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RBI Clarification – Detection and Reporting of counterfeit notes

RBI/2012-13/562 DCM (FNVD) No.5840/16.01.05/2012-13 June 27, 2013 The Chairman and Managing Directors/ Chief Executives Officers of All Scheduled Commercial Banks Madam / Sir, Detection and Reporting of counterfeit notes Please refer to the paragraph 115 (extract enclosed) of the Monetary Policy Statement for 2013-14 announced on May 3, 2013. It was indicated therein that the [...]

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Priority Sector Lending-Targets and Classification-Bank loans to MFIs for on-lending-Amendment in income generation criteria

RBI/2012-13/558 RPCD.CO.Plan.BC 80/04.09.01/2012-13 June 27, 2013 The Chairman/ Managing Director/ Chief Executive Officer [All scheduled commercial banks (excluding Regional Rural Banks)] Madam/Dear Sir, Priority Sector Lending-Targets and Classification-Bank loans to MFIs for on-lending- Amendment in income generation criteria Please refer to Paragraph VIII (a) of circular No. RPCD.CO.Plan. BC.13/04.09.01/2012-13 dated July 20, 2012 on Priority Sector Lending-Targets [...]

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RBI Rationalisation of Returns

RBI/2012-2013/556 MPD.PMD .BC.365/07.01.279/2012-13 June 27, 2012 Ashadha 6, 1935 (S) To, All Scheduled Commercial Banks Dear Sir / Madam, Rationalisation of Returns Please refer to our circular MPD.BC.218/07.01.279/2002-03 dated July 24, 2002 on the captioned subject. 2. At present, banks are submitting following SFR Returns/Statements. SFR II SFR III SFR VIII Statement on daily maintenance of SLR [...]

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RBI Guidelines on Valuation of Bonds issued by State Distribution Companies (Discoms)

RBI/2012-13/555 DBOD.BP.BC.No.105/21.04.132/2012-13 June 27, 2013 All Scheduled Commercial Banks (excluding RRBs) Dear Sir, Bonds issued by State Distribution Companies (Discoms) – Guidelines on Valuation Government of India had formulated and approved a Scheme for Financial Restructuring of State Owned Power Discoms to enable their turnaround and ensure their long term viability (Ministry of Power, GoI [...]

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RBI Notification on Risk Management and Inter Bank Dealings

RBI//2012-13/554 A.P. (DIR Series) Circular No.121 June 26, 2013 To All Authorised Dealer Category – I Banks Madam / Sir, Risk Management and Inter Bank Dealings Attention of Authorized Dealers Category – I (AD Category – I) banks is invited to section C of the Annex to A.P.(DIR Series) Circular No. 32 dated December 28, 2010  [...]

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RBI Guidelines on Securities Transactions to be followed by Primary Dealers

RBI/2012-13/549 IDMD.PCD.13/14.03.07/2012-13 June 26, 2013 To All Market Participants Dear Sir/Madam, Guidelines on Securities Transactions to be followed by Primary Dealers Please refer to our Notifications IDMC.PDRS.PDS.No.2/03.64.00/2000-01 dated November 13, 2000 and IDMC. No. PDRS/2049A/03.64.00/99-2000 dated December 31, 1999 on the captioned subject. 2. The above directions have been reviewed and it has been decided that Primary Dealers are [...]

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Settlement of OTC transactions in Corporate Bonds on DvP-I basis

RBI/2012-13/550 IDMD.PCD. 11 /14.03.06/2012-13 June 26, 2013 To All Market Participants Dear Sir/Madam, Settlement of OTC transactions in Corporate Bonds on DvP-I basis Please refer to our Notification IDMD. No.1764/11.08.38/2009-10 dated October 16, 2009 on the captioned subject. 2. The above directions have been reviewed and it has been decided that MCX-SX Clearing Corporation Limited is also [...]

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How social is your business?

Engaging your customers through social media can feel daunting.

It requires a steady stream of useful content, the will to involve customers more in your business, and the capacity to ask and respond to questions. And there’s always the pressure to be there, 24/7.

With responsibility devolved to Marketing or PR, a tempting option is to bring in outside help. Tech companies offer to automate content around the themes you want to cover. Agencies will run your social media presence for you.

But before rushing to automate or outsource, ask yourself why it’s called “social” media in the first place.

It enables people to interact, to share information, opinions, and emotions. People are social with people, not brands. If it were as simple as automation or outsourcing, then free customer service lines would be everybody’s best friend.

There are already numerous conversations between customers and employees going on in your stores every day. So why not make social media a business-wide enterprise, rather than the responsibility of a department?

