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US (CA): Heat affects Central Valley grapes

Several weeks of high temperatures in California’s Central San Joaquin Valley have affected table grapes in the region. The heat has had an effect on the sugar content, maturation and colouring.

High temperatures in the valley have reached or topped 100 degrees for most of the month of July, and that intense heat has sped up fruit maturation. The lack of water the state’s growers have had to deal with has also compounded the situation. As Nick Dulcich, of Sunlight International, explained, the drought means there’s less water for vineyards, and dry conditions in the fields have augmented the heat’s effects.

“We usually run water down the furrow in the middle of the rows and get grass growing in between,” said Dulcich. “But because we have less water due to the drought, the soil is dry in the field and there’s no absorption of that heat, so it’s just pure heat on that dirt. It’s stopped the colour, it’s advancing the sugars and some varieties are coming abnormally early.” He pointed to the Princess variety as an example of the effects of the heat. While that variety doesn’t usually come on until August, this year Sunlight will be done with the Princess by July 22 – a full two weeks before it’s usually available. In addition to speeding up maturity, the heat has also been upping sugars.

“Brix for Summer Royal grapes are usually around 18 or 19,” noted Dulcich, “but we’ve measured them at 27 this year, which is unheard of.” While sugars may be up, the timing to get good colouring on the grapes has been thrown off.

“We’ve got fruit that’s got 15 percent colour and 19 brix, and if the fruit doesn’t get the right colour it doesn’t make it to market,” said Dulcich. “We’re worried because, if you look at Scarlet Royals, they have 60 percent colour and a lot more sugar than you’d think. It’s a timing thing, and the heat hit at a time when it affects colour.”

For more information:

Nick Dulcich

Sunlight International

+1 661 792 6360

FreshPlaza.com

US (CA): Heat affects Central Valley grapes

Several weeks of high temperatures in California’s Central San Joaquin Valley have affected table grapes in the region. The heat has had an effect on the sugar content, maturation and colouring.

High temperatures in the valley have reached or topped 100 degrees for most of the month of July, and that intense heat has sped up fruit maturation. The lack of water the state’s growers have had to deal with has also compounded the situation. As Nick Dulcich, of Sunlight International, explained, the drought means there’s less water for vineyards, and dry conditions in the fields have augmented the heat’s effects.

“We usually run water down the furrow in the middle of the rows and get grass growing in between,” said Dulcich. “But because we have less water due to the drought, the soil is dry in the field and there’s no absorption of that heat, so it’s just pure heat on that dirt. It’s stopped the colour, it’s advancing the sugars and some varieties are coming abnormally early.” He pointed to the Princess variety as an example of the effects of the heat. While that variety doesn’t usually come on until August, this year Sunlight will be done with the Princess by July 22 – a full two weeks before it’s usually available. In addition to speeding up maturity, the heat has also been upping sugars.

“Brix for Summer Royal grapes are usually around 18 or 19,” noted Dulcich, “but we’ve measured them at 27 this year, which is unheard of.” While sugars may be up, the timing to get good colouring on the grapes has been thrown off.

“We’ve got fruit that’s got 15 percent colour and 19 brix, and if the fruit doesn’t get the right colour it doesn’t make it to market,” said Dulcich. “We’re worried because, if you look at Scarlet Royals, they have 60 percent colour and a lot more sugar than you’d think. It’s a timing thing, and the heat hit at a time when it affects colour.”

For more information:

Nick Dulcich

Sunlight International

+1 661 792 6360

FreshPlaza.com

Central Market to clang cans of new local brew

H-E-B’s Central Market will celebrate the canning of handcrafted beers from Dallas-based Four Corners brewery with food pairings this Friday, from 5-9 p.m. at its Dallas Lovers Cooking School.


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“Cheers! Salud & Clang Clang… Come join us for a toast,” said Central Market’s efoodie editor, Megan E, in a More, Please! blog post. “There is a new local can hitting our shelves, and we could not be more excited, so we thought we would throw them a party.”

