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Brazil aims to increase popularity of Prata Bananas in Europe

Brazil aims to increase popularity of Prata Bananas in Europe

Brazil is a very large banana producer, although it exports almost nothing. The reason for this, according to Heider Cabral, Marketing Manager of Abanorte, is that “the country has a really good internal market which absorbs almost the entire production, and that due to high production costs, it is difficult to be competitive.”

To target the international market, however, the company decided to supply the exotic Prata banana, very different from the Cavendish, and intended to offer a differentiated option. “It’s a product with its own characteristics, so we’ll wait and see what the market has to say.”

The Prata banana, which costs double the price of the Cavendish because the acreage is also smaller, (yields are 50% when compared to Cavendish and this is the most important factor that puts prices higher) has been showcased at various fairs and events for the past 10 years. Heider says that “the reaction of most tasting is: I want that! Where can I buy it? It is a unique product that nobody else has.”


In Brazil, the Cavendish used to be the only one consumed, but now the Prata has taken 50% of the market. “Brazilians are already willing to pay more for it, and whether or not they’ll also be a success in Europe, only time will tell, but once you have the market it is easy to increase the production” affirms Heider.

He also explains that “one of the great advantages they offer is that they need a much lower amount of agrochemicals. We use them perhaps four times a year instead of forty, so you are getting an almost 100% natural fruit.”

The biggest difficulty its export entails, according to Heider, is that the fruit needs plenty of care and refrigeration throughout the entire logistic process, and this is costly; ultimately, “we simply want to ensure that everything goes fine during the 20+ days of shipping.”

Abanorte

Heider L. Cabral

Tel +55 (38) 3821-2936

Publication date: 10/1/2014
Author: Pieter Boekhout
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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Fall mangos will be sourced largely from Brazil and Ecuador

With Mexico ending a bit early, Brazil and then Ecuador will be the main sources for mango supplies for the last third of the 2014 calendar year.

Typically, Mexico lasts well into September overlapping the Brazilian deal, which usually gets underway in August and has an eight- to 10-week shipping window before greater volume from Ecuador hits the market in late October and early November.

But this year cold August weather from Mexico to South America resulted in an early end to the Mexican deal and a late start for Brazil.

Albert Perez, managing member of Continental Fresh in Coconut Grove, FL, whose company specializes in Brazilian mangos, told The Produce News in early September that the Brazilian deal was running about three weeks behind schedule.

He said the firm usually gets some Brazilian mangos by the middle of August, but this year the first ship didn’t arrive into Miami until Sept. 5. He expects volume to be light through September and peak in October with good supplies in November as well.

Perez was cautiously optimistic that the Brazilian deal could capture some sales at the back end, but that will only occur if Ecuador is late, extending Brazil’s marketing window.

Sabine Henry, who is involved in tropical fruit sales for Central American Produce Inc. in Pompano Beach, FL, explained that because of the freight cost differential, Ecuadorian fruit lands in the United States at a lower cost point. And the greater volume usually leads to a market price drop. Brazil then finds it difficult to get the prices it needs to ship to North America.

At that point, which is typically late October or early November, Brazilian shippers look elsewhere for buyers for their production.

Agreeing that timing is everything, Isabel Freeland, vice president of Coast Tropical in San Diego, said this year might offer a very good timeline for fruit from Brazil, Ecuador and Peru. She spoke to The Produce News Sept. 10, one day after returning from a two-week trip that included stops in Ecuador and Peru.

“Brazil is very late,” she said. “They are two to three weeks behind last year, and it looks like they are going to have 30 percent less volume than in prior years.”

This has led to a strong market, which Henry of Central American said was at a solid $ 9 during the week of Sept. 8.

Freeland said Brazil’s late start would normally result in a shorter deal, but that might not be the case this year.  

“Ecuador is also late,” she said. “They don’t look like they are going to get started until week 39, which is the week of September 21. They won’t ship until week 40 [the last week of September], and that will only be the Ataulfos (yellow-skinned mangos). The red fruit, which is what competes with Brazil, won’t start until around October 15.”

With that start date, Freeland does not expect red mangos from Ecuador to hit the U.S. market until very late October, giving Brazil great access to the U.S. retail trade through that month and into November. If that occurs, Brazil can still achieve about an eight- to nine-week market widow unfettered by cheaper fruit.

