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Raw-Milk Advocates Plan Another Effort in South Carolina Legislature

The South Carolina Legislature will have only one more Republican vote next year than it had this year, but Delegate Kelli Sobonya (R-Cabell) thinks her colleagues may be more “liberty minded” in 2015. During the 2014 session, Sobonya sponsored two bills to promote raw milk sales in South Carolina, but both measures were killed in committee.

When the legislature convenes in Charleston in January, Sobonya will be back with her bills, one to permit the commercial sale of unpasteurized milk, and the other to allow raw milk to be acquired through herd shares. She won’t be alone.

Ernie Fazenbaker, owner of Windy Ridge Dairy in Independence, is looking to Sobonya and South Carolina State Sen. Daniel Hall (R-Wyoming) to push raw milk during the coming session. Hall introduced measures in the Senate that were similar to those backed by Sobonya in the House. Hall’s bills also died in committee.

Hall will chair the SC Senate Agriculture and Rural Development Committee come January, but he’ll need support from Sen. Ryan Ferns, who will chair the Health and Human Services Committee, if raw milk legislation is going to get a SC Senate floor vote. Hall, who will also be majority whip, predicts that Fern will give raw milk “a fair shot.”

Sobonya says that raw milk is part of “food freedom” and that all food comes “with a risk.” She points to raw oysters, sushi, rare steaks, and other foods people enjoy, but that come with a certain amount of danger.

Fazenbaker says he is only seeking to sell raw milk from his 35 dairy cows to his friends and neighbors. Some returning South Carolina lawmakers say they will oppose retail sales of raw milk in the state, but might be open to herd or cow share schemes to allow people who really want raw milk a way of obtaining it.

As in other states, the pasteurized dairy industry is expected to continue to oppose bills to liberalize raw-milk sales in South Carolina.

The GOP next year will have a 28-18 edge in the South Carolina Senate and a 78-46 margin in the House.

Food Safety News

Photo report State Farmers Market Raleigh, North Carolina

4.8 million visitors a year
Photo report State Farmers Market Raleigh, North Carolina

The Farmers Market still plays a prominent role in the United States. Last week I visited the State Farmers Market of Raleigh, the largest in the state of North Carolina. The Farmers Market in Raleigh has a consumer and a wholesale section. In 2013, the market was visited by 4.8 million people. The market is open seven days a week. You could find 30,000 people walking around the Farmers Market on any given Saturday. Restaurants and retailers buy there, but many families and schools also treat a visit to the Farmers Market as a day out.

Click here for the photo report


The consumer market only has farmers from North Carolina. Farmers rent a unit per day or week. Others (twelve out of a hundred) are there year-round. Remarkably, nearly all farmers have a wide range of products, often with one main product. The market’s organizers try to maintain a balance in the products on offer. For instance, there’s a waiting list for growers of pumpkins, strawberries and Christmas trees. The wholesalers at the Farmers Market also offer a wide range of imported fruit. Special events are held, such as a ‘Pumpkin Night’ and ‘Strawberry Day’.



Owner Ronnie Yokeley of R&H Produce is one of the wholesalers at the market. Potatoes, apples and oranges are his main products, but he also imports bananas, pineapple, melons, grapes and stonefruit


Click here for the photo report

There was a particularly large supply of local new-crop sweet potatoes, pumpkins and apples. In addition, there was a wide range of local fruit and open field vegetables. For instance, you see a lot of Collards (marrow-stem kale), a product that you don’t see at all in the Netherlands. Unlike retailers in the area, the supply of organic produce at the market was very limited. One of the reasons for this was, according to the manager of the market, that the farmers at the market represent a significant acreage, and not many organic farmers have this kind of capacity.


This Farmers Market has been in existence since 1955, and is managed by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. All in all, the market has an area of 30 hectares, a large part of which is indoors. In restaurants at the Farmers Market, products from the market are served. Opening hours are from Monday until Saturday from 5 am until 8 pm, and on Sunday between 8 am and 6 pm.



