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Second wave of California figs brings more volume

The California fig season started strong with great sizing and quality. While bigger sizing brought optimism to retailers looking for a premium at checkout, a lack of volume kept figs from being promotable.

The second season is also sizing well with the bonus of more volume, according to Kurt Cappelluti, sales manager for Stellar Distributing, based in Madera, CA.KurtKurt Cappelluti

“It could be the best one we’ve ever had as far as growth and production on our 300 plus acres of young trees,” Cappelluti said. “That means we’ll have figs as late as anyone. The young trees will give us a ton of production, which was missing during the first season, and sizing looks to be better. That’s good news for retailers looking to satisfy fig fans.”

Regular rain through California’s 2016 spring season benefitted the young fig trees, according to Cappelluti. After several years of severe drought, routine rain pushed growth on the young trees and is now pushing good volume.

“This year’s quality will be as good as our 2015 season and the great volume will give us strong supply into November,” he added. “It’s exciting when nature and our plans come together for a season like this. The people who love figs will love the 2016 season.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California Giant brings a taste of Wimbledon to New York

New Yorkers almost forgot what city they were in this week as they experienced a real grass tennis court, tennis pros, and real fresh strawberries and cream right in the middle of Manhattan.

California Giant Berry Farms, based in Watsonville, CA, partnered with HSBC Bank to bring the complete Wimbledon experience to locals and tourists in downtown Manhattan across from Madison Square Park facing the iconic Flat Iron Building.

berries-in-cartNew Yorkers were treated to more than 10,000 samples of fresh strawberries and real whipped cream.More than 10,000 samples of fresh strawberries and real whipped cream were being given to fans this week from California Giant-branded carts. Each container of berries carries a QR code linked to www.calgiant.com/win, providing consumers more information about California Giant and the longstanding Wimbledon tradition of fresh berries and cream.

As tennis fans, moms with kids, and business people enjoyed their berries, they had the opportunity to watch matches on the grass court between pros Monica Seles and Jim Courier in doubles matches against young tennis players enjoying the experience. Additionally, monitors were set up so people could watch the real Wimbledon matches while enjoying other interactive activities.

“With summer officially upon us and our strawberry season peaking now, this is a great time to interact with consumers and build brand loyalty,” Cindy Jewell, director of marketing for Cal Giant, said in a press release. “Additionally, we tied in with several local restaurants in the area that are featuring our berries in Wimbledon-inspired menu items in support of the event.”

This is the fifth year that California Giant Berry Farms has partnered with HSBC Bank in New York City to launch Wimbledon activities in the U.S. to coincide with the beginning of match play in London.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Do alternate varieties offer opportunities for California avocado growers?

It’s no secret that the Hass avocado is the darling of the world. More than 50 years ago, California growers began planting the variety and Mexico followed suit as it eyed the U.S. market, as did Peru and Chile. Colombia began adding Hass acreage to its prodigious supply of native avocados about a decade ago, and it is now also trying to gain access to the lucrative U.S. marketplace.

But is the Hass avocado really the only avocado that consumers will eat?

BellamoreTom BellamoreIn fact, Florida does grow and market its thin-skinned, large green fruit with some success. And at this time of year, some California shippers do have alternate varieties and have experienced good success.

California Avocado Commission President Tom Bellamore believes alternative varieties may offer at least a niche market for California growers as they continue to compete against the growing tide of Hass avocados from various sources.

While California growers argue that their Hass avocado is better during much of their season in the late spring to early fall vs. fruit that travels to the United States from thousands of miles away, no such argument is needed with the other varieties.

Currently only the Hass variety can be imported from Mexico or the other countries.

Bellamore said there is very little worry that a California avocado of the Reed variety, for example, will face direct competition of the same variety from foreign soil. He said CAC board members, as well as others in the industry, are discussing opportunities with other varieties and the concept has some strong advocates.

Bellamore said California is already attempting to distinguish its avocados to discriminating customers by touting its freshness and local appeal, especially to U.S. consumers in the West.

He said adding varieties would expand the portfolio — because they are often harvested at a different time of the year — and also add some year-round marketing punch to the California avocado brand.

“From a marketing perspective, it would be very advantageous to be able to continue talking to consumers all year round about our brand,” he said. “Right now it is very difficult to do that because we don’t have avocados all year round.”

A few shippers are already experiencing success with these “off” varieties.

Jared Bray who handles sales for Stehly Farms Organic in Valley Center, CA, said his packingshed does very well with five different avocado varieties: Zutanos, Bacons, Fuertes, Reeds and Pinkertons.

“It’s a very nice niche for us,” he said. “We actually have a huge following for our Reed avocados.”

