Blog Archives

Weather conditions in Chile have been favorable for this season’s crops

Apart from some recent rains that affected cherry volumes, weather conditions have been favorable for this season. “We expect to see volume increases across all commodities, even cherries,” said Karen Brux, managing director of the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, North America, based in San Carlos, CA.

The news is especially good because Chile saw large volume decreases in 2013-14 due to severe frosts in the country.Karen-BruxKaren Brux

Looking specifically at the blueberry category, Brux noted that there is a huge increase over 2013-14.  Exports of Chilean blueberries are expected to increase by 30 percent over last season, with volume exceeding 200 million pounds.

“Roughly 70 percent of exports come to North America, so that’s great news for our market,” added Brux.

She also noted a few promotion tips for retailers. Many shoppers still associate certain commodities, like blueberries or stone fruit, with a specific season, but Brux said, “Retailers should let their customers know that they can continue enjoying their favorite summer fruits during the winter, thanks to Chile.

“It goes without saying that retailers should communicate the key selling points of whatever product they’re carrying to their shoppers,” she continued. “For example, a large retail chain is flying in all of their Chilean stone fruit to offer what they believe are the freshest, best-tasting fruits for their shoppers. We’re helping them develop point-of-sale materials that communicates this. Another large retail chain brings in Muscat grapes from Chile and builds beautiful displays with information that highlights the unique taste of this grape.”

This also brings attention to the broader grape category. Brux said retailers see sales increases across all varieties. The CFFA works with them to develop targeted promotions.

“It’s additionally helpful to give consumers season-appropriate usage ideas and wellness messages,” Brux pointed out. “Consumers are familiar with summer usage ideas for items like cherries, blueberries, grapes and stone fruit, but what about during the cold winter months? We worked with one retail chain to introduce our roasted Brussels sprouts and Chilean grapes recipe via a video that was sent out to a database of more than 300,000 customers. The CFFA also has numerous usage ideas and corresponding images for everything from a cherry, wild rice and quinoa salad to cherry chocolate chip muffins to smoked salmon with blueberry compote or a festive green grape salsa for St. Patrick’s Day.”

For people committing to a healthier lifestyle in the New Year, the CFFA also has commodity-specific health messages available. It is, for example, currently working with a registered dietitian from a large retail chain in the Northeast to supply short sound bites on all of the Chilean fruits.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Maine CDC: Patrons of Unnamed Restaurant May Have Been Exposed to Hepatitis A

A food service worker with an acute Hepatitis A infection has been identified in Cumberland County, according to the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC). The worker served food while infectious from Sept. 29 to Oct. 11, 2014. Officials did not disclose the name of the Cumberland County restaurant that employed the infected food service worker.

A public health assessment by Maine CDC of the employee’s illness and food and beverage preparation practices determined that patrons of the unnamed restaurant might be at risk for Hepatitis A infection. The agency was notified of the illness beyond the 14-day window of opportunity for post-exposure prophylaxis to be effective.

Maine CDC said health care providers are encouraged to remain vigilant for Hepatitis A infection in persons with consistent symptoms. The fecal-oral route, commonly through consumption of contaminated food or water, transmits the Hepatitis A virus.

Persons will begin to exhibit symptoms 15-50 days after exposure to the virus. A person is considered infectious approximately two weeks prior to symptom onset until one week after onset of symptoms.

Exposed persons can receive post-exposure prophylaxis up to 14 days after exposure. Prophylaxis includes Hepatitis A vaccine for individuals 12 months to 40 years or immune globulin (IG) for individuals younger than than 12 months or 41 years of age and older (vaccine can be given to individuals 41 and older if IG is unavailable).

Healthcare providers should consider testing for Hepatitis A if patients present with any of the following symptoms: fever, jaundice, nausea, clay-colored stool, dark urine, malaise, abdominal discomfort, or anorexia.