Click here for the photo report

For more information:
State Farmers Market
1201 Agriculture Street
Raleigh (North Carolina) 27603
Tel: 919-733-7414
Fax: 919-733-9932
www.statefarmersmarket.org

Publication date: 10/31/2014
Author: Izak Heijboer
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

North Carolina Firm Recalls Nearly 150 Food Products for Potential Listeria Contamination

SunBurst Foods of Goldsboro, NC, is recalling numerous food products sold under several brands because of the potential of contamination with Listeria monocytogenes. The recall includes the food services firm’s SunBurst, Fresh Bites and Private labeled products, which were sold in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Georgia.

This recall was initiated as a result of sampling and testing performed by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.
The recalled products include sandwiches, hamburgers, chili dogs, salads and a long list of other items, which can be found here.

All codes, all sell-by dates and sizes of SunBurst and Fresh Bites brands are being recalled. Products not manufactured but distributed by SunBurst such as cakes, burritos, and chips are not part of this recall.

Private label products are identified by the following brand names: River Edge Farms, CFW, Southern Zest, CJ’s Vending, Binford Street Deli, Middle Georgia Vendors, Roanoke Foods, Select Foods, and Jesse Jones (Double Chili Dogs).

Consumers who have purchased the affected products are urged to destroy them or return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. EDT at 1-919-778-2151.

Listeria cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. To date, SunBurst is unaware of any illnesses related to these products.

Food Safety News

Nine Salmonella Cases Reported in South Carolina

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is investigating nine cases of Salmonella in Beaufort County.

Several of the cases are laboratory-confirmed and one of the illnesses has reportedly been matched to a national cluster. This single case appears to be separate from the other eight.

There are no other details currently available about the victims or when they became ill.

Health officials are investigating whether the infections have a common source.

Food Safety News

Nine Salmonella Cases Reported in South Carolina

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is investigating nine cases of Salmonella in Beaufort County.

Several of the cases are laboratory-confirmed and one of the illnesses has reportedly been matched to a national cluster. This single case appears to be separate from the other eight.

There are no other details currently available about the victims or when they became ill.

Health officials are investigating whether the infections have a common source.

Food Safety News

Food Lion plans makeover for North Carolina stores

Food Lion has unveiled a new, easier shopping experience for customers in 31 stores in the greater Wilmington, NC, market. The stores are the first in the Food Lion chain to receive remodels as part of the grocer’s new “Easy, Fresh and Affordable…You Can Count on Food Lion Every Day” strategy, which was announced earlier this year.

“Since announcing our new strategy, we’ve been doing a lot across the Food Lion chain to create positive change,” Beth Newlands Campbell, president of Food Lion, said in a press release. “We’re proud to continue that momentum by launching the first market of enhanced stores that bring all the elements of our new strategy to life to make shopping easier for customers. Our customers told us that they want a grocery experience where it’s easy to shop, easy to save and easy to figure out what is for dinner tonight. In these enhanced stores, we’ve worked to deliver just that. We invite our customers and the Wilmington community to come out and experience grocery shopping reimagined at Food Lion and let us know what you think about our new stores.”

The remodeled stores debut new features that make shopping easier for customers. Food Lion expanded its selection in stores by adding thousands of new items so customers can get everything they need in one trip. The new assortment of products includes a dedicated gluten-free section and a wide selection of quality fresh meat and produce that carry a double-your-money-back guarantee.

Food Lion also made great deals easier to find throughout the store with new yellow signage and three easy ways to save: MVP On Sale, Extended Savings and Great Value Every Day. MVP On Sale items are the great savings and promotions that Food Lion is known for, including deals from the weekly flyer. Extended Savings are prices reduced for longer on items throughout the store – up to 13 weeks. Great Value Every Day indicates incredibly low prices always available on Food Lion private brand items and in-season produce.

For busy families on the go, Food Lion has also added Daily Dinner Deals, hot meals for families of four for around $ 10, offered from 4-7 p.m., as well as all-day daily meal deals, in the deli department.

Knowing that customers want to get in and out of the store quickly, Food Lion made checkout faster with improved technology, larger display screens so customers can see items and prices as they’re scanned and additional associates available to bag groceries for customers. Unpacking is even easier at home with new blue bags, in addition to the traditional white bags, which help customers easily identify cold and frozen items.