Though there are not accurate numbers concerning the total California production of these “off” varieties, some estimate that it could be as high as 5 percent of total volume at this point. This year, that could represent as much as 25 million pounds. Currently much of that production ends up in farmers markets.

Stehly is a producer of organic avocados and Bray said much of the company’s production of organic Reed avocados is sold to Whole Foods, which apparently is very happy with that variety. Bray said it grows larger than the typical Hass with some of the fruit getting as large as two pounds.

“It is my favorite avocado,” he said. “It is nutty and buttery.”

Stehly leaves its Reed variety avocados on the tree as long as possible and tries to market them in the September-through-November time frame, which is at the back end of the California deal.

“By then the oil content is very good and it is just a great piece of fruit,” he said. “I could absolutely ship more if I had them.”

And he added that he always gets a premium for that fruit. He said the other varieties also do well, but the Reed is the real star.

Singing the same tune was Bob Lucy, a partner at Del Rey Avocado Co. in Fallbrook, CA.

“The non-Hass varieties are a very important part of our program,” he said.

Del Rey sells both organic and conventional avocados, and Lucy said the organic production of Reeds is also sold mostly to Whole Foods. But he also has conventional production, which sells for a premium to other retailers predominantly on the West Coast, but there is interest everywhere.

Lucy called the Reed “a big Florida-looking avocado with a pulp that doesn’t quite get as green as the Hass.”

He said the Reed variety has been around for a while but his firm, as well as others, did it a disservice by initially picking it too early.

“We picked it way too early and it didn’t do well,” said Lucy. “Now we keep it on the tree until at least late June and market it in July and August, and it does very well.”

Lucy is quick to say that it has its flaws, including the yellow pulp color that needs to be blended with a Hass for the right guacamole colors. But he said it does offer a niche opportunity for California growers fighting for market share and better pricing.

In fact, Del Rey has made a commitment to that variety, as well as other “off” varieties, by investing in its own nursery to grow root stock.

“One-third of the acreage in that nursery is devoted to Reed,” he said.

Rob Wedin, who is in charge of fresh sales for Calavo Growers in Santa Paula, CA, believes in the concept of expanding California’s variety diversity, but he doesn’t believe the state’s growers have found the right variety yet.

Wedin said most California growers have converted their acreage of Reeds and Fuertes and other varieties to Hass simply because of the economics.

“All other varieties are extremely minor and I don’t really see much opportunity, but I know people are working on some new things and we’d like to see that,” he said. “I just don’t think it is anything we already have.”

He was quick to point out that he does not put the Lamb Hass in that category.

The Lamb Hass is different than the regular Hass, as it has a slightly smoother skin and does tend to grow larger in the early part of the season. But by late June and into July, it behaves like a Hass and is marketed as such.

During the middle of the season, Wedin said the Lamb Hass can account for as much as 15 percent of Calavo’s volume during that period. But again it is largely marketed as a Hass avocado and doesn’t seem to qualify for “off” variety status.

Bellamore said he would like to see more growers add small acreage of the Reed variety precisely to expand the marketing opportunities for growers and the commission.

He said it will take several years to ramp up the volume “even if we start today,” but he added that could coincide perfectly with a growing of that market by shippers and the commission.

And at the end of the day, it could give the “California Avocado” brand an additional way to differentiate itself in the marketplace.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

California citrus crop escapes frost damage

The much-feared devastating freezing temperatures didn’t quite materialize in California’s San Joaquin Valley over the last few nights, and consequently the California citrus crop experienced little damage.

Below-freezing temperatures did prevail for several nights, necessitating the use of frost-protection tools, but the needle didn’t drop low enough or the cold hang around long enough to produce serious damage.

For damage to occur to Mandarin oranges on the tree, temperatures need to stay below 32 degrees for at least four hours. Navel oranges, with their thicker skin, typically don’t experience much damage until temperatures drop to the mid-20s for that four-hour threshold.

Many citrus-growing areas did see temperatures drop into the 20s but only for short periods of time. And most growers were able to use wind machines and irrigation systems to raised grove temperatures a few degrees during critical periods.

On the morning of Jan. 1, California Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelsen said that growers had survived what ended up being the worst of the nights.

“Growers initiated frost protection by 10 p.m. (the night before) in most cases,” he said. “No doubt the early start helped keep temperatures higher throughout the night and with lows not reaching 26 degrees, except in the coldest unprotected areas, we conclude it was a long night but a safe night.”

He added that producers of Mandarins and lemons ran their equipment for about 10 hours that night, with Navel orange growers needing about six hours of frost-protection action.

