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Chile pepper grower seeks support for improved grades and standards for category

A Florida-based grower-shipper of chile peppers is lobbying the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Specialty Crop Division to establish a USDA Grade and Delivery standard for the category, positing that it will benefit the industry at large.IMG 3585

Steve Veneziano, vice president of sales and operations for Oakes Farms, based in Immokalee, FL, said the company grades its own chile peppers as everyone else does Bell peppers, with grades of Fancy, No. 1 and No. 2 quality. He believes that if all shippers followed similar guidelines, the chile pepper category would benefit.

“With no grade contract established, the chile pepper category is fairly stagnant because they don’t have the proper sell-through, they have a lot of shrink, and produce managers don’t want to merchandise them because it’s a high-shrink category,” he said. “And especially during transitional times, some shippers mix No. 2s and poor-quality peppers in the box and they get away with it. Having a grade contract would eliminate that and help the entire industry. The chile pepper category has evolved tremendously over the past five years, and this is what it needs to continue moving forward.”

Veneziano said he recently contacted Jeffrey Davis, business development specialist with the USDA’s specialty crop program, who confirmed that grades and standards currently exist only for sweet peppers, and was told he would need to drum up support from the industry to move forward with his petition.

John Guerra, head of Eastern vegetable sales for S. Katzman Produce in the Bronx, NY, said he is in “100 percent in support of the petition.”

Guerra said the lack of quality standards for various hot peppers has really affected what the consumer thinks a hot pepper or varietal pepper should look like because there is very little restriction.

“Particularly from a terminal market point of view, on a tightly allocated market, everything goes into a box without any consideration on quality or grading, and you pass this along to a consumer who is expecting a certain quality, and it is frustrating,” said Guerra. “We went through a winter of some very unusual weather patterns in Florida, which created some limited availability. While many other grower-shippers were putting anything and everything into a box, Steve was separating them and giving us differentiated product. I feel very lucky that we had Oakes in our portfolio. It’s all about integrity, and Oakes is upholding something that isn’t being followed by all of the industry.”

Guerra said he would be interested in petitioning USDA in support of this movement.

Alan Goldberg, owner of A&B Tropical Produce in Miami, is another proponent of the concept, stating it is “long overdue” to have grading standards for the chile pepper industry.

“When issues come up, there needs to be something solid that people can rely on,” said Goldberg. “The chile pepper category is a growing category and the industry needs this. Really, every item should have a grade standard.”

Asked what benefit the grading standards would bring to the chile pepper industry, Goldberg said, “I think it will create confidence all across the board with both buyers and sellers, who will feel better that there is some protection down the line when it comes to settling disputes. It will limit the grey area. To me, anyone not in favor of implementing grade standards is unscrupulous. Why wouldn’t you want law and order?”

Goldberg said that he, too, is planning to contact USDA in support of this initiative. “I’ll do whatever I can to help promote this situation,” he said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

HAB promotes health benefits of Hass avocados as category continues to grow

The Hass Avocado Board in Irvine, CA, which represents growers and importers of Hass avocados in the U.S. market, continues, as it has for about the past two and a half years, to focus primarily on nutrition research and nutrition marketing “in a way that supports the category as a whole,” according to Emiliano Escobedo, executive director.

This year alone, “we are budgeting close to half a million dollars in new research,” Escobedo told The Produce News. New findings are expected to continue the wave of “not only good news” about avocados “but good news based on facts,” which allows the board and the industry as a whole “to engage in evidence-based marketing.”

For the past 10 years or so, the board has engaged in consumer tracking studies that have shown there are three key reasons consumers buy avocados. “They care about taste. They care about the variety of uses,” he said. But they also care about “the nutrition message.” People are “very interested in the nutritional benefits and nutritional properties of avocados.”

Recent studies have revealed avocados to be nutrient boosters. When eaten with other foods such as tomatoes or carrots, for example, the avocados enhance the body’s absorption of essential nutrients such as vitamin A.

“The Buzz keeps getting louder” in social media and in traditional media about the health and nutritional benefits of avocados, and that is believed to be a major factor in the continuing dramatic growth of avocado consumption in the U.S. market, according to Escobedo.

During the first six months of 2014, “the industry shipped slightly over 950 million pounds” of Hass avocados, a 22 percent increase from two years prior. “Definitely, this will be a record-breaking year,” he said. The original estimate was 1.7 billion pounds, similar to the prior year. But “right now, the way it is looking, we are going to be closer to 1.8 billion pounds, so it is a very good year in terms of volume.”