Food Lion will continue to roll out storewide enhancements in markets over time. The company plans to launch an additional 45 remodeled stores in the greater Greenville, N.C., market in November.

Food Lion, which serves more than 9 million customers each week at more than 1,100 locations in 10 states, was founded as Food Town in 1957 and still calls Salisbury, NC, its hometown.

A complete list of the remodeled stores, as well as other information, is available at www.foodlion.com/newsroom.

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Eubanks seeing high volume of quality South Carolina peaches moving though the pipeline

COLUMBIA, SC — Supermarket produce departments are moving an excellent volume of quality South Carolina peaches this summer, despite a cold snap that damaged early-season peaches in the state, according to Martin Eubanks, assistant commissioner for the South Carolina Department of Agriculture.

“We lost the first six weeks of the growing season due to a late-spring freeze, but we’ve had high-volume and high-quality peaches in our peak production months of July and August,” Eubanks said Aug. 1. “We will see volume falling off late this month, with some shipments into September.”

A 28-year veteran of the department and an old hand at riding the weather roller coaster for produce crops, Eubanks added,  “We had several bad spells of weather. Another degree or two colder, our entire crop could have been lost.”

Handling is critical for peaches, and Eubanks stressed, “They are hand-picked in a ‘hard-ripe’ condition so they won’t be bruised in shipping. Then they are chilled for a day, which puts them to sleep so they don’t ripen further until placed on the shelf.”

The slumbering peaches arrive at supermarkets in prime condition.

South Carolina, despite being a small state (41st in size among the 50 states), ranks high in produce. It is the nation’s second-largest grower of peaches, behind California, and ahead of Georgia, which is known as “The Peach State.” It places in the top 10 for leafy greens, cantaloupe, peanuts, watermelons, tomatoes, mixed vegetables and sweet potatoes, Eubanks noted, and its Southeast location allows overnight shipments to reach most of the U.S. population.

Other advantages include 842 miles of interstate highways and 9,500 miles of state primary roads, the flow of the growing seasons and “growers learning and adapting to make the state’s produce better,” he said.

Over his nearly three decades at the department, Eubanks said, the number of produce stock keeping units has grown from about 60 to more than 500 — some SKUs reflecting new processing for existing products, others, such as broccoli, due to new varieties.

“Diversity has increased rapidly, and that’s a real plus,” he said. Retail marketing lessons learned over the years, Eubanks observed, include “having a program for marketing a fruit or vegetable throughout the time it is available — a season-long plan, not just one or two special promotions.”

Eubanks credits South Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Hugh E. Weathers with starting the Certified SC Grown program, which makes it easy for consumers to identify, locate and buy South Carolina produce. Weathers won a 2006 appropriation from the state legislature to begin the program, citing a consumer survey that found 90 percent of the state’s residents would buy South Carolina food products if they knew where to buy them.

On average, the state has invested $ 1 million a year in Certified SC Grown and signed up more than 1,300 participants, who invest an average of $ 7 for every $ 1 in state funding for the program.

Also in the program are 500 in-state retailers, including more than a dozen supermarket chains and several out-of-state retailers.

Eubanks said sales of South Carolina-grown fruits and vegetables climbed to more than $ 200 million from $ 131 million in 2006.

Meanwhile, Eubanks has a timely word for retailers: In South Carolina, everything’s peachy.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Nine Salmonella Illnesses Linked to North Carolina Restaurant

The Watauga County office of the Appalachian District Health Department is working with the North Carolina Division of Public Health to investigate a gastrointestinal illness outbreak linked to Proper Restaurant in Boone, NC.

As of Friday, the health department had identified nine individuals with signs and symptoms consistent with Salmonellosis: diarrhea, stomach pain, fever, nausea, and occasional vomiting. Five cases have been confirmed as Salmonella infections.

“We are still investigating to determine the source (or sources) of infection. We are also actively working with restaurant management to resolve this as soon as possible,” said Health Director Beth Lovette. “We would like to thank the restaurant for their cooperation. The restaurant has been diligent and responsive during this process, and we appreciate their commitment to the safety of their customers.”

The health department is asking anyone who ate at Proper Restaurant on or after Saturday, May 17, and started having diarrhea within three days of eating or drinking there to call the department at (828) 264-6635.