After surveying some orchards and talking to people in the Ecuadorian mango industry, Freeland believes that country will also be down as much as 30 percent for this year. On the plus side, she expects the volume to be more evenly spread out over a two-month period, creating better marketing conditions.  

Following Ecuador, Peru should enter the U.S. market with fruit by early January. This will also be a bit late, as Freeland said the same weather issues affecting Mexico, Brazil and Ecuador are affecting Peru.

“I was just there last week and it was very cool in the nights,” she said. “You never have to wear a sweater in the evening, but I had to on this trip.”

Peru should have a good supply of mangos throughout January and well into February. Freeland said that despite the reduced volume from the Central America and South American countries this fall, there should be promotable volume from these countries throughout November and well into December and then again in January and February.  At that point, Mexico will have fruit again and the cycle will begin anew.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Brazil: “It is not a matter of revenue, but educational marketing”

The purchasing power of Brazilians has increased in the last decade and the greater access to information has resulted in consumers being more aware and demanding. 

In his dissertation during the first edition of PMA Fresh Connections Brazil, Jose Luiz Tejon Megiddo, of ESPM (Superior School of Marketing) spoke about five trends in contemporary food:

“The world has changed. It is no longer a matter of revenue, but educational marketing,” affirms Jose Luiz.

A few months ago, the French supermarket chain Intermarché started marketing “ugly” fruits and vegetables, which would normally be discarded. To convince customers to buy them, they were explained the importance of sustainability and were offered soups and smoothies produced from these fruits, in order to show that the flavour does not go hand in hand with the appearance. 

“Ugly” fruits have become a bestseller and an excellent example of this type of marketing. 

“Educational marketing changes things really quickly,” says Jose Luiz. 

Meanwhile, Carlos Alexandre Oliverai Gomes, of ANVISA, pointed out that Brazil’s horticultural sector needs more dialogue with the consumer. 

“No matter the size of your business, you always have the ability to communicate,” he said. “Packaging is very important as a means of communication between the consumer and the producer.” 

They also highlighted the importance of using the packaging to facilitate information on the traceability of food from producer to consumer in order to prevent health problems in the population caused by viral infections or excess traces of agro-chemicals.

FreshPlaza.com

Signs of deforestation in Brazil

Multiple fires are visible in in this image of the Para and Mato Grosso states of Brazil. Many of these were most likely intentionally set in order to deforest the land. Deforestation is the removal of a forest or stand of trees where the land is thereafter converted to a nonforest use. Examples of deforestation include conversion of forestland to farms, ranches, or urban use. The herringbone-patterned tan lines cutting through the dark green of the Amazon Rainforest in the middle of the image are evidence of deforestation in the Brazilian state of Pará. The deforestation in Pará follows the Brazialian national motorway BR 163, passing by cities such as Novo Progresso. The lower half of the image shows the state of Mato Grosso.

The beginning of the forest loss coincides with a 1979 decision by Brazil’s Program of National Integration to build roads across the forest and offer cheap land for agriculture, thus encouraging a population boom in the area. Images of the “fishbone” deforestation in Rondônia state were widely publicized, and have become the visual shorthand for tropical deforestation worldwide as evidenced in this Aqua image.

In recent decades the locus of deforestation in Brazil has shifted east to the states of Mato Grosso and Pará (seen in this image), where large tracts of land are being cleared for mechanized agriculture, rather than small-hold farming. Even so, Brazil’s overall rate of deforestation has slowed in recent years.

This natural-color satellite image was collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite on August 15, 2014. Actively burning areas, detected by MODIS’s thermal bands, are outlined in red.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Signs of deforestation in Brazil

Multiple fires are visible in in this image of the Para and Mato Grosso states of Brazil. Many of these were most likely intentionally set in order to deforest the land. Deforestation is the removal of a forest or stand of trees where the land is thereafter converted to a nonforest use. Examples of deforestation include conversion of forestland to farms, ranches, or urban use. The herringbone-patterned tan lines cutting through the dark green of the Amazon Rainforest in the middle of the image are evidence of deforestation in the Brazilian state of Pará. The deforestation in Pará follows the Brazialian national motorway BR 163, passing by cities such as Novo Progresso. The lower half of the image shows the state of Mato Grosso.