Enable the employee who has got the content, to share the content. Enable the employee who knows the answer, to give the answer. And encourage your employees to spread the word through their own networks.

Of course, it’s not without risk. Any conversation can quickly reach hundreds or thousands of people, and unlike a simple conversation in-store it remains a permanent record. Sensible policies and practices need to be put in place. And it’s essential that you’ve first established a culture in your business that lives and breathes the brand, so your employees are natural ambassadors.

But think of the upside. Your customers and employees would be intermingling and engaging in multiple conversations beyond the store. Pretty much all of your employees would now be on the frontline.

It would certainly make your business more social. What do you think of the benefits and risks involved?

Simon Uwins is a former CMO of fresh&easy and Tesco UK, and author of Creating Loyal Brands (2014). Find him online at www.simonuwins.com.

Supermarket News

How social is your business?

Engaging your customers through social media can feel daunting.

It requires a steady stream of useful content, the will to involve customers more in your business, and the capacity to ask and respond to questions. And there’s always the pressure to be there, 24/7.

With responsibility devolved to Marketing or PR, a tempting option is to bring in outside help. Tech companies offer to automate content around the themes you want to cover. Agencies will run your social media presence for you.

But before rushing to automate or outsource, ask yourself why it’s called “social” media in the first place.

It enables people to interact, to share information, opinions, and emotions. People are social with people, not brands. If it were as simple as automation or outsourcing, then free customer service lines would be everybody’s best friend.

There are already numerous conversations between customers and employees going on in your stores every day. So why not make social media a business-wide enterprise, rather than the responsibility of a department?

Enable the employee who has got the content, to share the content. Enable the employee who knows the answer, to give the answer. And encourage your employees to spread the word through their own networks.

Of course, it’s not without risk. Any conversation can quickly reach hundreds or thousands of people, and unlike a simple conversation in-store it remains a permanent record. Sensible policies and practices need to be put in place. And it’s essential that you’ve first established a culture in your business that lives and breathes the brand, so your employees are natural ambassadors.

But think of the upside. Your customers and employees would be intermingling and engaging in multiple conversations beyond the store. Pretty much all of your employees would now be on the frontline.

It would certainly make your business more social. What do you think of the benefits and risks involved?

Simon Uwins is a former CMO of fresh&easy and Tesco UK, and author of Creating Loyal Brands (2014). Find him online at www.simonuwins.com.

Supermarket News

“More than anything else in the fruit business, the key is the orchard”

Interview with Marc Peyres, of Blue Whale
“More than anything else in the fruit business, the key is the orchard”

Last year’s apple season for the French exporter Blue Whale, which accounts for around 22% of the country’s fresh apple export, started really well, with very good prices between summer and Christmas for many varieties. In the second half, however, the market came under pressure and some prices dropped, although on average it was a good campaign.


Marc Peyres from Blue Whale

Click here for the photo report

Marc Peyres affirms that “this season, however, with a better crop in terms of both quality and size, will not be as good, mainly for two reasons: firstly, because last season finished with a bad trend, and secondly, because of this year’s poor balance between supply and demand. We hope it will improve for the second half.”

Blue Whale focuses on the three apple varieties that yield the best results in the area and which, according to Marc cannot reach the same quality in other places of Europe: Gala, with 64,000 tonnes; Pink Lady (the most profitable in the area for the past five years), with 42,000 tonnes, and Granny Smith, with 34,000 tonnes.


Chantecler

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“We also produce Chantecler, which has a nice niche market in France, and our Fuji premium is very successful in Spain and France. Additionally, we have some other smaller and newer varieties, like Canada Gris or Joya.”

In recent seasons, there has been a dropping trend in the volumes of Southern Hemisphere apples imported to Europe. Marc Peyres says that “this is due to rising costs, which is reducing their competitiveness. Europe is also one of the few areas where imports have been massive and this is changing.”

Regarding the Russian ban and the Polish oversupply, Marc Peyres says that “the question is whether the Polish produce is suitable for Western consumers. They produce perhaps a good Elstar or Jonagored, but not a good Gala or Golden. There is a market for price and another for quality, and although we cannot compete on the former, we can on the latter.”


Coldstore

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Marc Peyres  says that Blue Whale exported just 10,000 tonnes of apples directly to Russia, last season, so for them, in this respect, it is not such a big deal. “It is certainly not as big a problem as that of peach and nectarine producers, who of course don’t have as long to adapt. But it will be really worrying for some varieties, if the ban continues after Janurary.”

Many sources also state that China’s production this year will drop by 10 to 20%, so there is no pressure on that front. “Additionally, India’s harvest this year is also not so high, so maybe they will start importing in December instead of March,” explains Marc.