The majority of that volume comes from Mexico, which will account for roughly two-thirds of the market this year.

The other major players are California, which had a lighter crop this year than last year; Peru, the newest player in the U.S. avocado market, which will double its volume this year over 2013; and Chile.

Mexico exports year-round, with lighter volumes during the summer. Chile  comes in primarily during the fall and  winter months. The length of the California season is largely determined by the size of the crop but typically is spring and summer and can continue well into fall on a large crop year. This year, the California crop will wane in the latter part of August and be mostly finished by September. Peru’s season is similar to that of California.

Shipping much smaller volumes to the United States are New Zealand and Dominican Republic.

Because the United States is “a very large market that is also growing very rapidly, it is attractive” to other producing countries as well, who are hoping to gain access. Columbia and South Africa are currently working their way through that process with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, although that is likely to take some time, Escobedo said. “Those certifications don’t happen overnight.”

A HAB tracking study of 4,400 grocery shoppers over the age of 25, over a period of 10 years or so, shows that two-thirds of U.S. consumers “have purchased avocados for home use,” Escobedo said. “Heavy and super-heavy avocado users represent 60 percent of all avocado users” but they consume about 92 percent of the avocados, “so these users are critical to driving the business. They are familiar with the product and know how to use it,” but they also “want to know more about how to use it and the variety of uses to which avocados can be put.”

HAB is continuing with its “Love One Today” marketing nutrition program designed both to raise consumption of avocados in the United States and to serve as “a uniform platform” for the organizations representing various points of origin that are promoting avocados in the U.S. market.

“We try to emphasize the points that are most relevant to consumers so the message is clear and consistent” across all marketing campaigns, regardless of origin, Escobedo said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California Giant welcomes new category manager, adds to sales department

California Giant Berry Farms announced the addition of Jerry Connery as the new bush berry category manager for the company. Connery is a veteran produce industry professional with sales experience both domestically and internationally.

Most recently Connery was the mixed berry category manager for Dole, but the bulk of his career was spent with Duda Farms where he served as the domestic and export sales manager. jerryserjioJerry Connery, Wes White, Gaby Pena and Serjio Sanchez.At California Giant Connery will manage the bush berry category both domestically and internationally, providing overall direction to the sales group for the year-round program. He will work with the vice presidents of sales and field operations to help continue to increase volume in all growing regions and retail market share for the company.

Connery graduated from San Diego State University, has two sons in college and resides in Aptos, CA.

The company also recently hired Wes White and Gaby Pena as sales coordinators to assist the sales staff in managing the continued increase in volume and support needed for the full product line. As a result, Serjio Sanchez is being promoted to salesperson and expanding his role in the department. Sanchez was hired as an analyst in late 2012 and has proven to be a critical addition to the team. He will perform daily domestic sales functions as well as support export sales on strawberries.

“We are excited to have Jerry on board and we look forward to his expertise and the knowledge he brings to the sales team”, Anthony Gallino, vice president of sales, said in a press release. “Jerry is coming into Cal Giant just as the season is ramping up and Serjio is more than ready to have a greater role within the sales department to make an impact from day one as we expand our sales team and service level to our customers.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California Giant welcomes new category manager, adds to sales department

California Giant Berry Farms announced the addition of Jerry Connery as the new bush berry category manager for the company. Connery is a veteran produce industry professional with sales experience both domestically and internationally.

Most recently Connery was the mixed berry category manager for Dole, but the bulk of his career was spent with Duda Farms where he served as the domestic and export sales manager. jerryserjioJerry Connery, Wes White, Gaby Pena and Serjio Sanchez.At California Giant Connery will manage the bush berry category both domestically and internationally, providing overall direction to the sales group for the year-round program. He will work with the vice presidents of sales and field operations to help continue to increase volume in all growing regions and retail market share for the company.

Connery graduated from San Diego State University, has two sons in college and resides in Aptos, CA.

The company also recently hired Wes White and Gaby Pena as sales coordinators to assist the sales staff in managing the continued increase in volume and support needed for the full product line. As a result, Serjio Sanchez is being promoted to salesperson and expanding his role in the department. Sanchez was hired as an analyst in late 2012 and has proven to be a critical addition to the team. He will perform daily domestic sales functions as well as support export sales on strawberries.