Some of the areas that typically get the coldest have already been harvested.

“Thirty days makes a difference,” Nelsen said. “Last season a major freeze event occurred the first week of December, thereby creating much more vulnerability for the industry. The past 30 days significant tonnage was harvested from those historic areas of low temperatures, thereby eliminating potential loss.”

The lower cost of fuel this year also helped in the battle as the cost of running the wind machines was considerably less than a year ago.

As the new year dawned, warmer temperatures were in the forecast for the next week and citrus harvest and packing operations were expected to return to normal levels.

The crop estimate for the 2014-15 Navel orange season is 78 million cartons in the San Joaquin Valley and another 5 million cartons in Southern California. Approximately 25 percent of the orange crop has been harvested.

Mandarin tonnage is estimated to be 50 million five-pound cartons this year and approximately 70 percent of the crop remains on the tree.

The California lemon crop has been estimated at 45 million cartons with the vast majority of the lemon tonnage in Ventura County and still on the tree.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California citrus crop escapes frost damage

The much-feared devastating freezing temperatures didn’t quite materialize in California’s San Joaquin Valley over the last few nights, and consequently the California citrus crop experienced little damage.

Below-freezing temperatures did prevail for several nights, necessitating the use of frost-protection tools, but the needle didn’t drop low enough or the cold hang around long enough to produce serious damage.

For damage to occur to Mandarin oranges on the tree, temperatures need to stay below 32 degrees for at least four hours. Navel oranges, with their thicker skin, typically don’t experience much damage until temperatures drop to the mid-20s for that four-hour threshold.

Many citrus-growing areas did see temperatures drop into the 20s but only for short periods of time. And most growers were able to use wind machines and irrigation systems to raised grove temperatures a few degrees during critical periods.

On the morning of Jan. 1, California Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelsen said that growers had survived what ended up being the worst of the nights.

“Growers initiated frost protection by 10 p.m. (the night before) in most cases,” he said. “No doubt the early start helped keep temperatures higher throughout the night and with lows not reaching 26 degrees, except in the coldest unprotected areas, we conclude it was a long night but a safe night.”

He added that producers of Mandarins and lemons ran their equipment for about 10 hours that night, with Navel orange growers needing about six hours of frost-protection action.

Some of the areas that typically get the coldest have already been harvested.

“Thirty days makes a difference,” Nelsen said. “Last season a major freeze event occurred the first week of December, thereby creating much more vulnerability for the industry. The past 30 days significant tonnage was harvested from those historic areas of low temperatures, thereby eliminating potential loss.”

The lower cost of fuel this year also helped in the battle as the cost of running the wind machines was considerably less than a year ago.

As the new year dawned, warmer temperatures were in the forecast for the next week and citrus harvest and packing operations were expected to return to normal levels.

The crop estimate for the 2014-15 Navel orange season is 78 million cartons in the San Joaquin Valley and another 5 million cartons in Southern California. Approximately 25 percent of the orange crop has been harvested.

Mandarin tonnage is estimated to be 50 million five-pound cartons this year and approximately 70 percent of the crop remains on the tree.

The California lemon crop has been estimated at 45 million cartons with the vast majority of the lemon tonnage in Ventura County and still on the tree.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California citrus crop escapes frost damage

The much-feared devastating freezing temperatures didn’t quite materialize in California’s San Joaquin Valley over the last few nights, and consequently the California citrus crop experienced little damage.

Below-freezing temperatures did prevail for several nights, necessitating the use of frost-protection tools, but the needle didn’t drop low enough or the cold hang around long enough to produce serious damage.

For damage to occur to Mandarin oranges on the tree, temperatures need to stay below 32 degrees for at least four hours. Navel oranges, with their thicker skin, typically don’t experience much damage until temperatures drop to the mid-20s for that four-hour threshold.

Many citrus-growing areas did see temperatures drop into the 20s but only for short periods of time. And most growers were able to use wind machines and irrigation systems to raised grove temperatures a few degrees during critical periods.

On the morning of Jan. 1, California Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelsen said that growers had survived what ended up being the worst of the nights.

“Growers initiated frost protection by 10 p.m. (the night before) in most cases,” he said. “No doubt the early start helped keep temperatures higher throughout the night and with lows not reaching 26 degrees, except in the coldest unprotected areas, we conclude it was a long night but a safe night.”

He added that producers of Mandarins and lemons ran their equipment for about 10 hours that night, with Navel orange growers needing about six hours of frost-protection action.

Some of the areas that typically get the coldest have already been harvested.

“Thirty days makes a difference,” Nelsen said. “Last season a major freeze event occurred the first week of December, thereby creating much more vulnerability for the industry. The past 30 days significant tonnage was harvested from those historic areas of low temperatures, thereby eliminating potential loss.”

