14,000 in the prior seven-day period, the agency said.

Stockpiles, meanwhile, plunged to 21.802 million barrels last week. That’s down from 22.553 million barrels the previous week and the lowest since July 20, according to government data.

In other news, the USDA is expected to release its Weekly Export Sales Report this morning. Analysts have pegged corn sales from 350,000 to 850,000 metric tons, soybean sales from 300,000 to 800,000 tons, and wheat sales from 200,000 to 500,000 tons, researcher Allendale said in a note this morning.

**

3. Dry Weather Today Precedes Potential For Thunderstorms Throughout Midwest

It looks to be dry in much of the Midwest today, though flooding continues to be a problem and more wet weather is possible into the weekend.

In southern Illinois and Indiana and parts of eastern Missouri, thunderstorms will develop tomorrow and may last through Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service.

That will exacerbate flooding along the Mississippi River and its tributaries that are already over flood stage in many areas. The Missouri River and Illinois River likely will be affected, the NWS said in a report early this morning.

In northern Illinois, there’s a chance of thunderstorms Friday evening with the potential for heavy rainfall in spots, the agency said. A few storms could be severe this weekend though location is uncertain at this time.

Rain also is expected Friday and Saturday in much of eastern Nebraska, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, June 12

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Corn Decline as Planting Speeds on Dry Weather

Soybeans and corn were lower in overnight trading as dry weather allows planting to accelerate in much of the Corn Belt.

Some rain is in the forecast for parts of Iowa and Illinois today, but storms are expected to be isolated and scattered, according to the National Weather Service.

Growers should be able to get into their fields, though some ground is likely quite muddy at this point, in many parts of the Corn Belt that have been inundated by rain. As much as six times the normal amount of precipitation has fallen in several Midwestern states in the past 30 days, NWS data show.

Soybean sowing was 60% finished as of Sunday, behind the prior five-year average of 88%, according to the USDA.

About 83% of the corn crop was in the ground, when 99% is normally in by this time of the year.

Soybeans for May delivery lost 3¾¢ to $8.55½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal dropped $1.60 to $312.80 a short ton, while soy oil declined 0.18¢ to 27.04¢ a pound.

Corn futures for May delivery fell 2¾¢ to $4.25 a bushel overnight.

Wheat for May delivery lost ½¢ to $5.17½ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat dropped ¼¢ to $4.57¼ a bushel.

**

2. USDA Unexpectedly Slashes Corn Acres, Yield in Latest WASDE Report

The World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates Report was out yesterday, and it was a bit of a shocker.

Corn production was cut by 1.35 billion bushels, or almost 10%, to 13.68 billion bushels month to month as the USDA lowered its forecasts for area planted and harvested by 3 million acres each and its outlook for yield to 166 bushels an acre from the previous outlook for 176 bushels.

Jeff Kaprelian, a broker with The Hueber Report, said in a note to clients that the corn number was the biggest shock from the report.

“Typically, even in wet years like 2013, the USDA doesn’t adjusted planted acreage until the July report,” he said. “Additionally, dropping yields a full 10 bushels was quite unusual.”

Total use was lowered by 425 million bushels to 14.25 billion, leaving the USDA’s ending stocks forecast at 1.675 billion, down from 2.485 billion predicted last month.

The government also increased its projection for price to $3.80 a bushel from the previous outlook for $3.30 a bushel.

While the USDA slashed corn production, it mostly left its projections on soybeans unchanged.

Planted area is pegged at 84.6 million acres, yield is seen at 49.5 bushels an acre, and output is expected to be 4.15 billion bushels – all unchanged from the May report.

Ending stocks was raised to 1.045 billion bushels from 970 million, according to the USDA.

**

3. Scattered Thunderstorms Expected in Central Iowa as Storms Widen in Northern Illinois

Some scattered thunderstorms are expected in central Iowa this afternoon and evening, but nothing severe is in the forecast, according to the National Weather Service.

There’s an additional threat of precipitation heading into the weekend, but again, nothing severe is predicted, the NWS said in a report early this morning.

Some rain also is expected in parts of northern Illinois and Indiana today and tonight as a storm spreads throughout the region.

“While severe weather is not currently expected, slow-moving storms today will be capable of gusty winds, small hail, and locally heavy rainfall,” the agency said.

Flooding is still an issue in many parts of Illinois. The Missouri and Mississippi rivers continue to run over their banks, according to NWS maps.

3 Big Things Today, June 11

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Corn Lower as Planting to Accelerate

Soybeans and corn declined overnight as drier weather in much of the Corn Belt will allow growers to finally plant their crops.

Growers in several Midwestern states that have been inundated by rainfall in recent months should be able to fire up their planters to accelerate seeding this week as dry weather prevails, according to forecasters.

As much as six times the normal amount of rain has fallen in parts of Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Iowa, and Illinois in the past month, according to the National Weather Service.

That’s put producers behind on planting. Soybean sowing was 60% finished as of Sunday, behind the prior five-year average of 88%, according to the USDA. About 83% of the corn crop was in the ground, when 99% is normally in by this time of the year.

The USDA also released its first corn rating, which showed 59% of the crop that’s actually made it into the ground was in good or excellent condition this week. Last year at this time, some 77% earned top ratings.

Analysts are expected corn seeding to be 80% to 85% finished as of yesterday, while soybean planting is forecast at 55% to 57% complete, researcher Allendale said in a note this morning.

Investors also are awaiting the USDA’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) Report that’s due out at noon in Washington.

Soybeans for May delivery lost 5¢ to $8.53½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal dropped $1.70 to $311.70 a short ton, while soy oil declined 0.01¢ to 27.37¢ a pound.

Corn futures for May delivery fell 3¾¢ to $4.12 a bushel overnight.

Wheat for May delivery lost 6¼¢ to $5.01½ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat dropped 10¼¢ to $4.42¾ a bushel.

**

2. Corn, Soybean Export Inspections Rise Week to Week, Wheat Examinations Decline

Inspections of corn and soybeans for overseas delivery both improved week to week, while wheat assessments declined, according to the USDA.

The government inspected 850,647 metric tons of corn for delivery to offshore buyers in the seven days that ended on June 6, the agency said in a report. That’s up from the 744,840 tons inspected the previous week but down from the 1.41 million tons assessed during the same time frame last year.

Soybean inspections totaled 714,627 metric tons last week, up from the 510,482 tons examined the previous week and the 675,621 tons assessed during the same week in 2018, the USDA said.

