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North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

North America continues to be the largest market for Chile

If a retailer is selling blueberries, grapes or stone fruit — such as peaches, plums and nectarines — during the winter months, chances are the fruit is from Chile, said Karen Brux, managing director of the San Carlos, CA-based Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America. “As the largest fruit exporter in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile exports more than 800,000 tons of fruit to the U.S. annually, and over half of that is supplied during our winter months. Consumers expect their retailers to have year-round supplies of their favorite fruits, and Chile makes it possible.”

Brux explained that Chilean cherries are available from November through January. Blueberries run from November through March. The Grape movement from Chile runs from December through May, and peaches, plums and nectarines arrive in the U.S. from December through April.

“Chile exports around 400,000 tons of grapes to the U.S. each year,” said Brux. “This represents about half of Chile’s entire export volume to the U.S. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has unique retail marketing programs for each of these products, and we work with retailers across the U.S. and Canada to develop in-store and online promotions to drive sales. Often, these are focused on a particular holiday, such as Christmas, New Year’s and Valentine’s Day. Occasionally we’ll participate in promotion for organizations, like Heart Health Month in February.”

The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America has a variety of point-of-sale cards and posters for every major commodity available from Chile during the winter months. An order form is available on the fruitsfromchile.com website. Brux noted that the website also provides numerous recipes and usage ideas, along with accompanying images for all the various Chilean fruits available throughout the year.

“In terms of promotions that are offered to retailers, during the 2013-14 season, the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association launched a very successful trial of a promotion called the ‘Great Grape Giveaway,” said Brux. “Retailers loved it. A total of 298 stores from 17 retail chains across the U.S. participated in the promotion. I think we had such strong support because it was fun and easy to enter, and it was a nice incentive for produce managers. We hope to expand on it in 2015, and hopefully double the number of stores participating.

“Most importantly, we work with retailers on custom point-of-sale promotion programs for their stores,” she continued. “In early 2014, for example, we designed a large 22-inch by 28-inch co-branded blueberry poster that reinforced some key blueberry health messages. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association has also sponsored numerous health and wellness programs developed by specific retailers. You can’t be an effective marketer without tailoring your programs to fit your customers’ needs.”

Social media, she explained, is of huge importance to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, and it has strongly changed the way its merchandisers work with retailers. For the past few years the organization has placed a strong emphasis on giving retail marketing staff — whether supermarket registered dietitians, social media or marketing managers — the information and images they need to reach their customers on their Facebook pages or other social media outlets.

“This has become a key component of our retail marketing programs and probably one of the most cost-effective means of reaching consumers with compelling information about fresh fruits from Chile,” said Brux. “Working with retailers on social media typically involves sending sound bites on usage ideas or nutrition info to whoever is responsible for social media within a retail chain. Retailers will often post this on their Facebook pages, blogs or websites, or even use it in in-store printed communication. Retailers of all types are on board with social media. We recently saw a small North Dakota chain take our information and turn it into a simple Facebook promotion where their customers could name their favorite way of eating Chilean oranges. It was so simple, and they had a few hundred responses.”

Supermarket registered dietitians often play a key role in retail social initiatives, and the association works directly with them on more nutrition-related info. It has sponsored numerous Produce for Better Health programs that bring together produce organizations and supermarket registered dietitians across the country.

“We encourage supermarkets to reach out to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association merchandiser in their area and discuss promotion opportunities,” Brux shared. “We want to support everyone interested in promoting Chilean fruit.”

Volume in tons of Chilean fruit imports has been stable over the years. But Brux explained that 2013-14 was a very “off” year.

“Chile suffered the worst drought in 80 years, and the country also had a three-week port strike,” she said. “Export volume to the U.S. has been quite stable over the years. With Chile continually expanding its global presence and selling to more international markets, one might expect to see decreasing volumes to the U.S., but clearly that is not the case. Some commodities, like grapes, have seen decreased volumes, but others, like blueberries and citrus, have witnessed huge growth. North America is the largest market for Chile, and growers and exporters want to know what they can do to better serve this market.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Data Specialist Retail Program at Feeding America

Data Specialist – Retail Program

Work. Serve. Thrive.
Imagine a place where your talent can make a meaningful difference in peoples’ lives. Working at Feeding America is a uniquely rewarding experience in which our employees work together as vital parts of a much larger mission. We are innovative, mission-focused, diverse, collaborative, values-driven and focused on results.

