Blog Archives

DNE kicks off Australian citrus season

DNE World Fruit LLC kicked off its 2013 Australian summer citrus program with the recent arrival of the first vessel into the port of Long Beach in California.

The season will run from late June through October starting with Daisies and Navels. Daisies will peak on size 70s followed by 54s. Peak promotion period for Daisies will run early July through early August.

Australian Navels will begin arriving early July but due to intermittent rains heavier volume won’t arrive until later in July.

“The quality has been excellent in the packing sheds in Australia,” said Stu Monaghan, Australian citrus program manager for DNE. “We’re seeing high color and great flavor right from the start from each of the growing regions. Peak sizing will be 56s followed by 48s then 72s. We’ll see that shift to higher volumes of 72s and fewer 48s in our August arrivals.”

DNE recommends promoting Aussie Navels from late July through the first week of October. Minneolas will be ready to promote the second week of July through September. Tangelo peak sizes will be 53 followed by 63 and packed in 10-kilo cartons. Three-pound bags are available throughout the program.

As the back-to-school timeframe approaches, Cara Cara Navels and blood oranges will be included in DNE’s Australian citrus lineup.

DNE, a leading importer of Australian citrus, plans to bring in more than 500,000 cartons of Navels for the season along with specialty varieties of Daisies, Minneolas, Cara Caras and blood oranges.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

TX Distributor Recalls Australian Lamb for Lack of Import Inspection

Houston, TX-based AMD Imports Inc. is recalling approximately 35,275 pounds of Australian lamb products because the meat imports were not presented at the U.S. point of entry for inspection, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

Without the benefit of full inspection, FSIS says a possibility of adverse health consequences exists. The recall involves a high health risk.

The following product are subject to recall:

  • Lot A, 17,500 lbs.: 416 containers of Australian Bone-In Lamb Shoulder weighing from 36 to 51 lbs. each with package code “730030.” The product was packaged by Wagstaff Canbourne on dates ranging from Sept. 8, 2014, to Oct. 10, 2014.
  • Lot B, 17,775 lbs.: 416 containers of Australian Bone-In Lamb Shoulder weighing from 36 to 51 lbs. each with package code “730030.” The product was packaged by Wagstaff Canbourne on dates ranging from Sept. 8, 2014, to Oct. 10, 2014.

The recalled lamb bears the Australian mark of inspection with establishment number “2773.” The product was shipped to AMD Imports Inc., a meat distributor in Houston, which was also the point of entry and further distributed to other distributors and retail locations.

The problem was discovered using the Public Health Information System (PHIS) when FSIS import staff reviewed records and discovered that the independent third-party carrier did not present the products for USDA inspection at the U.S. point of entry.

FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider. FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Food Safety News

Australian State Restricts Raw ‘Bath’ Milk Sales in Wake of Boy’s Death

Following the death of a 3-year-old boy and hospitalizations of other children last month, the Australian state of Victoria has significantly restricted the sale of raw milk labeled as “bath” milk, which is said to be labeled as such to circumvent Australia’s ban on sales of raw milk for human consumption.

Beginning Jan. 1, all milk sold as “bath” milk in Victoria must either be pasteurized or include a gag-inducing agent to make it taste bitter and discourage consumption, according to ABC News.

Many of the raw-milk products labeled as “bath” milk are sold in containers similar to drinkable milk and placed near drinkable milk in stores, according to the state’s Minister for Consumer Affairs.

Producers of “bath” milk say that the new law came so suddenly that they are not prepared to make the necessary changes, and, in some cases, are not sure how to change their operations to satisfy the new restrictions.

In early December, at least five children in Victoria fell ill and were hospitalized with severe infections from E. coli and Cryptosporidium in connection with consuming Mountain View Organic Bath Milk. One of those children, a 3-year-old boy, died after developing hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a kidney disease associated with the most severe E. coli infections.

Raw milk is milk that has not been pasteurized to eliminate potentially harmful pathogens. Children, the elderly, and individuals with compromised immune systems are especially vulnerable to pathogens such as E. coli and Cryptosporidium sometimes found in milk.

Food Safety News

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam will stop importing fruit from Australia from next year because of insect issues, an official from the Plant Protection Department under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed Tuesday.

The department will also stop granting plant quarantine certificates for Australian fruit from January 1, 2015, according to department head Nguyen Xuan Hong.

Hong attributed the import ban to the fact that fruits in Australia have been hit by Mediterranean Sea fruit flies, which could spread to Vietnam via the imports.

Australia is among the top five largest fruit exporters to Vietnam, besides China, the U.S., New Zealand, and South Africa. Vietnam mostly imports Australian cherries, apples, oranges, and grapes.

The Southeast Asian country purchased more than 2,000 tons of fruit from Australia in the first ten months of this year, according to the agriculture ministry.

News about Vietnam’s decision to block Australian fruit shipments emerged as early as November as Vietnamese importers began informing their Australian partners that they will not be permitted to import any fresh fruit from Australia.

