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Second wave of California figs brings more volume

The California fig season started strong with great sizing and quality. While bigger sizing brought optimism to retailers looking for a premium at checkout, a lack of volume kept figs from being promotable.

The second season is also sizing well with the bonus of more volume, according to Kurt Cappelluti, sales manager for Stellar Distributing, based in Madera, CA.KurtKurt Cappelluti

“It could be the best one we’ve ever had as far as growth and production on our 300 plus acres of young trees,” Cappelluti said. “That means we’ll have figs as late as anyone. The young trees will give us a ton of production, which was missing during the first season, and sizing looks to be better. That’s good news for retailers looking to satisfy fig fans.”

Regular rain through California’s 2016 spring season benefitted the young fig trees, according to Cappelluti. After several years of severe drought, routine rain pushed growth on the young trees and is now pushing good volume.

“This year’s quality will be as good as our 2015 season and the great volume will give us strong supply into November,” he added. “It’s exciting when nature and our plans come together for a season like this. The people who love figs will love the 2016 season.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California Giant brings a taste of Wimbledon to New York

New Yorkers almost forgot what city they were in this week as they experienced a real grass tennis court, tennis pros, and real fresh strawberries and cream right in the middle of Manhattan.

California Giant Berry Farms, based in Watsonville, CA, partnered with HSBC Bank to bring the complete Wimbledon experience to locals and tourists in downtown Manhattan across from Madison Square Park facing the iconic Flat Iron Building.

berries-in-cartNew Yorkers were treated to more than 10,000 samples of fresh strawberries and real whipped cream.More than 10,000 samples of fresh strawberries and real whipped cream were being given to fans this week from California Giant-branded carts. Each container of berries carries a QR code linked to www.calgiant.com/win, providing consumers more information about California Giant and the longstanding Wimbledon tradition of fresh berries and cream.

As tennis fans, moms with kids, and business people enjoyed their berries, they had the opportunity to watch matches on the grass court between pros Monica Seles and Jim Courier in doubles matches against young tennis players enjoying the experience. Additionally, monitors were set up so people could watch the real Wimbledon matches while enjoying other interactive activities.

“With summer officially upon us and our strawberry season peaking now, this is a great time to interact with consumers and build brand loyalty,” Cindy Jewell, director of marketing for Cal Giant, said in a press release. “Additionally, we tied in with several local restaurants in the area that are featuring our berries in Wimbledon-inspired menu items in support of the event.”

This is the fifth year that California Giant Berry Farms has partnered with HSBC Bank in New York City to launch Wimbledon activities in the U.S. to coincide with the beginning of match play in London.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Collaboration brings red flesh apples

Redmoon® Surprise
Collaboration brings red flesh apples

Redmoon® Surprise is a new brand for a series of red flesh apples. The brand is born out of the collaboration between French Escande and KIKU Variety Management from the Braun brothers, known for the global brand KIKU. “KIKU is one of the best addresses globally for the management of varieties and trademarks,” explains Benoit Escande.


Thomas Braun, Benoit Escande, Hans Scholten and Jürgen Braun present the new brand Redmoon® Surprise at Interpoma 2014.

“Wth KIKU®, but also with other brands such as the snack apple ISAAQ® and Crimson Snow®, the Brauns have proven to be professional and capable in introducing global novelties which benefit both the producer and consumer. It is all about high quality products with a great eating experience.”

“Quality,” explain the Brauns, “is our credo: we want to shock the consumer (in a positive way) and create new consumption, which only works with the highest quality. The series of Red Moon® red flesh apples, is really of high quality: some varieties are perfect for processing, i.e. juice and chips. Some are also good for fresh consumption. All of them have a very nice storage characteristics which helps them last until spring.”

“The key to success is to have a top product, and the other side is promotion. With red flesh apples you are coming to the market with an unique product, and you need to explain. That´s why we invented SURPRISE, in fact I get the surprise of the red flesh once I bite into the fruit.”

The group plans to conduct more trials throughout Europe, in order to understand the potential in different micro climates. The Brauns will plant some hectares in spring 2015 in their own farm. “The processing industry is very interested, the red flesh opens new possibilities for marketing, also because ingredients of those apples are very healthy. From autumn 2015 on we are able to deliver first fruit and fulfill contracts. Additionally our farm will show, on a large scale, how the varieties perform. We want attract new producers and sign new contracts, for both processing and fresh consumption.”