Salmonellosis is an infection caused by a bacteria called Salmonella. Salmonella is transmitted by food, water, or surfaces that have been contaminated with the feces of an infected animal or person. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea (sometimes bloody), fever, and abdominal cramps six to 72 hours after infection.

The illness usually lasts four to seven days, and most persons recover without treatment. However, in some persons, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. In some cases, the person must be treated with antibiotics. Groups at greatest risk for severe or complicated disease include infants, the elderly, and persons with compromised immune systems.

Food Safety News

Carolina Blueberry Association volume to see jump in 2014

The North Carolina blueberry season is ramping up, and signs are pointing to a favorable season in 2014. “Last year’s harvest was cut short by the excessive amount of rain that we had,” said Rod Bangert, general manager of the Carolina Blueberry Association. “I am hopeful that our production will be 30 percent higher than last season.”

The association, founded in 1941, is located in Garland, NC. Bangert said the cooperative has 24 members.

Although development for the 2014 crop slowed earlier due to cool weather, Bangert said production will begin around May 15, a start time similar to production last year. “The weather cooperated with the pollination process. The harvest looks excellent from a volume perspective,” Bangert told The Produce News. “If weather conditions permit, we hope to continue to ship fresh product until mid-July and continuing harvesting process berries through August.”

The lion’s share of the annual crop is marketed under the “Bonnie Blue” label to the company’s customer base. Seventy percent of blues are moved in the fresh market, with the balance taken up by frozen. The Carolina Blueberry Association has always worked to strengthen its customer base and supply quality product.

“We work with multiple retailers direct and through our broker partners,” Bangert commented.

According to the association’s website, each grower has its own packing facilities and has implemented quality assurance programs on each packingline. “Our growers practice safe farming techniques as well as safe handling in the post-harvest season,” the website states. “Shipment tracking [is] monitored daily through internal systems and lot identification. Third-party audits are AIB -certified and posted on Primus.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Continuing tradition, South Carolina hosts April EPC meeting

PATERSON, NJ — South Carolina hosted the Eastern Produce Council’s April 22 dinner meeting, the 43rd time the state has done so. “We thank them for their continued support,” EPC President Paul Kneeland, vice president of produce, floral, seafood and meat at Kings Food Markets and Balducci’s Food Lovers Markets, said in his introductory remarks at the meeting, held here at The Brownstone.

South Carolina’s delegation was led by Martin Eubanks, the state’s assistant commissioner of agriculture, who has represented his state for many, many years at its annual journey north to host the EPC’s April meeting.EPC916 Brian Sewall and Scott Knospe of Wakefern Food Corp. with Brendan Keating of Bozzuto’s Inc.

In giving updates on the crop situation in their state, all of the host speakers touched on the late March freeze that hit parts of the South, including South Carolina.

Noting that “no two years are the same” regarding weather, Lynne Chappell, president of the South Carolina Peach Council, said that early varieties of peaches in some parts of her state were lost in the March 25 freeze. There will be “limited supplies of the early crop” from those affected areas, and production will be “later than normal.”

In light of this situation, Eubanks stated, “Communication is vital in a year like this.”

Angela O’Neal Chappell, president of the South Carolina Watermelon Association, said that some watermelons had to be replanted after the late March freeze but that for the most part, they “should be on time.” That means retailers and other distributors should see plenty of South Carolina watermelons for the Fourth of July holiday period, as usual.

In EPC business, four directors were re-elected to three-year terms: Matthew D’Arrigo of D’Arrigo Bros. Company of New York Inc., Marianne Santo of Wakefern Food Corp., Greg Veneziano of Bozzuto’s Inc. and Wendell Hahn of Four Seasons Produce Inc. The officers continue in their posts: Kneeland as president, Vic Savanello of Allegiance Retail Services as first vice president, Terry Murphy of Wakefern as second vice president, Rob Goldstein of Genpro Inc. as secretary and Sal Zacchia of RDD Associates as treasurer.

Kneeland stated that the council’s dinner dance April 5 had been a great success and that the next two months will see a variety of events as the council wraps up its 2014 season.

