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FDA to Block Pomegranate Seeds from Turkey; Townsend Recall Expands

Updated July 30 with expanded recall information:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Saturday it will detain shipments of pomegranate seeds from Turkey as health officials have narrowed the likely cause of a Hepatitis A outbreak that has sickened at least 127 people in 8 states. On Sunday, one of the frozen berry recalls associated with the outbreak expanded.

The agency has worked with the Centers for Disease Control and state and local health authorities for several weeks to try and track down the ingredient making people sick. Health officials have now determined that the “most likely vehicle” for the virus appears to be a common shipment of pomegranate seeds from Goknur Foodstuffs Import Export Trading of Turkey that were used by Townsend Farms to make Organic Antioxidant Blend, a mix of frozen berries, sold to Costco and Harris Teeter stores.

FDA is now barring Goknur from shipping pomegranate seeds into the United States. It is not clear how much product is impacted, but an FDA official noted that Turkey is a “minor player” compared to countries like India, Iran, China, and Thailand, when it comes to providing pomegranate to the U.S. market.

“This outbreak highlights the food safety challenge posed by today’s global food system,” said Michael Taylor, deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, in a press release over the weekend. “The presence in a single product of multiple ingredients from multiple countries compounds the difficulty of finding the cause of an illness outbreak. The Hepatitis A outbreak shows how we have improved our ability to investigate and respond to outbreaks, but also why we are working to build a food safety system that more effectively prevents them.”

The Townsend Farms blend has been linked to the multistate outbreak affecting mostly western states. According to CDC, about half of the reported Hepatitis A cases are in California.

Colorado has reported 25 and Arizona 17. Hawaii is reporting 7, New Mexico and Nevada have 5 cases and Utah and Wisconsin have 2 each. The cases reported in Wisconsin, however, resulted from exposure to the product in California, according to health officials.

Nearly 60 percent of those sickened are women. The ages in the outbreak range from 2 to 84 and include 6 children under the age of 18. CDC said none of the children had been vaccinated. More than half of those ill required hospitalization.

The outbreak strain of hepatitis A virus, belonging to genotype 1B, is rarely seen in the Americas but circulates in North Africa and the Middle East, according to CDC.

The outbreak has sparked several large recalls. In early June, Townsend Farms recalled more than 300,000 four pound packages of the frozen berries sold at Costco and then issued another recall of berries sold at Harris Teeter. Last week, Scenic Fruit Company recalled over 60,000 bags of Woodstock Frozen Organic Pomegranate Kernels because their product, imported from Turkey, has the potential to be contaminated with Hepatitis A.

On Sunday, FDA announced the Townsend Farms frozen berry recall has been expanded again. The company is now recalling Townsend Farms Organic Antioxidant Blend, 3 lb. bag with UPC 0 78414 40444 8. The codes are located on the back of the package with the words “BEST BY” followed by the code T122114 sequentially through T053115, followed by a letter. All letter designations are included in the voluntary recall, according to the expanded recall announcement.

The announcement also said that the epidemiological evidence “does not support an association between the illness outbreak and the four other berry products (raspberry, blueberry, strawberry and dark cherry) in the Frozen Organic Antioxidant blend,” which were also used in other Townsend Farms products, so consumers do not have reason to be concerned about those berries.

Townsend Farms said an FDA inspection of the company’s frozen fruit repacking operations has been completed. “The FDA found no evidence linking either the Townsend Farms, Inc.’s repacking facility or any food handler who had possible contact with the product to the source of the illness outbreak,” according to the release.

Hepatitis A, a liver disease, can range from mild to severe and can last anywhere from a few weeks to several months. Symptoms usually occur within 15 to 50 days of exposure and include fatigue, abdominal pain, jaundice, abnormal liver tests, dark urine and pale stool.

If a person has been exposed to the Hepatitis A virus within two weeks or less, they may be able to prevent the disease by receiving a vaccine. Consumers who may have eaten recalled product or have Hepatitis A symptoms should consult with their healthcare provider or their local health department.

 

Food Safety News

FDA to Block Pomegranate Seeds from Turkey Linked to Outbreak

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Saturday it will detain shipments of pomegranate seeds from Turkey as health officials have narrowed the likely cause of a Hepatitis A outbreak that has sickened at least 127 people in 8 states.

The agency has worked with the Centers for Disease Control and state and local health authorities for several weeks to try and track down the ingredient making people sick. Health officials have now determined that the “most likely vehicle” for the virus appears to be a common shipment of pomegranate seeds from Goknur Foodstuffs Import Export Trading of Turkey that were used by Townsend Farms to make Organic Antioxidant Blend, a mix of frozen berries, sold to Costco and Harris Teeter stores.