Local Buzz Honey Rye Golden Ale, El Chingon IPA and Block Party Robust Porter will be featured along with live local music and Chicken Chile Arbol Quesadillas, Brisket Tacos, Elotes Salad with Grilled Shrimp and Chocolate Porter Gelato Tortas, prepared by Central Market’s executive chef.

In addition to canned beers, there will be a surprise seasonal beer from Four Corners on tap and growlers available for off-premise consumption. Tickets are $ 25 and include a punch card to enjoy each beer and food pairing.

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Supermarket News

USDA Closes Central Valley Meat Co. Over Cleanliness Failures

California’s Central Valley Meat Co. has been indefinitely closed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for failing to meet cleanliness standards.

“FSIS withdrew our inspectors and suspended operations due to insanitary conditions at the establishment,” the agency said in an emailed statement to Food Safety News. ”The plant’s suspension will be lifted once we receive adequate assurances of corrective action.”

The USDA previously shut down Central Valley in 2012 for inhumane handling of animals after an undercover video showed alleged violations of humane slaughter laws taking place at the slaughterhouse. Central Valley employees were caught on camera torturing cattle with prods and subjecting them to other inhumane treatment.

No recall has been initiated in the latest closure, suggesting federal authorities are not treating this as a food safety issue.

Central Valley supplies beef to the National School Lunch Program. In 2012, Food Safety News reported that Central Valley beef had accounted for roughly 16 percent of beef purchases made by the USDA during the 2010-2011 school year.

Food Safety News

General Manager – Durham Central Market

GENERAL MANAGER JOB DESCRIPTION
 

DURHAM CENTRAL MARKET & THE CITY OF DURHAM

Durham Central Market (the Market) is seeking a motivated, community-oriented leader with previous retail management experience to serve as its first General Manager. The Market is in the process of building a new 10,000 square foot, full-service natural foods co-operative in central Durham which will open as early as November 2014.

The Market already has strong community support with nearly 1,300 members, along with 160 community investors who have funded a large portion of the store’s development. In addition, the Market is being developed with advice and guidance from Weaver Street Market of Chapel Hill/Carrboro, a top 10 co-operative grocery chain in the country.

The Market will be a focal point for the entire Durham community, with the goal of creating a neighborhood co-operative grocery that reflects Durham’s unique culture and community serving those who live and work in the heart of Durham.
 

MARKET GOALS

The Durham Central Market will create and maintain a strong community by: contributing to a vibrant local economy; engaging in socially equitable relationships; and being a trusted resource for information on food, the environment and the Seven Co-operative Principles. The Market is targeting annual sales of nearly $ 3 million in its first year of operations with significant growth targets set for the subsequent years. Given the outstanding growth in the natural foods and products industry, the Market’s Board believes that the purpose-built space for the Market ensures plenty of opportunity for store growth over the coming decade. In support of this growth, the General Manager will be tasked with attracting, hiring, and retaining a motivated staff to lead the Market through a period of tremendous growth, while working with the Board and any contractors, consultants, or external advisors to ensure that startup and operations are meeting or exceeding plan.

ABOUT DURHAM

Home to Duke and North Carolina Central Universities, the Durham Bulls, a vibrant tech startup community, as well as thriving sustainable agriculture and culinary scenes, Durham was recently ranked in the top 10 best places for business and careers and is consistently ranked by major media outlets as one of the most livable cities in America. In early 2013, Durham earned the title of “Tastiest Town in the South” from Southern Living magazine, after being awarded “Foodiest Small Town” by Bon Appetit magazine in 2008. To learn more about why it’s so great to live and work in Durham: www.durham-nc.com/about/accolades.php.

As part of the greater Research Triangle Park metropolitan area (which includes Raleigh, Cary, Chapel Hill, and Carrboro), Durham is considered among the fastest growing areas of the country, as well as one of the most highly educated. These factors all provide great confidence that Durham is “ripe” for its own successful natural foods co-operative. Finally, Durham’s central location makes access to both the mountains and the sea a short two to three hour drive away!
 

