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Much fewer Brazilian mangoes over the past weeks

numbers are increasing now
Much fewer Brazilian mangoes over the past weeks

Although the total mango supply from Brazil this year is 9% higher than last year, supply was significantly lower in the past few weeks. Wholesalers mentioned daily shortages, and weren’t able to meet demand. Below are the containers shipped over the past few weeks from Brazil to Europe, compared to last year:


Containers of mangoes Brazil – Europe

Week
2014
2013
36
24
68
37
31
85
38
28
67
39
43
90
40
81
127
41
101
132
42
148
149


“Supply has been significantly lower for a few weeks, but now it’s getting there and surpassing it. This will also influence prices. Last week, the mango price was around 9/10 Euro. This week, we’re at about 8-9 Euro. Next week, I’m expecting us to reach 7/8 Euro, and depending on what else will come in, we could go down further to 5/6 Euro”, one importer says. “Those are still great prices, by the way.”

The quality of the mangoes is perfect, according to the trader, but that’s never a big issue with natural blossoming of the second semester. The stronger local market does influence trade quite a bit, according to the importer: “I expect we’ll never get the volumes we used to have in the past from Brazil.”

Publication date: 10/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Much fewer Brazilian mangoes over the past weeks

numbers are increasing now
Much fewer Brazilian mangoes over the past weeks

Although the total mango supply from Brazil this year is 9% higher than last year, supply was significantly lower in the past few weeks. Wholesalers mentioned daily shortages, and weren’t able to meet demand. Below are the containers shipped over the past few weeks from Brazil to Europe, compared to last year:


Containers of mangoes Brazil – Europe

Week
2014
2013
36
24
68
37
31
85
38
28
67
39
43
90
40
81
127
41
101
132
42
148
149


“Supply has been significantly lower for a few weeks, but now it’s getting there and surpassing it. This will also influence prices. Last week, the mango price was around 9/10 Euro. This week, we’re at about 8-9 Euro. Next week, I’m expecting us to reach 7/8 Euro, and depending on what else will come in, we could go down further to 5/6 Euro”, one importer says. “Those are still great prices, by the way.”

The quality of the mangoes is perfect, according to the trader, but that’s never a big issue with natural blossoming of the second semester. The stronger local market does influence trade quite a bit, according to the importer: “I expect we’ll never get the volumes we used to have in the past from Brazil.”

Publication date: 10/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Much fewer Brazilian mangoes over the past weeks

numbers are increasing now
Much fewer Brazilian mangoes over the past weeks

Although the total mango supply from Brazil this year is 9% higher than last year, supply was significantly lower in the past few weeks. Wholesalers mentioned daily shortages, and weren’t able to meet demand. Below are the containers shipped over the past few weeks from Brazil to Europe, compared to last year:


Containers of mangoes Brazil – Europe

Week
2014
2013
36
24
68
37
31
85
38
28
67
39
43
90
40
81
127
41
101
132
42
148
149


“Supply has been significantly lower for a few weeks, but now it’s getting there and surpassing it. This will also influence prices. Last week, the mango price was around 9/10 Euro. This week, we’re at about 8-9 Euro. Next week, I’m expecting us to reach 7/8 Euro, and depending on what else will come in, we could go down further to 5/6 Euro”, one importer says. “Those are still great prices, by the way.”

The quality of the mangoes is perfect, according to the trader, but that’s never a big issue with natural blossoming of the second semester. The stronger local market does influence trade quite a bit, according to the importer: “I expect we’ll never get the volumes we used to have in the past from Brazil.”

Publication date: 10/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian apples expanding to India, Russia and Middle East

Grupo Fischer
Brazilian apples expanding to India, Russia and Middle East


The Brazilian Grupo Fischer was created in 1932 by the German Carl Fischer, but only started expanding exponentially from the 1960’s with the construction of Citrosuco’s juice processing plant.
                    
The Citrosuco division, devoted to the production of orange juice, introduced the means for offshore transportation, and in 1985 it started working also with apples in Fraiburgo, Santa Catarina. Today the group is formed by both the orange juice and apple production segments.

The Apple Businesses currently owns around 2,500 hectares of apple plantations, almost 3,000 hectares of pines (for wood extraction); it produces about 1,200 tonnes of kiwis per year and another part is devoted to seeds, soya beans, corn, etc., although apples are the core of the business.

Fischer’s apple production reaches 150,000 tonnes per year; 60% Gala and 40% Fuji. “We believe that the Royal Gala in our country is the best in the world, not only in terms of colour, but also flavour. When it comes to Fuji, it has a good colour and flavour as well, although the shape is flat.  explains Wilson Passos, commercial manager of Fischer.

80% of the fruit (both Gala and Fuji) is distributed in the domestic market and 20% is exported, mostly to Europe (Finland, Sweden, Denmark, the UK, the Netherlands and Germany) and the Middle East. Wilson affirms that “we are also trying to expand to India and Russia for next year.”