For more information:
Dr. Jürgen Braun
KIKU G.m.b.H.
Tel: +39 0471 660 640
Fax: +39 0471 660 190
Email: [email protected]

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Collaboration brings red flesh apples

Redmoon® Surprise
Collaboration brings red flesh apples

Redmoon® Surprise is a new brand for a series of red flesh apples. The brand is born out of the collaboration between French Escande and KIKU Variety Management from the Braun brothers, known for the global brand KIKU. “KIKU is one of the best addresses globally for the management of varieties and trademarks,” explains Benoit Escande.


Thomas Braun, Benoit Escande, Hans Scholten and Jürgen Braun present the new brand Redmoon® Surprise at Interpoma 2014.

“Wth KIKU®, but also with other brands such as the snack apple ISAAQ® and Crimson Snow®, the Brauns have proven to be professional and capable in introducing global novelties which benefit both the producer and consumer. It is all about high quality products with a great eating experience.”

“Quality,” explain the Brauns, “is our credo: we want to shock the consumer (in a positive way) and create new consumption, which only works with the highest quality. The series of Red Moon® red flesh apples, is really of high quality: some varieties are perfect for processing, i.e. juice and chips. Some are also good for fresh consumption. All of them have a very nice storage characteristics which helps them last until spring.”

“The key to success is to have a top product, and the other side is promotion. With red flesh apples you are coming to the market with an unique product, and you need to explain. That´s why we invented SURPRISE, in fact I get the surprise of the red flesh once I bite into the fruit.”

The group plans to conduct more trials throughout Europe, in order to understand the potential in different micro climates. The Brauns will plant some hectares in spring 2015 in their own farm. “The processing industry is very interested, the red flesh opens new possibilities for marketing, also because ingredients of those apples are very healthy. From autumn 2015 on we are able to deliver first fruit and fulfill contracts. Additionally our farm will show, on a large scale, how the varieties perform. We want attract new producers and sign new contracts, for both processing and fresh consumption.”

For more information:
Dr. Jürgen Braun
KIKU G.m.b.H.
Tel: +39 0471 660 640
Fax: +39 0471 660 190
Email: [email protected]

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Stemilt brings locales to life in new Rushing Rivers Pear video

Rushing-Rivers-Pears

Stemilt is giving consumers a look at its world renowned pear locales in a new video that highlights the company’s heritage and its position growing and packing pears in Washington state’s Wenatchee and Entiat river valleys.

The video features high-definition aerial footage that was shot by a drone helicopter during harvest. Throughout the short video, second-generation pear growers Mike Taylor and Rudy Prey tell the story of where Stemilt’s Rushing Rivers pears come from and what makes the two river valleys the best in the world for growing pears.

The Rushing Rivers pear video debuted at PMA Fresh Summit, and now Stemilt has taken it to its website, blog and social media channels in order to share with consumers what makes Rushing Rivers pears so unique.

“We know from research and our own engagement with consumers that people want to know where their food comes from and who grew it, so we focused this video on telling that story,” Roger Pepperl, Stemilt marketing director, said in a press release.Rushing-Rivers-Pears “The locales Rushing Rivers pears come from are to pears what the Napa Valley is to wine. We want consumers to experience these locales and visually sharing our farms and passion for quality with them in this video allows them to do just that.”

Stemilt and its long-time pear partners, Peshastin Hi-Up Growers, have been growing pears in the Wenatchee River Valley and Entiat River Valley for decades. These two river valleys run parallel of each other and are separated only by the peaks of the Cascade Mountain range. The alpine peaks keep orchards cool during the warm summer months and serve to protect delicate pears. The two rivers are recharged by fresh mountain snowpack each spring to provide a pure and plentiful water source for producing dessert-flavored pears.

“The video focuses on the unique features of the Wenatchee and Entiat river valleys and how those features combine to create a perfect growing environment where pears thrive. It’s the story that our family growers in the area have known and told for so long, and the story that consumers hear first-hand in the Rushing Rivers pear video,” Pepperl said in the release.