He believes that the biggest problem for the Southern Hemisphere next season will be finding markets for their fruit, as “Europe will be full, and although there will be a bigger market in China or India, their conditions are not as easy as Europe’s.”

“Additionally, when you look at the volume Russia imports, you see that they purchase mostly cheap fruit, and they will not replace cheap Polish apples with expensive South American produce.”


Big boxes for far destinations

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Blue Whale currently exports to 50 countries outside Europe. “We prefer 10 small markets rather than just one large, because it gives you more options to ship your fruit depending on its characteristics. Last season, for example, we managed to ship our small fruit to Southeast Asia,” explains Marc. “Although selling outside Europe is always riskier.”

In terms of cultivation, Blue Whale has partnerships with growers in South America to be able to supply the Middle East and Asia during the off-season, packing in Chile and Brazil. Marc states that “more than anything else in fruit, the key is the orchard, and growers in that area are very competitive. With a good orchard and good growers you can accomplish a lot.”

When it comes to long-term expectations, he believes that Blue Whale will continue increasing its production volumes, but also remain involved in projects to renew its varieties, as “in the fruit business, you can sell cheap and survive for 10 years, but if you don’t renew, you have no future.”

For more information:
Marc Peyres
Blue Whale
Tel +33 563 215 656
Email: [email protected]
www.blue-whale.com

Publication date: 9/22/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Colombia using PMA Fresh Summit to open doors for new business in United States

The Colombian Pavilion at the 2014 Produce Marketing Association’s Fresh Summit Exposition will feature new opportunities for popular products, including avocado, goldenberry (uchuva), pineapple, herbs and limes.

Visitors to the Colombia Pavilion will be able to meet with exporters as well as promotion representatives and learn more about the new developments allowing for successful export of these products.

In the case of goldenberry (also known as uchuva, physalis or Cape gooseberry), Colombia is now approved by authorities for entry into the United States without cold treatment from certain parts of the country.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service has recognized the Bogota Savannah and parts of neighboring Boyacá and Cundinamarca departments above 2,200 meters as Medfly-free. The systems approach approved for this export scenario will allow Colombia exporters to ship a higher-quality, fresher product than those needing to be held in cold treatment. Goldenberry from Colombia is available year round.

Another development is the admissibility of Hass avocados from Colombia. The Colombian Hass avocado industry currently exports to Europe, and the industry continues to invest with the goal of expanding exports to the United States. Colombia’s Hass avocado production runs from September to June, with peaks from October to January.

The Colombian Pavilion will also promote exports of established products like fresh herbs (basil, mint, cilantro, dill, thyme, bay leaves) pineapples (variety MD 2 Golden) and limes (Tahiti).

Colombia’s long history of exporting flowers and fresh produce around the world coupled with extraordinary prime growing climates for specific products holds great promise for expanding sourcing deals for the United States. Country representatives will be on hand at Booth No. 4629 in Anaheim, CA, to discuss additional products and opportunities with interested parties.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Greenhouse Produce Co. adds sales veteran to business development role

Edgar (Eddie) Condes, former director of global sourcing and regional sales manager at Eurofresh Farms in Willcox, AZ, joined Greenhouse Produce Co., based in Vero Beach, FL, effective June 15.

In his new role as director of business development, Condes will be located at the Nogales, AZ, office and is responsible for sales, sourcing, channel and product development. His duties also will include assisting ownership in strategically developing the company’s growth.

At Greenhouse Produce, Condes, who spent close to two decades at Eurofresh, rejoins former colleagues Fried De Schouwer and Glen Bezanson, who were also formerly employed by Eurofresh Farms.

Greenhouse Produce Co. and its family of growers operate over 250 acres of greenhouse facilities in Mexico, ranging from high- to medium-tech facilities, securing year-round supply from Mexico and other Central American regions.

As a grower-shipper, GPC is dedicated to continuously improving the efficiency of its growing operations for optimal resource management while growing produce with superior flavor and ultimate safety.

Greenhouse Produce ships between 20 and 30 truckloads weekly to the United States and Canada through a forward distribution network stretching from its Arizona and Texas border warehouses to distribution points in Pennsylvania and California.

Its conventional and organic greenhouse product line includes a variety of tomatoes, such as beefsteak, on-the-vine, grape and Roma, as well as colored Bell peppers. GPC’s offering includes retail, club and food service packs.