Australian broadcaster ABC News reported on November 4 that the country’s Department of Agriculture had confirmed that Vietnam “raised concerns with Australia’s fruit fly management systems and is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit.”

The Vietnamese market is worth US$ 40 million to Australia’s fruit exporting sector, according to ABC News.

Nguyen Thai Dung, deputy general director of Big C, said the supermarket chain imports a large amount of Australian fruit but has yet to be informed of the import ban. “Big C will consider importing pears, oranges and apples from alternative markets such as Japan, New Zealand and the U.S.,” he told the ministry-run newspaper.

Australian fruits are competitive with similar imports in Vietnam thanks to the close geographical proximity between the two countries.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam will stop importing fruit from Australia from next year because of insect issues, an official from the Plant Protection Department under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed Tuesday.

The department will also stop granting plant quarantine certificates for Australian fruit from January 1, 2015, according to department head Nguyen Xuan Hong.

Hong attributed the import ban to the fact that fruits in Australia have been hit by Mediterranean Sea fruit flies, which could spread to Vietnam via the imports.

Australia is among the top five largest fruit exporters to Vietnam, besides China, the U.S., New Zealand, and South Africa. Vietnam mostly imports Australian cherries, apples, oranges, and grapes.

The Southeast Asian country purchased more than 2,000 tons of fruit from Australia in the first ten months of this year, according to the agriculture ministry.

News about Vietnam’s decision to block Australian fruit shipments emerged as early as November as Vietnamese importers began informing their Australian partners that they will not be permitted to import any fresh fruit from Australia.

Australian broadcaster ABC News reported on November 4 that the country’s Department of Agriculture had confirmed that Vietnam “raised concerns with Australia’s fruit fly management systems and is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit.”

The Vietnamese market is worth US$ 40 million to Australia’s fruit exporting sector, according to ABC News.

Nguyen Thai Dung, deputy general director of Big C, said the supermarket chain imports a large amount of Australian fruit but has yet to be informed of the import ban. “Big C will consider importing pears, oranges and apples from alternative markets such as Japan, New Zealand and the U.S.,” he told the ministry-run newspaper.

Australian fruits are competitive with similar imports in Vietnam thanks to the close geographical proximity between the two countries.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam will stop importing fruit from Australia from next year because of insect issues, an official from the Plant Protection Department under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed Tuesday.

The department will also stop granting plant quarantine certificates for Australian fruit from January 1, 2015, according to department head Nguyen Xuan Hong.

Hong attributed the import ban to the fact that fruits in Australia have been hit by Mediterranean Sea fruit flies, which could spread to Vietnam via the imports.

Australia is among the top five largest fruit exporters to Vietnam, besides China, the U.S., New Zealand, and South Africa. Vietnam mostly imports Australian cherries, apples, oranges, and grapes.

The Southeast Asian country purchased more than 2,000 tons of fruit from Australia in the first ten months of this year, according to the agriculture ministry.

News about Vietnam’s decision to block Australian fruit shipments emerged as early as November as Vietnamese importers began informing their Australian partners that they will not be permitted to import any fresh fruit from Australia.

Australian broadcaster ABC News reported on November 4 that the country’s Department of Agriculture had confirmed that Vietnam “raised concerns with Australia’s fruit fly management systems and is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit.”

The Vietnamese market is worth US$ 40 million to Australia’s fruit exporting sector, according to ABC News.

Nguyen Thai Dung, deputy general director of Big C, said the supermarket chain imports a large amount of Australian fruit but has yet to be informed of the import ban. “Big C will consider importing pears, oranges and apples from alternative markets such as Japan, New Zealand and the U.S.,” he told the ministry-run newspaper.

Australian fruits are competitive with similar imports in Vietnam thanks to the close geographical proximity between the two countries.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Australian Boy, 3, Dies in E. Coli Outbreak from Raw Milk

A 3-year old boy has died and four other children have fallen ill in an E. coli and Cryptosporidium outbreak linked to raw milk sold by a company based in Victoria, Australia.

The milk, Mountain View Organic Bath Milk, was labeled as being “for cosmetic use only” and “not for human consumption,” as well as “organic, grass-fed, ethical.”

Raw milk is illegal to sell for human consumption in Australia, but labeling it as a cosmetic product allows for it to be sold.

The five children sickened in the outbreak were between 1 and 5 years old. Three children, including the boy who died, developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a kidney disease associated with severe E. coli infections. The other two children came down with infections from Cryptosporidium, a pathogen that causes vomiting, nausea and stomach cramping.

Victoria’s minister for emergency services has reportedly called for an investigation into raw milk labeling, according to the Guardian. Regulators from around the country are also said to be discussing whether the product should be recalled or even banned.

Mountain View Organic Bath Milk has been sold for four years. These are the first illnesses connected to the product, according to the owner.

Raw milk is milk that has not been pasteurized to eliminate potentially harmful pathogens. Children, the elderly, and individuals with compromised immune systems are especially vulnerable to pathogens such as E. coli and Cryptosporidium sometimes found in milk.

Food Safety News