“We are excited to have Jerry on board and we look forward to his expertise and the knowledge he brings to the sales team”, Anthony Gallino, vice president of sales, said in a press release. “Jerry is coming into Cal Giant just as the season is ramping up and Serjio is more than ready to have a greater role within the sales department to make an impact from day one as we expand our sales team and service level to our customers.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chris Jones joins Market Fresh Produce as category manager

Market Fresh has added Chris Jones to its corporate staff, where he will take on the role of category manager. Jones will oversee many of the products that Market Fresh currently offers. He will be responsible for negotiating a competitive cost of goods as well as developing and maintaining rapport with growers, shippers and other vendors.

Jones has been in the produce world since 1995. He started as a produce stocker at a Walmart store in Springfield, MO. From there, he continued to advance within the Walmart organization, becoming assistant produce manager and then produce manager.

In 2002, Jones joined the team at Associated Wholesalers Grocers in Springfield. At AWG, he held a variety of positions, including produce quality insurance inspector, banana ripener and produce buyer. In his most recent position with AWG, he was a produce specialist.

“Chris’ background and vast knowledge of the industry will help in our day-to-day operations as well as the future growth and development of our company,” Steve Phipps, Market Fresh chief executive officer and owner, said in a press release. “We look forward to the added value and expertise he will bring to our organization.”

“I am enthusiastic to join the MFP team,” Jone said in the release. “The business model at Market Fresh creates some exciting opportunities to go to market selling fresh tomatoes, sweet onions, etc. The possibilities for promotions are exciting and I look forward to working with supply partners I have worked with before and meeting and working with new suppliers.”

Market Fresh offers full-line procurement and category management in tomatoes, potatoes, onions, sweet potatoes, peppers, avocados and kiwifruit. Through its national network of distribution centers, state-of-the-art vendor managed inventory program, and a proven track record of customer service, Market Fresh continues to help its customers eliminate supply-side problems and grow in store categories.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Stemilt’s premium pear program leads industry to huge category increases

Stemilt’s premium river valley pear program helped the industry achieve huge category increases through the first four months of the season, according to the company’s recent analysis of retail scan data from Nielsen Perishables Group.

D’Anjou pears were up 24 percent in volume and nearly 26 percent in dollar sales year over year according to national composite data from September through December 2013. Other key pear varieties, including Red d’Anjou, Bartlett and Bosc, also realized increases in both categories.

MillerStreetPears 6174D’Anjou pears on one of Stemilt’s modern packing lines at its Miller Street facility in Wenatchee, WA.“Though no two crop years are ever the same — and the 2013-14 crop is up in volume and fruit size is larger than the prior crop — the fact that dollar sales have increased for d’Anjou and other key varieties along with volume increases shows that consumer demand for pears is very strong,” Roger Pepperl, Stemilt marketing director, said in a press release.

There are a number of factors that led to the pear category increases, Pepperl said. Harvest in the Northwest was slightly earlier than normal, which allowed retailers to get a jump on the pear season. The total pear crop is up over last year due to this being an “on” year for pears, and fruit size is running a size larger this year.

“About 10 percent of the volume increase for d’Anjou pears can be attributed to fruit size,” Pepperl said. “Customers might be picking up the same number of pears but are bringing home more weight when they buy bulk simply because fruit size is larger at retail.”

Aside from crop realities, Pepperl believes that increased attention on ripening programs for d’Anjou, value bag offerings, and putting multiple varieties on ad each month is elevating the pear category.

“Here at Stemilt, our pear program has really benefitted over the past several years from capital investments, new products and a focus on getting multiple pears on ad every month during the fall and winter season,” he said. “The increased shelf space for pears during a multi-pear ad often results in 15-20 percent increases in volume when compared to one item pear ads.”

Stemilt pears come primarily from two renowned locales: the Wenatchee River Valley and the Entiat River Valley. Surrounded by alpine mountains, these two regions benefit from cooler temperatures during the growing season and high-quality air drainage, which consistently produces premium quality pears.

The two locales are both located in close proximity to four modern packinglines operated by Stemilt or its pear partner, Peshastin Hi-Up. Additionally, Stemilt’s Miller Street facility in Wenatchee features two Thermal Tech ripening rooms to round out the company’s recognizable RipeRite pear-ripening program.

“Our increased investment in packinglines and pear ripening has resulted in a better consumer eating experience,” Pepperl said. “We already benefit from tremendous pear quality thanks to the location of our pear orchards, and so we focus on tight inventory turns and delivering ready-to-eat pear pressures to retail on normally hard-to-ripen varieties like d’Anjou and Red d’Anjou.”