Wheat assessments, meanwhile, declined week to week to 464,779 metric tons from 592,964 tons a week earlier. The government examined 419,589 metric tons the same week last year, according to the report.

Since the start of the corn marketing year on September 1, the USDA has examined 40.2 million metric tons of the grain for overseas delivery. That’s down slightly from the 41 million tons that were assessed during the same period a year earlier.

Soybean inspections since September 1 stand at 34.9 million metric tons, well below the 47.5 million tons examined during the same time frame last year.

Wheat’s marketing year started on June 1. In the first six days, the USDA has inspected 400,126 metric tons of the grain for offshore delivery, down from 419,589 during the same period last year, the government report said.

**

3. Weather Maps Mostly Quiet, Though Flooding Continues and Isolated Rain May Fall

Weather maps are mostly quiet this morning as dry weather prevails in much of the central U.S.

The Missouri River is still flooded from parts of South Dakota all the way to where it meets the Mississippi River along the Missouri and Illinois border, as are several smaller rivers throughout the Midwest, according to the National Weather Service.

While most of the Corn Belt is expected to be dry, a couple of isolated thunderstorms are possible along the Interstate 39 corridor in northern Illinois this afternoon, the NWS said in a report early this morning.  

Severe weather isn’t expected, though some gusty winds may occur.

There’s also a chance for storms in parts of central and southern Missouri and southern Illinois starting tomorrow, though severe storms aren’t in the forecast, the agency said. Any rain that falls, however, likely will exacerbate flooding along the Missouri and Mississippi rivers.

3 Big Things Today, June 10

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Corn Fall on Dry Midwest Weather

Soybeans and corn declined overnight on expectations that growers will get their crops planted this week as dry weather finally moves into the Midwest.

Little rain is expected in much of the Corn Belt this week with the first chance of thunderstorms on Tuesday night or Wednesday morning. Storms in Iowa and Illinois, the biggest producers of both corn and soybeans, will be isolated, the National Weather Service said.

Producers and traders likely will keep an eye on weather reports throughout the week.

The corn crop was about two-thirds planted while less than 40% of soybeans were in the ground as of June 2, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which will update its weekly crop progress report this morning.

Analysts are expected corn seeding to be 80% to 85% finished as of yesterday, while soybean planting is forecast at 55% to 57% complete, researcher Allendale said in a note this morning.

Soybeans for May delivery lost 5 1/4¢ to $8.51 a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soymeal dropped $2.10 to $310.20 a short ton, while soy oil declined 0.10¢ to 27.28¢ a pound.

Corn futures for May delivery fell 3 3/4¢ to $4.12 a bushel overnight.

Wheat for May delivery lost 7 1/2¢ to $4.97 a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat fell 5¢ to $4.44 a bushel.

**

2. Investors Turn Bullish on Corn Futures, Hold Net-Long Positions First Time Since January

Money managers turned bullish on corn futures in the seven days that ended on June 4, increasing their holdings to a net-long position of 95,262 contracts, according to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

That’s the first time investors have held a net-long positions since the seven days that ended on Jan. 22, data from the CFTC show.

Speculators also reduced their net-short positions, or bets on lower prices, in soybeans last week to 90,820 futures contracts from 128,137 contracts the previous week. That’s the smallest such position since April 9.

Fund managers and other large speculative investors have become more bullish on corn and soybeans in recent months as wet weather continues to delay planting.

Only 67% of the U.S. corn crop was planted as of June 2, well below the average of 96% for this time of year, and 39% of soybeans were in the ground, which compares with the average of 79%, according to the USDA.

In wheat, investors reduced their net-short position in hard-red winter futures to 25,160 contracts, down from 40,374 contracts the previous week and the smallest such position since Feb. 5, the CFTC said.

Money managers reduced their bearish bets on soft-red winter wheat to 12,080 futures contracts, down from 23,206 contracts the prior week and also the smallest net-short position since Feb. 5.

The Weekly Commitment of Traders Report from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission shows trader positions in futures markets.

The report provides positions held by commercial traders, or those using futures to hedge their physical assets; noncommercial traders, or money managers (also called large speculators); and nonreportables, or small speculators.

A net-long position indicates more traders are betting on higher prices, while a net-short position means more are betting futures will decline.

**

3. Farmers Get Break From The Rain as Storm Chances Low For Most of This Week

Producers may actually get a break from the rain for a couple more days in the Midwest as storms aren’t forecast until Tuesday or Wednesday in the region.

It’ll be dry throughout most of the Corn Belt today and most of tomorrow afternoon before the potential for a storm rises again.

In parts of Iowa and northern Illinois, there’s only a slight chance for an isolated thunderstorm on Tuesday night, according to the National Weather Service. Severe weather is not expected.

The next change for a storm isn’t until Friday, the NWS said in a report early this morning.

Further south, there’s a possibility of thunderstorms in northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas starting Tuesday night, which could bring hail or strong winds, the agency said.

3 Big Things Today, June 7

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Corn Decline on Trade, Export Sales

Soybeans and corn were again lower overnight on escalating trade wars and weak export sales.

The Trump administration is still planning to impose a 5% import tax on Mexican goods unless there’s proof that the government is doing enough to stem the tide of immigrants into the U.S., Vice President Mike Pence said yesterday.

Talks ended yesterday without an agreement, but more negotiations are scheduled for today.

There’s been little news about talks between the U.S. and China. President Donald Trump said this week he could increase tariffs on another $300 billion worth of Chinese goods.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, meanwhile, has been in Russia on an official state visit. Xi and Russian President Vladimir Putin have reportedly had high-level talks as China cozies up to Russia amid its trade spat with the U.S.

Export sales were weak for both corn and wheat, though soybeans rose week to week.

Soybeans for May delivery lost 5¼¢ to $8.63½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal dropped $2 to $313.90 a short ton, while soy oil declined 0.13¢ to 27.63¢ a pound.

Corn futures for May delivery fell 3¼¢ to $4.17¼ a bushel overnight.

Wheat for May delivery lost 6¼¢ to $5.03¾ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat dropped 5¢ to $4.50¼ a bushel.

**

2. Old-Crop Corn, Wheat Sales Result in Net Reductions as Several Countries Cancel Shipments

Export sales of U.S. corn were reported as a net reduction as several countries canceled purchases, according to the USDA.