Maine requires all suspected and confirmed cases of Hepatitis A to be reported to the state’s disease reporting and consultation line at 1-800-821-5821 on a 24/7 basis.

Food Safety News

Danish Listeria Outbreak Has Killed 15 People, 38 Have Been Sickened

The Danish State Serum Institute (SSI) reportedly confirmed on Monday that 15 people have now died from the ongoing Listeria monocytogenes outbreak, with the total number of those sickened at 38.

The outbreak has been traced to a spiced meat roll known as “rullepølse,” and 30 products, including salami and hot dogs, have been recalled and the producer shut down.

Consumers in Denmark have also been warned of a Listeria risk connected to halibut from a company called Hjerting Laks that was sold in Netto, Irma and Føtex stores. Anyone with halibut in their freezers purchased from that company before June 1 was advised to dispose of it or return it to the store.

Symptoms of Listeria infection include fever, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. Most patients begin feeling symptoms anywhere from seven to 21 days after infection.

Food Safety News

Europe’s 2011 Killer Pathogen Could Have Been Spread on Purpose or Accidentally

A new analysis applied to Northern Europe’s deadly 2011 E. coli O101:H4 outbreak calls the official assumption that the pathogen, spread by “its natural origin,” is “questionable.” Further, the Serbian-German researchers say that neither accidental nor deliberate spreading of the pathogen can be ruled out as the cause.

Based on their findings, the researchers are calling on the European Union to conduct further epidemiological, microbiological and forensic investigations into the incident. In other words, they want to re-open the case. Their analysis is found in the European Journal of Public Health.

The 2011 outbreak killed 53 people in an event that pushed local medical facilities, mostly in Germany, to their limits and tested the European Union’s Early Warning and Outbreak Response System. It began on May 1, 2011, and peaked around May 21-22, 2011. The Robert Koch Institute in Berlin declared the outbreak over on July 26, 2011.

In between those dates, there were 2,987 cases of E. coli O104:H4 that did not develop into Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) but still resulted in 18 deaths. And, of the 855 HUS cases, 35 were fatal.

Until now, the EU’S official explanation for the sudden and severe outbreak was the introduction of fenugreek sprouts from seeds imported from Egypt contaminated with the fairly new O104:H4 E. coli strain through normal commercial transactions.

However, that explanation has always been a little murky because the rare E. coli strain was not found in places that might have resulted in a more definite conclusion.

“Assessing the likelihood of criminal or terroristic act behind a UEE ( unusual epidemiological event) is of great public health importance, as it may be helpful in improved response and the resolution of epidemics,” the Serbian-German researchers write.

The research teams used “epidemiological assessment tools” to differentiate between natural, accidental and deliberate epidemics. Two are “scoring models” and the third is based on “typical clues to a deliberate epidemic without a numerical ponderation.” The models and scoring used are found in detail in the team’s report.

They point out that these techniques are not new, having been used to investigate the 1984 Salmonellosis outbreak in The Dalles, OR; the 1996 shigellosis outbreak in Dallas, TX; the 2001 anthrax cases in the U.S., the 1979 anthrax cases in Sverdlovsk, Soviet Union; the 1999 West Nile Virus outbreak in New York City, and the 1999 tularemia cases in Kosovo.

The team is the first to apply the facts of the 2011 outbreak to these investigative models, and they’ve concluded that the possibilities that the pathogen was introduced accidentally or intentionally into the food chain are theories that cannot be discarded.

“From the onset of the outbreak, there was confusion about the source and mode of transmission.  On 10 June 2011, German authorities announced contaminated sprouts of one particular charge of fenugreek seeds imported from Egypt in 2009 as the most probable culprit source of this outbreak,” the new report states. “The conclusions of the EHEC Task Force were accepted by the European Food Safety Agency (EFSA) who supported the investigations. However, although it might have been expected, no data or evidence on similar outbreaks in Egypt caused by the new German EHEC O104:H4 strain and on the origin of the suspected seeds were available.