Stemilt has also increased the volume of bag offerings to provide added value to the pear category. The company includes four varieties of pears in its trademarked Lil Snappers line of kid-sized fruits, and also provides retailers with high-graphic half tri-wall bins, which are perfect for promoting family-sized bags of pears.

“Our pear half tri-wall bins are a great in-and-out merchandising tool to move five-pound bags of pears,” said Pepperl. “It adds one more item to the mix to elevate the category and really appeals to value shoppers.”

Pepperl expects the pear category increases to level down a bit through the spring months as seasonal items — like cherries — start to take some shelf space in produce departments. Overall, the Nielsen data from the primary pear promotion months tells him that consumers are responding to the premium quality of pears, especially when strong merchandising programs are behind them.

“It’s always our goal at Stemilt to continuously improve pear quality in order to provide consumers with an unforgettable eating experience,” Pepperl said. “It’s great to see our efforts pay off in the form of strong category growth nationally.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Meat Conference 2014: Improving economy helps meat category

Attitudes about meat are starting to shift as the economy improves and convenience and nutrition gain importance in consumers’ decision making process, panelists said during a presentation of the latest Power of Meat study.

Nearly 50% of shoppers surveyed said they are changing how they shop for meat and poultry based on the economy, a large increase from recent years. However, in contrast to previous surveys, this year a large percentage of those (36%) said they are spending more in the meat department.

This difference is driven by higher income shoppers who are purchasing more ready to eat and heat and eat products for convenience, said Anne-Marie Roerink, principal, 210 Analytics, who led the study.

Similarly, the factors behind the purchasing decision have changed somewhat.

“Price per pound still rules the day, and I think it always will,” said Roerink. Yet, price was not as important as in previous years, consumers said.

Factors that carried more weight with consumers this year than in previous years included nutritional content, knowledge of how to prepare, and preparation time required. Roerink said it is also higher income shoppers who are leading these shifts.

In addition, more consumers are looking for a branded meat product, whether it be a national brand or private label. Consumers started buying national brands last year as the economy improved but private label items also gained ground.

According to previous research from Midan Marketing, one third of shoppers pick a store because of the brand offered in the meat department.

“One way or another, you’ve got to get a brand in there,” Michael Uetz, principal, Midan Marketing, said at the Power of Meat panel.

Supermarket News

U.S. apple category volume grows in November

Consumers switching to newer varieties
U.S. apple category volume grows in November

Supermarket performance data for November shows apple volume in supermarkets increased by 2.5%. Volume gains were supported by falling retail prices, which for the full apple category declined by 6.5%.

According to data released by Nielsen Perishables Group, newer varieties like Gala and Honeycrisp are driving growth, while older varieties like Red and Golden Delicious are losing ground.

For the four week period ending 11/23/2013, Gala was the largest volume apple in U.S. supermarkets, increasing by 3% over the same period last year. Honeycrisp was the 2nd highest volume apple, jumping by 14%.

Steve Lutz, Vice President of Marketing for CMI said, “More consumers are selecting newer variety apples like Gala, Honeycrisp and Fuji at the expense of some traditional favorites.” He added, “This is beginning to impact performance of legacy varieties like Red Delicious and Golden Delicious and even established varieties like Braeburn. For the four week period, Red volume dropped by almost 12% while Golden volume declined by about 8%.”

According to Lutz, shoppers are increasingly seeking out apples believed to be high in flavor. “Consumers are more willing to pay high prices for apples like Fuji and Honeycrisp. But we’re seeing even stronger gains in high-flavor varieties like Pink Lady and Ambrosia. For the period, among the top 10 apple varieties nationally, Pink Lady and Ambrosia had the strongest percentage gains in volume”, said Lutz. “Pink Lady volume jumped by 44% while Ambrosia volume increased by 22%, despite supermarket shelf prices substantially higher than the category average.”

“The apple category continues to become more complex,” said Lutz. “Increasingly, for retailers success hinges not only on knowing which apple varieties to put on the shelf, but also knowing which apples to emphasize in merchandising and which varieties should be dropped.”

For More information, contact
Steve Lutz
CMI
Tel: +1 509.888.3401
cmiapples.com
 

Publication date: 1/2/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Green Giant Fresh expands lettuce category

Growers Express debuted its newest leaf lettuce category offering — living butter lettuce — under the “Green Giant Fresh” brand.

