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US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Concerns about low wages behind Moroccan tomatoes sold in European supermarkets

Female Moroccan tomato pickers living in poverty:
Concerns about low wages behind Moroccan tomatoes sold in European supermarkets

Fairfood International’s newest report exposes the poverty wages paid to workers in the Moroccan tomato sector. These tomatoes are picked and packed by tens of thousands of workers who do not receive a living wage for their arduous work. The fruit is then sold by European supermarkets who receive the lion’s share of the profits.

Fairfood’s report The fruits of their labour – The low wages behind Moroccan tomatoes sold in European supermarkets was published on 9th September 2014 and is an initiative of Fairfood’s Morocco ‘hotspot’ project. This project has conducted research in the Souss Massa Drâa region: one of the main sources of tomatoes for many European supermarkets during the winter months.

This report ties in with Fairfood’s upcoming Living Wage campaign, which sees a living wage – a wage sufficient for the basic needs of workers and their families, such as food, clothing, healthcare and education – as a human right.

The key issues in the report are:

  •     In winter, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Albert Heijn and other European supermarkets sell tomatoes which are sourced from Morocco.
  •     They are picked and packed by tens of thousands Moroccan workers, mainly female, who earn painfully low wages.
  •     Moroccan tomato pickers and packers earn between 5 and 8 Euro a day, while their costs of living are around 15 Euro a day. Therefore they are unable to make ends meet and must live in poverty
  •     Supermarkets have the power and influence to determine what consumers buy, as well as how and under what conditions the food is produced
  •     Fairfood calls upon supermarkets to take up their responsibility and to ensure a living wage for all their workers in their supply chains


Click here to read the complete report (PDF)

Publication date: 9/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Concerns about low wages behind Moroccan tomatoes sold in European supermarkets

Female Moroccan tomato pickers living in poverty:
Concerns about low wages behind Moroccan tomatoes sold in European supermarkets

Fairfood International’s newest report exposes the poverty wages paid to workers in the Moroccan tomato sector. These tomatoes are picked and packed by tens of thousands of workers who do not receive a living wage for their arduous work. The fruit is then sold by European supermarkets who receive the lion’s share of the profits.

Fairfood’s report The fruits of their labour – The low wages behind Moroccan tomatoes sold in European supermarkets was published on 9th September 2014 and is an initiative of Fairfood’s Morocco ‘hotspot’ project. This project has conducted research in the Souss Massa Drâa region: one of the main sources of tomatoes for many European supermarkets during the winter months.

This report ties in with Fairfood’s upcoming Living Wage campaign, which sees a living wage – a wage sufficient for the basic needs of workers and their families, such as food, clothing, healthcare and education – as a human right.

The key issues in the report are:

  •     In winter, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Albert Heijn and other European supermarkets sell tomatoes which are sourced from Morocco.
  •     They are picked and packed by tens of thousands Moroccan workers, mainly female, who earn painfully low wages.
  •     Moroccan tomato pickers and packers earn between 5 and 8 Euro a day, while their costs of living are around 15 Euro a day. Therefore they are unable to make ends meet and must live in poverty
  •     Supermarkets have the power and influence to determine what consumers buy, as well as how and under what conditions the food is produced
  •     Fairfood calls upon supermarkets to take up their responsibility and to ensure a living wage for all their workers in their supply chains


Click here to read the complete report (PDF)

Publication date: 9/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind pace set last year

Imports of mangos from Mexico this year trail behind the pace set by U.S. importers last season. Prices for the fruit have also been up from last season.

For the week ending on July 19, shipments of mangos from Mexico to the U.S. totalled 3.1 million boxes, which brought the total for the season to 46.6 million boxes. As a comparison, shipments for the same time last season totalled 3.3 million boxes for the week and 52.6 million boxes for the season. Less fruit this season has coincided with higher prices.

“We don’t really know the reason for there being less fruit, but there are fewer mangos around this season,” said Jesse Sepulveda of Vision Produce Company. “This whole season has been unusual, with prices higher than in past years.” The average price per box for Ataulfo mangos for the week ending on July 19 was $ 5.40 and $ 5.96 at Texas and Nogales entry points, respectively. Average price for a box of Tommy Atkins mangos was $ 4.58 at the Texas entry point and $ 4.74 at the Nogales entry point, and the average price for a box of Kent mangos was $ 4.60 at the Texas entry point and $ 4.94 at the Nogales entry point.

FreshPlaza.com

Online produce orders grow, but still behind supermarket sales

More and more consumers are buying produce through online services, but most purchases are still being made at brick-and-mortar retailers, said speakers today at United Fresh 2014 in Chicago.

“Online produce purchases are still not making a significant dent in the overall marketplace. It’s very attractive, but won’t overwhelm brick-and-mortar soon,” said Randy Burt, principal at A.T. Kearney, a management consulting firm headquartered in Chicago.