Sales came in at a net reduction of 8,800 metric tons in the seven days that ended on May 30, the USDA said in a report.

New Zealand was the big buyer at only 33,200 metric tons, followed by Japan, which bought 24,200 tons. Mexico took 20,500 tons, Guatemala was in for 13,000 tons, and Taiwan purchased 5,500 tons.

The purchases, however, were more than offset by cancelations as Nicaragua and Costa Rica each nixed cargoes of 27,300 tons, an unknown customer canceled a shipment of 24,300 tons, and the Dominican Republic canceled a purchase of 22,000 tons.

For the 2019-2020 marketing year that starts on September 1, sales totaled 23,500 metric tons.

Wheat sales in the last week of the grain’s 2018-2019 marketing year also resulted in a net reduction of 26,000 metric tons, the USDA said. The Congo was the big buyer at 15,500 metric tons, Liberia took 8,800 tons, Mali was in for 5,500 tons, Malaysia took 4,600 tons, and Iraq bought 2,500 tons.

An unknown buyer canceled a shipment for 73,000 tons, and the Philippines and Guatemala each nixed cargoes of 3,000 tons.

For the 2019-2020 season that started on June 1, however, sales totaled 501,900 metric tons as Taiwan purchased 111,000 metric tons, Panama was in for 89,500 tons, unknown customers bought 81,000 tons, Mexico took 68,200 tons, and Colombia was in for 41,300 tons.

Soybean sales, meanwhile, were up 28% week to week to 510,000 metric tons, the government said.

An unknown buyer took 214,000 metric tons, China was in for 72,300 tons, Germany bought 56,800 tons, the Netherlands took 40,000 tons, and China purchased 31,300 tons. Sales for the 2019-2020 year that starts on September 1 totaled 73,700 tons, the USDA said.

**

3. Thunderstorms Likely Today in Parts of Southern Illinois, Indiana, River Flooding Continues

Heavy rain, lightning, and isolated thunderstorms are expected in parts off southern Illinois and Indiana today, the National Weather Service said in a report early this morning, further delaying planting in the states.

The storms likely will continue into the weekend.

Flood warnings are already in effect along the Missouri River through Missouri and along the Mississippi River on the state’s border with Illinois.

The Mississippi River is at 45.5 feet at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, well above flood stage of 32 feet, according to the NWS. The river is expected to continue rising to 46 feet by Monday morning.

Farther north, storms that will bring locally heavy rain is expected in parts of northern Indiana, southwestern Michigan, and northwest Ohio starting this weekend, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, June 6

Byline:

1. Soybeans, Corn Lower Overnight on Trade Concerns

Soybeans and corn were lower in overnight trading as worries about ongoing trade disputes between the U.S. and its major trading partners weigh on prices.

China, once the largest buyer of U.S. soybeans, has said it will stop future purchases of the oilseeds as the trade war between the countries wears on.

Washington increased tariffs on more than $200 billion worth of Chinese goods in a bid to pressure Beijing into a trade agreement. President Donald Trump said he could raise tariffs on another $300 billion worth of Chinese imports.

The Trump administration also may implement tariffs on imports from Mexico, the biggest buyer of U.S. corn, which likely would lead the country to retaliate with levies on U.S. goods. Trump said the tariffs will begin next week unless Mexico assures him that it will stem the tide of immigrants to the U.S. border.

A Reuters report yesterday said the list of items Mexico would target doesn't include corn, however, as it’s a staple in Mexican food making. 

Soybeans for May delivery lost 7¢ to $8.62¾ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soy meal dropped $3 to $314.70 a short ton, while soy oil rose 0.01¢ to 27.23¢ a pound.

Corn futures for May delivery fell 1½¢ to $4.13¼ a bushel overnight.

Wheat for May delivery gained 4½¢ to $4.95¼ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat rose 2¼¢ to $4.47¾ a bushel.

**

2. Ethanol Production Falls to Lowest Level in Four Weeks, Inventories Down Slightly

Ethanol production in the U.S. fell to the lowest level in four weeks, and stockpiles declined in the seven days that ended on May 31, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Output last week came in at 1.044 million barrels a day, on average, last week, the EIA said in a report. That’s down from 1.057 million barrels the previous week and the lowest average since the seven days that ended on May 3.

Production in the Midwest, by far the largest-producing area, fell to an average of 965,000 barrels a day last week from 976,000 barrels.

Gulf Coast output also declined, falling to an average of 19,000 barrels a day from 24,000 barrels the previous week, the agency said.

Rocky Mountain production rose to 14,000 barrels a day, on average, from 12,000 barrels. West Coast output increase to 20,000 barrels from 19,000. East Coast production was unchanged at 26,000 barrels a day.

Inventories, meanwhile, declined to 22.553 million barrels on May 31, down slightly from 22.624 million seven days earlier. The total was the lowest since the week that ended on May 10, according to EIA data.

In other news, the USDA will release its Weekly Export Sales Report this morning. Analysts are expected combined old- and new-crop corn sales from 550,000 to 1.05 million metric tons, soybean sales from 250,000 to 750,000 tons, and wheat sales from zero to 600,000 tons, according to researcher Allendale.

**

3. Flood Warnings in Effect For Parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas

Flood warnings and flash flood warnings and watches are in effect for a large chunk of land encompassing southeastern Kansas, northeastern Oklahoma, southwestern Missouri, and northwestern Arkansas, according to the National Weather Service.

“Thunderstorms containing excessive rainfall are expected to develop today, becoming more widespread by tonight,” the NWS said in a report early this morning.

One to 3 inches of rain are expected in the area with some counties getting 4 inches, the agency said.

The ground is already saturated from recent rains, so any precipitation that falls likely will run off, potentially creating flash floods.

Farther north, some isolated thunderstorms are possible in eastern Nebraska and western Iowa that could produce heavy rain, small hail, and gusts of winds, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, June 5

Byline:

1. Grains, Beans Plunge Overnight on Trade Worries

Grains and soybeans plunged in overnight trading as trade concerns overshadow planting delays and as some investors who had bet on higher prices sell contracts and book profits.

President Donald Trump said during his trip to London that new tariffs will indeed start next week unless Mexico assures him that it will stem the tide of immigrants to the U.S. border.

While ongoing wet weather that’s kept planters from running has given prices a boost, investors and hedgers have kept one eye on the ongoing trade wars between the U.S. and Mexico and the U.S. and China.

