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S.C. peach crop finishes strong, close to 2013 production totals

COLUMBIA, SC — Despite an early freeze that killed an estimated 20 percent of the 2014 peach crop, production finished strong and managed to pull within shouting distance of last year’s harvest. Matt Cornwell, marketing specialist for peaches at the South Carolina Department of Agriculture here, said final totals, as reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in mid-September, were 2,290 truckloads, compared to 2,320 in 2013.

“One thing we can’t control is the weather,” Cornwell said. “But the strong finish to the season meant that growers were able to fill orders and retailers were able to get high-quality product.SC-PEACHES11214This Harris Teeter store in downtown Charleston, SC, featured ‘fresh off the farm’ locally grown peaches in August. That bodes well for next year.” South Carolina peach growers, who usually rank second in the nation in peach production, behind California, have proven over the past few years that they can meet volume demands of supermarkets and other mass-market retailers, he added.  

Peach growers over the years have diversified, noted Martin Eubanks, assistant commissioner for agricultural services, so they are not dependent on a single crop of peaches. Many peach growers have now turned to harvesting greens, he said. Also, he added, when weather conditions are not off-the-scale, growers can save peach crops in near-freezing weather with blowers, smoke pots and even helicopters. “We had several bad spells of weather in 2014; another degree or two colder, our entire crop could have been lost,” he added.

Fir 2015, peach promotions will include a South Carolina Peach Council-sponsored Peach Day at the State Farmers’ Market in Columbia, Cornwell said, along with a fund-raising auction for the council in late March or early April in the Myrtle Beach, SC, area. Other materials and activities for retailers and consumers are on the drawing board, he noted.

“Right now, peach growers are doing their game planning for the year,” Cornwell observed. He said he had spoken with Lynne Chappell of Chappell Farms, a fifth-generation family peach grower in Kline, SC,  Dec. 19 and she recounted that they are “currently pruning, getting ready to fertilize in January, and as her father Pat Chappell said, ‘enjoying good peach weather in December.’”

Value-added processing makes South Carolina peaches a year-round item, with some growers providing peach puree to craft brewers making peach beer and brandy, others packing sliced frozen peaches in puree, as well as peaches for ice cream sold to dairies, and peach menu items for restaurants and foodservice operations. Value-added products have steadily increased, Cornwell said, along with growers adding organic peaches to their offerings.  

For 2015, Cornwell said, “Demand for South Carolina peaches is growing, and the state has a natural advantage in that the soil and climate are ideal for peaches. Because of our location, we are one of the first states to have peaches on the market, and we can reach the major population centers of the East Coast and Midwest. The outlook for 2015, weather permitting, is good.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

S.C. peach crop finishes strong, close to 2013 production totals

COLUMBIA, SC — Despite an early freeze that killed an estimated 20 percent of the 2014 peach crop, production finished strong and managed to pull within shouting distance of last year’s harvest. Matt Cornwell, marketing specialist for peaches at the South Carolina Department of Agriculture here, said final totals, as reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in mid-September, were 2,290 truckloads, compared to 2,320 in 2013.

“One thing we can’t control is the weather,” Cornwell said. “But the strong finish to the season meant that growers were able to fill orders and retailers were able to get high-quality product.SC-PEACHES11214This Harris Teeter store in downtown Charleston, SC, featured ‘fresh off the farm’ locally grown peaches in August. That bodes well for next year.” South Carolina peach growers, who usually rank second in the nation in peach production, behind California, have proven over the past few years that they can meet volume demands of supermarkets and other mass-market retailers, he added.  

Peach growers over the years have diversified, noted Martin Eubanks, assistant commissioner for agricultural services, so they are not dependent on a single crop of peaches. Many peach growers have now turned to harvesting greens, he said. Also, he added, when weather conditions are not off-the-scale, growers can save peach crops in near-freezing weather with blowers, smoke pots and even helicopters. “We had several bad spells of weather in 2014; another degree or two colder, our entire crop could have been lost,” he added.