We are a national, nonprofit organization and the nation’s leading domestic hunger-relief charity. Located in the heart of downtown Chicago, our mission is to feed America’s hungry through a nationwide network of member food banks and engage our country in the fight to end hunger.

The Opportunity
The Data Specialist will indirectly support the continued growth of the retail store donation program (currently over $ 1B pounds annually) by developing and implementing processes to collect, manage, mine and analyze retail store donation program data; Develop insights and recommends strategies to drive incremental value through the retail channel.

Responsibilities
· Supports the continued growth of the retail store donation program by managing program data and statistics that are disseminated to donors, food banks and internally within Feeding America.
· Reviews and analyzes general industry and internal data to identify new opportunities for retail program growth and expansion.  
· Supports the development of the retail program strategy through data management and analysis.  Strategy to focus on: a) identifying areas of program underperformance, b) identifying major opportunities for new growth, and c) creating insight as to how to capture incremental value from both scenarios.
· Identifies processes to more effectively collect, store, and mine retail program data.
· Develops and manages communications on program performance to key donors on monthly basis (including store level program reporting, key exceptions, areas for intervention, etc.).
· Works with food bank members to increase accuracy and timeliness of retail program data reporting through recurring communication on performance, scorecard development, issue troubleshooting, and reporting tool generation / upgrades.
· Generates quarterly updates for senior level audiences (both internal and external) on performance of program.

Requirements
· BA/BS required; focus on statistics and/or research desirable
· 2+ years’ experience in developing quantitative models and working with large data sets, preferably in a research-based environment.
· 2+ years’ experience working with databases and manipulation of data.  Experience structuring and driving strategic initiatives strongly preferred.
· Experience in food retail industry preferred.
· Experience extracting data from databases and writing reports based on results to meet business requirements.
· Strong analytical skills.
· Experience with food security or food waste issues preferred.
· Excellent presentation skills, in addition to oral and written communication skills.
· Ability to think creatively and strategically as part of a team and within broad coalitions.
· Strong acumen in MS Office applications, particularly Access, Excel and PowerPoint.
· Committed to organizational mission of ending hunger.

Please click here to apply

Supermarket News

Gallery: New Kroger, Delhaize America executives and other trending stories

Video: Analyst foresees some Walmart ‘cannibalization’

BB&T Capital’s Andrew Wolf, in this video shot during SN’s 2014 Analysts Roundtable, says it’s “too soon to say” how Walmart’s new focus on its Neighborhood Markets will affect the performance of its Supercenters, but he does expect some “cannibalization” to occur. He also discusses Whole Food Market’s move toward more competitive prices, and its increased competition from Mariano’s, Sprouts and others, plus convention retailers with greater emphasis on natural/organic.

See the full video

Supermarket News

Delhaize America names new CIO

Delhaize America said Monday it has named Michael Laurenti chief information officer, effective Nov. 17.

He succeeds Deb Dixson, who announced her retirement earlier this year.

Laurenti will be responsible for all information technology and information security operations for the Salisbury, N.C.-based company, a division of Brussels-based Delhaize Group.

He previously worked in information technology for Belk Department Stores, Monroe, N.C.; Family Dollar Stores, Charlotte, N.C.; Linens ‘N Things Clifton, N.J.; and Toys R Us, Wayne. N.J.

According to Kevin Holt, CEO of Delhaize America, “Mike brings a wealth of information technology leadership to Delhaize America, and we look forward to tapping into his extensive experience to propel our U.S. operations forward, enhance service in our retail stores and leverage technology to better serve our customers.”

Supermarket News

Closing Arguments Today in Peanut Corporation of America Criminal Trial

The jury today will hear closing arguments in the Peanut Corporation of America criminal case in Albany, GA.

One of the final acts in a drama six years in the making, the closings will get underway on the 32nd day of the twice-delayed trial that began July 28 in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Georgia.

The jury has already heard from about 45 witnesses over the 26 days that the prosecution took in putting on its case. The government began by calling one of the top officials of a private microbiological laboratory used by PCA and wrapped up with an agent from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

Prosecutors put on top witnesses they’d made deals with and who required multiple days on the witness stand and then called up others to give quick, cameo-like appearances.

The government reached pre-trial plea bargains with two of PCA former top managers in Blakely, GA — plant manager Samuel Lightsey and operations manager Daniel Kilgore. The testimony of Lightsey and Kilgore spanned about 10 days. The two men helped the government put much of the complex criminal case before the jury.

