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Asia Fruit Logistica registers highest ever demand

Asia Fruit Logistica registers highest ever demand

Meeting top-quality buyers, suppliers and service providers in one place is a challenge. But consider the number and value of the business opportunities that present themselves when that challenge is met. Asia Fruit Logistica is the unique fresh fruit and vegetable business hub to achieve this goal in Asia.

Asia’s leading trade show for the fresh fruit and vegetable business, which takes place at AsiaWorld-Expo Center in Hong Kong on 4-6 September 2013, is seeing more demand for stand space than ever before.

Companies from 34 countries and all five continents have already registered to exhibit at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, with exhibitors from Ecuador, Morocco and Cyprus making their debut appearance at the show.

Vietnam will also have a national pavilion at this year’s event for the very first time. Coordinated by the country’s fruit and vegetable association, Vinafruit, the Vietnam pavilion will feature eight exhibitors including exporters and importers from the country.

“We believe that exhibiting at Asia Fruit Logistica is a great opportunity to promote Vietnamese fresh fruit to the world and to all our partners in Asia,” said Vinafruit’s Nauyen Van Ky. “Our exporters are looking forward to securing contracts, and to meeting potential quality partners and clients in Asia and worldwide as well as exchanging experience and know-how.”

With its diverse climate and capacity to produce a wide variety of fruit and vegetables year-round, Vietnam boasts significant export potential. The country has set an ambitious target to increase the value of its overall fruit and vegetable exports to US$ 1.2bn by 2020, from US$ 829m last year.

Dragon fruit, pomelo, mangoes and pineapples as well as sweet potato and other vegetables will be among the key products displayed at the Vietnam pavilion.

Many countries are joining Vietnam with national pavilions at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, including Argentina, Australia, China, Chile, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Greece, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa, Taiwan and the US.

“It’s amazing how big Asia Fruit Logistica has become and how quickly it’s grown,” said Joon Hong Choi of major South Korean importer Sooil Commerce, a regular visitor to the trade show. “Many Korean importers and retailers are visiting to meet with Asian buyers and suppliers as well their suppliers from other parts of the world like Chile and the US. They can meet everybody they need to see at this event.”

With only a few stands still available at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, book now to secure your access to Asia’s leading buyers. Visitors who register online now (www.asiafruitlogistica.com/tickets) save up to 35 per cent on their admission fee.

For more information:
Sinenart Baramirattanachai
Tel: +66 2 941 4600
[email protected] 
www.asiafruitlogistica.com

Publication date: 6/27/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Growing interest for Argentinian fruit in Russia and Asia

Growing interest for Argentinian fruit in Russia and Asia

Salixfruits, a fruit trader based in Argentina, has truly taken off this year with the opening of offices in the United States, Mexico, and soon also in Peru, intended to carry out a double importer-exporter role. The company’s main products include pears, apples, grapes and stone fruit.

Juan Martín González Pita, founder of Salixfruits, affirms that “the firm pursues to add substantial value to the producers and help them maximise their results. We provide medium and small producers with a professionalised commercial structure with over 10 years’ experience.” 

According to González, despite the reduction of demand in absolute terms, fruit consumption levels are the same. “The difference is that people are now more careful to avoid wasting food. Supermarkets, by adopting pre-packaged formats, also contribute to this change in consumption habits.”

As for markets, Salixfruits works mainly with the Middle East, Russia and South East Asia. González explains that “these markets pay well, with fixed prices and are good to do business with. They do not ask for certificates or demand high import taxes. The only problem is that there are no logistic infrastructures or cold storage services to make large shipments.”

In Europe, the firm only makes occasional small deals with Spain and Italy. The current strategy is to close deals at fixed prices and with more guarantees, something which, according to González, the European market is not offering.

“I would be interested in developing South Africa as origin, as our clients demand South African products. Another interesting market is India, which despite not being logistically advantageous, offers a potential market of 10 million willing to pay Premium prices,” concludes Juan Martín González Pita.

For more information:
Salixfruits                                                                                         
Argentina
Juan Martín González Pita
Skype: jmgpita
[email protected]
Tel. +54 11 3221 3649
Mob. +54 911 5039 7981

Publication date: 6/27/2013


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast.