On May 13, the council will hold its second meeting ever at the Philadelphia Wholesale Produce Market, followed one week later when its May 20 meeting — dubbed the Jersey Fresh cookout — will take place at Demarest Farms in Hillsdale, NJ. Its 39th annual golf outing will take place June 7 at Royce Brook Golf Club in Hillsborough, NJ. The council’s final dinner meeting before its traditional summer break will take place June 24 at The Brownstone, hosted by Earthbound Farm and House Foods.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Sun World appoints Carolina Uquillas as South American licensing manager

Sun World International LLC is expanding its presence in South America and, in order to accommodate that expansion, has named well-respected Chilean grape breeder and agronomist Carolina Uquillas to manage its fruit licensing business throughout Brazil, Chile and Peru.

She assumes responsibilities for managing all of Sun World’s growing South American activities. Executive Vice President David Marguleas said Uquillas joined Sun World Jan. 13 and will be based at the California company’s Santiago, Chile, office. Carolina-UquillasCarolina Uquillas

Sun World licenses a wide-ranging intellectual property portfolio, including proprietary grapes and stone fruit licensed to growers and export-marketers throughout Chile, Peru and northeastern Brazil.

“South America is an essential Southern Hemisphere production region for our international licensing business and for quality-minded supermarket retailers seeking differentiated varieties,” Marguleas said in a press release. “Carolina brings keen knowledge of variety development and best production practices as well as an appreciation for what brands and unique varieties can accomplish for progressive grower-marketers.” 

For the past six years Uquillas led the Chilean government’s INIA grape-breeding program, where she had responsibility for developing new varieties, designing crosses and evaluating selections as well as assisting with the commercialization of varieties.

“Carolina worked closely with growers throughout Chile, has a keen understanding of the fruit industry and supply chain and is eager to apply her experience and energy to Sun World, its varieties and brands,” Marguleas said.

She obtained her PhD in plant molecular biology from the Catholic University of Chile and subsequently attended the University of California’s Plant Breeding Academy. She and her family live in Santiago.

In addition to licensing its fruit varieties to producers throughout South America, Sun World has licensed leading Chilean fruit marketing companies, including Subsole, Unifrutti, Gesex, Frutera Santa Maria, Dole, Tuniche and Agricom as well as Peruvian counterparts such as Camposol and Agricola Don Ricardo and Brazilian marketers such as VDS, Special Fruit, COANA and Expofruit.

Sun World is one of the leading U.S. producers and marketers of fresh fruit and operates one of the world’s largest table grape and stone fruit breeding programs. Since its inception in the mid-1970s, the company’s Variety Development Center has released more than 90 varieties with improved flavor, size, color, shelf life and extended seasonality. In addition to production on its own California farms, Sun World licenses producers to grow its proprietary varieties in North America, Europe, South America, Australia, the Middle East and South Africa. For more information, please visit www.sun-world.com.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Possible E. coli Outbreak Investigated in North Carolina

Two children attending Tyro Middle School in Lexington, NC hospitalized for severe, bloody diarrhea thought to be caused by E. coli have now seen their infections develop into the kidney threatening disease know as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). The school is located in the central part of the state, about 22 miles south of Winston-Salem.

The Davidson County Health Department learned of the cases on Friday, and has not yet determined the source of the original infections. The department has set up a hotline for information on the incident.

The public is asked to call 336-242-2300.  If calling after 2 p.m., the #8 prompt can be selected to leave a message for a call back.

“Our sincerest sympathies go out to the families of these two students who have experienced illness”, says Monecia Thomas, Davidson County Health Department Health Director. “Our goal in this is to inform the public, reduce the spread of the infection to others, and identify any other cases.”

While most E. coli are harmless, the shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) type identified is very infectious and can easily cause illness.

Symptoms may include acute diarrhea, including bloody diarrhea, vomiting, severe abdominal cramps, and low-grade fever.

Food Safety News

Piggly Wiggly Carolina Selling 28 Stores

CHARLESTON, S.C. — In a continuation of rapid consolidation in the Southeast, Piggly Wiggly Carolina said Thursday that it would sell 28 stores — 22 to Bi-Lo Holdings and another 6 to Harris Teeter. Financial terms were not disclosed.