Fir 2015, peach promotions will include a South Carolina Peach Council-sponsored Peach Day at the State Farmers’ Market in Columbia, Cornwell said, along with a fund-raising auction for the council in late March or early April in the Myrtle Beach, SC, area. Other materials and activities for retailers and consumers are on the drawing board, he noted.

“Right now, peach growers are doing their game planning for the year,” Cornwell observed. He said he had spoken with Lynne Chappell of Chappell Farms, a fifth-generation family peach grower in Kline, SC,  Dec. 19 and she recounted that they are “currently pruning, getting ready to fertilize in January, and as her father Pat Chappell said, ‘enjoying good peach weather in December.’”

Value-added processing makes South Carolina peaches a year-round item, with some growers providing peach puree to craft brewers making peach beer and brandy, others packing sliced frozen peaches in puree, as well as peaches for ice cream sold to dairies, and peach menu items for restaurants and foodservice operations. Value-added products have steadily increased, Cornwell said, along with growers adding organic peaches to their offerings.  

For 2015, Cornwell said, “Demand for South Carolina peaches is growing, and the state has a natural advantage in that the soil and climate are ideal for peaches. Because of our location, we are one of the first states to have peaches on the market, and we can reach the major population centers of the East Coast and Midwest. The outlook for 2015, weather permitting, is good.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

S.C. peach crop finishes strong, close to 2013 production totals

COLUMBIA, SC — Despite an early freeze that killed an estimated 20 percent of the 2014 peach crop, production finished strong and managed to pull within shouting distance of last year’s harvest. Matt Cornwell, marketing specialist for peaches at the South Carolina Department of Agriculture here, said final totals, as reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in mid-September, were 2,290 truckloads, compared to 2,320 in 2013.

“One thing we can’t control is the weather,” Cornwell said. “But the strong finish to the season meant that growers were able to fill orders and retailers were able to get high-quality product.SC-PEACHES11214This Harris Teeter store in downtown Charleston, SC, featured ‘fresh off the farm’ locally grown peaches in August. That bodes well for next year.” South Carolina peach growers, who usually rank second in the nation in peach production, behind California, have proven over the past few years that they can meet volume demands of supermarkets and other mass-market retailers, he added.  

Peach growers over the years have diversified, noted Martin Eubanks, assistant commissioner for agricultural services, so they are not dependent on a single crop of peaches. Many peach growers have now turned to harvesting greens, he said. Also, he added, when weather conditions are not off-the-scale, growers can save peach crops in near-freezing weather with blowers, smoke pots and even helicopters. “We had several bad spells of weather in 2014; another degree or two colder, our entire crop could have been lost,” he added.

Fir 2015, peach promotions will include a South Carolina Peach Council-sponsored Peach Day at the State Farmers’ Market in Columbia, Cornwell said, along with a fund-raising auction for the council in late March or early April in the Myrtle Beach, SC, area. Other materials and activities for retailers and consumers are on the drawing board, he noted.

“Right now, peach growers are doing their game planning for the year,” Cornwell observed. He said he had spoken with Lynne Chappell of Chappell Farms, a fifth-generation family peach grower in Kline, SC,  Dec. 19 and she recounted that they are “currently pruning, getting ready to fertilize in January, and as her father Pat Chappell said, ‘enjoying good peach weather in December.’”

Value-added processing makes South Carolina peaches a year-round item, with some growers providing peach puree to craft brewers making peach beer and brandy, others packing sliced frozen peaches in puree, as well as peaches for ice cream sold to dairies, and peach menu items for restaurants and foodservice operations. Value-added products have steadily increased, Cornwell said, along with growers adding organic peaches to their offerings.  