Republican leaders have said they don’t want tariffs, but Trump said it would be “foolish” of party leadership to try to block any increase in levies. Tariffs will start at 5% next week and increase to 25% by October if a deal isn’t reached.

China President Xi Jinping, meanwhile, will meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin as part of a state visit this week. The countries’ leaders are expected to have high-level talks during the three-day visit, according to media reports.

Corn futures for May delivery fell 8¼¢ to $4.17 a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Soybeans for May delivery lost 5¼¢ to $8.76½ a bushel. Soy meal dropped $2.90 to $318.10 a short ton, and soy oil rose 0.02¢ to 27.51¢ a pound.

Wheat for May delivery plunged 13¢ to $4.94¼ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat lost 16½¢ to $4.52 a bushel.

**

2. Chinese Companies to Apply For Tariff Waivers on Ag Items, Xi Set to Visit Putin

Chinese companies said they will apply for tariff waivers on several agriculture items from the U.S.  

Businesses said they want waivers for more than 700 items including beef, pork, soybeans, coal, and copper scrap, according to Reuters.

China put levies on more than $50 billion worth of U.S. goods after the latter imposed tariffs on $200 billion in goods from the Asian nation.

Those seeking waivers have until July 5 to apply. A second round of waiver applications is expected to open on September 2, which will cover the $60 billion worth of goods on which tariffs were imposed last year, Reuters reported.

"Applicants must be interested parties of imports in China, including importers, consumers, and industrial associations, the Finance Ministry said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Chinese President Xi Jinping is cozying up to Russia’s Vladimir Putin as trade tensions between the U.S. and China escalate. Xi travels to Moscow today for a three-day state visit that includes high-level talks.

Xi told Russian news agency TASS that he wants to build a relationship with Putin and see that the countries’ “comprehensive strategic partnership of coordination will stride into a new era.”

**

3. Severe Weather Expected in Ohio River Valley, Southern Plains

Severe storms are forecast for the Ohio River Valley and Southern Plains today and tomorrow, according to the National Weather Service, which likely will further delay planting in the areas.

Moisture is moving up from the Gulf of Mexico, bringing rainfall to parts of the Southern Plains, the NWS said in a report. Up to 7 inches of rain are expected in east Texas, while severe weather and “excessive rainfall” are forecast into Oklahoma on Thursday.

In the Ohio Valley, heavy rain and severe weather are expected today as a cold front moves into the area.

Flash flood warnings have been issued in parts of Iowa and Illinois along the Mississippi River, and flood warnings are in effect from Iowa to the Gulf of Mexico. Flooding continues to be a problem on the Missouri River between Iowa and Nebraska all the way through Missouri, according to NWS maps.

3 Big Things Today, June 4

Byline:

1. Corn, Soybeans Surge as Planting Well Behind Normal

Corn and soybeans jumped in overnight trading after the USDA said planting is still well behind the average for this time of year.

The U.S. corn crop was only 67% seeded as of Sunday, well behind the prior five-year average of 96%, the USDA said in a report yesterday. Planting was almost complete at this time last year.

In Iowa, about 80% was in the ground, behind the average of 99%. In Illinois, only 45% was planted at the start of this week, when normally it’d be all but finished. Indiana growers had 31% in the ground, behind the average of 94%, the agency said.

Only 46% of the crop has emerged from the ground, behind the normal 84%.

Soybean planting was less than half of normal, as 39% was seeded at the start of the week, behind the average of 79%, the USDA said.

Iowa farmers had 41% of the crop in the ground as of Sunday, which compares with the average of 89%. About 21% of Illinois soybeans were in the ground, behind the average of 84%. In Indiana, only 17% had been seeded vs. the normal 80%.

Just 19% of soybeans have emerged, behind the normal 56%, the government said.

Corn futures for May delivery rose 6¼¢ to $4.30½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Soybeans for May delivery gained 10¼¢ to $8.89¼ a bushel. Soy meal jumped $5.20 to $325.70 a short ton, and soy oil rose 0.16¢ to 27.50¢ a pound.

Wheat for May delivery fell 5¼¢ to $5.14½ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat lost 7¾¢ to $4.79 a bushel.

**

2. Inspections of Corn, Beans Fall Week to Week While Wheat Assessments Rise

Inspections of corn and soybeans for overseas delivery declined week to week while wheat assessments rose, the USDA said.

The government inspected 743,077 metric tons of corn for offshore delivery in the seven days that ended on May 30, the agency said in a report. That’s down from the 1.11 million tons that were assessed the previous week and the 1.56 million inspected in the same week in 2018.

Soybean inspections totaled 498,771 metric tons, down from 535,183 tons the previous week and 573,294 tons during the same period last year.

Wheat assessments, meanwhile, rose to 592,744 metric tons through May 30, up from 530,797 tons the previous week and up from the 347,469 tons inspected during the same time frame in 2018, the USDA said.

The report shows wheat inspections through almost the entire marketing year that ended on May 31 at 24.8 million metric tons, above the previous year’s 23.8 million tons.

For corn, inspections since the start of the marketing year on September 1 now stand at 39.3 million metric tons, just behind the 39.6 million tons assessed during the same time frame last year.

Soybean inspections since the start of September are still way behind the previous year at 34.2 million metric tons vs. 46.8 million tons at this point in 2018, the USDA said.

The loss of China as a primary customer has hurt exports of the oilseed.

**

3. More Storms Expected From High Plains to Mississippi River Valley on Tuesday

The rain just won’t stop.

Severe weather and heavy rain are expected in parts of the central U.S. again today, according to the National Weather Service.

Precipitation is expected in parts of the southern High Plains, central Midwest into the middle to upper Mississippi Valley, the NWS said in a report early this morning. Heavy rainfall and flash flooding are likely, the report said.

A flash flood warning is in effect near Falls City, Nebraska, where Missouri and Nebraska meet, while flood warnings are still in place for the Missouri River. The Mississippi River also is flooding as are many tributaries and smaller rivers nearby, the agency’s maps show.

It doesn’t look like eastern Nebraska and Kansas and western Iowa and Missouri are going to get any relief, as strong to severe thunderstorms are forecast for today.

“Some storms will be capable of producing large hail and damaging winds, with an isolated tornado risk possible,” the NWS said. “Flash flooding is possible with any rainfall as the evening progresses.”