Harris Teeter, based in Matthews, N.C., is also acquiring a store site under construction in Isle of Palms, S.C. The company said it planned to expand and remodel the stores it is buying, which include three locations in Charleston; two stores in Mt. Pleasant, S.C.; and the Newton Farms specialty store, located in Kiawah Island, S.C.


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Bi-Lo Holdings, Jacksonville, Fla., is acquiring 22 Piggly Wiggly locations — 16 in South Carolina and 6 in Coastal Georgia. The company said it anticipated converting those stores to the Bi-Lo banner following the closing of the deal in the fourth quarter.

The deals continue a wave of consolidation among Southeast retailers this year. Harris Teeter is in the process of being acquired by Kroger Co., Cincinnati. Bi-Lo Holdings earlier this year announced plans to acquire the Sweetbay, Reid’s and Harveys banners from Delhaize America.

Piggly Wiggly Carolina will continue to operate 32 corporate-owned stores and to supply 28 franchise customers, sources said.

“The departure of employees and stores from the Piggly Wiggly team will be acutely felt, but we know that Bi-Lo Holdings will benefit from these outstanding folks,” David Schools, president and chief executive officer of Piggly Wiggly Carolina, said in a statement. “We are glad that employees will have the opportunity to work for Bi-Lo Holdings, and guests will continue to be served by the familiar people who have been the backbone of these stores for years.”

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Publix expanding presence in North Carolina

Publix Super Markets Inc. has announced plans to grow its presence in North Carolina with the addition of two new stores. Publix will enter the Winston-Salem market and add a third location in Mecklenburg County.

“We continue to deliver on our promise of serving the great state of North Carolina by adding yet another county to our market area,” Maria Brous, Publix media and community relations director, said in a press release. “We are more than your community grocer – we are your neighbors and look forward to sharing the Publix spirit with you.”

Publix previously announced its first five North Carolina locations: Ballantyne, opening in early 2014; two locations in Greater Charlotte, one opening in early 2015 and the other in late 2014; Cary, opening in late 2014; and Asheville, opening in 2015.

The Winston-Salem store will be a 49,000-square-foot Publix supermarket with covered parking below the store. The opening is scheduled for 2015.

The Cornelius store, located in Mecklenburg County, will be a 49,000-square-foot supermarket with drive-thru pharmacy. It is planned to open in late 2014; however, grand opening will depend on several factors, including permitting and completion of the store’s construction.

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Publix expanding presence in North Carolina

Publix Super Markets Inc. has announced plans to grow its presence in North Carolina with the addition of two new stores. Publix will enter the Winston-Salem market and add a third location in Mecklenburg County.

“We continue to deliver on our promise of serving the great state of North Carolina by adding yet another county to our market area,” Maria Brous, Publix media and community relations director, said in a press release. “We are more than your community grocer – we are your neighbors and look forward to sharing the Publix spirit with you.”

Publix previously announced its first five North Carolina locations: Ballantyne, opening in early 2014; two locations in Greater Charlotte, one opening in early 2015 and the other in late 2014; Cary, opening in late 2014; and Asheville, opening in 2015.

The Winston-Salem store will be a 49,000-square-foot Publix supermarket with covered parking below the store. The opening is scheduled for 2015.

The Cornelius store, located in Mecklenburg County, will be a 49,000-square-foot supermarket with drive-thru pharmacy. It is planned to open in late 2014; however, grand opening will depend on several factors, including permitting and completion of the store’s construction.

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Publix expanding presence in North Carolina

Publix Super Markets Inc. has announced plans to grow its presence in North Carolina with the addition of two new stores. Publix will enter the Winston-Salem market and add a third location in Mecklenburg County.

“We continue to deliver on our promise of serving the great state of North Carolina by adding yet another county to our market area,” Maria Brous, Publix media and community relations director, said in a press release. “We are more than your community grocer – we are your neighbors and look forward to sharing the Publix spirit with you.”

Publix previously announced its first five North Carolina locations: Ballantyne, opening in early 2014; two locations in Greater Charlotte, one opening in early 2015 and the other in late 2014; Cary, opening in late 2014; and Asheville, opening in 2015.