John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that, “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 12/3/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

AU: Expanding avocado production seeks opportunities in Asia

Australia, with its huge variety of climates, has the capacity to grow avocados all year-round in different production sites in Queensland and down the east coast. John Tyas, CEO of the Avocados Australia Board, explains that “most of this fruit is currently intended for the domestic market, which absorbs about 95% of the production. Exports go mostly to Singapore, Malaysia and a little to the Middle East.”

At the moment, the Board is in the middle of re-negotiations with Thailand because of a new protocol, but it is also looking to enter China, “where there are huge opportunities. We are really interested in gaining access, because a third of Australia’s plantations have yet to come into full production.”

As far as acreage goes, Australia currently has 8,000 hectares, from which 65,000 tonnes are produced per year. “With the new plantings, the production is expected to increase by 50% in the next 5 or 6 years. It won’t be long before we reach 100,000 tonnes per year,” affirms John.

“We still think there’s room for growth domestically, but exports are a very important part of the mix, particularly to the Asian market, which accepts small calibres that Australia doesn’t value. Mexico is already exporting and Chile has also just gained access to China, and these two will hopefully help turn avocados into a less exclusive product in the Chinese market.”

Publication date: 11/28/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Though Asia is the continent to which the most grapes from California are shipped, there is still much potential for growth. A booming population and a rising middle class, especially in China, makes the region very attractive for California’s grape shippers.

“Out of the top 15 export markets we have, 10 of them are in Asia,” said Susan Day, vice president of the California Table Grape Commission at last week’s Asia Fruit Logistica. “So it’s a significant market that is still offering lots of potential for growth.” She pointed to China, which is the second biggest destination for California grapes, only behind Canada, as a prime example of the growth potential in Asia.

“China has a lot of people and shows a lot of growth,” said Day. “Along with the population increasing, the middle class is also increasing, and that gives more people the opportunity to enjoy grapes from California.” But opportunities in the region for shippers are not limited to just China. California grapes find their way to many Asian countries, and all of the countries that import those grapes import the top 15 varieties grown in the state. That means that not only are many of the top importers of California grapes in Asia, and not only are those countries spread out through the continent, but those countries are also interested in the plethora of varieties California’s growers offer throughout the season. The commission is looking to take advantage of that potential.

“We’re in the middle of a pilot program that will promote grapes during the holiday season,” said Day. “We’ve spoken to retailers about doing Moon Festival promotions, where they’ll display grapes along with moon cakes, and that will give consumers more opportunities to see and buy grapes from California.”

Publication date: 9/11/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Though Asia is the continent to which the most grapes from California are shipped, there is still much potential for growth. A booming population and a rising middle class, especially in China, makes the region very attractive for California’s grape shippers.

“Out of the top 15 export markets we have, 10 of them are in Asia,” said Susan Day, vice president of the California Table Grape Commission at last week’s Asia Fruit Logistica. “So it’s a significant market that is still offering lots of potential for growth.” She pointed to China, which is the second biggest destination for California grapes, only behind Canada, as a prime example of the growth potential in Asia.

“China has a lot of people and shows a lot of growth,” said Day. “Along with the population increasing, the middle class is also increasing, and that gives more people the opportunity to enjoy grapes from California.” But opportunities in the region for shippers are not limited to just China. California grapes find their way to many Asian countries, and all of the countries that import those grapes import the top 15 varieties grown in the state. That means that not only are many of the top importers of California grapes in Asia, and not only are those countries spread out through the continent, but those countries are also interested in the plethora of varieties California’s growers offer throughout the season. The commission is looking to take advantage of that potential.

“We’re in the middle of a pilot program that will promote grapes during the holiday season,” said Day. “We’ve spoken to retailers about doing Moon Festival promotions, where they’ll display grapes along with moon cakes, and that will give consumers more opportunities to see and buy grapes from California.”

Publication date: 9/11/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Though Asia is the continent to which the most grapes from California are shipped, there is still much potential for growth. A booming population and a rising middle class, especially in China, makes the region very attractive for California’s grape shippers.

“Out of the top 15 export markets we have, 10 of them are in Asia,” said Susan Day, vice president of the California Table Grape Commission at last week’s Asia Fruit Logistica. “So it’s a significant market that is still offering lots of potential for growth.” She pointed to China, which is the second biggest destination for California grapes, only behind Canada, as a prime example of the growth potential in Asia.