3 Big Things Today, June 3

Byline:

1. Corn, Soybeans Lower Overnight Amid Trade Disputes

Corn and soybeans were lower in overnight trading as trade tensions continue to escalate.

The U.S. is now involved in trade disputes with China, as it has been for almost a year, and Mexico, after President Donald Trump said he would impose tariffs on Mexican imports unless the country slowed illegal immigration across the border.

Analysts from J.P. Morgan and Morgan Stanley said they don’t expect a deal between the U.S. and China to be brokered at the Group of 20 meeting later this month. Both Trump and his counterpart Xi Jinping will be on hand, and the last time the leaders got together they reached a tentative trade deal.

It’s still unclear, however, whether they will meet at the event in Japan.

Last week, Trump said he would impose a graduating tariff on imports of Mexican goods starting at 5% until the country stops illegal immigration into the U.S.

The White House said the tariffs will start on June 10 and would increase to 10% if Mexico doesn’t comply. The rate will go to 15% on August 1, 20% on September 1, and 25% on October 1.

Mexico is the biggest buyer of U.S. corn, and China was, at one time, the biggest importer of U.S. soybeans.

Prices, however, are being underpinned by wet weather that’s kept producers from planting their field for the past several weeks. More storms are forecast from Texas to Kansas into Arkansas, the National Weather Service said.

Corn futures for May delivery fell 3¼¢ to $4.23¾ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Soybeans for May delivery fell 1¾¢ to $8.76¾ a bushel. Soy meal gained $1.80 to $323.10 a short ton, and soy oil declined 0.24¢ to 27.35¢ a pound.

Wheat for May delivery rose 2½¢ to $5.05½ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat added 6¼¢ to $4.79¼ a bushel.

**

2. Grain Sales Rise Week to Week, Soybean Sales Slightly Lower

Sales of corn and wheat to overseas buyers were higher week to week, while soybean sales declined, according to the USDA.

Corn sales in the seven days through May 23 jumped to 906,800 metric tons last week, rising 94% from the prior-week average, the USDA said in a report released Friday.

Japan was the big buyer at 713,200 metric tons, Mexico took 184,700 tons, Colombia bought 147,800 tons, and Guatemala purchased 20,600 tons, the agency said. An unknown customer canceled a shipment for 203,200 tons, and South Korea nixed a shipment for 63,700 tons.

Sales for the 2019-2020 marketing year totaled 76,500 metric tons after Mexico bought 30,000 tons of the grain.

Wheat sales for the marketing year that ended on May 31 also increased, jumping to 153,000 metric tons, the USDA said.

Indonesia led by purchasing 70,000 metric tons, Yemen was in for 44,000 tons, Canada bought 29,900 tons, Japan took 29,000 tons, and the Dominican Republic purchased 27,4000 tons. Unknown buyers canceled cargoes of 140,000 metric tons.

In the 2019-2020 marketing year that started on June 1, sales came in at 411,800 metric tons, as unknown customers bought 83,400 tons, Japan was in for 82,600 tons, the Philippines bought 55,000 tons, Nigeria took 50,000 tons, and Indonesia purchased 43,000 tons.

Soybean sales in the current marketing year that ends on August 31 were reported at 455,800 metric tons, down 15% week over week but up 92% from the four-week average, the USDA said.

China was again the big buyer for the week, but only took 135,700 metric tons. Spain was in for 57,000 tons, the Netherlands purchased 56,800 tons, Canada bought 47,700 tons, and Japan took 33,800 metric tons.

For the 2019-2020 year, sales totaled 22,000 tons.

**

3. Thunderstorms Expected in Parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas Monday

More storms are expected in parts of the Southern Plains into the Midwest today that may bring damaging hail and winds, according to the National Weather Service.

Thunderstorms are expected to move from western Oklahoma east today, bringing severe weather to much of the state.

“The main threats from the storms will be damaging wind gusts, very large hail, and potential for flash flooding,” the NWS said in a report early Monday morning. “Additional rainfall from northern Texas to southeast Kansas, and Arkansas through this week will hasten ongoing major to record flooding.”

The storms are unlikely to let up for most of this week, as a series of weather disturbances keep the rain coming, the agency said.

Farther north, storms are expected in parts of eastern Iowa and northern Illinois tonight, though the chances of severe weather are slight to marginal, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, May 31

Byline:

1. Corn, Soybeans Lower After Trump Vows to Impose Tariffs on Mexico

Corn and soybeans were lower in overnight trading amid rising trade tensions, this time with Mexico.

President Trump said yesterday that he would impose a graduating tariff on imports of Mexican goods starting at 5% until the country stops illegal immigration into the U.S.

The White House said the tariffs will start on June 10 and would increase to 10% if Mexico doesn’t comply. The rate will go to 15% on August 1, 20% on September 1, and 25% on October 1.

Mexico is the biggest buyer of U.S. corn, and some investors worry that agriculture will be again used as a pawn in a trade war with Mexico as the country likely will impose countermeasures on imports of U.S. goods.

Investors are still concerned about the trade dispute with China. The country this week said it would halt future purchases of U.S. soybeans, though it won’t cancel cargoes it’s already ordered, according to Bloomberg.

Corn futures for May delivery fell 5¼¢ to $4.31 a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Soybeans for May delivery fell 4½¢ to $8.84½ a bushel. Soy meal lost $2.20 to $325.20 a short ton, and soy oil declined 0.24¢ to 27.54¢ a pound.

Wheat for May delivery lost 8¼¢ to $5.06¼ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat lost 6¢ to $4.73 a bushel.

**

2. Ethanol Production, Stockpiles Decline in Seven Days Through May 24

Ethanol production and stockpiles both fell week to week, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Output of the biofuel in the seven days that ended on May 24 averaged 1.057 million barrels a day, down from 1.071 million the previous week, the EIA said in a report that was delayed due to Memorial Day.

In the Midwest, by far the biggest-producing region, production declined to an average of 976,000 barrels a day last week, down from 993,000 the previous week. Output also declined in the Rocky Mountain region, which dropped to 12,000 barrels a day from 13,000, the government said.

Gulf Coast production was unchanged at 24,000 barrels a day, on average, while West Coast output stayed at 19,000 barrels.

Producers on the East Coast increased production to 26,000 barrels a day from an average of 21,000 barrels, the EIA said.

Stockpiles also fell, dropping to 22.624 million barrels as of May 24. That’s down from 23.404 million the previous week, according to the agency.