POSITION DESCRIPTION

The job of the General Manager (GM) is to lead the Market so that it achieves the goals and objectives developed by the Market’s Board of Directors (the Board). The ideal candidate for this position will be someone with strong leadership skills, high standards, great enthusiasm for co-operatives – especially the Durham Central Market, an ability to keep multiple balls in the air at any given time, well developed people management skills, openness to giving and receiving constructive feedback, and strong communication skills.
 

REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS

The GM reports to the Board as a whole. The Board, acting together, hires, directs evaluates, compensates and (if required) disciplines and terminates the GM. The GM is empowered to make decisions, create policies and authorize engagements that she or he can demonstrate to be consistent with a reasonable interpretation of Board policies, goals, and objectives.

The GM’s performance will be evaluated regarding asset protection, financial conditions, business planning, financial budgeting, staff treatment and compensation, treatment of customers, membership equity and benefits, and communication and support to the Board. The Board will clearly delineate expected results within defined limits of prudence and ethics.

The GM has the authority to manage all other staff. This authority includes hiring, training, directing, evaluating, compensating and (if required) disciplining and terminating each staff member. The GM has the authority to structure staff in any way that the GM deems effective; including creating staff positions with the responsibility to manage other staff members (e.g., department managers).

Please note that the Market currently employs a Project Manager under contract to the Board whose responsibilities are focused on store development and construction. The GM is expected to work closely with this Project Manager through the store opening phase to ensure smooth operations and progress toward achieving the Market’s goals.
 

SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES

Planning and Finance

• Develop and recommend to the Board short-term and long-term plans to achieve the goals and objectives established by the Board

• Prepare annual operating and capital budgets for approval by the Board

• Be accountable for stewardship of resources

• Direct all financial operations of the Market, including management of all banking accounts

• Investigate and recommend to the Board opportunities for expansion, relocation and acquisitions; conduct negotiations as agreed upon by the Board

• Inform the Board regularly on operating results and on all other matters material to the success of the Market

• Participate in co-op and industry events, both regionally and nationally
 

Operations

• Ensure a profitable and growing business

• Maintain and increase knowledge of natural foods retailing and industry trends

• Maintain good relations with local producers, wholesale distributors and other industry sources

• Establish and maintain a product mix which meets customer and owner-member needs

• Plan and execute a strategy designed to control expenses, be price competitive and maintain sufficient profit for capital needs

• Ensure the Market’s compliance with all applicable laws, including licenses, permits, health regulations and employment
 

Personnel

• Develop and lead the team of people who will make this store a success.

• Develop and oversee compliance with personnel policies; update as needed

• Hire, supervise, evaluate, train, discipline and terminate management staff

• Develop an organizational structure that promotes fair distribution of work, controls expenses and maintains maximum service to customers

• Prepare and meet an annual payroll budget that meets operating budget constraints

• Revise the personnel plan as needed to meet unplanned changes in store sales

• Ensure a safe, healthy and enjoyable workplace for employees

• Ensure adequate training for staff members
 

Marketing

• Develop an advertising and marketing strategy to increase public awareness of the Market’s products and services

• Execute the advertising and marketing plan within budgetary guidelines

• Communicate information about the business to the owner-members via an annual report and regular updates

• Oversee store displays, signage, storytelling and other promotions to maximize marketing impact
 

QUALIFICATIONS

Essential

• Retail management experience

• Supervisory experience: hiring, training, evaluating, compensating, firing

• Bottom-line accountability experience

• Experience with operating, capital, and cash budgeting

• Computer literacy

• Demonstrated ability to develop systems

• Experience supervising managers
 

Desired

• Ability to evaluate and determine appropriate strategic changes

• Marketing and merchandising in highly competitive markets

• Experience in the natural foods industry, particularly in a retail setting and with knowledge of current industry trends.