“China has a lot of people and shows a lot of growth,” said Day. “Along with the population increasing, the middle class is also increasing, and that gives more people the opportunity to enjoy grapes from California.” But opportunities in the region for shippers are not limited to just China. California grapes find their way to many Asian countries, and all of the countries that import those grapes import the top 15 varieties grown in the state. That means that not only are many of the top importers of California grapes in Asia, and not only are those countries spread out through the continent, but those countries are also interested in the plethora of varieties California’s growers offer throughout the season. The commission is looking to take advantage of that potential.

“We’re in the middle of a pilot program that will promote grapes during the holiday season,” said Day. “We’ve spoken to retailers about doing Moon Festival promotions, where they’ll display grapes along with moon cakes, and that will give consumers more opportunities to see and buy grapes from California.”

Publication date: 9/11/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Though Asia is the continent to which the most grapes from California are shipped, there is still much potential for growth. A booming population and a rising middle class, especially in China, makes the region very attractive for California’s grape shippers.

“Out of the top 15 export markets we have, 10 of them are in Asia,” said Susan Day, vice president of the California Table Grape Commission at last week’s Asia Fruit Logistica. “So it’s a significant market that is still offering lots of potential for growth.” She pointed to China, which is the second biggest destination for California grapes, only behind Canada, as a prime example of the growth potential in Asia.

“China has a lot of people and shows a lot of growth,” said Day. “Along with the population increasing, the middle class is also increasing, and that gives more people the opportunity to enjoy grapes from California.” But opportunities in the region for shippers are not limited to just China. California grapes find their way to many Asian countries, and all of the countries that import those grapes import the top 15 varieties grown in the state. That means that not only are many of the top importers of California grapes in Asia, and not only are those countries spread out through the continent, but those countries are also interested in the plethora of varieties California’s growers offer throughout the season. The commission is looking to take advantage of that potential.

“We’re in the middle of a pilot program that will promote grapes during the holiday season,” said Day. “We’ve spoken to retailers about doing Moon Festival promotions, where they’ll display grapes along with moon cakes, and that will give consumers more opportunities to see and buy grapes from California.”

Publication date: 9/11/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Though Asia is the continent to which the most grapes from California are shipped, there is still much potential for growth. A booming population and a rising middle class, especially in China, makes the region very attractive for California’s grape shippers.

“Out of the top 15 export markets we have, 10 of them are in Asia,” said Susan Day, vice president of the California Table Grape Commission at last week’s Asia Fruit Logistica. “So it’s a significant market that is still offering lots of potential for growth.” She pointed to China, which is the second biggest destination for California grapes, only behind Canada, as a prime example of the growth potential in Asia.

“China has a lot of people and shows a lot of growth,” said Day. “Along with the population increasing, the middle class is also increasing, and that gives more people the opportunity to enjoy grapes from California.” But opportunities in the region for shippers are not limited to just China. California grapes find their way to many Asian countries, and all of the countries that import those grapes import the top 15 varieties grown in the state. That means that not only are many of the top importers of California grapes in Asia, and not only are those countries spread out through the continent, but those countries are also interested in the plethora of varieties California’s growers offer throughout the season. The commission is looking to take advantage of that potential.

“We’re in the middle of a pilot program that will promote grapes during the holiday season,” said Day. “We’ve spoken to retailers about doing Moon Festival promotions, where they’ll display grapes along with moon cakes, and that will give consumers more opportunities to see and buy grapes from California.”

Publication date: 9/11/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Though Asia is the continent to which the most grapes from California are shipped, there is still much potential for growth. A booming population and a rising middle class, especially in China, makes the region very attractive for California’s grape shippers.

“Out of the top 15 export markets we have, 10 of them are in Asia,” said Susan Day, vice president of the California Table Grape Commission at last week’s Asia Fruit Logistica. “So it’s a significant market that is still offering lots of potential for growth.” She pointed to China, which is the second biggest destination for California grapes, only behind Canada, as a prime example of the growth potential in Asia.