“Raw vegetables have shown up in the past years as an important transmission factor of enteric pathogens, which may infect or persist dormant in a ‘viable but non-culturable’ state in/on plants and their seeds. Until the (German) outbreak, sprouts were known as a possible but rare vehicle in some outbreaks caused by enteric pathogens,” the report continues.

“The high environmental persistence of E. coli O157:H7 on raw nut shells imported from the USA was a likely cause of a multi-provincial E. coli O157:H7 outbreak in Canada in April 2011. The EFSA therefore some years ago warned that raw sprouts may be contaminated under poor hygienic conditions and become a health risk. However, neither the fenugreek seeds nor remains of the suspected sprout lots distributed in Germany were positive for EHEC O104:H4. The (outbreak) demonstrates the high impact of awareness of practitioners and clinicians to detect and notify early even ‘small clusters’ of a disease as an alerting clue of a developing outbreak requiring immediate microbiological and epidemiological investigations of the possible causes.

“In conclusion, after using three published models for the analysis of UEE, a generally accepted assumption the (outbreak) in 2011 was a natural one may not be accepted without reserve. This is the first time ever that an E. coli O104:H4 pathotype of a high virulence suddenly emerged, which may indicate an unnatural phenomenon. In the interest of the safety and biosecurity of food chains, further epidemiological, microbiological and forensic analyses are needed for a definite answer on a question concerning (the outbreak) : ‘What was it, actually?.’”

Funding for the study was provided by the Serbian Ministry of Education.

Food Safety News

Europe’s 2011 Killer Pathogen Could Have Been Spread on Purpose or Accidentally

A new analysis applied to Northern Europe’s deadly 2011 E. coli O101:H4 outbreak calls the official assumption that the pathogen, spread by “its natural origin,” is “questionable.” Further, the Serbian-German researchers say that neither accidental nor deliberate spreading of the pathogen can be ruled out as the cause.

Based on their findings, the researchers are calling on the European Union to conduct further epidemiological, microbiological and forensic investigations into the incident. In other words, they want to re-open the case. Their analysis is found in the European Journal of Public Health.

The 2011 outbreak killed 53 people in an event that pushed local medical facilities, mostly in Germany, to their limits and tested the European Union’s Early Warning and Outbreak Response System. It began on May 1, 2011, and peaked around May 21-22, 2011. The Robert Koch Institute in Berlin declared the outbreak over on July 26, 2011.

In between those dates, there were 2,987 cases of E. coli O104:H4 that did not develop into Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) but still resulted in 18 deaths. And, of the 855 HUS cases, 35 were fatal.

Until now, the EU’S official explanation for the sudden and severe outbreak was the introduction of fenugreek sprouts from seeds imported from Egypt contaminated with the fairly new O104:H4 E. coli strain through normal commercial transactions.

However, that explanation has always been a little murky because the rare E. coli strain was not found in places that might have resulted in a more definite conclusion.

“Assessing the likelihood of criminal or terroristic act behind a UEE ( unusual epidemiological event) is of great public health importance, as it may be helpful in improved response and the resolution of epidemics,” the Serbian-German researchers write.

The research teams used “epidemiological assessment tools” to differentiate between natural, accidental and deliberate epidemics. Two are “scoring models” and the third is based on “typical clues to a deliberate epidemic without a numerical ponderation.” The models and scoring used are found in detail in the team’s report.

They point out that these techniques are not new, having been used to investigate the 1984 Salmonellosis outbreak in The Dalles, OR; the 1996 shigellosis outbreak in Dallas, TX; the 2001 anthrax cases in the U.S., the 1979 anthrax cases in Sverdlovsk, Soviet Union; the 1999 West Nile Virus outbreak in New York City, and the 1999 tularemia cases in Kosovo.

The team is the first to apply the facts of the 2011 outbreak to these investigative models, and they’ve concluded that the possibilities that the pathogen was introduced accidentally or intentionally into the food chain are theories that cannot be discarded.