The lower cost of fuel this year also helped in the battle as the cost of running the wind machines was considerably less than a year ago.

As the new year dawned, warmer temperatures were in the forecast for the next week and citrus harvest and packing operations were expected to return to normal levels.

The crop estimate for the 2014-15 Navel orange season is 78 million cartons in the San Joaquin Valley and another 5 million cartons in Southern California. Approximately 25 percent of the orange crop has been harvested.

Mandarin tonnage is estimated to be 50 million five-pound cartons this year and approximately 70 percent of the crop remains on the tree.

The California lemon crop has been estimated at 45 million cartons with the vast majority of the lemon tonnage in Ventura County and still on the tree.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California Snack Foods Recalls Caramel Apples for Potential Listeria Risk

California Snack Foods Inc. of South El Monte, CA, is issuing a voluntary recall of California Snack Foods brand caramel apples with a best use by date between Aug. 15 and Nov. 28, 2014, because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

California Snack Foods caramel apples are sold in single packs and three packs, and each package will have a best use by date on the front of the label.

They were available for retail sale through grocery, discount and club stores, generally in the produce section, and were distributed to retailers in the following states: Arizona, California, Nevada, Texas and Utah.

Company officials have been working with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in its investigation of the current outbreak of Listeriosis, which has been associated with caramel apples. California Snack Foods recently received notice from Bidart Brothers of Shafter, CA, one of its apple suppliers, that there may be a connection between this outbreak and the apples that they supplied to the company’s facility.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has noted 29 illnesses in 10 states linked to the outbreak, and the agency has advised consumers not to eat commercially produced, pre-packaged caramel apples until more is known.

California Snack Foods officials said they used the last of the Bidart Brothers apples in the first week of November 2014, and that the caramel apples produced with Bidart Brothers apples should no longer be available in stores. However, the company recommends that consumers follow the advice of CDC and remove any caramel apples in storage and dispose of them in a secure container to avoid potential contamination in animals.

Consumers who have any product may return it to the store where purchased or dispose of it per the advice of CDC. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 800-966-5501, Monday through Friday during normal business hours, or via email to [email protected]

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

California Giant event helps Salvation Army, families in need

For the fifth year in a row, California Giant Berry Farms has participated in the local NBC Affiliate KSBW holiday event called ‘Share Your Holiday.’ Each year the station has a telethon-style event throughout the central coast of California over an eight-hour time period encouraging the community to donate food, clothing, toys and cash to support the local chapters of the Salvation Army.IMG 4385Bill Moncovich, president and CEO of California Giant, with Santa and KSBW TV anchor Brittany Neilsen.

During the Dec. 12 event, California Giant employees — along with TV Anchor Brittany Nielsen — greeted hundreds of locals in the community as they dropped off more than 900 toys, hundreds of pounds of canned food, blankets, clothing and cash donations. In addition to sponsoring the drop location, California Giant donated 100 toys for kids in need to ensure they had something under the tree from Santa and 500 frozen turkeys to make sure each family had Christmas dinner.

As a whole, the event (held at five different locations) raised more than $ 162,000, which is 30 percent over the previous year’s record. The event also raised 10,704 pounds in non-perishable food; 1,753 pounds of clothes; and 9,928 toys (a 16 percent increase over last year).

“The staff was proud to participate again and be part of such a positive program to support our local community,” Bill Moncovich, president and chief executive officer, said in a press release. “It was inspirational to see so many people come out to our cooler in Watsonville to donate and share in the spirit of giving” says . (pictured above with TV Anchor Brittany Neilsen/KSBW and Santa)

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Avocado market strengthens as Mexican shipments wane and California fruit sizes

The California avocado deal has been hampered by a plethora of small-sized fruit, with Mexican producers providing most of the larger fruit for the past couple of months. But the avocado market is on an uptick as Mexico moves into a typical lag period and California fruit begins to have a more diverse size portfolio.

Rob Wedin, vice president of fresh sales for Calavo Growers Inc. in Santa Paula, CA, told The Produce News that “Mexico is barely importing any small fruit at all, while packers in California are getting better sizing every day.”

The result, he said, is a strengthening in the market. He said Mexico’s fruit, which has largely ranged from 32-48s, was down in volume the last week in June and should be down for most of July. It will be August, he predicted, before Mexico gets into big volume shipments again as its new crop begins.

At the same time, California is expected to have good size and good volume well into October.

At the beginning of the season, the California crop was estimated at about 515 million pounds, which is a big-volume crop. The smaller fruit during the first third of the season has reduced the estimate a bit, but most observers still expect it to be very close to the 500 million-pound figure.