After the government wrapped up its presentations, attorneys for Stewart Parnell announced they would not be bringing in any witnesses of their own. Michael Parnell’s defense attorney, Athens, GA-based Edward Tolley, did call Parnell’s wife, Jean Parnell, as a character witness.

Tolley also gave an opening defense statement that went about trying to separate his client from PCA’s business. Michael’s peanut brokerage, PP Sales, was entirely independent of PCA, according to Tolley. Michael Parnell was a buyer for Kellogg’s, never worked for or received a paycheck from PCA, and was solely responsible for financing the purchase and insurance for the big tanker trucks that were used to deliver peanut paste to Kellogg’s from the PCA plant in Blakely.

Tolley said his client could not have been involved in conspiracy at PCA dating back to 2003 because his first deal with the company did not occur until July 2007. The defense attorney even took exception to classifying his client’s role as a peanut broker. He said that “buyer” is a more accurate term for what Michael Parnell did. He also said that Michael Parnell was one of those deceived by PCA.

Albany, GA, defense attorney Thomas G. Ledford, representing Wilkerson, passed on the opportunity to either make an opening statement or call any witnesses.

This minimalist approach taken by the defense is bringing the trial to a somewhat abrupt end. If closing arguments are completed today, that means federal Judge W. Louis Sands could give the jury instructions as early as Friday.

A 76-count indictment in February 2013 against an original four defendants led to the current criminal trial. It might have been five, but before the indictment was unsealed, Kilgore reached a separate plea deal with the government. Last May, Lightsey did the same thing. The three others pleaded not guilty and were released on bond to assist in their own defenses.

Lightsey’s deal reduced down to 71 the counts in the indictment to be decided by the jury, but with numerous counts charged to multiple defendants, the jury is going to have to decide on guilt or innocence on a total of 111 felonies charged.

Individually, here’s the breakdown:

Stewart Parnell is charged with two counts of conspiracy, 20 counts of introducing adulterated foods into interstate commerce with intent to defraud or mislead, 13 counts of introducing misbranded food into interstate commerce with intent to defraud or mislead, 20 counts of interstate shipments fraud, 11 counts of wire fraud, and two counts of obstruction of justice.

Michael Parnell is charged with two counts of conspiracy, 12 counts of introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce with intent to defraud or mislead, 12 counts of introducing misbranded food into interstate commerce with intent to defraud or mislead, 12 counts of interstate shipments fraud, and five counts of wire fraud.

Mary Wilkerson is charged with two counts of obstruction of justice.

Daniel Kilgore’s plea deal limits his potential jail time to 12 years, and Samuel Lightsey negotiated a six-year maximum. Both men could serve much-reduced sentences for the job they did testifying for the government at the trial.

The three who opted to go trial could, if convicted, face lengthy prison sentences and stiff fines. Each felony count of obstruction of justice can result in 10 years of imprisonment. Most of the felonies charged in this case also carry 5- or 10-year maximums for jail time.

Today’s closing arguments come almost six years after an outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium swept across the country from PCA peanut butter and products made with it. Nine deaths would eventually be blamed on the outbreak that multiplier models based on confirmed cases suggest sickened more than 22,0000 people in the U.S. and Canada. The outcome of this trial will determine whether the practices that led to those infections amounted to criminal activity.

Food Safety News

Russia’s ban gives Latin America opportunities

Russia’s ban gives Latin America opportunities

Russia’s 1-year ban on food products from the EU, US, Canada, and Norway will force Russia to increase food imports from Latin America, specifically Ecuador, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina.

Russia’s ban opens the door to Russia’s partners on the other side of the world. Russia will have to fill an 8 percent gap in its total agricultural imports that it sources from the EU, USA, Canada, Australia, and Norway. The Netherlands, Germany, and Poland are currently Russia’s biggest food suppliers in the EU.

On Wednesday the three countries confirmed they are ready to start supplying Russia with agricultural goods and Moscow will soon hold meetings with ambassadors from Brazil and Argentina.

Agricultural products dominate Argentina’s export. Russia imports Argentinian pears, grapes, apples, citrus fruits, and other food. In 2012 trade turnover exceeded $ 1 billion.

In 2013, Chile exported $ 567 million worth of agricultural products to Russia. Regionally, Chile exports an array of fruits, including grapes, avocadoes, berries, plums, and kiwis.

Even though Ecuador primarily sends exports to the US and EU, it still has the potential to cut into the Russian agriculture and raw materials market. At present, bananas, cut flower, and coffee and tea are sent eastward to Russia. 

Source: Rt.com

Publication date: 8/8/2014


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