For 2015, Cornwell said, “Demand for South Carolina peaches is growing, and the state has a natural advantage in that the soil and climate are ideal for peaches. Because of our location, we are one of the first states to have peaches on the market, and we can reach the major population centers of the East Coast and Midwest. The outlook for 2015, weather permitting, is good.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

June 27, 2013: The Week in Stocks

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Jun. 27, 2013

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    WEEK ENDING 06/27/13          
   52-Week     Sales       Amt. Pct.
High  Low Retailers (00′s) High Low Close Change Change
    ——————–            
17.02 11.32 Ahold 7584.92 15.21 14.80 14.91 -0.35 -2.26
113.90 82.60 Arden Group 76.28 108.99 106.59 108.99 3.48 3.30
115.77 89.91 Costco Cos. 105143.9 112.35 111.25 111.49 3.93 3.65
67.60 32.50 Delhaize (ADR) 3812.25 62.95 62.07 62.24 -0.66 -1.05
73.80 52.36 Empire 0 73.41 73.06 73.06 -0.35 -0.47
48.96 35.25 Harris Teeter 30725.42 48.96 47.15 47.17 1.73 3.81
27.10 14.93 Ingles 3664.62 27.10 25.41 25.47 2.42 10.50
35.64 20.98 Kroger 256364.66 34.94 34.48 34.71 1.73 5.25
48.91 30.71 Loblaw Cos. 4 47.55 45.00 45.00 -2.55 -5.36
74.00 51.56 Metro 20541.95 70.71 69.33 69.75 -0.17 -0.24
34.34 17.20 Natural Grocers 7765.21 34.34 32.41 32.56 1.54 4.96
24.85 20.09 North West Co. 0 23.68 23.68 23.68 0.00 0.00
10.78 3.69 Roundy’s 40427.21 8.73 8.29 8.32 0.99 13.51
28.42 14.73 Safeway 253176.45 24.09 23.52 23.85 0.93 4.06
7.11 1.68 Supervalu 314837.43 6.45 6.17 6.21 0.19 3.16
72.77 56.70 Target 244312.26 69.64 68.57 68.79 0.13 0.19
65.69 36.51 The Fresh Market 31230.19 52.40 50.73 50.84 1.56 3.17
39.29 29.51 Village 2052.68 33.65 33.16 33.51 0.63 1.93
79.96 67.37 Wal-Mart 486284.48 76.11 75.24 75.26 2.23 3.05
47.92 37.65 Weis Markets 7917.85 47.92 46.60 46.92 4.41 10.37
53.60 40.70 Whole Foods 22420.19 53.21 52.20 52.37 1.66 3.27
                 
    Wholesalers            
    ——————–            
24.62 18.64 Nash Finch 1720.86 23.16 21.98 22.04 -0.27 -1.21
19.73 13.44 Spartan Stores 3981 18.93 18.47 18.81 0.57 3.13
61.26 47.20 United Natural Foods 16696.33 54.70 54.07 54.28 1.72 3.27
                 
    Indices Last This Pct.      
    ——- Week Week Change      
                 
    Dow Jones 14758.32 15024.49 1.80      
    S&P 500 1588.19 1613.20 1.57      
                 
    SN Composite 2270.48 2322.93 2.31      
                 
    Retailers 2054.38 2101.74 2.31      
    Wholesalers 894.49 920.24 2.88      
                 
        Pct        
    Leading Gainers Close Change        
    —————            
    Roundy’s 8.32 13.51        
    Ingles 25.47 10.50        
    Weis Markets 46.92 10.37        
                 
        Pct        
    Leading Decliners Close Change        
    —————            
    Loblaw Cos. 45.00 -5.36        
    Ahold 14.91 -2.26        
    Nash Finch 22.04 -1.21        
                 
    Most Active by Volume          
    —————            
    Wal-Mart 48628448          
    Supervalu 31483743          
    Kroger 25636466          
                 
    Most Active            
    as Percent of SHO            
    —————            
    Supervalu 12.24          
    Safeway 10.66          
    Roundy’s 8.65          
                 
    Gainers 17          
    Unchanged 1          
    Decliners 6          
                 
  COMPILED BY DATA NETWORK, HUNTINGTON, NY  (631) 549-1014      
  -INFORMATION AND DATA HEREIN THOUGH BELIEVED ACCURATE IS NOT GUARANTEED.    
   DATA NETWORK SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INACCURACIES.        