Back in August, Stemilt introduced “Rushing Rivers” as its label for pears and began packing pears in a new carton. The white box features the Rushing Rivers logo and tagline “the best pear locales in the world,” and just like the video, helps tell the story of where the pears inside came from and how they were grown.

“The ‘Rushing Rivers’ label and new carton is already proving to be a great merchandising vehicle for pears,” Pepperl said. “Displays and signage around Rushing Rivers allow retailers to bring the beauty of where Stemilt pears come from and the passion that goes into growing each one, into their stores. Pears should be prominently displayed during the late fall and winter seasons and promoting Rushing Rivers pears is a perfect way to build category excitement and repeat purchases among shoppers.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Hart’s brings local food to downtown Rochester, N.Y.

Local food may be all the rage these days, but Hart’s Local Grocers in Rochester, N.Y., is taking the trend to the next level. The percentage of local products storewide is in the double digits, according to general manager Dean Sparks. “We’re a small footprint, as compared to bigger chains, and so we’re able to bring in smaller vendors that are working with maybe two or three farmers’ markets in the area or they’re selling [products] off their farm, that …

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Supermarket News

Summer brings cherries jubilee for some cargo carriers

Summer brings cherries jubilee for some cargo carriers

Virtually all of the phrases that incorporate the word “cherries” denote something happy and positive. That’s certainly the case this summer for cargo carriers serving the Pacific Northwest, as the banner cherry crop has been the cherry on top of the sundae.

This has been especially true for cargo carriers serving Seattle’s Sea-Tac International Airport and Vancouver International Airport in British Columbia.

Tom Green, senior manager for air cargo operations and development at Sea-Tac International Airport, says when the last cherry is picked in a few weeks, it will likely be the second strongest crop on record for the region. The crop is running ahead of forecasts and is huge compared to last year, when poor weather resulted in reduced tonnage. Cherries are the top perishable cargo shipped out of Sea-Tac.

It has been a bonanza for air cargo carriers, both those with freighters in their fleets and those who only carry the sweet fruit in their bellies. Eight cargo carriers who feature freighters have hauled cherries this summer out of Seattle, Green says. That’s in addition to belly-cargo-only carriers such as Delta.

It has become the summer of the cherry charter at Sea-Tac. China Eastern and Nippon Cargo have both added weekly charters, while Polar Air Cargo has flown three weekly charters. In addition, EVA has added three weekly flights, Asiana has added two flights, China Airlines has added six and Korean Air five weekly flights. That’s 21 flights beyond scheduled services.

Seven of the carriers with freighters serve Asian destinations while Cargolux brings Washington State cherries to Europe.

“The charters are coming in empty and filling total loads,” Green says.

This year’s crop has produced about 22 million 20-pound boxes of Washington State cherries with a couple of weeks to go in the season, says B.J. Thurlby, president of the Washington State Fruit Commission. He says 92 percent of exported cherries are shipped by air.

For Sea-Tac, the cherry cargo comes on the heels of a healthy first half of the year.

“Through June, our overall cargo tonnage is up 10 percent,” Green says. “It’s been a strong spring, certainly for exports.”

During the early weeks of the cherry season, Delta was primarily moving fruit to China and Japan. As the season has progressed, its cherry traffic also heads to Europe and Australia and will continue to do so through September. Ray Curtis, Delta’s senior vice president, global cargo sales, says Delta’s cherry business has more than doubled compared to 2013. The airline operates 10 daily wide-body flights from Seattle, including a recent expansion of its Asia schedule that added service to Seoul, Tokyo-Haneda and Hong Kong.

Air Canada is another belly-cargo carrier benefiting from the cherry bounty with flights from both Seattle and Vancouver, British Columbia. The season’s first cherries move from Seattle to Asia.

“We’ve been able to maximize dedicated reefer trucks out of Seattle connecting into our global gateways in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal,” says Keola Pang-Ching, regional manager, cargo sales for the Western U.S. and Hawaii.

Pang-Ching says the addition of five more 777-300ers in Air Canada’s fleet has provided significant network capacity for the Northwest perishable customers. From its Vancouver gateway, Air Canada serves Narita, Incheon, Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai and has the only non-stop service to Sydney.  

Normally, the British Columbia cherry season begins later than the Washington State season, but an unusual amount of warm weather accelerated that process this year.