Winnie Hsia , export analist, adds that “we already had some business with Russia six years ago, and it is not an easy market, as they demand cheaper fruit and big sizes. We also ask for advanced payment of 90% of the costs.” Rafael Negrini says that we are working with a government agency  APEX to find potential importers. We are also going to Moscow’s next fair in September.”

One of Fischer’s most noteworthy aspects in terms of marketing is its brand “Turma da Monica” (Monica’s gang), based on a famous character in Brazil. “We have had this brand for 20 years, and its main principle is to promote fruit consumption amongst children. All the small-sized Cat-1 fruit ranging between 150 and 216 goes directly to this brand,” affirms Wilson.


Las Manzanas “Turma da Monica”

Despite being targeted at children, the brand has however become famous amongst other segments, mainly because “the fruit is smaller and suitable for a snack and it has a great sweet taste; it can also be easily stored in the refrigerator,” explains Rafael.

Wilson assures that Fischer is also constantly in touch with consumers by means of a phone number, which they can use to report problems or give suggestions. “We also frequently conduct market researches in collaboration with supermarkets when we introduce new varieties, and this is another way to be in contact with the market.”

“We are always working in the development of new varieties to improve aspects such as colour, reducing the application of agricultural pesticides, improving their resistance to pests and increasing their shelf life,” affirms Wilson.

Fischer also makes great efforts in terms of traceability, which is enforced for the entire production. Wilson assures that “we also strive to meet the requirements for every certification that our clients demand, including Global G.A.P., BRC or HACCP and the enforcement of good practices in both packing houses and plantations.” Rafael adds that “Fischer is really oriented towards sustainability and reducing waste, inspecting all processes from harvest to final sale, including sorting and transport.”
In terms of future plans, Fischer is currently researching new clones in an effort to expand its range of varieties, focusing on Royal Gala apples, aiming to increase its market share by 20-30%, both domestically and internationally and to cover the growing demand from its clients.

“Russia and India are promising markets for us in this direction. We already have a good relationship with a company in India, but the problem in that market is that there is a need of more clarity about what to include in the phytosanitary certification, as there are numerous rules in place to protect the domestic production, ” explains Wilson.

Rafael adds that “we have asked the Brazilian authorities to negotiate to make the process easier. Last season we were not able to get the necessary certifications, but next year we expect to be able to enter the Indian market.”

 “Fischer’s main philosophy is to always deliver what was committed with our customers,” concludes the commercial manager.
 

Publication date: 9/12/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian apples expanding to India, Russia and Middle East

Grupo Fischer
Brazilian apples expanding to India, Russia and Middle East


The Brazilian Grupo Fischer was created in 1932 by the German Carl Fischer, but only started expanding exponentially from the 1960’s with the construction of Citrosuco’s juice processing plant.
                    
The Citrosuco division, devoted to the production of orange juice, introduced the means for offshore transportation, and in 1985 it started working also with apples in Fraiburgo, Santa Catarina. Today the group is formed by both the orange juice and apple production segments.

The Apple Businesses currently owns around 2,500 hectares of apple plantations, almost 3,000 hectares of pines (for wood extraction); it produces about 1,200 tonnes of kiwis per year and another part is devoted to seeds, soya beans, corn, etc., although apples are the core of the business.

Fischer’s apple production reaches 150,000 tonnes per year; 60% Gala and 40% Fuji. “We believe that the Royal Gala in our country is the best in the world, not only in terms of colour, but also flavour. When it comes to Fuji, it has a good colour and flavour as well, although the shape is flat.  explains Wilson Passos, commercial manager of Fischer.

80% of the fruit (both Gala and Fuji) is distributed in the domestic market and 20% is exported, mostly to Europe (Finland, Sweden, Denmark, the UK, the Netherlands and Germany) and the Middle East. Wilson affirms that “we are also trying to expand to India and Russia for next year.”

Winnie Hsia , export analist, adds that “we already had some business with Russia six years ago, and it is not an easy market, as they demand cheaper fruit and big sizes. We also ask for advanced payment of 90% of the costs.” Rafael Negrini says that we are working with a government agency  APEX to find potential importers. We are also going to Moscow’s next fair in September.”

One of Fischer’s most noteworthy aspects in terms of marketing is its brand “Turma da Monica” (Monica’s gang), based on a famous character in Brazil. “We have had this brand for 20 years, and its main principle is to promote fruit consumption amongst children. All the small-sized Cat-1 fruit ranging between 150 and 216 goes directly to this brand,” affirms Wilson.


Las Manzanas “Turma da Monica”

Despite being targeted at children, the brand has however become famous amongst other segments, mainly because “the fruit is smaller and suitable for a snack and it has a great sweet taste; it can also be easily stored in the refrigerator,” explains Rafael.

Wilson assures that Fischer is also constantly in touch with consumers by means of a phone number, which they can use to report problems or give suggestions. “We also frequently conduct market researches in collaboration with supermarkets when we introduce new varieties, and this is another way to be in contact with the market.”