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Supermarket News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

FDA: Idaho Knew About Chobani Mold Problem Before 2013 Recall

A federal report obtained under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicates that the Idaho Department of Agriculture knew about that moldy Chobani yogurt two months before it was recalled.

The state denies the claim found in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report by the Twin Falls Times-News, the daily newspaper located near the Idaho Chobani plant.

Moldy Greek yogurt by Chobani made about 300 people sick in an event associated with a September 2013 recalls of the products.

Documents released to the newspaper show that the Idaho Department of Agriculture became aware of the problem during a routine inspection two months before the company’s voluntary recall of 35 yogurt varieties.

The company said that its products were contaminated with a mold commonly found in yogurt production known as Mucor circinelloides.

“In July the routine Grade A sampling and testing samples taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture (ISDA) from the Chobani Idaho Inc. production were visually noted, by the laboratory technician, that surface defects were present and additional testing was conducted noting a yeast like growth developing in the yogurt samples,” FDA reported.

The Idaho Department of Agriculture claims it never found any mold and does not know the source of FDA’s information. What it knew in July 2013 did not prompt FDA to take any action on its own.

“All of the raw and finished product-testing results met the requirements of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” a state spokesman told the Times-News. “All of the tests we’ve done met the requirements.”

Food Safety News

S.C. watermelon production up 64 percent over 2013

Aided by good weather, South Carolina’s 2014 watermelon crop recorded a robust gain of 64 percent over last year’s total, according to a National Watermelon Report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. As production ended in early August, the state had shipped almost 81 million pounds of seeded and seedless watermelons.

Georgia, usually the leading state for watermelon production, was still shipping in early August and was close to the 586 million pounds to date.SC-WATERMELON-COOPER-RIVER-Brooke Hastings Allender, South Carolina’s 2014 Watermelon Queen, and watermelon queens from four other states handed out 30,000 free watermelon samples to runners at the Cooper River Bridge Run in Charleston, SC, in March. North Carolina, which was winding down production Aug. 12, reported a total to date of 79 million pounds; last year’s total for the Tar Heel state was close to 102 million pounds.

Matt Cornwell, executive director of the South Carolina Watermelon Association and a marketing specialist with the South Carolina Department of Agriculture, said the increased production “was welcomed by our growers, who had a bad year in 2013 when heavy rains during harvest held down production. This year’s harvest was back to normal.”

The South Carolina watermelon harvest began in early June and ended by Aug. 12, for all but two growers, who grew a second, late-harvest crop, Cornwell said. This year’s crop consisted mainly of seedless melons, roughly by a 10 to 1 margin. The Tar Heel state crop was about 85 percent seedless. Both states shipped by truck; Georgia used trucks and piggyback rail, and California used rail and trucks. The Carolinas rank in the top 10 states in the nation for producing watermelon.

Promotion events, usually featuring the South Carolina Watermelon Queen, included college and university football practices; a minor league baseball game; marathons and bridge runs; civic events such as food festivals; visits to farms, hospitals and schools; in-store promotions at Bi-Lo, Giant Foods, Lowe’s, Piggly Wiggly and Whole Foods, among others; and trade shows and news media interviews.

This year, the South Carolina Watermelon Association promoted watermelon at sporting events, with giveaways of fruit slices and signage extolling the health benefits of watermelon. The highlight of the promotions, Cornwell believes, was the Cooper River Bridge run in Charleston, SC, where the association gave away 30,000 five-ounce servings of watermelon, which Cornwell calls “nature’s sports drink.”

For 2015, Cornwell said, “Demand for watermelon is growing, and South Carolina has a natural advantage in that the soil and climate are good for melons. Because of our location, we are one of the first states to have watermelon on the market, and we can reach the major population centers of the East Coast and Midwest. The outlook for 2015, weather permitting, is good. Two growers experimented this year with a late-harvest crop of watermelons, and did really well, shipping into September. I expect we’ll see more growers try a second crop in 2015.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

S.C. watermelon production up 64 percent over 2013

Aided by good weather, South Carolina’s 2014 watermelon crop recorded a robust gain of 64 percent over last year’s total, according to a National Watermelon Report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. As production ended in early August, the state had shipped almost 81 million pounds of seeded and seedless watermelons.