“From the onset of the outbreak, there was confusion about the source and mode of transmission.  On 10 June 2011, German authorities announced contaminated sprouts of one particular charge of fenugreek seeds imported from Egypt in 2009 as the most probable culprit source of this outbreak,” the new report states. “The conclusions of the EHEC Task Force were accepted by the European Food Safety Agency (EFSA) who supported the investigations. However, although it might have been expected, no data or evidence on similar outbreaks in Egypt caused by the new German EHEC O104:H4 strain and on the origin of the suspected seeds were available.

“Raw vegetables have shown up in the past years as an important transmission factor of enteric pathogens, which may infect or persist dormant in a ‘viable but non-culturable’ state in/on plants and their seeds. Until the (German) outbreak, sprouts were known as a possible but rare vehicle in some outbreaks caused by enteric pathogens,” the report continues.

“The high environmental persistence of E. coli O157:H7 on raw nut shells imported from the USA was a likely cause of a multi-provincial E. coli O157:H7 outbreak in Canada in April 2011. The EFSA therefore some years ago warned that raw sprouts may be contaminated under poor hygienic conditions and become a health risk. However, neither the fenugreek seeds nor remains of the suspected sprout lots distributed in Germany were positive for EHEC O104:H4. The (outbreak) demonstrates the high impact of awareness of practitioners and clinicians to detect and notify early even ‘small clusters’ of a disease as an alerting clue of a developing outbreak requiring immediate microbiological and epidemiological investigations of the possible causes.

“In conclusion, after using three published models for the analysis of UEE, a generally accepted assumption the (outbreak) in 2011 was a natural one may not be accepted without reserve. This is the first time ever that an E. coli O104:H4 pathotype of a high virulence suddenly emerged, which may indicate an unnatural phenomenon. In the interest of the safety and biosecurity of food chains, further epidemiological, microbiological and forensic analyses are needed for a definite answer on a question concerning (the outbreak) : ‘What was it, actually?.’”

Funding for the study was provided by the Serbian Ministry of Education.

Food Safety News

Shoppers May Have Been Exposed to Hepatitis A at Indianapolis Tea Store

County public health officials say that a worker at a Teavana tea store in Indianapolis, IN, may have exposed shoppers who drank free tea samples to the Hepatitis A virus.

Anyone who drank tea samples at the Fashion Mall at Keystone in Indianapolis on April 5 or April 19 should watch for signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A exposure. These include nausea, vomiting, fever and yellowing of the skin or eyes. Those who notice signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A exposure should contact a doctor.

Teavana, an Atlanta, GA-based company bought by Starbucks in 2012, has disinfected the store and thrown out all tea makers, said Starbucks spokeswoman Jaime Riley.

Marion County health officials said that people who drank tea samples brewed on April 19 may still benefit from a vaccine or immune globulin to help stave off the disease. People younger than 40 should take the vaccine, and anyone older than 40 and, therefore, more at risk if infected, is encouraged to get the immune globulin. The county health department is offering free vaccine to anyone who visited the store April 19 and drank the tea.

“It’s kind of an extra-cautionary step, but we did feel that the public needed to know,” said Melissa McMasters, coordinator of the county’s immunization and infectious disease program.

For more information or to learn where to get the shot or immune globulin, contact the county health department at (317) 221-2122.

Food Safety News

Shoppers May Have Been Exposed to Hepatitis A at Indianapolis Tea Store

County public health officials say that a worker at a Teavana tea store in Indianapolis, IN, may have exposed shoppers who drank free tea samples to the Hepatitis A virus.

Anyone who drank tea samples at the Fashion Mall at Keystone in Indianapolis on April 5 or April 19 should watch for signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A exposure. These include nausea, vomiting, fever and yellowing of the skin or eyes. Those who notice signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A exposure should contact a doctor.

Teavana, an Atlanta, GA-based company bought by Starbucks in 2012, has disinfected the store and thrown out all tea makers, said Starbucks spokeswoman Jaime Riley.