The beginning of the forest loss coincides with a 1979 decision by Brazil’s Program of National Integration to build roads across the forest and offer cheap land for agriculture, thus encouraging a population boom in the area. Images of the “fishbone” deforestation in Rondônia state were widely publicized, and have become the visual shorthand for tropical deforestation worldwide as evidenced in this Aqua image.

In recent decades the locus of deforestation in Brazil has shifted east to the states of Mato Grosso and Pará (seen in this image), where large tracts of land are being cleared for mechanized agriculture, rather than small-hold farming. Even so, Brazil’s overall rate of deforestation has slowed in recent years.

This natural-color satellite image was collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite on August 15, 2014. Actively burning areas, detected by MODIS’s thermal bands, are outlined in red.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Brazil: Agrícola Famosa to start shipping melon to Middle East

Agrícola Famosa will start shipping its current fruit crop to the Middle East in September. The company is based in Icapuí, in Brazil’s Ceará state, and sells approximately ten containers a week to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. “This is the third crop we have sold to these countries,” says company partner Luiz Roberto Barcelos. The enterprise sells mostly melon and watermelon.

Sales to the Middle East still pale in comparison to Agrícola Famosa’s total weekly export volume, which is 300 containers. But Barcelos believes in the market’s potential. “We are new to this market, but it holds great promise, what with its hot weather and widespread consumption of the fruits we sell,” says Barcelos regarding melons and watermelons, more widely consumed in high temperature places.

The company first entered the Arab market by taking part in overseas promotion programs of the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and via a trader in Holland who occasionally sold Agrícola Famosa fruit to the Arab countries. Barcelos believes exports to Arabs can increase to thirty 40-foot containers a week within five years.

Presently, Agrícola Famosa’s premier foreign destination is Europe, which accounts for over 90% of sales. The company sells to England, Holland and Spain. Annual output is roughly 150,000 tonnes of fruit and approximately 60% is shipped abroad. Barcelos and the company’s other founding partner, Carlo Borro, both have backgrounds in trading companies. The company currently has two other partners, Richard Müller and Marconi Lima.

For more information:
Agrícola Famosa
Tel: (+55 85) 33245038
www.agricolafamosa.com.br

Publication date: 8/20/2014


FreshPlaza.com

“Argentina needs to export citrus to Brazil and the U.S.”

Tangerine exports fall 18% and orange exports fall 100%
“Argentina needs to export citrus to Brazil and the U.S.”

According to data provided by the Chamber of Exporters of Citrus NEA, tangerine exports fell by 18% and orange exports by 100%. “We’ll keep moving forward despite difficulties,” said the head of the Chamber, Mariano Caprarulo. The sector is in search of international credits. 

Dr. Mariano Caprarulo, executive director of the Chamber of Exporters of Citrus of Northeast Argentina (CECNEA), said the industry is facing an 18 percent drop in exports of tangerines and a 100 percent drop in exports of oranges when compared with the past year, which also wasn’t good, because there had been a huge frost and there was little fruit. “This year we have a little more fruit,” he said. 

The CECNEA considers that the opening of more competitive markets “in terms of cost – benefit – price, a policy to encourage formal activity and the access to strong international credits,” are some of the relevant actions that need to be taken so that the citrus export sector can overcome the crisis it has faced for several years now. 

Caprarulo explained in an interview that that the devaluation in early 2014 didn’t bring significant benefits to the sector: “When the devaluation arrived, we had finished the activity and when restarted it, between May and June, the devaluation had been absorbed by the increase in costs. Additionally, we had to meet our economical obligations so the producers and citrus exporters in general had to make a strong effort to reach a 30% increase,” he said. 

Brazil and the United States are closed to Argentinean citrus

“It’s very strange that we can’t enter Brazil as we are partners of Mercosur. We export citrus to Europe with the same protocol and can’t do it regionally. The Brazilian State opposes our citrus and do not know why,” lamented Mariano Caprarulo. 

The head of the CECNEA stated that “Uruguay, a country that has the same phytosanitary status that we do, is exporting a lot of citrus to Brazil and we should also be doing that.” 

Caprarulo assured that selling citrus to Brazil “would improve our annual income, not only because they have a good price and demand, but because we would send smaller shipments, by land, and there would be a smaller risk.” 

The head of CECNEA said he expected the ongoing negotiations to open the Brazilian market. “The President of SENASA, engineer Diana Maria Guillen, told me the minister Casamiquela had a bilateral meeting to try to open Brazil.” 