Georgia, usually the leading state for watermelon production, was still shipping in early August and was close to the 586 million pounds to date.SC-WATERMELON-COOPER-RIVER-Brooke Hastings Allender, South Carolina’s 2014 Watermelon Queen, and watermelon queens from four other states handed out 30,000 free watermelon samples to runners at the Cooper River Bridge Run in Charleston, SC, in March. North Carolina, which was winding down production Aug. 12, reported a total to date of 79 million pounds; last year’s total for the Tar Heel state was close to 102 million pounds.

Matt Cornwell, executive director of the South Carolina Watermelon Association and a marketing specialist with the South Carolina Department of Agriculture, said the increased production “was welcomed by our growers, who had a bad year in 2013 when heavy rains during harvest held down production. This year’s harvest was back to normal.”

The South Carolina watermelon harvest began in early June and ended by Aug. 12, for all but two growers, who grew a second, late-harvest crop, Cornwell said. This year’s crop consisted mainly of seedless melons, roughly by a 10 to 1 margin. The Tar Heel state crop was about 85 percent seedless. Both states shipped by truck; Georgia used trucks and piggyback rail, and California used rail and trucks. The Carolinas rank in the top 10 states in the nation for producing watermelon.

Promotion events, usually featuring the South Carolina Watermelon Queen, included college and university football practices; a minor league baseball game; marathons and bridge runs; civic events such as food festivals; visits to farms, hospitals and schools; in-store promotions at Bi-Lo, Giant Foods, Lowe’s, Piggly Wiggly and Whole Foods, among others; and trade shows and news media interviews.

This year, the South Carolina Watermelon Association promoted watermelon at sporting events, with giveaways of fruit slices and signage extolling the health benefits of watermelon. The highlight of the promotions, Cornwell believes, was the Cooper River Bridge run in Charleston, SC, where the association gave away 30,000 five-ounce servings of watermelon, which Cornwell calls “nature’s sports drink.”

For 2015, Cornwell said, “Demand for watermelon is growing, and South Carolina has a natural advantage in that the soil and climate are good for melons. Because of our location, we are one of the first states to have watermelon on the market, and we can reach the major population centers of the East Coast and Midwest. The outlook for 2015, weather permitting, is good. Two growers experimented this year with a late-harvest crop of watermelons, and did really well, shipping into September. I expect we’ll see more growers try a second crop in 2015.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Mexico: Price of oranges increased by 90% compared to 2013

Mexico: Price of oranges increased by 90% compared to 2013

The price of oranges in Mexico continues to rise. According to the SNIIM, last week prices increased by 5.49 percent, amounting to an average 90.24 percent from a year ago. 

The agency detailed in its most recent report that the wholesales prices for the small calibres of Valencia orange were at 9.10 pesos per kilogram, 4.6 percent more than the 8.70 pesos price they had a week ago. 

The records detail that the same fruit was being traded at an average of 4.22 pesos per kilogram a year ago, so the current price for this variety has increased by 115.63 percent. 

The SNIIM said that the prices of the medium calibres of this citric rose from 9.40 pesos to 10 pesos per kilogram; i.e. a 6.38 percent increase. 

A year ago, this fruit was worth 5.82 pesos per kilogram, thus its price has increased by 71.82 percent in one year. 

In its report, the agency explained that the country’s supply of this fruit is limited because, currently, only the mayera variety from Veracruz is in its harvest season. 

The report also said that this harvest was smaller in magnitude compared to the 2,150,000 tons harvested in the same cycle last year. 

“Consequently, the average price increased a little more,” stated the report. 

“We expect that some volumes of the ramillete orange, also from Veracruz, will enter the market in the next fortnight, which might help stop or moderate the upward trend in prices.” 

Source: noticiasnet.mx

Publication date: 8/26/2014


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