The Winston-Salem store will be a 49,000-square-foot Publix supermarket with covered parking below the store. The opening is scheduled for 2015.

The Cornelius store, located in Mecklenburg County, will be a 49,000-square-foot supermarket with drive-thru pharmacy. It is planned to open in late 2014; however, grand opening will depend on several factors, including permitting and completion of the store’s construction.

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Publix expanding presence in North Carolina

Publix Super Markets Inc. has announced plans to grow its presence in North Carolina with the addition of two new stores. Publix will enter the Winston-Salem market and add a third location in Mecklenburg County.

“We continue to deliver on our promise of serving the great state of North Carolina by adding yet another county to our market area,” Maria Brous, Publix media and community relations director, said in a press release. “We are more than your community grocer – we are your neighbors and look forward to sharing the Publix spirit with you.”

Publix previously announced its first five North Carolina locations: Ballantyne, opening in early 2014; two locations in Greater Charlotte, one opening in early 2015 and the other in late 2014; Cary, opening in late 2014; and Asheville, opening in 2015.

The Winston-Salem store will be a 49,000-square-foot Publix supermarket with covered parking below the store. The opening is scheduled for 2015.

The Cornelius store, located in Mecklenburg County, will be a 49,000-square-foot supermarket with drive-thru pharmacy. It is planned to open in late 2014; however, grand opening will depend on several factors, including permitting and completion of the store’s construction.

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Publix expanding presence in North Carolina

Publix Super Markets Inc. has announced plans to grow its presence in North Carolina with the addition of two new stores. Publix will enter the Winston-Salem market and add a third location in Mecklenburg County.

“We continue to deliver on our promise of serving the great state of North Carolina by adding yet another county to our market area,” Maria Brous, Publix media and community relations director, said in a press release. “We are more than your community grocer – we are your neighbors and look forward to sharing the Publix spirit with you.”

Publix previously announced its first five North Carolina locations: Ballantyne, opening in early 2014; two locations in Greater Charlotte, one opening in early 2015 and the other in late 2014; Cary, opening in late 2014; and Asheville, opening in 2015.

The Winston-Salem store will be a 49,000-square-foot Publix supermarket with covered parking below the store. The opening is scheduled for 2015.

The Cornelius store, located in Mecklenburg County, will be a 49,000-square-foot supermarket with drive-thru pharmacy. It is planned to open in late 2014; however, grand opening will depend on several factors, including permitting and completion of the store’s construction.

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Salmonella Outbreak Linked to North Carolina Holiday Sickened 100, Final Report Says

The Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak linked to a Holiday Inn in North Carolina ultimately sickened at least 100 people this May, the North Carolina Division of Public Heath reported this week.

The bacteria was linked to the All American Grill at the Holiday Inn Bordeaux in Fayetteville, NC, according to the final outbreak report, issued by NCDPH July 19.

Health officials in Cumberland County first alerted the state health department of a Salmonella outbreak that had sickened an estimated 15 people on May 15. All of the ill people had reported eating at the Holiday Inn Bordeaux in the days preceding illness. The case count would eventually expand to 88 — the number reported May 28. Now, in its final outbreak report, NCDPH says 100 Salmonella illnesses were ultimately linked to the outbreak.

That final count included 25 cases confirmed by laboratory testing and an additional 75 suspected cases. Of those sickened, 29 were staff members at the hotel. Victims ranged in age from 17 to 81 years old. 

The first illnesses began May 1, 2013 and the last reported illness onset was May 17, 2013.

The strain of Salmonella Typhumurium responsible for the outbreak was one that’s unique to North Carolina, according to the report.

While the specific vehicle of the bacteria was not identified, health officials found a series of sanitation violations that might have led to contamination. 

“Interviews with managerial staff and observation of food preparation identified multiple opportunities for Salmonella contamination, including improper water temperatures and the absence of hand washing supplies in some areas,” the final report notes. “Other potential food safety issues that were identified included bare hand contact with ready to eat foods, temperature violations, and a dishwasher in one kitchen that was not operating effectively as described by staff members.”

Health officials speculate that various foods and surfaces in the restaurant kitchen were cross-contaminated, which would explain why they were unable to identify the specific source of the bacteria.

Food Safety News