• Strategic planning experience

• Ability to interpret financial statements to lay people

• Independent (as opposed to chain) store management

• Experience working for or serving on a board of directors

• Co-operative management experience
 

COMPENSATION

Durham Central Market will provide its General Manager with salary and benefits commensurate with experience.
 

APPLICATION PROCESS & DEADLINES

Please include the following items in your application for the General Manager position:

1. Cover letter explaining your background and interest in this position.

2. Resume or CV.

3. Three professional references including name, title, e-mail, phone number, and professional relationship.

Applications for this position will be accepted until March 15, 2014.
 

Please e-mail all inquiries and application materials to:

Visit the Market’s website at: www.DurhamCentralMarket.org

Supermarket News

Central American Produce launches hard squash program

Central American Produce has received its first shipment of Mayan Pride butternut squash from its farms in Guatemala. Shipments of spaghetti squash will start arriving to the United States by Jan. 7.bnut2

“We grow our squash in a very unique climate,” Michael Warren, company president, said in a press release. “Our squash is cultivated at high altitudes in volcanic soils, which truly enhances the flavor, sweetness, and vibrant color of each squash variety.  We encourage customers to try our squash and see how it enhances their sales.

“We consider butternut squash to be a super-food,” he said. “It is high in many antioxidant-rich vitamins and minerals, and is recommended for controlling cholesterol and weight reduction. Spaghetti squash is also highly nutritious and a great substitute for potatoes, rice or pasta.“

Central American will have both butternut squash and spaghetti squash available until June.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Central California onion production now under way, will continue throughout summer

Fresh-market bulb onions are produced throughout California, with the main production areas being the low desert, the San Joaquin Valley and the southern and central coast. Planting takes place from September through May, and harvesting “begins in April or May and is usually completed in September,” according to “Fresh-Market Bulb Onion Production in California,” a publication on the subject published by the University of California Research & Information Center

onions-LA

A bag of yellow onions at a wholesale house in Los Angeles.

Fresh or fresh-cut (“lightly processed”) onions account for approximately 45 percent of bulb onion acreage in California, “which ranks among the top fresh-bulb-producing states in the United States,” according to the publication.

Acreage of fresh-market bulb onions in California in 2009, the most recent date listed in the undated publication, was 22,766 acres.

For 2013, total bulb onion production in California was about 50,000 acres, a figure that normally doesn’t fluctuate much from year to year, according to according to Robert C. (Bob) Ehn, chief executive officer and technical manager of the California Garlic & Onion Research Advisory Board, which represents processed onion producers in the state.

He did not have specific acreage or production data for fresh onions “because we don’t deal with that, we just deal with processed.” But there have been “no changes” in the processed market this year, which typically represents about half of the total, running at close to 25,000 acres “year-in and year-out.”

Ehn said that although he cannot verify it, he thinks the fresh acreage may be down some this year because the market price last fall “wasn’t really great.” In particular, “the white and the yellow onions, I think, are down” in terms of planted acreage, although “I don’t know how much. I wouldn’t want to guess.” But “we never see huge changes.”

The harvest in the Central Valley was already under way when The Produce News talked to Mike Smythe, a salesman at Telesis Onion Co. Inc. in Five Points, CA. The company, which grows reds, whites and yellows on the west side of the valley, is down about 5 percent in acreage overall but is up in acreage in red onions, Smythe said. Whether that is typical of the industry, “I really can’t say. I really don’t know what other people are doing.”

Yields are normal, and “size is mostly jumbo and larger, from what we’ve seen before,” which is a fairly normal size curve, he said.

Acreage is up in Central California for Saven Corp., which grows exclusively flat yellow Vidalia-type certified sweet onions marketed as “Oso Sweet.” Mark Breimeister, a shareholder in the company and national sales director said June 7 that the company was currently harvesting in Brawley in the southern desert and expected to begin in the Bakersfield area in the Central Valley mid-June.

The season so far “has been fantastic,” Breimeister said. “We are getting very good yields on the product. It tastes great, and the lab says it is sweet. We see the same thing happening in Bakersfield.”