Burt was joined by Tony Stallone, VP of merchandizing and food safety at Peapod in a session called Online Produce Sales: A Permanent Trend or a Temporary Fad?

The online purchase of produce, and food in general, may not have yet taken off in the United States, but brick-and-mortar retailers shouldn’t get too complacent, said Stallone. Peapod had double-digit sales growth in 2013, while sales at conventional grocery stores grew by no more than 2%. Produce is the fastest growing online sales category, he said.

“Produce is the gateway to most [online] sales,” said Stallone.

Driving the trend for online produce purchases is the increasing urbanization of society, with more suburbanites moving to large cities, said Burt. The typical customer wants the convenience of online shopping and they are always able to access any information they want, any time they want, through technology. Also among the drivers is the rise in smaller households, such as empty-nest Baby Boomers and Gen X who are putting off marriage, he said.

“They also want a personalized shopping experience, which online can do better than brick-and-mortar although some grocers are figuring that out,” Burt added.

He predicts that the future on produce purchases will be a combination of online and conventional retailers.

“[But] whoever wins the perishable side of this business will win the online shopping business,” added Stallone.

Supermarket News

Online produce orders grow, but still behind supermarket sales

More and more consumers are buying produce through online services, but most purchases are still being made at brick-and-mortar retailers, said speakers today at United Fresh 2014 in Chicago.

“Online produce purchases are still not making a significant dent in the overall marketplace. It’s very attractive, but won’t overwhelm brick-and-mortar soon,” said Randy Burt, principal at A.T. Kearney, a management consulting firm headquartered in Chicago.

Burt was joined by Tony Stallone, VP of merchandizing and food safety at Peapod in a session called Online Produce Sales: A Permanent Trend or a Temporary Fad?

The online purchase of produce, and food in general, may not have yet taken off in the United States, but brick-and-mortar retailers shouldn’t get too complacent, said Stallone. Peapod had double-digit sales growth in 2013, while sales at conventional grocery stores grew by no more than 2%. Produce is the fastest growing online sales category, he said.

“Produce is the gateway to most [online] sales,” said Stallone.

Driving the trend for online produce purchases is the increasing urbanization of society, with more suburbanites moving to large cities, said Burt. The typical customer wants the convenience of online shopping and they are always able to access any information they want, any time they want, through technology. Also among the drivers is the rise in smaller households, such as empty-nest Baby Boomers and Gen X who are putting off marriage, he said.

“They also want a personalized shopping experience, which online can do better than brick-and-mortar although some grocers are figuring that out,” Burt added.

He predicts that the future on produce purchases will be a combination of online and conventional retailers.

“[But] whoever wins the perishable side of this business will win the online shopping business,” added Stallone.

Supermarket News

Behind the scenes at the Retail Academy

The Retail Academy meets each year at the Shopper Marketing Summit.

Walmart, Food Lion, Ahold, Family Dollar and Safeway are among the 15 food retail chains participating in the “Retail Academy” at the Shopper Marketing Summit.

The academy meets each year at the Shopper Marketing Summit and the Shopper Marketing Expo. The meeting at this year’s Summit will take place Wednesday, March 26.

Inclusion is by invitation only.

The goal of the academy is for retailers and their trading partners to develop mutually beneficial strategies in a “neutral zone,” free from corporate interference, multiple agendas, stifling silos and mixed signals.

“In a rapidly changing shopper environment, the only viable option is a win-win-win for the retailer, manufacturer and shopper,” said Steve Frenda, managing director of strategy and development at the Path to Purchase Institute. “Retailers and brands must collaborate earlier in the process.”

The concept of the Retail Academy arose from a challenge posed by The Coca-Cola Co. to create a place for retailers and brands to “learn at the same school.” It debuted in October 2011 at the Shopper Marketing Expo.

Topics focus on collaboration across all areas including online/offline communication with shoppers, digital and social coordinated communication, organizational alignment, and joint shopper marketing strategies.

Read more: Walmart, Ahold, P&G executives to be honored

Along with Walmart, Food Lion, Ahold, Family Dollar and Safeway, other retail chains expected to be in attendance at the Summit include CVS/pharmacy, H-E-B Grocery Co., Meijer, Price Chopper, Raley’s, Roundy’s Supermarkets, SpartanNash, Target, Unified Grocers and Walgreens.

The sponsors of the Retail Academy are Arc Worldwide, The Capre Group, The Coca-Cola Co., Datalogix, IN Marketing Services, RTC, Symphony EYC, Valassis and Vestcom.

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Health Inspector Comics: Behind the Kitchen Door

In October 2013, public health official Jim Chan retired from his roles as the manager of the Food Safety Program in Toronto and as the media spokesperson for food safety and tobacco control enforcement issues for Toronto Public Health. Since then, he has been making a comic strip, The Health Inspector’s Notebook, with his son Chris. Reprinted here are some of his recent comics, including some references to Toronto’s infamous Cronut Burger outbreak from this past August. More comics can be found at www.chanchris.com.

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