Illustrating the size issue was Mark Carroll, senior director of purchasing and merchandising for produce and floral for Gelson’s Markets, which is a Southern California chain of 16 upscale stores.

Gelson’s typically supports the California avocado growers when their crop is in season, but this year it was mid-June before he was able to find enough large fruit for his conventional displays.

He said he was able to switch to organic avocados from California early in the season because he uses a 48 size in his organic displays. But he just wasn’t able to find enough of the 40 size and larger fruit for his conventional displays until mid-June.

Wedin said that most of the larger California Hass avocados that have been available are “Lamb Hass,” which is a slightly different variety though it does have the “Hass” designation and as the season wears on it is hardly distinguishable from the regular Hass. It does have a slightly smoother skin, especially early in the season.

Bob Lucy, who is a partner and handles sales at Del Rey Avocado Co. in Fallbrook, CA, cautioned that while the fruit is getting larger, it may be several weeks before there are consistent supplies across all sizes.

Lucy said many growers have been size picking for two months, literally taking any fruit with any size at all off the trees. So even though the fruit is now sizing at a much faster clip, he said it is going to take several weeks to completely fill the pipeline of all sizes.

So during the last week of June, the shipment of smaller fruit (60-72) from California actually increased as a percentage of total volume while larger fruit (40 and 48) declined, according to Lucy

Of course this was also caused by a several-dollar jump in the market place, which saw a strong demand for many sizes.

By the last week of June, the U.S. Market News Service reported that larger fruit from California was selling in the $ 35 to $ 37 range, while the smaller fruit was in the $ 28 to $ 30 range. Some of the smaller fruit was being sold in bags for attractive retail pricing on multiples.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Good news for California citrus growers

Good news for California citrus growers

Toward the end of 2011, Mark Hoddle, an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside, first released into a citrus grove on campus a batch of Pakistani wasps that are natural enemies of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), the vector of a bacterium that causes Huanglongbing (HLB), a lethal citrus disease.

Now on Tuesday, Dec. 16, Hoddle, the director of UCR’s Center for Invasive Species Research, is poised to release in the same grove the wasp Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis, a second species of ACP natural enemy, also from the Punjab region of Pakistan.  Shortly after 9 a.m., Chancellor Kim A. Wilcox will release the first set of the new wasps from a vial into the grove. Media representatives may arrive as early as 8:30 a.m.

The new wasp attacks the second and third developmental stages of immature ACP (called nymphs) whereas Tamarixia attacks the larger nymphs in the fourth and fifth stages of development. ACP nymphs have five developmental stages, or instars, after they hatch from the egg.

Successful biocontrol of citrus pests in California sometimes requires more than one species of natural enemy because citrus is grown in a variety of different habitats – hot desert areas like Coachella, cooler coastal zones like Ventura, and intermediate areas like Riverside/Redlands and northern San Diego County.

Around 300 male and female wasps will be released on Dec. 16. Hoddle and his team will open vials of the wasps to allow them to fly into the citrus orchard to start hunting for ACP nymphs.

Source: ucr.edu

Publication date: 12/10/2014


FreshPlaza.com

California Giant expands consumer network with new blog

California Giant, a Watsonville, CA-based shipper of a full line of berries, has unveiled a new blog to continue its emphasis on consumer engagement to build brand loyalty.

The new blog http://thebuzzblog.calgiant.com is a stand-alone tool using new methods of permission-based marketing that attracts consumers, converts them into leads and ultimately builds brand evangelists. The new format of permission-based marketing is a tool California Giant will ultimately convert all of its online tools to in 2015 as it focuses even more on better serving the consumer that is buying their berries.

“Our Buzz Blog is a great place for sharing news, recipes, tips, videos and more,” Cindy Jewel, vice president of marketing, said in a press release. “Consumers subscribe to stay up-to-date with the latest happenings at California Giant Berry Farms, and keep coming back for new content. Each time we learn more about their preferences and make sure we are on point to provide information they specifically want, which keeps them engaged and feeling a personal connection to our company.”

The beautiful photography on the site grabs consumers immediately, but the content on the new blog maintains their attention with everything from promotions and prize-winning opportunities, to freebies and giveaways, recipes and cooking ideas, nutritional information and health news.

California Giant also provides opportunities for consumers to learn about philanthropic opportunities and events the company and staff participates in as well as what is happening on the farm. A key new element that boosts readership and continues to expand the database of consumers is the opportunity to check out great posts and recipes by guest authors, the company’s favorite food bloggers.