There are “a lot of onions,” he said, but he expected prices to “remain somewhat steady in the mid-teens” for flat sweet onions. “The guys with the round sweet onions are offering their product out a couple of dollars cheaper than we can” because yields per acre are not as high on the flat onions.

Good news for onion producers has come this year in the form of a new tool for fighting onion thrips, a serious onion pest. The industry has been granted a Section 18 approval from the Environmental Protection Agency for a product called Movento, which is “just excellent,” according to Ehn.

A Section 18 allows an unregistered use of a pesticide for a limited time if EPA determines that an emergency condition exists and no suitable alternative is available. The material is available for use on fresh as well as processed onions.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Sun World grants producer rights to Central American and South American companies

Sun World International LLC has appointed two companies in Central American and South American agriculture as grape producer-marketer licensees.

Camposol S.A. of Peru and Grupo Alta of Sonora Mexico have been granted rights to produce Sun World grape varieties in their respective countries, to distribute and market their fruit and to use Sun World’s brands in the marketplace, David Marguleas, executive vice president of the Bakersfield, CA-based company, said in a press release.

Grupo Alta was established in 1989 by its original founders, Enrique Camou, Carlos Bon and Alan Aguirre, who is its current chief executive officer. Located in the state of Sonora, Mexico, Grupo Alta farms several products in seven different ranches, mainly stone fruit, melons, pecan, hot-house vegetables and table grapes. It prides itself on its commitment to innovation, food safety, ethical standards and packing quality.

Camposol was founded in Peru in 1997 and currently owns more than 25,000 hectares (61,000 acres) throughout Peru’s agricultural regions. It is one of the world’s larger asparagus exporters, one of the world’s larger avocado producers and is a leading grape producer-exporter. Its grape operation is managed by Manzur Fegale, fruit division general manager.

“Grupo Alta’s specific attention to producing and marketing quality fruit makes them a compelling partner and a great addition to the Sun World licensing family,” Marguleas said in the press release, adding, “Camposol’s broad-based involvement in the Peruvian fruit industry and its singular commitment to grape production in Peru’s Piura region will bring even greater strength to our aim for truly year-round supply capability.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Sun World grants producer rights to Central and South American companies

Sun World grants producer rights to Central and South American companies

Sun World International LLC has appointed two companies in Central and South American agriculture, as grape producer-marketer licensees.

Camposol S.A. of Peru and Grupo Alta of Sonora Mexico have been granted rights to produce Sun World grape varieties in their respective countries, to distribute and market their fruit and to use Sun World’s brands in the marketplace, Sun World Executive Vice President David Marguleas said.

Grupo Alta was established in 1989 by its original founders, Enrique Camou, Carlos Bon and Alan Aguirre, its current CEO. Located in the state of Sonora, Mexico, Grupo Alta farms several products in seven different ranches, mainly stone fruit, melons, pecan, hot house vegetables and most important, table grapes. It prides itself on its commitment to innovation, food safety, ethical standards and packing quality.

Camposol was founded in Peru in 1997 and today owns more than 25,000 hectares (61,000 acres) throughout Peru’s agricultural regions. It is one of the world’s largest asparagus exporter, one of the world’s largest avocado producers and a leading grape producer-exporter. Its grape operation is managed by Manzur Fegale, fruit division general manager.

“Grupo Alta’s specific attention to producing and marketing quality fruit makes them a compelling partner and a great addition to the Sun World licensing family,” Marguleas noted, adding that “Camposol’s broad-based involvement in the Peruvian fruit industry and its singular commitment to grape production in Peru’s Piura region will bring even greater strength to our aim for truly year-round supply capability.”

For more information:
David Marguleas
SunWorld
Tel: +1-661-631-4156
Email: [email protected]

Publication date: 10/1/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Central Market Tests Growlers

FORT WORTH, Texas — H-E-B‘s Central Market store here is testing a growler station.