GGF-Living-LettuceLiving butter lettuce is known for its consistent quality and attached roots, giving it significantly longer shelf life than other fully harvested lettuces.

Each butter lettuce head will be packaged in an individual clamshell with the “Green Giant Fresh” brand and Box Tops for Education clips. To aid shoppers in easy access to quick meal solutions, each package provides a QR code that links to recipes, helpful preparation instructions and handling tips.

CEO Jamie Strachan stated,

“On the heels of over 25 other product launches this year, we are very excited to expand our greenhouse line with ‘Green Giant Fresh’ butter lettuce,” Jamie Strachan, chief executive officer of Growers Express, said in a press release. “We remain committed to consistently delivering solutions that truly help our customers enhance their category offerings.”

All butter lettuce clamshells will feature the Box Tops for Education logo. Green Giant Fresh is the only produce brand featuring Box Tops for Education, a program that enables consumers to earn money for their children’s’ schools by clipping Box Tops coupons from hundreds of participating products.

Since 1996, the Box Tops for Education program has helped America’s schools earn more than $ 558 million.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

2013 OTA Industry Survey data show fresh organic produce continues to lead the category

The Organic Trade Association’s 2013 Organic Industry Survey, conducted and produced by Nutrition Business Journal, indicates that the U.S. organic product market continued to climb in 2012, putting more distance between the growth of today and the difficulties of the recession in 2009.

More than 200 companies responded to the survey, which was conducted from Jan. 25, 2013 through April 5, 2013. It includes revenues reported in narrow ranges, sales growth, revenue by product and sales channel breakdowns.

Blood OrangesOrganic blood oranges ripe and ready to enjoy. (Photo by Leslie Goldman and courtesy of the Organic Trade Association)Consumer sales of organic products — both food and non-food — accounted for $ 31.5 billion in sales in 2012, adding roughly $ 2.9 billion in new annual sales dollars while also achieving double-digit growth for the first time since 2008.

In the produce category, fresh fruit and vegetable sales continues to lead the way by a huge margin over canned and frozen products. Fresh produce sales in 2012 represented 90.8 percent of total organic produce sales, with frozen organic produce at four percent, canned at 3.45 percent and dried beans, fruits and vegetables at 2 percent.

The survey also indicated that private label and contract manufacturing continue to be important segments of the organic business. While the private label organic product offerings in the mass market channel continue to expand, many large players in this channel indicated that sales growth was down in 2012.

Private label growth is stronger in the natural retail channel, where shopping for organic is easier and consumers clearly understand the value proposition of an organic private label product.

The OTA has also been actively involved in certain fresh produce issues. A July 22 statement issued by Laura Batcha, OTA’s executive vice president, stated that organic practices offer hope for citrus greening, a disease that poses an unprecedented challenge to U.S. citrus growers.

“As the industry scrambles to curb the devastating effects of this disease, the organic sector is discovering some promising findings that could offer hope for the future of U.S.-grown citrus overall,” Batcha stated. “Early field research, including U.S. Department of Agriculture monitoring of the Asian citrus psyllid population — the insect which spreads the disease — in Florida and Texas groves, indicates organic management techniques focusing on tree and soil health plus biological treatments provide equal or better disease management than the use of repeated pesticide applications allowed in conventionally managed citrus groves.”

Batcha offers Uncle Matt’s Organic in Clermont, FL, as an example of the significant progress one organic citrus producer has made in keeping the disease contained. Uncle Matt’s has found that the Asian citrus psyllid can be kept in check through a comprehensive sustainable, organic farm program integrating biological controls — including the release of predator wasps — organic fertilizers and sprays of botanical oils.

After 18 months of collecting data from grove monitoring, USDA reported that Uncle Matt’s organic grove ranked in the “low” percentile, and, in some cases, in a group with the lowest percentile for psyllid presence.

Research is also under way at the OTA to address critical organic apple and pear challenges in an effort to seek options to help growers.

Jessica Shade at The Organic Center in Washington, DC, announced in a press release in late July a project to prevent a potential catastrophe now looming over organic apple and pear production in the U.S. The goal is to provide the organic farming community with critically needed information on how to prevent fire blight, a bacterial tree disease, from decimating apple and pear orchards while maintaining rigorous organic standards. Exacerbating the situation is that U.S. organic farmers will no longer be allowed to use oxytetracycline, one of the key control agents to prevent this disease, as of October 2014.