The bloggers are constantly feeding the Buzz Blog with new content, great photography and seasonal information featuring California Giant berries.

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California Giant expands consumer network with new blog

California Giant, a Watsonville, CA-based shipper of a full line of berries, has unveiled a new blog to continue its emphasis on consumer engagement to build brand loyalty.

The new blog http://thebuzzblog.calgiant.com is a stand-alone tool using new methods of permission-based marketing that attracts consumers, converts them into leads and ultimately builds brand evangelists. The new format of permission-based marketing is a tool California Giant will ultimately convert all of its online tools to in 2015 as it focuses even more on better serving the consumer that is buying their berries.

“Our Buzz Blog is a great place for sharing news, recipes, tips, videos and more,” Cindy Jewel, vice president of marketing, said in a press release. “Consumers subscribe to stay up-to-date with the latest happenings at California Giant Berry Farms, and keep coming back for new content. Each time we learn more about their preferences and make sure we are on point to provide information they specifically want, which keeps them engaged and feeling a personal connection to our company.”

The beautiful photography on the site grabs consumers immediately, but the content on the new blog maintains their attention with everything from promotions and prize-winning opportunities, to freebies and giveaways, recipes and cooking ideas, nutritional information and health news.

California Giant also provides opportunities for consumers to learn about philanthropic opportunities and events the company and staff participates in as well as what is happening on the farm. A key new element that boosts readership and continues to expand the database of consumers is the opportunity to check out great posts and recipes by guest authors, the company’s favorite food bloggers.

The bloggers are constantly feeding the Buzz Blog with new content, great photography and seasonal information featuring California Giant berries.

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Duda Farm Fresh Foods opens California citrus season

Duda Farm Fresh Foods marks the start of the California-grown citrus season with a large variety of items available now in promotable volumes.

“The Navel oranges crop is off to an early start this season and the fruit is exceptionally sweet,” Paul Huckabay, Duda Western citrus sales manager, said in a press release.DUDA-12134-MeyerLemonBag Fr

“The Navel orange sizing is slightly smaller than the past few seasons and we are seeing a lot of excitement surrounding bag promotions for the holidays,” Huckabay said.  “We anticipate some fruit growth over the next few months and hope to have larger sized fruit near Christmas or the first of the year.”

Supplies of lemons are abundant from the California desert region. The Duda lemon crop has an even distribution of sizes which will appeal to both retail and foodservice customers.

“We plan to transition harvest to the central San Joaquin Valley district in December and then continue production into spring,” Huckabay said.

Mandarins also had an early start to the season this year, and the fruit size is moderate to slightly larger with a nice eating quality.  

“We have good volume now and we are well positioned for holiday ads as we move into November and December,” he said. “We will have good volume from early January all the way through March and into early April.”

Lastly, Duda started shipping Meyer lemons the last week of October — a full week earlier than last year.  The Dandy one-pound Grab n’ Go bag is updated this year to reflect new recipes and uses for Meyer lemons. The quality is excellent with smooth, well-shaped fruit and a sweet and juicy interior, Huckabay said.  

“Meyer lemons are one of the last really seasonal items in the product department, and that creates excitement for the overall citrus set and brings attention to the category,” he said.

The company projects good volume of Meyer lemons for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays and continuing through March.

Duda is supporting sales with new seasonal packaging, data and an online sales kit that includes recipes for consumers and point-of-sale material.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Duda Farm Fresh Foods opens California citrus season

Duda Farm Fresh Foods marks the start of the California-grown citrus season with a large variety of items available now in promotable volumes.

“The Navel oranges crop is off to an early start this season and the fruit is exceptionally sweet,” Paul Huckabay, Duda Western citrus sales manager, said in a press release.DUDA-12134-MeyerLemonBag Fr

“The Navel orange sizing is slightly smaller than the past few seasons and we are seeing a lot of excitement surrounding bag promotions for the holidays,” Huckabay said.  “We anticipate some fruit growth over the next few months and hope to have larger sized fruit near Christmas or the first of the year.”

Supplies of lemons are abundant from the California desert region. The Duda lemon crop has an even distribution of sizes which will appeal to both retail and foodservice customers.

“We plan to transition harvest to the central San Joaquin Valley district in December and then continue production into spring,” Huckabay said.

Mandarins also had an early start to the season this year, and the fruit size is moderate to slightly larger with a nice eating quality.  

“We have good volume now and we are well positioned for holiday ads as we move into November and December,” he said. “We will have good volume from early January all the way through March and into early April.”

Lastly, Duda started shipping Meyer lemons the last week of October — a full week earlier than last year.  The Dandy one-pound Grab n’ Go bag is updated this year to reflect new recipes and uses for Meyer lemons. The quality is excellent with smooth, well-shaped fruit and a sweet and juicy interior, Huckabay said.  