About two dozen types of beer are sold in 32- and 64-ounce sizes. Prices range from about $ 6.99 for a 32-ounce to $ 13.99 for a 64-ounce size.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


Featured brands include Brooklyn Maranjito, Revolver High Brass, Breckrenridge Regal Pils and Revolver Bock.

Central Market wants local brews account for one-third to one-half of the taps, according to a Central Market Facebook post.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Central Market Tests Growlers

FORT WORTH, Texas — H-E-B‘s Central Market store here is testing a growler station.

About two dozen types of beer are sold in 32- and 64-ounce sizes. Prices range from about $ 6.99 for a 32-ounce to $ 13.99 for a 64-ounce size.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


Featured brands include Brooklyn Maranjito, Revolver High Brass, Breckrenridge Regal Pils and Revolver Bock.

Central Market wants local brews account for one-third to one-half of the taps, according to a Central Market Facebook post.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Central Market Tests Growlers

FORT WORTH, Texas — H-E-B‘s Central Market store here is testing a growler station.

About two dozen types of beer are sold in 32- and 64-ounce sizes. Prices range from about $ 6.99 for a 32-ounce to $ 13.99 for a 64-ounce size.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


Featured brands include Brooklyn Maranjito, Revolver High Brass, Breckrenridge Regal Pils and Revolver Bock.

Central Market wants local brews account for one-third to one-half of the taps, according to a Central Market Facebook post.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Central Market Tests Growlers

FORT WORTH, Texas — H-E-B‘s Central Market store here is testing a growler station.

About two dozen types of beer are sold in 32- and 64-ounce sizes. Prices range from about $ 6.99 for a 32-ounce to $ 13.99 for a 64-ounce size.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


Featured brands include Brooklyn Maranjito, Revolver High Brass, Breckrenridge Regal Pils and Revolver Bock.

Central Market wants local brews account for one-third to one-half of the taps, according to a Central Market Facebook post.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Central Market Tests Growlers

FORT WORTH, Texas — H-E-B‘s Central Market store here is testing a growler station.

About two dozen types of beer are sold in 32- and 64-ounce sizes. Prices range from about $ 6.99 for a 32-ounce to $ 13.99 for a 64-ounce size.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


Featured brands include Brooklyn Maranjito, Revolver High Brass, Breckrenridge Regal Pils and Revolver Bock.

Central Market wants local brews account for one-third to one-half of the taps, according to a Central Market Facebook post.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Central America increases trade with Mexico after FTA signed

Central America increases trade with Mexico after FTA signed

In September, Central American countries will celebrate the first anniversary of the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) signed between Mexico and the region, which has led to an increase in trade, as by the end of 2012, commercial exchanges reached a value of 9,211 million dollars, according to the Mexican ambassador in San Salvador, Raúl López Lira.

He stated that, when negotiations started in 2010 to unify all FTAs, Central American purchases and sales with Mexico were worth 6,554 million dollars.

For his part, the head of Economic and Commercial Affairs of the Mexican Embassy, Julio César Escobedo, said that, in 2012, Costa Rica was the Central American country that made the most commercial exchanges with Mexico, with 4,253 million dollars, followed by Guatemala, with 2,440 million dollars. 

Honduras reached 927 million dollars; Nicaragua 875.7 million and El Salvador 715.1 million. Another two countries in the region that remain outside of the FTA but maintain trade relations with Mexico are Panama, with 1,218.7 million dollars and Belize, with 135.9 million.

Source: prensa.com

Publication date: 8/30/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Market Fresh acquires West Central Florida Produce

Market Fresh Produce, based in Nixa, MO, has acquired West Central Florida Produce, located in Tampa. The acquisition was completed on Aug. 11.

“This is an exciting time in the life of our company,” Steve Phipps, owner and chief executive officer of Market Fresh Produce, said in a press release. “Having a repacking and distribution facility located in Florida really strengthens our go-to-market strategy, not only in Florida, but in many areas outside of the state.”

West Central Florida’s shareholders will remain minority partner in the company.  