In other news, the USDA will release its Weekly Export Sales Report this morning. Sales of corn are pegged from 450,000 to 850,000 metric tons, soybean sales are seen at 250,000 to 650,000 tons, and wheat sales are expected to be from 200,000 to 600,000 tons, researcher Allendale said in a report this morning.

**

3. Storms Roll Into Wisconsin, Michigan as Strong Winds, Possibly Hail Expected

Thunderstorms that have been hitting much of the Midwest this week are now moving north into Wisconsin and Michigan, according to the National Weather Service.

Storms are likely tonight north of Milwaukee, with a few becoming severe with large hail and strong winds, the NWS said in a report this morning.

Across Lake Michigan in the state of Michigan, strong thunderstorms are likely today and tonight with strong winds, rain and hail. More storms are in the forecast for the weekend, with some becoming severe Saturday and Sunday, the agency said.

Still, the central and western Midwest isn’t out of the woods yet. There are chances for thunderstorms today and tonight in parts of southern Iowa, west-central Iowa, east-central Nebraska, and southern Nebraska, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, May 30

Byline:

1. Corn, Soybeans Little Changed as Investors Weigh Weather, Trade

Corn futures were little changed overnight after yesterday hitting the highest in three years, while soybeans and wheat also moved little.

Investors took a step back after pushing prices up on adverse weather in yesterday’s session. Corn ended Thursday lower, but soybeans closed up 16¢.  

As much as six times the normal amount of rain has fallen in much of the Midwest in the past two weeks, according to the National Weather Service.

That’s left corn and soybean planting well behind their prior five-year averages for this time of year. More rain is in the forecast for some areas, which will further delay seeding.

Still, investors and hedgers are concerned about the ongoing trade dispute between the U.S. and China. The Asian nation will halt future purchases of U.S. soybeans, though it won’t cancel cargoes it’s already ordered, according to Bloomberg.

Corn futures for May delivery rose 1¾¢ to $4.20½ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Soybeans for May delivery fell 2¼¢ to $8.69¾ a bushel. Soy meal lost 20¢ to $318.80 a short ton, and soy oil declined 0.11¢ to 27.62¢ a pound.

Wheat for May delivery rose 1¼¢ to $5.91¾ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat gained ½¢ to $4.53¾ a bushel.

**

2. China Will Reportedly Halt Purchases of U.S. Soybeans in Latest Trade War Move

In the latest move in the ongoing trade war, China has put purchases of soybeans from the U.S. on hold, Bloomberg News reported overnight, citing people familiar with the matter.

The countries have been involved in an escalating trade war that at one time seemed almost resolved. Talks were going well with U.S. delegations led by Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer visiting Beijing for negotiations and Chinese Vice Premier Li Hue coming to Washington on several occasions.

Earlier this month, however, President Trump said on Twitter that his administration would increase tariffs on more than $200 billion worth of Chinese goods after Beijing reneged on an agreement. China, for its part, denies the claim.

The Asian country then increased tariffs on $60 billion worth of U.S. goods in retaliation.

Talks may begin again at some point, though there’s been no word about when that will be, as Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are scheduled to meet after the Group of 20 meeting at the end of June.

It’s possible a deal could come from that meeting, but market-watchers are skeptical after enduring months of negotiations without a resolution.

China purchased 13 million metric tons of soybeans from the U.S. after the countries called a truce in December, and it will take delivery of those shipments when they’re due, Bloomberg reported.

**

3. Thunderstorms Expected in Texas, Illinois, Indiana on Thursday

More thunderstorms are expected from central Texas into the Ohio River Valley today, according to the National Weather Service.

Storms that spawned tornadoes and hail that coated the ground hit parts of Nebraska, Kansas, and Iowa this week, while rain continues in northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin.

Flood warnings are now in effect in parts of southeastern Kansas, northeastern Oklahoma, and northern Missouri. Several rivers including the Missouri and Mississippi are over their banks, and flood warnings have been issued.

A separate storm is now moving out of northern Arkansas into southern Illinois and Indiana, NWS weather maps show.

“Thunderstorms are forecast through midday today” in southern Illinois, the agency said. “A storm or two may approach severe limits ahead of the cold front as it moves toward southwest Indiana and western Kentucky. Locally damaging winds and isolated hail would be the primary hazard.”

3 Big Things Today, May 29

Byline:

1. Grains, Beans Surge as Rain Stalls Planting

Corn, soybeans, and wheat all surged overnight as a government report showed wet weather kept farmers out of fields last week.

About 58% of the U.S. corn crop was planted as of Sunday, down from the prior five-year average of 90%, according to the USDA.

In Iowa, 76% of the crop was in the ground, down from the average of 96% for this time of year, the USDA said in a report. Illinois growers were only 35% finished with seeding compared with the normal 95% for the week.

Soybean planting was 29% finished as of Sunday, well behind the average pace of 66%. Iowa growers were 32% finished vs. the normal 77%, while Illinois planting was 14% done compared with the average of 70%, the government said.

Thunderstorms that are bringing enough rain to cause continued flooding are hitting the Midwest again this week, leaving little hope that planting will accelerate anytime soon.

Six times the normal amount of rain has fallen in much of the Midwest, Northern Plains, and Southern Plains in the past 14 days, the NWS said.

Corn futures for May delivery jumped 16½¢ to $4.36¾ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Soybeans for May delivery added 31¢ to $8.87 a bushel. Soy meal rose $11.70 to $324.50 a short ton, and soy oil gained 0.70¢ to 27.99¢ a pound.

Wheat for May delivery was up 15¢ to $5.19¾ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat gained 18¢ to $4.78¾ a bushel.

**

2. Export Inspections of Corn, Beans, Rise Week to Week, Wheat Assessments Decline

Export inspections of corn and beans rose week to week, while wheat assessments declined.

The USDA inspected 1.1 million metric tons of corn in the week that ended on May 23 for delivery to overseas buyers, up from 840,474 tons the previous week.

Still, that’s down from the 1.71 million tons examined during the same week a year earlier.

Soybean assessments last week totaled 532,881 metric tons, ahead of the previous week’s 498,122 tons, the USDA said. That’s down from the 581,422 tons inspected at the same time last year.

Government inspections of wheat totaled 494,097 metric tons in the seven days through May 23, well below the previous week’s 838,956 tons but up from the 446,209 tons assessed at this time last year, according to the government.