“Meyer lemons are one of the last really seasonal items in the product department, and that creates excitement for the overall citrus set and brings attention to the category,” he said.

The company projects good volume of Meyer lemons for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays and continuing through March.

Duda is supporting sales with new seasonal packaging, data and an online sales kit that includes recipes for consumers and point-of-sale material.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Duda Farm Fresh Foods opens California citrus season

Duda Farm Fresh Foods marks the start of the California-grown citrus season with a large variety of items available now in promotable volumes.

“The Navel oranges crop is off to an early start this season and the fruit is exceptionally sweet,” Paul Huckabay, Duda Western citrus sales manager, said in a press release.DUDA-12134-MeyerLemonBag Fr

“The Navel orange sizing is slightly smaller than the past few seasons and we are seeing a lot of excitement surrounding bag promotions for the holidays,” Huckabay said.  “We anticipate some fruit growth over the next few months and hope to have larger sized fruit near Christmas or the first of the year.”

Supplies of lemons are abundant from the California desert region. The Duda lemon crop has an even distribution of sizes which will appeal to both retail and foodservice customers.

“We plan to transition harvest to the central San Joaquin Valley district in December and then continue production into spring,” Huckabay said.

Mandarins also had an early start to the season this year, and the fruit size is moderate to slightly larger with a nice eating quality.  

“We have good volume now and we are well positioned for holiday ads as we move into November and December,” he said. “We will have good volume from early January all the way through March and into early April.”

Lastly, Duda started shipping Meyer lemons the last week of October — a full week earlier than last year.  The Dandy one-pound Grab n’ Go bag is updated this year to reflect new recipes and uses for Meyer lemons. The quality is excellent with smooth, well-shaped fruit and a sweet and juicy interior, Huckabay said.  

“Meyer lemons are one of the last really seasonal items in the product department, and that creates excitement for the overall citrus set and brings attention to the category,” he said.

The company projects good volume of Meyer lemons for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays and continuing through March.

Duda is supporting sales with new seasonal packaging, data and an online sales kit that includes recipes for consumers and point-of-sale material.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Duda Farm Fresh Foods opens California citrus season

Duda Farm Fresh Foods marks the start of the California-grown citrus season with a large variety of items available now in promotable volumes.

“The Navel oranges crop is off to an early start this season and the fruit is exceptionally sweet,” Paul Huckabay, Duda Western citrus sales manager, said in a press release.DUDA-12134-MeyerLemonBag Fr

“The Navel orange sizing is slightly smaller than the past few seasons and we are seeing a lot of excitement surrounding bag promotions for the holidays,” Huckabay said.  “We anticipate some fruit growth over the next few months and hope to have larger sized fruit near Christmas or the first of the year.”

Supplies of lemons are abundant from the California desert region. The Duda lemon crop has an even distribution of sizes which will appeal to both retail and foodservice customers.

“We plan to transition harvest to the central San Joaquin Valley district in December and then continue production into spring,” Huckabay said.

Mandarins also had an early start to the season this year, and the fruit size is moderate to slightly larger with a nice eating quality.  

“We have good volume now and we are well positioned for holiday ads as we move into November and December,” he said. “We will have good volume from early January all the way through March and into early April.”

Lastly, Duda started shipping Meyer lemons the last week of October — a full week earlier than last year.  The Dandy one-pound Grab n’ Go bag is updated this year to reflect new recipes and uses for Meyer lemons. The quality is excellent with smooth, well-shaped fruit and a sweet and juicy interior, Huckabay said.  

“Meyer lemons are one of the last really seasonal items in the product department, and that creates excitement for the overall citrus set and brings attention to the category,” he said.

The company projects good volume of Meyer lemons for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays and continuing through March.

Duda is supporting sales with new seasonal packaging, data and an online sales kit that includes recipes for consumers and point-of-sale material.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Duda Farm Fresh Foods opens California citrus season

Duda Farm Fresh Foods marks the start of the California-grown citrus season with a large variety of items available now in promotable volumes.

“The Navel oranges crop is off to an early start this season and the fruit is exceptionally sweet,” Paul Huckabay, Duda Western citrus sales manager, said in a press release.DUDA-12134-MeyerLemonBag Fr

“The Navel orange sizing is slightly smaller than the past few seasons and we are seeing a lot of excitement surrounding bag promotions for the holidays,” Huckabay said.  “We anticipate some fruit growth over the next few months and hope to have larger sized fruit near Christmas or the first of the year.”