Upgrades have begun to transform the Florida operation into a state-of-the-art repacking facility. Immediate plans are to operate business as usual, however plans are being drawn to expand the product offering beyond tomatoes into other categories that Market Fresh currently offers.  

In other Market Fresh news, Phipps has purchased Bushman Inc.’s ownership stake in Market Fresh Produce.

“Bushmans has been a great partner for the last three years, and we are appreciative that Bushmans supported our vision to take the reins of the company and pursue our vision of building the enterprise and tying us closer to the ground,” Phipps said in the press release.

Mike Kemp Sr., director of business development, added, “It’s a great time to be working for Market Fresh. Over the last three years, the company has changed in so many positive ways. I’m even more excited about the next three years.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Germany: A central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists

Weiling
Germany: A central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists

Weiling was founded in 1975 and has since grown to become one of Germany’s largest organic wholesale traders. The company, still family owned 38 years later, supplies exclusively organic product lines to organic only stores.

2012 saw Weiling achieve growth of 8.6%, turning over 145.2 million Euro with 11,000 strong organic product lines.

Fresh fruit and vegetables make an important contribution to this success, representing one third of total business.

Sascha Hinkes, head of Weilings department for purchasing fruits an vegetables explains that this high proportion of total sales activity is due to a strong focus on the quality of the fruit and vegetables traded.

” supplies many subscription services for fruit and vegetables. Due to long term cooperation and commitment to the best possible quality, Weiling is very thorough in the selection of its fruit and vegetable suppliers.”

This, Sascha explains, means regular mutual visits and additional auditing at producers by the Gessellschaft für Ressourcenshutz, one of the strictest organic inspectors in the EU.

“Weiling works with producers and production groups in Spain, Italy, Southern France and Tunisia, many of whom work to Naturland and Demeter standard; the rest will do so in the coming years. The end product is a unique brand developed exclusively with Weiling. Weiling then creates an extremely diverse marketing package, which includes posters, profiles, shelf labels, You-tube videos, training courses, tastings and QR codes to link smartphones with producer mini-sites.”

Sascha says, however, that the Weiling package does not end there and the company also offers professional store development.

“Included in this is staff training at the Weiling Academy, which has already been visited by 10,000 people. Specialist personnel for organic shops are just as important as the high quality organic fruit and vegetables in store and Weiling has a central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists.”

For more information:
Hanjörg Bahmann
Weiling
Tel: +49 2541 747 100
[email protected]

Publication date: 8/15/2013
Author: Ben Littler
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Germany: A central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists

Weiling
Germany: A central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists

Weiling was founded in 1975 and has since grown to become one of Germany’s largest organic wholesale traders. The company, still family owned 38 years later, supplies exclusively organic product lines to organic only stores.

2012 saw Weiling achieve growth of 8.6%, turning over 145.2 million Euro with 11,000 strong organic product lines.

Fresh fruit and vegetables make an important contribution to this success, representing one third of total business.

Sascha Hinkes, head of Weilings department for purchasing fruits an vegetables explains that this high proportion of total sales activity is due to a strong focus on the quality of the fruit and vegetables traded.

” supplies many subscription services for fruit and vegetables. Due to long term cooperation and commitment to the best possible quality, Weiling is very thorough in the selection of its fruit and vegetable suppliers.”

This, Sascha explains, means regular mutual visits and additional auditing at producers by the Gessellschaft für Ressourcenshutz, one of the strictest organic inspectors in the EU.

“Weiling works with producers and production groups in Spain, Italy, Southern France and Tunisia, many of whom work to Naturland and Demeter standard; the rest will do so in the coming years. The end product is a unique brand developed exclusively with Weiling. Weiling then creates an extremely diverse marketing package, which includes posters, profiles, shelf labels, You-tube videos, training courses, tastings and QR codes to link smartphones with producer mini-sites.”

Sascha says, however, that the Weiling package does not end there and the company also offers professional store development.