Marion County health officials said that people who drank tea samples brewed on April 19 may still benefit from a vaccine or immune globulin to help stave off the disease. People younger than 40 should take the vaccine, and anyone older than 40 and, therefore, more at risk if infected, is encouraged to get the immune globulin. The county health department is offering free vaccine to anyone who visited the store April 19 and drank the tea.

“It’s kind of an extra-cautionary step, but we did feel that the public needed to know,” said Melissa McMasters, coordinator of the county’s immunization and infectious disease program.

For more information or to learn where to get the shot or immune globulin, contact the county health department at (317) 221-2122.

Food Safety News

QUAFETY EU project: The effect of hot water treatment on fresh-cut produce has been shown

QUAFETY EU project: The effect of hot water treatment on fresh-cut produce has been shown

The 3rd International Conference on “Effect of Pre- and Post-harvest Factors on Health Promoting Components and Quality of Horticultural Commodities” took place in Skierniewice, Poland, March 23-25, 2014.

The Organising Committee of Conference is very greatfull to prof. Giancarlo Colelli and other participants of QUAFETY project for the active attendance on this scientific event. The conference was organized by Research Institute of Horticulture in cooperation with Storage Section of the Committee of Horticultural Sciences of the Polish Academy of Sciences and EUFRIN – Fruit Quality Working Group, under the auspices of Polish Academy and Sciences and Polish Society for Horticultural Sciences.

More than 110 participants attended the conference from 17 countries.

Within the eight sessions, 28 oral and 60 poster presentations were delivered.
The newest results connected with most of aspects of pre and post-harvest factors influencing storage durability as well as contents of pro-healthy components were shown. The innovative storage technology was presented in practice in ROJA (Group of Fruit Producers) in Regnów. The apple cold store is equipped with apparatus for Initial Low Oxygen Stress I.L.O.S –Plus.

Within the conference, the QUAFETY session was opened by prof. Giancarlo Colelli. He delivered the leading lecture: “A state of art on Quality and safety of fresh-cut products through the EC-funded R&D Project ‘QUAFETY’”. 

The next QUAFETY scientists brought out the following issues:

  • Maria Grzegorzewska (Poland) – The effect of hot water treatment on durability of Chinese cabbage
  • Periklis Tzamalis (Greece) – Development of a diagnostic instrument for evaluation of food quality and safety management system
  • Manuela Pintado (Portugal) – Impact of processing and storage on nutritional and functional properties of strawberry
  • Natasha Spadafora (UK) – Evaluation volatile organic Compounds in rocket leaf for non-destructing analysis of post-harvest quality
  • Marina Cavaiuolo (Italy) – Isolation of molecular markers for the evaluation of quality in pre-harvest and post-harvest stages in rocket and melon
  • Elazar Fallik (Israel) – Testing suitability of melon genotypes for fresh-cut processing.

The Commission chosen from Scientific Committee of Conference awarded three posters among delivered presentations. The first place was delivered to the poster based on QUAFETY project and entitled “The influence of hot water treatment on structure of rocket leaves tissues” by Dyki B., Grzegorzewska M., Murgrabia A., Panek E..

Source: Maria Grzegorzewska, Research Institute of Horticulture, Poland

Publication date: 4/7/2014
Author: Emanuela Fontana
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Fyffes Exec: “Takeovers have been an important factor in the growth of Fyffes”

What will result in EU from Chiquita/Fyffes merger?
Fyffes Exec: “Takeovers have been an important factor in the growth of Fyffes”

It is not very common that a news story within our sector comes along that has such an impact on the international economy, as the news that Chiquita and Fyffes was to merge. Analysts believe that the merger was due to the fact that there is less and less to be earned in the banana market. This is also true in the European market where supermarkets are often using low banana prices as a way to lure in customers.