Furthermore, Argentina hasn’t been able to export citrus into the United States. “The province has been very supportive. We’ve gone to the U.S. and tried to open the market, but that will still take time because we they have currently finished the technical part for limes and SENASA has asked the U.S. to be open for sweet citrus,” said Caprarulo. 

Caprarulo considered it was crucial that “the national government and the provinces of the NEA exert pressure to gain entry into the United States, because they have a price that exceeds all expectations and would make the activity profitable again. We should get in, given that Uruguay also entered it and they are exporting the same varieties we have and have the same status as us. “

Source: Elentrerios.com

Publication date: 7/1/2014


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EU: Demand and price for mangoes not interesting for Brazil

EU: Demand and price for mangoes not interesting for Brazil

Supply of mangoes this Summer has been moderate according to, Carlos André de Faria from Dutch importer, Sun City. “Supply from Central America, mainly Mexico, Porto Rico and the Dominican Republic also from Africa and Mali has been fine but there has been a very low supply from Brazil. Prices were moderate to low at between €3.75 – 5.00, but mostly around the €4.50.” He goes on to say that demand was normal, if a bit on the low side.

Israel and Spain will be entering the market with increasing supply at end of August, demand should starting kicking-in in September when the Summer fruit supplies get lower, weather conditions could also create more demand if the temperatures drop in Europe. Demand is still slack according to de Faria, because Northern Europeans are still on holiday. Brazil is concentrating on shipping to the US at the moment, also demand and prices in Brazil are still high compared to Europe.

Israeli mangoes are said to be down 30-40% lower on last season. The Spanish supply should be normal or possibly up on last season. Normally however the Spanish mangoes demand a higher price.

Faria explains that Germany is their biggest customer at the moment. At the moment Palmer and Tommy are available and Keith will arriving mid September, followed by Kent giving us the whole range until we stop at the end of the year.

More and more consumers are looking for ‘ready to eat’, Palmer, Keith and Kent shall be the trend for those markets.

“In general Fruit from Mexico has very poor quality, from Central America it is moderate, from Brazil is good with some minor defects and from Senegal it cant be send  too ripe, but appearance is moderate to good,” explains Faria. “It is too soon to tell for Israel, at end of month we will know more. Spain is not yet in market.”

For more information:
Carlos André de Faria
Sun City bv
Klappolder 191
2665 MP Bleiswijk
Tel: +31 10 2667640
[email protected]
www.scf-mango.com

Publication date: 8/13/2013
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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Brazil: Embrapa presents new variety of black grapes

Brazil: Embrapa presents new variety of black grapes

The Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa) introduced the new range of black table grapes with seeds BRS Nubia. “Among its main attributes, the new variety has a uniformity in colour, requires less work when being cultivated, and is suitable for hot climates (subtropical or tropical moist, semi-arid),” says Embrapa’s Grape and Wine researcher Juan Dimas Garcia Maia, one of the coordinators of Embrapa’s Grape Genetic Improvement Program.

Núbia BRS is an important evolution in the domestic production of black table grapes with seeds. According to Dimas, so far, the only crop of this type produced on a larger scale in the country was “Brazil” a spontaneous genetic mutation from the Benitaka variety. However, in Brazil, it is a variety that has little colour expression when its ripening coincides with periods of high temperatures and high production at which point its colour is at a midpoint between the black and red.

Apart from which, under these circumstances, it is a crop that requires a great deal of labour to manage its racemes.

Researcher Patricia Ritschel, Coordinator of the Grape Genetic Improvement program, said that the large size of the new crop’s gores, measuring 24 mm to 34 mm, is obtained without the use of growth regulators such as gibberellins. That means that the Nubia BRS’s gores opulence aligns with the prospect of a more sustainable production.

The new variety stands out for the amount of health beneficial substances it has in its shortest cycle, thus saving money in the application of fungicides and postharvest conservation.

Nubia BRS was tested in the validation areas of Jales (Northwest of São Paulo), Petrolina (PE, in the Valle do Submédio San Francisco), Marialva (Northern Paraná) and Jaíba (North of Minas Gerais), in farms of producers and affiliate companies. It was recommended for all these regions because of its good performance. This is the result of a cross between the Michele Palieri and Arkansas 2095 varieties that was carried out in 2000 in Bento Gonçalves, Brazil.

Publication date: 8/9/2013


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