“Fire blight doesn’t just destroy the fruit; it has the potential to kill the entire tree,” Shade stated in the release. “To make matters worse, it is highly contagious among trees and orchards, so the potential for damage is enormous. Fire blight could have huge ramifications on the future organic apple and pear market, which is now estimated to be over $ 300 million at retail. Washington, which leads in production, currently has over 15,000 acres dedicated to organic apple and pear orchards.”

To address the issue of non-antibiotic alternatives for fire blight control, The Organic Center is funding a project, in collaboration with Granatstein and Harold Ostenson, to research integrative antibiotic-free management strategies.The project will be published as a report written by farmers for farmers, reviewing methods for controlling fire blight holistically, and covering other pertinent issues.This will provide a critically needed bridge to cover the gap created with the 2014 expiration of oxytetracycline.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Fresh Fruit Cuts develops proprietary process to bolster stone fruit category

Fresh Fruit Cuts has launched Woot Froot, a line of expertly selected and processed fresh peaches and nectarines. The line, which caters to health-conscious consumers looking for value-added stone fruit, will be available through October in 2013, although the company is preparing for year-round availability in 2014.

“Woot Froot pairs the great taste of fresh nectarines and peaches — one of America’s top 10 fruits — with the 18-oz-NectarineAn 18-ounce retail consumer pack of ‘Woot Froot’ nectarines.ease and convenience of fresh cut and the added benefit of consistent quality and flavor,” Fresh Fruit Cuts’ Kim Gaarde, the researcher and developer of Woot Froot, said in a press release.

Gaarde worked diligently through her company, Fruit Dynamics, over a seven-year time frame to develop the proprietary process for selecting, processing and packaging the fresh cut peaches and nectarines.

After seven years of research and development — and a few relentless doubters — Gaarde said she is proud to be a part of the team that is building new value for stone fruit growers and enhancing consumers’ access to value-added stone fruit that is both healthy and convenient.

The company tested more than 500 varieties before finding the select few that provide the desired taste and texture for Woot Froot, which has a 15-day shelf life. Retail consumer packs are available in three-ounce and 18-ounce trays, and bulk packages are available for foodservice.

“Three out of five consumers prefer to purchase ripe fruit,” Gaarde said, “but two out of five don’t know how to go about it. Woot Froot takes the guesswork out of purchasing stone fruit, a category that is loved by Americans but has been relatively flat for the past several years.  We aim to change that and add a little excitement.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Category Merchant and Retail Space Planning Analyst Jobs – Dollar Tree

COME GROW WITH US!!

Join North America’s leading operator of discount variety stores selling everything for $ 1.00 or less as we continue to grow! Dollar Tree, a Fortune 500 company, operates over 4,700 stores

in 48 states and 5 Canadian Provinces and is looking for support in our Merchandise department.

We have openings for the following:

Category Merchant – HBC (#209517)
The principal purpose of this position is to develop the Dollar Tree & Deal$ stores assortment, define and execute the Deal$ merchandising strategy, identify merchandising opportunities

and risks, develop action plans and support the Category Director in developing the Dollar Tree & Deal$ business.
 

Retail Space Planning Analyst (#214427)

Responsible for the development of store layouts including fixture plans, merchandise category adjacencies, lineal footage space allocation by merchandise category, and accurate fixture buyouts for new stores, re-locations and expansions based on approved architectural plans.
 

For more info and to apply, please visit www.dollartree.com/careers

and search for the respective job req number.

Supermarket News

2013 IRI Category Review

Be a part of the annual snapshot of the top-selling products in supermarkets, delivering up-to-date information from IRI and The Perishables Group, plus an in-depth look at key categories.

Issue date: August 5/12  |  Ad Close: 7/22  |  Materials Due: 7/24

For advertising information contact:

Jerry Rymont, Publisher
[email protected]
216-931-9720

Bill Dooley, Associate Publisher 
Northeast and Northern Mid-Atlantic Regions
[email protected]
(774) 521-3344

Joy Kulick, Advertising Director 
Central and Midwest Regions
[email protected]
(847) 726-1870

Stephanie Reid, Advertising Director 
Southeast Region
[email protected]
(770) 345-1597

Mike Hahn, Advertising Director 
Western Region
[email protected]
(760) 420-4675

Courtney Woofter, Inside Sales
[email protected]
(216) 931-9577

Supermarket News