FDA is now barring Goknur from shipping pomegranate seeds into the United States. It is not clear how much product is impacted, but an FDA official noted that Turkey is a “minor player” compared to countries like India, Iran, China, and Thailand, when it comes to providing pomegranate to the U.S. market.

“This outbreak highlights the food safety challenge posed by today’s global food system,” said Michael Taylor, deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, in a press release over the weekend. “The presence in a single product of multiple ingredients from multiple countries compounds the difficulty of finding the cause of an illness outbreak. The Hepatitis A outbreak shows how we have improved our ability to investigate and respond to outbreaks, but also why we are working to build a food safety system that more effectively prevents them.”

The Townsend Farms blend has been linked to the multistate outbreak affecting mostly western states. According to CDC, about half of the reported Hepatitis A cases are in California.

Colorado has reported 25 and Arizona 17. Hawaii is reporting 7, New Mexico and Nevada have 5 cases and Utah and Wisconsin have 2 each. The cases reported in Wisconsin, however, resulted from exposure to the product in California, according to health officials.

Nearly 60 percent of those sickened are women. The ages in the outbreak range from 2 to 84 and include 6 children under the age of 18. CDC said none of the children had been vaccinated. More than half of those ill required hospitalization.

The outbreak has sparked several large recalls. In early June, Townsend Farms recalled more than 300,000 four pound packages of the frozen berries sold at Costco and then issued another recall of berries sold at Harris Teeter. Last week, Scenic Fruit Company recalled over 60,000 bags of Woodstock Frozen Organic Pomegranate Kernels because their product, imported from Turkey, has the potential to be contaminated with Hepatitis A.

Hepatitis A, a liver disease, can range from mild to severe and can last anywhere from a few weeks to several months. Symptoms usually occur within 15 to 50 days of exposure and include fatigue, abdominal pain, jaundice, abnormal liver tests, dark urine and pale stool.

If a person has been exposed to the Hepatitis A virus within two weeks or less, they may be able to prevent the disease by receiving a vaccine. Consumers who may have eaten recalled product or have Hepatitis A symptoms should consult with their healthcare provider or their local health department.

 

Food Safety News

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam will stop importing fruit from Australia from next year because of insect issues, an official from the Plant Protection Department under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed Tuesday.

The department will also stop granting plant quarantine certificates for Australian fruit from January 1, 2015, according to department head Nguyen Xuan Hong.

Hong attributed the import ban to the fact that fruits in Australia have been hit by Mediterranean Sea fruit flies, which could spread to Vietnam via the imports.

Australia is among the top five largest fruit exporters to Vietnam, besides China, the U.S., New Zealand, and South Africa. Vietnam mostly imports Australian cherries, apples, oranges, and grapes.

The Southeast Asian country purchased more than 2,000 tons of fruit from Australia in the first ten months of this year, according to the agriculture ministry.

News about Vietnam’s decision to block Australian fruit shipments emerged as early as November as Vietnamese importers began informing their Australian partners that they will not be permitted to import any fresh fruit from Australia.

Australian broadcaster ABC News reported on November 4 that the country’s Department of Agriculture had confirmed that Vietnam “raised concerns with Australia’s fruit fly management systems and is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit.”

The Vietnamese market is worth US$ 40 million to Australia’s fruit exporting sector, according to ABC News.

Nguyen Thai Dung, deputy general director of Big C, said the supermarket chain imports a large amount of Australian fruit but has yet to be informed of the import ban. “Big C will consider importing pears, oranges and apples from alternative markets such as Japan, New Zealand and the U.S.,” he told the ministry-run newspaper.

Australian fruits are competitive with similar imports in Vietnam thanks to the close geographical proximity between the two countries.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam will stop importing fruit from Australia from next year because of insect issues, an official from the Plant Protection Department under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed Tuesday.

The department will also stop granting plant quarantine certificates for Australian fruit from January 1, 2015, according to department head Nguyen Xuan Hong.

Hong attributed the import ban to the fact that fruits in Australia have been hit by Mediterranean Sea fruit flies, which could spread to Vietnam via the imports.

Australia is among the top five largest fruit exporters to Vietnam, besides China, the U.S., New Zealand, and South Africa. Vietnam mostly imports Australian cherries, apples, oranges, and grapes.

The Southeast Asian country purchased more than 2,000 tons of fruit from Australia in the first ten months of this year, according to the agriculture ministry.

News about Vietnam’s decision to block Australian fruit shipments emerged as early as November as Vietnamese importers began informing their Australian partners that they will not be permitted to import any fresh fruit from Australia.

Australian broadcaster ABC News reported on November 4 that the country’s Department of Agriculture had confirmed that Vietnam “raised concerns with Australia’s fruit fly management systems and is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit.”

The Vietnamese market is worth US$ 40 million to Australia’s fruit exporting sector, according to ABC News.