Since the start of the marketing year on September 1, the USDA has inspected 38.6 million metric tons of corn, up from 38 million during the same time frame last year.

Soybean inspections since the beginning of September are now at 33.7 million tons, well behind last year’s 46.2 million tons. The lack of Chinese buying has made a big dent in export inspections.

Since the start of the grain’s marketing year on June 1, government officials inspected 24.2 million metric tons of wheat for overseas delivery, up slightly from the 23.5 million tons assessed during the same period last year, the USDA said.

**

3. More Rain on the Way For Parts of Corn Belt as Storms Continue to Rage

It sounds like a broken record – for those who remember records – but more rainfall is expected in parts of the Midwest and Southern Plains today.

Flood warnings, flash flood watches, and hazardous weather warnings are in effect in several parts of the country including Oklahoma, Missouri, and Illinois, according to the National Weather Service.

In central Illinois, widespread rain associated with thunderstorms fell overnight, dropping several inches of rain overnight. With the ground already saturated, flash flooding is occurring in several parts of the state, the NWS said.

Flood warnings are also in effect in parts of eastern Oklahoma, western Arkansas, and southern Missouri this morning, as are severe thunderstorm warnings.

“Storms developing across west Texas this morning will spread northeast toward Oklahoma by later this morning,” the NWS said. “Meanwhile, a front now across northwest Oklahoma will slowly sag across eastern Oklahoma.”

Thunderstorm activity will increase throughout the day along the Interstate 44 corridor and push east, the agency said. Scattered, strong storms are expected this afternoon that could produce large hail, damaging winds, and tornadoes.

3 Big Things Today, May 28

Byline:

1. Grains, Beans Move Higher as Wet Weather Persists

Corn and soybeans surged overnight after the long weekend as precipitation continues to hammer the central U.S.

As much as 5 inches of rain fell in parts of Nebraska and northern Kansas yesterday, while central South Dakota saw up to 4 inches of precipitation, according to the National Weather Service.

Six times the normal amount of rain has fallen in much of the Midwest, Northern Plains, and Southern Plains in the past 14 days, the NWS said. As of May 19, only 49% of U.S. corn was planted vs. the normal 80% for this time of year, according to the USDA.

In Illinois, only 24% was seeded, well behind the average of 89% for the week; in Indiana, 14% was in the ground compared with the normal 73%, the USDA said. The agency will release its Weekly Crop Progress Report today, a day late due to Memorial Day.

Nineteen percent had emerged vs. the average of 49% for this time of year.

Soybean seeding was only 19% complete, well behind the average of 47% for this time of year, the USDA said. About 5% of the crop had emerged, compared with the normal 17%.

Corn futures for May delivery jumped 9¾¢ to $4.14 a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Soybeans for May delivery added 13½¢ to $8.43 a bushel. Soy meal rose $3.90 to $304.40 a short ton, and soy oil gained 0.33¢ to 27.34¢ a pound.

Wheat for May delivery was up 13¢ to $5.02½ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat gained 15¢ to $4.57 a bushel.

**

2. Speculators Push Corn Net-Short Positions to Four-Month Low, Reduce Bearish Bets in Beans

Money managers lowered their net-short positions, or bets on lower price, on corn futures to the lowest level in almost four months last week, according to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

Investors were net short by 117,954 corn futures contracts as of May 21, down from 298,551 futures contracts the previous week and the lowest since the seven days that ended on January 26, the CFTC said in a report.

Speculators also lowered their bearish outlook on soybeans, pushing their net-short positions to 157,998 contracts as of last week. That’s down from 171,141 futures contracts the previous week and the lowest level since April 30, government data show.

Large funds and other money managers have become less bearish on corn and beans as wet weather continues to inundate the central U.S., keeping planters out of fields and slowing the rate of emergence for both crops.

In wheat, investors slashed their net-short positions in soft red winter futures contracts to the lowest level in more than three months.

Money managers held 40,159 such positions in soft red futures as of May 21, the smallest amount since the seven days that ended on February 12, the CFTC said.

Investors also cut their bearish positions in hard red winter wheat, pushing their net shorts to 49,136 futures contracts from 57,198 contracts the previous week, which is the lowest level since April 9, according to the government.

The Weekly Commitment of Traders Report from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission shows trader positions in futures markets.

The report provides positions held by commercial traders, or those using futures to hedge their physical assets; noncommercial traders, or money managers (also called large speculators); and nonreportables, or small speculators.

A net-long position indicates more traders are betting on higher prices, while a net-short position means more are betting futures will decline.

**

3. Thunderstorms Already Hitting Parts of Nebraska, Iowa, Headed Toward Illinois

There’s an “enhanced” risk for thunderstorms in the central U.S. today that could bring tornadoes and flash flooding, according to the National Weather Service.

A severe thunderstorm warning is in effect for counties in eastern Nebraska and western Iowa as a storm moves through the area this morning. Wind damage was expected as winds reached up to 60 mph, the NWS said in a report at about 5:30 a.m.

As much as 2 inches of rain fell overnight, which likely will cause some flooding in the area.

In eastern Iowa and western Illinois, flood warnings are still in effect in many areas, while a flood watch has been issued for wide chunk of the region, the agency said.

Thunderstorms that will bring heavy rain are expected today, and the threat of storms and precipitation will spread to all of eastern Iowa and northwestern Illinois.

“With most of the area saturated from heavy rainfall over the past week, flash flooding will be possible with thunderstorms,” the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, May 24

Byline:

1. Corn, Soybean Futures Higher on Continued Wet Weather

Corn and soybean futures were higher overnight as wet weather that doesn’t seem to be going anywhere continues to keep growers out of fields.

About 49% of the corn crop was in the ground at the start of the week, down from the prior five-year average of 80%, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture; 19% had emerged vs. the average of 49% for this time of year.

Soybean seeding was only 19% complete, well behind the average of 47% for this time of year, the USDA said. About 5% of the crop was out of the ground as of Sunday, compared with the normal 17%.

Showers are falling or forecast in many parts of the Midwest today and through the weekend including in Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, and Illinois, according to the National Weather Service.

Corn futures for May delivery rose 4¢ to $3.93¾ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Soybeans for May delivery added 2¾¢ to $8.24¼ a bushel. Soymeal rose 40¢ to $297.60 a short ton, and soy oil gained 0.21¢ to 26.99¢ a pound.