“China has a lot of people and shows a lot of growth,” said Day. “Along with the population increasing, the middle class is also increasing, and that gives more people the opportunity to enjoy grapes from California.” But opportunities in the region for shippers are not limited to just China. California grapes find their way to many Asian countries, and all of the countries that import those grapes import the top 15 varieties grown in the state. That means that not only are many of the top importers of California grapes in Asia, and not only are those countries spread out through the continent, but those countries are also interested in the plethora of varieties California’s growers offer throughout the season. The commission is looking to take advantage of that potential.

“We’re in the middle of a pilot program that will promote grapes during the holiday season,” said Day. “We’ve spoken to retailers about doing Moon Festival promotions, where they’ll display grapes along with moon cakes, and that will give consumers more opportunities to see and buy grapes from California.”

Publication date: 9/11/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Large potential for growth for California grapes in Asia

Though Asia is the continent to which the most grapes from California are shipped, there is still much potential for growth. A booming population and a rising middle class, especially in China, makes the region very attractive for California’s grape shippers.

“Out of the top 15 export markets we have, 10 of them are in Asia,” said Susan Day, vice president of the California Table Grape Commission at last week’s Asia Fruit Logistica. “So it’s a significant market that is still offering lots of potential for growth.” She pointed to China, which is the second biggest destination for California grapes, only behind Canada, as a prime example of the growth potential in Asia.

“China has a lot of people and shows a lot of growth,” said Day. “Along with the population increasing, the middle class is also increasing, and that gives more people the opportunity to enjoy grapes from California.” But opportunities in the region for shippers are not limited to just China. California grapes find their way to many Asian countries, and all of the countries that import those grapes import the top 15 varieties grown in the state. That means that not only are many of the top importers of California grapes in Asia, and not only are those countries spread out through the continent, but those countries are also interested in the plethora of varieties California’s growers offer throughout the season. The commission is looking to take advantage of that potential.

“We’re in the middle of a pilot program that will promote grapes during the holiday season,” said Day. “We’ve spoken to retailers about doing Moon Festival promotions, where they’ll display grapes along with moon cakes, and that will give consumers more opportunities to see and buy grapes from California.”

Publication date: 9/11/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Asia Fruit Logistica, Hong Kong

Photo report
Asia Fruit Logistica, Hong Kong

This year’s edition of Asia Fruit Logistica which took place in Hong Kong surpassed expectations according to Gerald Lamusse, event Director.

“This edition has seen a strong growth in exhibitor and visitor numbers,” explains Lamusse. “There have been lots of opportunities to do business and network.”

Click here for the photo report

“We had a record growth in trade visitors of 24% from 64 countries to AFL 2014 last week. This, together with the 28% growth in the number of exhibitors from a record 38 countries really made for an event that was packed full of business opportunity.”

Click here for the photo report

Standholders were positive about the number and quality of the visitors.

At the exhibition there was, of course much talk about Asia and especially China as, ‘the next big market’. The general feeling from those who already did business there was that it is a slow but steady process, they stressed the need to build good relationships with business partners and with some products to educate consumers about how to incorporate them into their diets.

Click here for the photo report

Many countries are still trying to gain access to some of the Asian markets and for some it is proving to be a very long and sometimes frustrating process.

Click here for the photo report

Looking forward to next year Lamusse said they will keep on doing what they have been doing and build on it.

Publication date: 9/9/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Pink Lady apple operations expand into South East Asia

Pink Lady apple operations expand into South East Asia

Exports of Australia’s most popular apple, the Pink Lady, will start a new marketing campaign for Asian markets. There’s been huge growth in Pink Lady exports across Europe and the UK.

Apple and Pear Australia Limited (APAL) is the licensed owner of the Pink Lady variety, and its managing director for intellectual property, Garry Langford, says an office has been opened in Malaysia to oversee the new campaign.

“This approach provides us with the opportunity to bring some of the money that we otherwise might have spent within the European area to invest in the development of new markets.”

Revenue from Europe has allowed APAL to push into Asian markets closer to home.

“As an industry, we are actively re-encouraging people to export. Clearly it’s a huge opportunity for Australian product to come into South East Asia as well.”

Mr Langford says the new investment will encourage bigger export volumes into Asia.

“We feel like we can give some confidence to those in the system that want to ship out of Australia that we have a good mechanism in place.”     

Source: abc.net.au

Publication date: 8/19/2014


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