“Demand has been very strong into Hong Kong,” says Stephen Phillips, Air Canada regional manger, cargo sales for Western Canada. “We are also anticipating large volumes of cherries moving into Mainland China this year. Up until last year, British Columbia cherries were not allowed to be exported into Mainland China. As a result of trade missions and lobbying from the growers and packing houses, 2014 will be the first full season whereby we can move cherries from BC into Shanghai, Beijing and other parts of China.”

Source: www.aircargoworld.com

Publication date: 8/1/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Second Auction for Sunland Plant Brings In Almost $6 Million More for Creditors

Sunland Inc.’s peanut-processing plant at Portales, NM, has been sold to Canada’s Golden Boy Foods, a move that could restart a facility closed after a 2012 Salmonella outbreak that sickened 46 people in 20 states.

Golden Boy’s winning bid came Wednesday at the second court-ordered auction held in the past week to dispose of Sunland’s physical assets. It’s opening bid was a $ 25-million cash offer made Friday after the first auction.

North Carolina-based Hampton Farms then upped Golden Boy’s bid with an offer of $ 25.1 million, but that was immediately trumped by another bid of $ 26 million from Golden Boy, and there were no other offers.

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge for New Mexico David Thuma immediately approved the sale to Golden Boy as final for the processing plant that at one time produced more organic peanut butter than any other facility in the U.S.

Hampton Farms, the largest peanut roaster in the U.S., said it was disappointed to have come in second in the second auction for the facility.

After last week’s first auction, when Hampton Farms initially prevailed with a bid of $ 20.05 million, Golden Boy captured the court’s attention with its last-minute $ 25-million cash offer, which caused the judge to order the second auction.

Golden Boy’s late entry into the bidding means that $ 5.95 million more will be available to satisfy Sunland’s creditors, especially the unsecured ones.

Paul Henderson, head of Golden Boy’s nut butter business unit, was not exactly new to the proceedings. Henderson was interested in acquiring Sunland’s physical plant as soon as he heard about the bankruptcy last November. Golden Boy was then owned by Tricore Pacific Capital Inc., but was in the process of being sold to Post Holdings Inc.

As a result, Henderson could not proceed, but was told to monitor the sale proceedings. At the time, it appeared that the bankruptcy trustee was going forward with a sale of the property to California-based Ready Roast Nut Co. Henderson then learned of the auction from another Golden Boy employee, who saw a March 18, 2014, article about the auction planned for two days later. (The only news outlet publishing such an article on that day was Food Safety News.)

Golden Boy’s new owners were now interested in the purchase, and Henderson, who had visited the Portales facility in late 2013, immediately tried to reach the bankruptcy trustee in Roswell. However, he couldn’t since the trustee was in Albuquerque preparing for the hearing to approve the bid from the first auction.

Golden Boy then made its $ 25-million cash offer on March 21, making the funds available through a local title company, and putting the judge in a position to call for the second auction.

Food Safety News

Valentine’s Day brings sweet promos

Retailers are pulling out all the stops for Valentine’s Day. Some boast displays with flowers and candy. Others cross-merchandise everything from meal solutions, home decor products and novelty gift items, and toss in custom flower arrangements and free giveaways too. Valentine’s Day is one of the most heavily promoted holidays in supermarket circulars, with Mother’s Day as its closest contender, according to a 2013 report by ECRM, the Solon, Ohio-based market research and …

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Supermarket News

Foster Farms Outbreak Brings Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella Petition to the Fore

The outbreak of Salmonella linked to Foster Farms chicken products has some consumer advocates talking again about a petition filed in 2011 by the Center for Science in the Public Interest asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture to declare antibiotic-resistant Salmonella an adulterant. Doing so would allow the agency to recall meat based simply on tests.

“If tests showed that the meat tested positive for antibiotic-resistant Salmonella, that would be enough to trigger a recall,” said Caroline Smith DeWaal, CSPI’s director of the food safety program. “Right now, they’re saying they can’t recall the Foster Farms products because they don’t have specific evidence linking an individual who got sick to a package that contains both a lot number and date information that would allow them to track it back to a specific product coming back to the plant.”

This lack of information, she added, could be “totally overcome if they acted on our petition.”