Nguyen Thai Dung, deputy general director of Big C, said the supermarket chain imports a large amount of Australian fruit but has yet to be informed of the import ban. “Big C will consider importing pears, oranges and apples from alternative markets such as Japan, New Zealand and the U.S.,” he told the ministry-run newspaper.

Australian fruits are competitive with similar imports in Vietnam thanks to the close geographical proximity between the two countries.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam will stop importing fruit from Australia from next year because of insect issues, an official from the Plant Protection Department under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed Tuesday.

The department will also stop granting plant quarantine certificates for Australian fruit from January 1, 2015, according to department head Nguyen Xuan Hong.

Hong attributed the import ban to the fact that fruits in Australia have been hit by Mediterranean Sea fruit flies, which could spread to Vietnam via the imports.

Australia is among the top five largest fruit exporters to Vietnam, besides China, the U.S., New Zealand, and South Africa. Vietnam mostly imports Australian cherries, apples, oranges, and grapes.

The Southeast Asian country purchased more than 2,000 tons of fruit from Australia in the first ten months of this year, according to the agriculture ministry.

News about Vietnam’s decision to block Australian fruit shipments emerged as early as November as Vietnamese importers began informing their Australian partners that they will not be permitted to import any fresh fruit from Australia.

Australian broadcaster ABC News reported on November 4 that the country’s Department of Agriculture had confirmed that Vietnam “raised concerns with Australia’s fruit fly management systems and is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit.”

The Vietnamese market is worth US$ 40 million to Australia’s fruit exporting sector, according to ABC News.

Nguyen Thai Dung, deputy general director of Big C, said the supermarket chain imports a large amount of Australian fruit but has yet to be informed of the import ban. “Big C will consider importing pears, oranges and apples from alternative markets such as Japan, New Zealand and the U.S.,” he told the ministry-run newspaper.

Australian fruits are competitive with similar imports in Vietnam thanks to the close geographical proximity between the two countries.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Pear Bureau Northwest awarded specialty crop block grant

Pear Bureau Northwest was awarded $ 40,000 from the Oregon Department of Agriculture and $ 20,000 from the Washington State Department of Agriculture through the 2014 Specialty Crop Block Grant. The grant will enable the Pear Bureau Northwest to focus on “Putting Pears on the Menu: Increasing the use of Pears on National Chain Restaurants.”uspear

The Pear Bureau will educate foodservice decision makers on pear varieties, seasonality, storage and ripening through outreach activities targeting large restaurant chains. The increased demand of fresh pears in foodservice will help Northwest growers and shippers keep pace with a growing supply of high-quality fruit.

“This grant will help increase pear usage and awareness among consumers throughout the US.,” Kevin Moffitt, Pear Bureau Northwest president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “Studies show that nearly 40 percent of consumers who try a food in a restaurant will look to make it at home*, so expanding restaurant use of pears will expand retail purchases and home use as well.”

Under the 2014 farm bill, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Washington State Department of Agriculture receive annual funding from the USDA to award grants for projects that enhance the competitiveness of states’ specialty crops.

Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. Eligible plants must be intensively cultivated and used by people for food, medicinal purposes, and/or aesthetic gratification to be considered specialty crops.

*Foodservice and Influencers, national telephone survey of 1,000 primary shoppers conducted by Produce Marketing Association, May 2006.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chilean truckers block roads, ports to protest lengthy inspections

Chilean truckers block roads, ports to protest lengthy inspections

Chilean truck drivers held a road and port-blocking protest last Friday to draw attention to lengthy inspections and a host of other problems and demand a rapid government response, strike organizers said.

The protesters, who began demonstrating on Thursday, said they are being hard hit by lengthy phytosanitary and cargo inspections at ports, the high price of fuel, assaults and arson attacks on trucks in the south-central region on Araucania, and what they term the government’s apathy toward these problems.

Truckers are being “mistreated” by shipping companies and terminal operators at the ports, according to Juan Araya, president of the National Truck Owners’ Confederation.

In Temuco, capital of the Araucania region, truckers blocked some roads and rode their vehicles in a single file with horns blaring. Some of the vehicles carried the charred chassis of burned trucks, which organizers said now number 120.

The protest began Thursday at the central Chilean ports of San Antonio and Valparaiso and spread later to the northern ports of Iquique and Antofagasta, to the central region of Maule, and to ports in the southern region of Bio Bio.

It will last all day on Friday.

Jose Egido, head of the truckers’ union in Valparaiso, told Cooperativa radio that the decision to protest was made after two years of fruitless talks with the authorities.

Under the current system, “the driver has to be practically enclosed in his cab for 24-48 hours, without hardly being able to go to the restroom, eat anything or be a little more at ease while they’re carrying out the inspections,” he said.

Strike organizers said their next protest will be open-ended if their demands are not met.

Source: laprensasa.com

Publication date: 10/21/2014


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