Supplies of lemons are abundant from the California desert region. The Duda lemon crop has an even distribution of sizes which will appeal to both retail and foodservice customers.

“We plan to transition harvest to the central San Joaquin Valley district in December and then continue production into spring,” Huckabay said.

Mandarins also had an early start to the season this year, and the fruit size is moderate to slightly larger with a nice eating quality.  

“We have good volume now and we are well positioned for holiday ads as we move into November and December,” he said. “We will have good volume from early January all the way through March and into early April.”

Lastly, Duda started shipping Meyer lemons the last week of October — a full week earlier than last year.  The Dandy one-pound Grab n’ Go bag is updated this year to reflect new recipes and uses for Meyer lemons. The quality is excellent with smooth, well-shaped fruit and a sweet and juicy interior, Huckabay said.  

“Meyer lemons are one of the last really seasonal items in the product department, and that creates excitement for the overall citrus set and brings attention to the category,” he said.

The company projects good volume of Meyer lemons for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays and continuing through March.

Duda is supporting sales with new seasonal packaging, data and an online sales kit that includes recipes for consumers and point-of-sale material.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Duda Farm Fresh Foods opens California citrus season

Duda Farm Fresh Foods marks the start of the California-grown citrus season with a large variety of items available now in promotable volumes.

“The Navel oranges crop is off to an early start this season and the fruit is exceptionally sweet,” Paul Huckabay, Duda Western citrus sales manager, said in a press release.DUDA-12134-MeyerLemonBag Fr

“The Navel orange sizing is slightly smaller than the past few seasons and we are seeing a lot of excitement surrounding bag promotions for the holidays,” Huckabay said.  “We anticipate some fruit growth over the next few months and hope to have larger sized fruit near Christmas or the first of the year.”

Supplies of lemons are abundant from the California desert region. The Duda lemon crop has an even distribution of sizes which will appeal to both retail and foodservice customers.

“We plan to transition harvest to the central San Joaquin Valley district in December and then continue production into spring,” Huckabay said.

Mandarins also had an early start to the season this year, and the fruit size is moderate to slightly larger with a nice eating quality.  

“We have good volume now and we are well positioned for holiday ads as we move into November and December,” he said. “We will have good volume from early January all the way through March and into early April.”

Lastly, Duda started shipping Meyer lemons the last week of October — a full week earlier than last year.  The Dandy one-pound Grab n’ Go bag is updated this year to reflect new recipes and uses for Meyer lemons. The quality is excellent with smooth, well-shaped fruit and a sweet and juicy interior, Huckabay said.  

“Meyer lemons are one of the last really seasonal items in the product department, and that creates excitement for the overall citrus set and brings attention to the category,” he said.

The company projects good volume of Meyer lemons for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays and continuing through March.

Duda is supporting sales with new seasonal packaging, data and an online sales kit that includes recipes for consumers and point-of-sale material.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Duda Farm Fresh Foods opens California citrus season

Duda Farm Fresh Foods marks the start of the California-grown citrus season with a large variety of items available now in promotable volumes.

“The Navel oranges crop is off to an early start this season and the fruit is exceptionally sweet,” Paul Huckabay, Duda Western citrus sales manager, said in a press release.DUDA-12134-MeyerLemonBag Fr

“The Navel orange sizing is slightly smaller than the past few seasons and we are seeing a lot of excitement surrounding bag promotions for the holidays,” Huckabay said.  “We anticipate some fruit growth over the next few months and hope to have larger sized fruit near Christmas or the first of the year.”

Supplies of lemons are abundant from the California desert region. The Duda lemon crop has an even distribution of sizes which will appeal to both retail and foodservice customers.

“We plan to transition harvest to the central San Joaquin Valley district in December and then continue production into spring,” Huckabay said.

Mandarins also had an early start to the season this year, and the fruit size is moderate to slightly larger with a nice eating quality.  

“We have good volume now and we are well positioned for holiday ads as we move into November and December,” he said. “We will have good volume from early January all the way through March and into early April.”

Lastly, Duda started shipping Meyer lemons the last week of October — a full week earlier than last year.  The Dandy one-pound Grab n’ Go bag is updated this year to reflect new recipes and uses for Meyer lemons. The quality is excellent with smooth, well-shaped fruit and a sweet and juicy interior, Huckabay said.  

“Meyer lemons are one of the last really seasonal items in the product department, and that creates excitement for the overall citrus set and brings attention to the category,” he said.

The company projects good volume of Meyer lemons for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays and continuing through March.

Duda is supporting sales with new seasonal packaging, data and an online sales kit that includes recipes for consumers and point-of-sale material.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.