Wheat for May delivery was up 6¼¢ to $4.76½ a bushel in Chicago, while Kansas City wheat gained 5¾¢ to $4.31 a bushel.

**

2. Corn Export Sales Fall Week-to-Week While Soybeans Improve, USDA Says

Export sales for corn declined week-to-week while soybean sales jumped, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Corn sales in the seven days that ended on May 16 totaled 442,100 metric tons, down 20% from the previous week and four-week average, the USDA said in a report.

Japan was the big buyer at 185,800 metric tons, followed by an unknown buyer of 42,600 tons and Colombia at 40,900 tons. Costa Rica was in for 30,800 tons, and Guatemala bought 27,700 tons, the government said.

For the 2019-2020 marketing year that starts on Sept. 1, corn sales totaled 183,900 tons as Panama bought 65,000 tons, Costa Rica took 33,500 tons, Honduras was in for 24,400 tons, El Salvador took 16,000 tons, and Guatemala purchased 12,800 tons.

Soybean sales last week jumped 45% to 535,800 metric tons, which was up considerably from the four-week average, the USDA said.

An unknown buyer took 255,500 tons, Indonesia was in for 78,000 tons, and China made an appearance on the buyer rolls at 71,000 tons. Egypt bought 55,000 tons, and Japan was in for 15,900 tons. For the 2019-2020 marketing year, sales totaled 5,100 tons.

Wheat sales in the 12 months that end on May 31 hit a marketing-year low at 48,400 metric tons, the USDA said. That’s down 58% week-to-week and 74% from the average.

Indonesia bought 129,900 tons, Taiwan was in for 56,700 tons, Kenya purchased 30,700 tons, Canada took 25,000 tons, and Ecuador bought 23,300 tons. Those purchases were offset by reductions by an unknown customer of 249,000 tons.

For the 2019-2020 marketing year that starts on June 1, sales totaled 344,900 metric tons as unnamed customers bought 196,000 tons, Japan took 62,000 tons, Mexico purchased 39,300 tons, and Thailand was in for 25,000 tons, the government said.

**

3. Strong Storms Continue to Hammer the Corn Belt With Rain, Hail, Wind

Storms that have already affected parts of the Midwest and southern Plains continue to hammer the Corn Belt, according to the National Weather Service.

Severe thunderstorm warnings and flash flood warnings are in effect for parts of northwestern Kansas, eastern Nebraska, western Iowa, and northwestern Missouri, the agency said in a report early this morning.

A severe thunderstorm with winds topping 60 mph, small hail, and heavy rainfall is hitting parts of northwestern Missouri this morning. Flash flood watches also have been put in place as the area is ripe for flooding, the NWS said.

The threat for strong storms continues tomorrow through Tuesday with heavy rainfall and flooding possible.

In eastern Iowa and northern Illinois, meanwhile, flood warnings and flash flood watches are in effect as more rainfall is expected in the area.

Showers and thunderstorms will hit this morning with more likely tonight. The biggest risks include up to half-dollar-size hail, wind gusts up to 70 mph, and a “limited” possibility of a tornado, the NWS said.

3 Big Things Today, May 23

Byline:

1. Wheat Higher on Adverse Southern Plains, Canada Weather

Wheat futures were higher in overnight trading, as severe weather may lead to flooding in parts of the Southern Plains.

Showers and thunderstorms are expected in the region today and tonight, the National Weather Service said. Flooding is in the forecast in some areas, along with large hail in others.

Quality and lodging concerns will persist in parts of Kansas and Oklahoma wheat country, according to Commodity Weather Group. There’s also some cold weather that may cause “spotty” damage in Colorado, the forecaster said in a report.

“(A) wetter Southern Plains trend adds to wheat damage threat,” CWG said.

The Canadian wheat crop has the opposite problem, as the lack of rain is now threatening plants, the forecaster said.

Still, winter wheat in the U.S. was 64% good or excellent as of Sunday, up from 36% at the same time last year, the government said.

Wheat for May delivery rose 5½¢ to $4.78¼ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade, while Kansas City wheat gained 4¢ to $4.36¼ a bushel.

Soybeans for May delivery fell 1¼¢ to $8.27¼ a bushel. Soy meal added 60¢ to $298.90 a short ton, and soy oil lost 0.19¢ to 27.12¢ a pound.

Corn futures for May delivery rose 1½¢ to $3.96 a bushel overnight.

**

2. Ethanol Production Jumps to Highest Level in Almost Nine Months

Ethanol production in the seven days that ended on May 17 jumped to the highest level in almost nine months. Inventories also rose.

Output last week was reported at an average 1.071 million barrels a day, up from 1.051 million the previous week and the most since the seven days that ended on August 31, according to the Energy Information Administration.

In the Midwest, by far the biggest producer of the biofuel, production averaged 993,000 barrels a day, up from 978,000 the previous week. That’s also the highest since the end of August, the EIA said in a report.

The Gulf Coast also saw a jump as output rose to 24,000 barrels a day, on average, from 19,000 a week earlier. East Coast production was unchanged at 21,000 barrels a day, while Rocky Mountain producers held the course at 13,000 barrels, government data show.

The lone decliner for the week was West Coast output, which fell to 19,000 barrels a day, on average, from 20,000 the prior week.

Stockpiles, meanwhile, rose to 23.404 million barrels as of May 17, up from 22.25 million seven days earlier and the most since the seven days that ended on March 29, according to the EIA.

In other news, the USDA is scheduled to release its Weekly Export Sales Report this morning. Analysts are expecting corn sales in a wide range from 250,000 to 1.05 million metric tons, soybean sales from 100,000 to 800,000 tons, and wheat sales from zero to 700,000 tons, according to researcher Allendale.

**

3. Severe Storms Remain Centered on Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Illinois

Severe storms are expected to continue today in parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri, according to the National Weather Service.

A flash flood warning is in effect for several counties in southern Missouri this morning, as up to 2 inches of rain have already fallen with another 2 inches on the way, the NWS said in a report early this morning. Flash flooding is expected to begin shortly.

A flash flood warning is also in place in several counties in central Illinois, where as much as 2 inches of rain have already fallen, and thunderstorms will bring more.

Storms in the southern Midwest also are capable of producing isolated tornadoes, large hail, and damaging winds, the agency said. Major flooding is expected in the next seven days along the Missouri, Mississippi, and Illinois rivers.