Chiquita has been experiencing a lot of competition from the two other fruit giants, Del Monte and Dole in the last few years, which has meant a decrease of almost half in the market share. Dole overtook Chiquita a couple of years ago by becoming the largest banana producer in the world, with a market share of 19 percent. Fyffes is the fourth producer in the world. Consequently, with this merger, both companies have immediately become the largest in one fell swoop.

The question is what the result of the fusion will mean to the European banana market? Univeg is the largest distributor of Chiquita bananas in Europe at the moment, which had meant that they were in direct competition with Fyffes. Management from the competition are still needing to offer their approval with the merger.


Coen Bos

Fyffes Chief Operating Officer Coen Bos, spoke about the position of the company within Europe, during a recent FreshPlaza interview: “When you look at the market share in Europe, Fyffes is the largest in the area of bananas at the moment. After that it is, I think, Chiquita, followed by Dole then Del Monte. Chiquita has lost a lot of market share in recent years, especially in Europe. But also in America. The current management seems to be focussing on bananas more again, which may lead to improvement of the market share.”

When questioned about Fyffes position on takeovers, Bos responded, “We like partners. This is why our history is full of (partial) takeovers. With (partial) takeovers we are interested in the company first of all. The first thing we try to do is to keep the management, and if possible the owner. We strive to maintain the company’s own identity and to only supplement where we can find synergies, where it makes sense. The companies continue to operate autonomously for a large part. Of course, we are not afraid of complete company takeovers. Takeovers have been an important factor in the growth that Fyffes has gone through over the last few decades.”

 
 

 

Publication date: 3/11/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

Region of Valencia
Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

“32% of all fruit and vegetable exports in 2012 were shipped by the region of Valencia. That year, exports grew by 9% compared to 2011, but so far this year, exports have increased by more than 15% compared to 2012, and this means that we have a very powerful agro-food sector,” stated José Císcar, vice-president of the Region of Valencia’s Council of Agriculture.

However, it is worth noting that 2013, in terms of production, has not been such a good year. In fact, according to Juan José Alepuz, president of Cohoca, it has been terrible. “Since the month of March/April, vegetables have taken a hit, peaches are smaller, and the temperatures and lack of rain have also reduced the orange calibers,” confirmed Alepuz. “The situation with kakis is not as bad, but it is also worse than last year.” 

“During my eleven years as president, I had never seen a year as bad as this,” said Alepuz. “Now the question is, what do we do with the kilos lost? How do we cover our general costs? If we don’t have good quality, we cannot expect good prices,” concluded Alepuz.


Source: Lasprovincias

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

Region of Valencia
Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

“32% of all fruit and vegetable exports in 2012 were shipped by the region of Valencia. That year, exports grew by 9% compared to 2011, but so far this year, exports have increased by more than 15% compared to 2012, and this means that we have a very powerful agro-food sector,” stated José Císcar, vice-president of the Region of Valencia’s Council of Agriculture.

However, it is worth noting that 2013, in terms of production, has not been such a good year. In fact, according to Juan José Alepuz, president of Cohoca, it has been terrible. “Since the month of March/April, vegetables have taken a hit, peaches are smaller, and the temperatures and lack of rain have also reduced the orange calibers,” confirmed Alepuz. “The situation with kakis is not as bad, but it is also worse than last year.” 

“During my eleven years as president, I had never seen a year as bad as this,” said Alepuz. “Now the question is, what do we do with the kilos lost? How do we cover our general costs? If we don’t have good quality, we cannot expect good prices,” concluded Alepuz.


Source: Lasprovincias

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

Region of Valencia
Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

“32% of all fruit and vegetable exports in 2012 were shipped by the region of Valencia. That year, exports grew by 9% compared to 2011, but so far this year, exports have increased by more than 15% compared to 2012, and this means that we have a very powerful agro-food sector,” stated José Císcar, vice-president of the Region of Valencia’s Council of Agriculture.