Antibiotic resistance is a growing concern with all foodborne pathogens. While Salmonella outbreaks usually cause a 20-percent hospitalization rate, the Foster Farms outbreak has hospitalized 42 percent of its 317 victims due to antibiotic resistance.

“We’re asking for a declaration that the department consider these pathogens, which make people sick and cause more severe illnesses than your standard Salmonella, be treated as adulterants and subject to the same recall policies as E. coli O15:H7.”

USDA has yet to act on the petition even though a number of consumer groups has expressed support. In May 2013, 14 organizations, including the Center for Food Safety, Consumer Federation of America, Food and Water Watch, the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, and STOP Foodborne Illness, wrote to USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack to mark the two-year anniversary of the filing and urge the agency to act.

“The USDA currently recalls products contaminated with antibiotic-resistant Salmonella only after illnesses or hospitalizations, and possibly deaths, have occurred,” the groups wrote. “That reactionary approach continues to put consumers at undue risk from illnesses that are more complicated to treat, due to ineffective antibiotics; treatment failure increases the risk of death.”

“Outbreaks like this are tragic reminders that the government just can’t wait to act on urgent public health issues,” DeWaal said. “The fact that USDA has not acted on our petition in two-and-a-half years is just inviting more outbreaks like this and the agency is left with an inability to respond effectively to a consumer health threat.”

Food Safety News

Spain: Sugraone Seedless grape campaign brings heavy losses

Spain: Sugraone Seedless grape campaign brings heavy losses

Sadly, not all news regarding Murcia’s Summer crops are good, and Sugraone Seedless grapes appear to be bearing the brunt. Last Spring’s unusual weather conditions, with lower than normal temperatures, have taken a toll on the ripening process of this grape variety, preventing it from reaching its optimal sugar content, essential for its consumption. Additionally, those same temperatures also caused an excessive settling of the fruit, which also affected its quality, as reported by COAG.

The organisation reminded that the ideal moment for the harvest and sales of the Sugraone Seedless, which is the most produced variety in the Valley of Guadalentin, is the month of July, which was not possible this year, “which is made worse by the fact that it currently has to compete with other table grape varieties which are within their normal sales cycles.”

It is also worth noting that large volumes have been lost due to the presence of Oidium, a fungal disease with a powdery appearance which proliferates in conditions of moderate heat (15 to 25ºC) and high humidity. The production affected has had to be sold to the alcohol industries, which has entailed spectacular losses in value. Many grapes will also not be harvested.

These incidents will be reported by COAG Murcia to the Administrations so that the damage can be further assessed, opening the possibility for future compensations.

Source: Abc.es

Publication date: 8/15/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Ship Philly First brings competitors together to promote the Delaware River region

PHILADELPHIA — The infrastructure along the Delaware River is uniquely positioned to handle imports of international fruits and vegetables. With major facilities from Wilmington, DE, upriver to Philadelphia and southern New Jersey, a network of expediters, transporters, fumigators and cold storage facilities exist that tie a bow on the import package.

Ship Philly First is a three-year-old private marketing organization designed to promote the entire region. POD-1A U.S. Coast Guard vessel makes its way up the Delaware River between Philadelphia and New Jersey, with the Camden water tower and mammoth waterfront cranes in the background, at 8 a.m. on the morning of July 3. (Photo by Chip Carter)While there is nothing unique about that, what does set the Philly crowd apart is the fact that SPF has competitors working arm-in-arm to further all interests.

There are no banquets, no golf outings, no meetings at swanky resorts — instead all dues go straight to marketing and promotion.

“I am extremely proud of this community and it has been an honor to serve as president,” said Fred Sorbello, SPF president, owner of New Jersey’s Mullica Hill Group and himself a peach and apple grower. “I’ve learned a lot. The SPF membership is comprised of some really smart and knowledgeable people with world-class facilities. We’re also good listeners. We want to learn more. We want to know what is it you’re looking for from a port community that would help us work with you. We’re not saying we’ve got everything you need — we’re saying talk to us and tell us what you need. As a result we’ve become probably one of the more powerful organizations in Philadelphia now at a trade level.”

“The ports along the Delaware River are unique and the infrastructure is very entwined,” said Ed Fitzgerald, assistant vice president of import operations for OHL Inc. and SPF treasurer. “There is the business that’s 52 weeks out of the year, like bananas. During certain times of the year there are the mountains that come in — watermelons, cantaloupe — from various countries. That lays a good foundation because it’s consistent. It’s repetition.