With the help of its local partners, Greenhouse Produce recently founded Greenhouse Company de Mexico, which operates a 20,000-square-foot distribution center in Celaya, Guanajuato Mexico. GCM supports growers from seed selection, production advice, food safety and traceability support through local distribution, packaging and shipping services.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Greenhouse Produce Co. adds sales veteran to business development role

Edgar (Eddie) Condes, former director of global sourcing and regional sales manager at Eurofresh Farms in Willcox, AZ, joined Greenhouse Produce Co., based in Vero Beach, FL, effective June 15.

In his new role as director of business development, Condes will be located at the Nogales, AZ, office and is responsible for sales, sourcing, channel and product development. His duties also will include assisting ownership in strategically developing the company’s growth.

At Greenhouse Produce, Condes, who spent close to two decades at Eurofresh, rejoins former colleagues Fried De Schouwer and Glen Bezanson, who were also formerly employed by Eurofresh Farms.

Greenhouse Produce Co. and its family of growers operate over 250 acres of greenhouse facilities in Mexico, ranging from high- to medium-tech facilities, securing year-round supply from Mexico and other Central American regions.

As a grower-shipper, GPC is dedicated to continuously improving the efficiency of its growing operations for optimal resource management while growing produce with superior flavor and ultimate safety.

Greenhouse Produce ships between 20 and 30 truckloads weekly to the United States and Canada through a forward distribution network stretching from its Arizona and Texas border warehouses to distribution points in Pennsylvania and California.

Its conventional and organic greenhouse product line includes a variety of tomatoes, such as beefsteak, on-the-vine, grape and Roma, as well as colored Bell peppers. GPC’s offering includes retail, club and food service packs.

With the help of its local partners, Greenhouse Produce recently founded Greenhouse Company de Mexico, which operates a 20,000-square-foot distribution center in Celaya, Guanajuato Mexico. GCM supports growers from seed selection, production advice, food safety and traceability support through local distribution, packaging and shipping services.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Giumarra hires western region business manager

Giumarra has added Kellee Harris to its marketing team. Harris joins the company as western region business manager.

She comes to Giumarra from Package Containers Inc., where her responsibilities included business development and account management for the California, Utah and Colorado regions. She has also held positions in the nonprofit and sporting goods sectors, with an emphasis on marketing and sales.

“Kellee has an kellee harrisKellee Harrisimpressive background of results-proven work both inside and outside the produce industry,” Hillary Brick, senior vice president of marketing for the Giumarra Cos., said in a press release. “Her knowledge of customer accounts and strong history of project execution will make her a vital new member of our marketing team.”

Harris will be based in Portland, OR, and will manage key customer accounts in the western region of the United States and Canada, marketing Giumarra’s complete product line and developing new promotions and strategies. She will also represent the company at industry tradeshows and events, and Harris will be responsible for spearheading the marketing efforts of Giumarra’s Southern Hemisphere and Reedley sales divisions.

“I am honored to join the progressive team at Giumarra, whose family legacy of integrity and quality is known and respected throughout the fresh produce industry,” Harris said in the release. “The company and its network of domestic and international growers are poised for continued growth and I look forward to working with them on new, innovative ideas in marketing, merchandising and packaging.”  

 

 

 

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Giumarra hires western region business manager

Giumarra has added Kellee Harris to its marketing team. Harris joins the company as western region business manager.

She comes to Giumarra from Package Containers Inc., where her responsibilities included business development and account management for the California, Utah and Colorado regions. She has also held positions in the nonprofit and sporting goods sectors, with an emphasis on marketing and sales.

“Kellee has an kellee harrisKellee Harrisimpressive background of results-proven work both inside and outside the produce industry,” Hillary Brick, senior vice president of marketing for the Giumarra Cos., said in a press release. “Her knowledge of customer accounts and strong history of project execution will make her a vital new member of our marketing team.”

Harris will be based in Portland, OR, and will manage key customer accounts in the western region of the United States and Canada, marketing Giumarra’s complete product line and developing new promotions and strategies. She will also represent the company at industry tradeshows and events, and Harris will be responsible for spearheading the marketing efforts of Giumarra’s Southern Hemisphere and Reedley sales divisions.

“I am honored to join the progressive team at Giumarra, whose family legacy of integrity and quality is known and respected throughout the fresh produce industry,” Harris said in the release. “The company and its network of domestic and international growers are poised for continued growth and I look forward to working with them on new, innovative ideas in marketing, merchandising and packaging.”  

 

 

 

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Developing a Food Recall Plan is Important to any Food Processor’s Business

(This article by Frank Gublo of Michigan State University Extension and Paige Filice of MSU’s Department of Fisheries and Wildlife was first posted July 28, 2014, on the MSU Extension site and is reposted here with permission.)