However, it is worth noting that 2013, in terms of production, has not been such a good year. In fact, according to Juan José Alepuz, president of Cohoca, it has been terrible. “Since the month of March/April, vegetables have taken a hit, peaches are smaller, and the temperatures and lack of rain have also reduced the orange calibers,” confirmed Alepuz. “The situation with kakis is not as bad, but it is also worse than last year.” 

“During my eleven years as president, I had never seen a year as bad as this,” said Alepuz. “Now the question is, what do we do with the kilos lost? How do we cover our general costs? If we don’t have good quality, we cannot expect good prices,” concluded Alepuz.


Source: Lasprovincias

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

Region of Valencia
Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

“32% of all fruit and vegetable exports in 2012 were shipped by the region of Valencia. That year, exports grew by 9% compared to 2011, but so far this year, exports have increased by more than 15% compared to 2012, and this means that we have a very powerful agro-food sector,” stated José Císcar, vice-president of the Region of Valencia’s Council of Agriculture.

However, it is worth noting that 2013, in terms of production, has not been such a good year. In fact, according to Juan José Alepuz, president of Cohoca, it has been terrible. “Since the month of March/April, vegetables have taken a hit, peaches are smaller, and the temperatures and lack of rain have also reduced the orange calibers,” confirmed Alepuz. “The situation with kakis is not as bad, but it is also worse than last year.” 

“During my eleven years as president, I had never seen a year as bad as this,” said Alepuz. “Now the question is, what do we do with the kilos lost? How do we cover our general costs? If we don’t have good quality, we cannot expect good prices,” concluded Alepuz.


Source: Lasprovincias

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

Region of Valencia
Spain: “2013 has been a year of losses and lack of quality”

“32% of all fruit and vegetable exports in 2012 were shipped by the region of Valencia. That year, exports grew by 9% compared to 2011, but so far this year, exports have increased by more than 15% compared to 2012, and this means that we have a very powerful agro-food sector,” stated José Císcar, vice-president of the Region of Valencia’s Council of Agriculture.

However, it is worth noting that 2013, in terms of production, has not been such a good year. In fact, according to Juan José Alepuz, president of Cohoca, it has been terrible. “Since the month of March/April, vegetables have taken a hit, peaches are smaller, and the temperatures and lack of rain have also reduced the orange calibers,” confirmed Alepuz. “The situation with kakis is not as bad, but it is also worse than last year.” 

“During my eleven years as president, I had never seen a year as bad as this,” said Alepuz. “Now the question is, what do we do with the kilos lost? How do we cover our general costs? If we don’t have good quality, we cannot expect good prices,” concluded Alepuz.


Source: Lasprovincias

Publication date: 1/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Attendees of Maine Community Dinner May Have Been Exposed to Hep A

Health officials in Maine have traced a case of hepatitis A back to a community dinner in the town of Durham. Attendees who ate at the Durham Friends Meetinghouse over the weekend of Sept. 28 have been encouraged to receive a vaccine for hepatitis A if they have not previously been vaccinated.

Approximately 100 people are believed to have attended the dinner.

Those who receive vaccines within two weeks of exposure to hepatitis A have a good chance of staving off illness.

The Maine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will hold a free vaccination clinic on Wednesday, Oct. 9, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Durham Eureka Community Center.

Symptoms of hepatitis A vaccine include fatigue, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

Food Safety News

Attendees of Maine Community Dinner May Have Been Exposed to Hep A

Health officials in Maine have traced a case of hepatitis A back to a community dinner in the town of Durham. Attendees who ate at the Durham Friends Meetinghouse over the weekend of Sept. 28 have been encouraged to receive a vaccine for hepatitis A if they have not previously been vaccinated.

Approximately 100 people are believed to have attended the dinner.

Those who receive vaccines within two weeks of exposure to hepatitis A have a good chance of staving off illness.

The Maine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will hold a free vaccination clinic on Wednesday, Oct. 9, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Durham Eureka Community Center.

Symptoms of hepatitis A vaccine include fatigue, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

Food Safety News