“Then we have the deciduous product that’s 12 months out of the year too. Spanish clementines, Preurivan grapes, the Chilean season that runs all the way from December through May. There are smaller niche commodities like summer citrus and chestnuts out of Italy. That’s what makes us unique: In comparison to other ports where it’s seasonal, here it’s year-round. The cold storage facilities and expediters are intertwined. More and more commodities are coming on. The great thing about Philly, it is a backhaul market. And depending on the product, the cold treatment has to be north of the 39th parallel latitude and east of the 104th longitude. That is basically Philadelphia. Of course we’re in direct competition with New York, but New York does not have the cold storage facilities.”

SPF member Larry Antonucci, president of 721 Logistics and its J&K Fresh East division, added, “We started our business here because of the infrastructure. We’re tired, as an ownership group and a company, that Philadelphia is considered a red-headed stepchild. As far as the service providers go and the infrastructure, the Class A railroads and other access we have, it’s very frustrating. The port just needs to be marketed better and if we can do that jointly — publicly, privately, those entities getting together and acting as one to publicize the port — we can certainly handle any kind of commodity form anywhere in the world.”

Even direct competitors are working together to promote the area’s services and benefits.

“Fred Sorbello is a friendly competitor and was the driving force behind Ship Philly First,” said Frank Manfredi of The Manfredi Cos. in Kennet Square, PA. “He asked me to join and then I went to my very first meeting and found myself sitting right next to another competitor, Rusty Lucca (of Lucca Cold Storage in Vineland, NJ). I’ve known Rusty and Fred, but as we talked and got to know each other better, we found our parents all had ag backgrounds, we all worked on farms, it was almost spooky how much we had in common.

“We are friendly competitors. If I lose a deal to Fred or Rusty I’ll have an opportunity to bid on that deal in three years. But if it the deal goes to Baltimore, none of us are getting it. We realized it’s all in our best interests to keep it here — then we’ll fight over it. So we’re not to be perceived as a threat to any other agency out there marketing the Delaware River — we just want to be waving a very big flag at a very important time as everybody’s jockeying for position.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Government Brings Out Everything It Has on Former PCA Executives

The federal government has sealed some recent proceedings involving defendant Mary Wilkerson in the criminal case against four former Peanut Corporation of America.

The former quality control manger for the PCA peanut processing plant at Blakely, GA was charged with two felony counts of obstruction of justice, the smallest slice of the government’s 76-count federal felony indictment against all four defendants.  The other three are brothers Stewart and Michael Parnell and plant manager Samuel Lightsey.

The criminal case against the four is being heard in the federal trial court for the Middle District of Georgia, not far from the Blakely plant that in 2008-09 shipped peanut butter and peanut paste that was contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium. The poisoned peanut butter killed nine people and sickened another 700 in a nationwide outbreak.

Judge W. Louis Sands scheduled a June 25 ex parte hearing with Wilkerson, her attorney, and government prosecutors, but that meeting was apparently cancelled. Still, sealed records now raise the question of whether Wilkerson might go from defendant to witness for the government before the trial begins.

Government and defense attorneys have also differed in their views on all the documents being produced as part of pre-trial discovery. Sands granted the government extra time to do its document dump of everything the enforcement agencies and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has on PCA.

The information amounts to 80 gigabytes, or 93,000 documents, including many that were seized by the FBI when it executed search warrants during the outbreak. Some were recovered using “forensic hard drives,” which mirror documents and emails found on confiscated devices.

While the government asked for more discovery time, it opposed giving the defendants the same break by extending their deadline for pre-trial motions by two weeks to July 29. Attorneys for Stewart Parnell, the former chief executive officer of the defunct peanut company, said they needed more time because the two-and-half to three million documents they’ve already received are in an unsearchable format.

The government said the defense should not need more time because except for 14 additional CDs provided on June 17, all the other documents were provided to the defendants when they were charged last February.

In other pre-trial action, defense attorneys notified the court that John James Farmer III, a former science official for U.S. Public Health, would be called as an expert witness. Also, attorneys for Parnell said PCA’s food safety manual and insurance policies would be introduced at trial.

Food Safety News