Food processors should have processes in place, such as a HACCP plan and a recall plan, to evaluate products and the management of complaints related to food safety. Typically, food safety problems are found both internally and externally, through consumer and regulatory notification as well as through internal inspection and laboratory discovery.

Upon receiving notification or a consumer complaint, the food processor should establish a record of the notification. The processor will need to know who is notifying the processor of the problem, including name, address, phone number and email address. Also, record what is wrong with the product, what is the unique batch or production code, what was the purchase date and location and what were the injury or illness, if any.

For small processors, the owner/operator will likely receive the complaint. In larger firms, the person receiving the complaint would forward the complaint to those responsible for the recall plan. In either case, the responsible person should make an initial assessment, and, if necessary, put the recall plan into effect.

The first step would be to determine what hazards have been identified with the food product and determine the public safety concerns. Two basic criteria can be used to determine how to proceed. These criteria are related to how widespread is the problem and what is the severity of the problem. For instance, E. coli O157:H7 is a serious condition, and one illness related to a product should prompt a recall, where less serious and less widespread illness may not prompt a recall.

Beyond the basic criteria of severity and spread, additional criteria may be used in the evaluation and the decision of how to handle a complaint related to a product. Public relations, contracts establishing rules for recalls, and actions by retailers may also influence the decision to enact the recall procedures.

In any case, food safety is a serious concern, and protection of the public should be an important consideration. Having a recall plan is an important piece of any food processor’s business. When a complaint is received, the plan will provide guidelines and eliminate mistakes made under stress when determining what actions to take.

Food processors who are taking their first steps into distribution should consider developing a recall plan. Educators at Michigan State University Extension and Innovation Counselors at the Michigan State University Product Center assist businesses in the establishment of good practices to improve business effectiveness. For further information and assistance with employee communications, please contact your local MSU Extension office.

Food Safety News

Wisconsin Raw Milk Dairy Farmer’s Business Improves After Prosecution

What’s Wisconsin’s “raw milk outlaw” been up to since the state appeals court upheld his misdemeanor conviction on July 17 and imposed a $ 1,000 fine?

Well, according to a recent profile by the Wisconsin State Journal, Vernon Hershberger is back home on the farm with his 10 children building up membership in his raw milk buyers club called Grazin Acres LLC.

Since the Loganville, WI, raw milk dairy farmer was found not guilty 13 months ago of producing milk, operating a dairy plant, and selling food in a retail establishment, all without licenses, his raw milk business has increased by 25 percent to about 325 families.

All the charges stem from a 2010 raid on his dairy farm, including breaking the holding order the state Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection placed on products. That’s the only charge that resulted in a conviction by the Sauk County jury, and Hershberger lost on appeal.

Hershberger credits his business growth with the relationships he built while the state pursued charges against him, including jurors, sheriff’s deputies, and others. The State Journal reported that Hershberger has emerged from his confrontation with prosecutors as “the face of the growing raw milk industry in Wisconsin and the nation.”

The newspaper states that raw milk advocates believe there has been a dramatic fall-off in enforcement actions since the Hershberger trial. Because he was acquitted on the licensing counts, Hershberger came out against Rep. Sen. Glenn Grothman’s bill to ease restrictions on licensed raw milk dairies.

Food Safety News

Business as usual between Europe and Russia

Business as usual between Europe and Russia

The emotion in Russia is tense after the plane crash in Ukraine. “This tragic event has been a shock,” says Gabriel Berard, owner of Bretonskiy Koupets, a representative agent in Russia for European exporters of fresh fruits and vegetables, who lives in Moscow since 2004. “Russian buyers of fresh fruits and vegetables have nothing to do with politics; they are also shocked after the disaster in Ukraine, and many have expressed their sympathy.” When it comes to the fruit and vegetable trade, Gabriel sees no impact from the political situation at the moment.  “The fruit and vegetables business community in Russia wants to continue doing business with Europe. I have been getting orders to load in Europe this week as usual – including orders to load in Holland.”

Sanctions on fruits and vegetables would not be of benefit to anyone. “In 2013, according to Russian customs statistics, 26. 4% of the fresh fruits and vegetables imported to Russia were from EU origin, explains Gabriel. Should our governments try to limit the fruit and vegetable trade for political reasons, it would not benefit anyone,” explains Gabriel. “I do not think that Europe as a whole would decide to stop exporting fruits and vegetables to Russia. Right now, of course, everyone is deeply affected by the plane crash, but I expect the Netherlands and Europe will tackle the issue in another way. On the economic level, maintaining a good cooperation between European and Russian trading companies is important to restore stability and trust between countries.”

 
 

Publication date: 7/25/2014


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