“We are always working in the development of new varieties to improve aspects such as colour, reducing the application of agricultural pesticides, improving their resistance to pests and increasing their shelf life,” affirms Wilson.

Fischer also makes great efforts in terms of traceability, which is enforced for the entire production. Wilson assures that “we also strive to meet the requirements for every certification that our clients demand, including Global G.A.P., BRC or HACCP and the enforcement of good practices in both packing houses and plantations.” Rafael adds that “Fischer is really oriented towards sustainability and reducing waste, inspecting all processes from harvest to final sale, including sorting and transport.”
In terms of future plans, Fischer is currently researching new clones in an effort to expand its range of varieties, focusing on Royal Gala apples, aiming to increase its market share by 20-30%, both domestically and internationally and to cover the growing demand from its clients.

“Russia and India are promising markets for us in this direction. We already have a good relationship with a company in India, but the problem in that market is that there is a need of more clarity about what to include in the phytosanitary certification, as there are numerous rules in place to protect the domestic production, ” explains Wilson.

Rafael adds that “we have asked the Brazilian authorities to negotiate to make the process easier. Last season we were not able to get the necessary certifications, but next year we expect to be able to enter the Indian market.”

 “Fischer’s main philosophy is to always deliver what was committed with our customers,” concludes the commercial manager.
 

Publication date: 9/12/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Chiquita to reconsider previously rejected Brazilian buyout

The merger agreement Chiquita Brands International Inc. had announced with Dublin, Ireland-based Fyffes plc is once again at risk. Fyffes has granted Chiquita a waiver permitting it to engage in discussions with the Cutrale Group and the Safra Group, a pair of Brazilian companies that submitted an Aug. 11 buyout proposal.  

At the time, Chiquita said the offer was not in the best interest of its shareholders and reaffirmed its recommendation that they vote to approve the Chiquita-Fyffes merger; however, Chiquita has now sent a letter to Cutrale and Safra indicating its willingness to offer to the pair of companies the opportunity to present its final and best offer.

Chiquita also announced that the special meeting of shareholders to vote on the proposed merger with Fyffes has been postponed to Oct. 3. The meeting had been scheduled for Sept. 17.

“Chiquita does not expect to update the market with any further information unless and until the board has reached a decision on a definitive course of action,” the company said in a press release.

In the interim, Chiquita continues to recommend that its shareholders vote for the Fyffes transaction.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chiquita to reconsider previously rejected Brazilian buyout

The merger agreement Chiquita Brands International Inc. had announced with Dublin, Ireland-based Fyffes plc is once again at risk. Fyffes has granted Chiquita a waiver permitting it to engage in discussions with the Cutrale Group and the Safra Group, a pair of Brazilian companies that submitted an Aug. 11 buyout proposal.  

At the time, Chiquita said the offer was not in the best interest of its shareholders and reaffirmed its recommendation that they vote to approve the Chiquita-Fyffes merger; however, Chiquita has now sent a letter to Cutrale and Safra indicating its willingness to offer to the pair of companies the opportunity to present its final and best offer.

Chiquita also announced that the special meeting of shareholders to vote on the proposed merger with Fyffes has been postponed to Oct. 3. The meeting had been scheduled for Sept. 17.

“Chiquita does not expect to update the market with any further information unless and until the board has reached a decision on a definitive course of action,” the company said in a press release.

In the interim, Chiquita continues to recommend that its shareholders vote for the Fyffes transaction.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

“A lot of overlap in European and Brazilian melons over the next few weeks”

Lean van den Hombergh, Frankort & Koning:
“A lot of overlap in European and Brazilian melons over the next few weeks”

The Brazilian melon season is coming slowly but surely. Frankort & Koning expect the first arrivals on Friday, after which the numbers will increase weekly. Commercial director Leon van den Hombergh expects a difficult start to the season. “There are a number of melons on the field in Spain. Prices of around a dime per kilo are being made and the qualities vary strongly. We won’t compete with Brazilian melons in price, so it will have to be done in quality.”



 
“Spain can mainly continue with yellow melons and watermelons for a while, but there are also quite a few Galia and Cantaloupe available. I expect an overlap until around week 37/38 and it will be even later for yellow melons and watermelons, depending on the quality,” says Leon. “The mediocre weather recently has meant a disappointing consumption. Spain has harvest the largest reserves. The Spanish melons also aren’t allowed into Russia, so there is enough left to be marketed.”

“The factor with the largest influence on the melon market is still the weather. it wasn’t to our advantage over the last few weeks, but if the weather cooperates, we know we can sell a lot, despite the large supply. The week has started with sun, which gives consumers hope. We need good weather to get the melon feeling back. But we know this is a challenge. Brazil has a strong production and the first few weeks will be tough, especially now that there is a lot of cheap alternative fruit on the market.”

For more information: 
Leon van den Hombergh
Frankort & Koning
Venrayseweg 126
5928 RH Venlo
Tel: +31 (077) 389 72 72
Fax: +31 (077) 382 61 34
www.frankort.nl

Publication date: 9/2/2014


FreshPlaza.com