“Included in this is staff training at the Weiling Academy, which has already been visited by 10,000 people. Specialist personnel for organic shops are just as important as the high quality organic fruit and vegetables in store and Weiling has a central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists.”

For more information:
Hanjörg Bahmann
Weiling
Tel: +49 2541 747 100
[email protected]

Publication date: 8/15/2013
Author: Ben Littler
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Germany: A central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists

Weiling
Germany: A central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists

Weiling was founded in 1975 and has since grown to become one of Germany’s largest organic wholesale traders. The company, still family owned 38 years later, supplies exclusively organic product lines to organic only stores.

2012 saw Weiling achieve growth of 8.6%, turning over 145.2 million Euro with 11,000 strong organic product lines.

Fresh fruit and vegetables make an important contribution to this success, representing one third of total business.

Sascha Hinkes, head of Weilings department for purchasing fruits an vegetables explains that this high proportion of total sales activity is due to a strong focus on the quality of the fruit and vegetables traded.

” supplies many subscription services for fruit and vegetables. Due to long term cooperation and commitment to the best possible quality, Weiling is very thorough in the selection of its fruit and vegetable suppliers.”

This, Sascha explains, means regular mutual visits and additional auditing at producers by the Gessellschaft für Ressourcenshutz, one of the strictest organic inspectors in the EU.

“Weiling works with producers and production groups in Spain, Italy, Southern France and Tunisia, many of whom work to Naturland and Demeter standard; the rest will do so in the coming years. The end product is a unique brand developed exclusively with Weiling. Weiling then creates an extremely diverse marketing package, which includes posters, profiles, shelf labels, You-tube videos, training courses, tastings and QR codes to link smartphones with producer mini-sites.”

Sascha says, however, that the Weiling package does not end there and the company also offers professional store development.

“Included in this is staff training at the Weiling Academy, which has already been visited by 10,000 people. Specialist personnel for organic shops are just as important as the high quality organic fruit and vegetables in store and Weiling has a central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists.”

For more information:
Hanjörg Bahmann
Weiling
Tel: +49 2541 747 100
[email protected]

Publication date: 8/15/2013
Author: Ben Littler
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Germany: A central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists

Weiling
Germany: A central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists

Weiling was founded in 1975 and has since grown to become one of Germany’s largest organic wholesale traders. The company, still family owned 38 years later, supplies exclusively organic product lines to organic only stores.

2012 saw Weiling achieve growth of 8.6%, turning over 145.2 million Euro with 11,000 strong organic product lines.

Fresh fruit and vegetables make an important contribution to this success, representing one third of total business.

Sascha Hinkes, head of Weilings department for purchasing fruits an vegetables explains that this high proportion of total sales activity is due to a strong focus on the quality of the fruit and vegetables traded.

” supplies many subscription services for fruit and vegetables. Due to long term cooperation and commitment to the best possible quality, Weiling is very thorough in the selection of its fruit and vegetable suppliers.”

This, Sascha explains, means regular mutual visits and additional auditing at producers by the Gessellschaft für Ressourcenshutz, one of the strictest organic inspectors in the EU.

“Weiling works with producers and production groups in Spain, Italy, Southern France and Tunisia, many of whom work to Naturland and Demeter standard; the rest will do so in the coming years. The end product is a unique brand developed exclusively with Weiling. Weiling then creates an extremely diverse marketing package, which includes posters, profiles, shelf labels, You-tube videos, training courses, tastings and QR codes to link smartphones with producer mini-sites.”

Sascha says, however, that the Weiling package does not end there and the company also offers professional store development.

“Included in this is staff training at the Weiling Academy, which has already been visited by 10,000 people. Specialist personnel for organic shops are just as important as the high quality organic fruit and vegetables in store and Weiling has a central role in the development of sustainable trade specialists.”

For more information:
Hanjörg Bahmann
Weiling
Tel: +49 2541 747 100
[email protected]

Publication date: 8/15/2013
Author: Ben Littler
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com