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Peapod to charge for store pick-up

Online grocer Peapod will implement a fee for its store pickup service beginning Sept. 2.

Store pick-up customers will be charged $ 2.95, with a minimum order size of $ 60. The service – available at Ahold’s Stop & Shop and Giant stores- previously was free, with no minimum order.

Peapod announced the change in an email to customers:

“We kept it as close to free as we possibly could. But it’s true — we have to start charging a fee for pick-up orders… We hope you agree it’s worth it.”

The service lets shoppers choose their groceries online or via a mobile app. Pick-up clients then go to their store, and their groceries are loaded into their cars.

The Peapod email encourages users to sign up for the Peapod Pod Pass, which charges a fee for unlimited home delivery or pickup services. A three-month Pod Pass costs $ 39; six-month, $ 59; and one year, $ 99.

Peapod is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ahold.

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Peapod to charge for store pick-up

Online grocer Peapod will implement a fee for its store pickup service beginning Sept. 2.

Store pick-up customers will be charged $ 2.95, with a minimum order size of $ 60. The service – available at Ahold’s Stop & Shop and Giant stores- previously was free, with no minimum order.

Peapod announced the change in an email to customers:

“We kept it as close to free as we possibly could. But it’s true — we have to start charging a fee for pick-up orders… We hope you agree it’s worth it.”

The service lets shoppers choose their groceries online or via a mobile app. Pick-up clients then go to their store, and their groceries are loaded into their cars.

The Peapod email encourages users to sign up for the Peapod Pod Pass, which charges a fee for unlimited home delivery or pickup services. A three-month Pod Pass costs $ 39; six-month, $ 59; and one year, $ 99.

Peapod is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ahold.

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Supermarket News

Peapod to charge for store pick-up

Online grocer Peapod will implement a fee for its store pickup service beginning Sept. 2.

Store pick-up customers will be charged $ 2.95, with a minimum order size of $ 60. The service – available at Ahold’s Stop & Shop and Giant stores- previously was free, with no minimum order.

Peapod announced the change in an email to customers:

“We kept it as close to free as we possibly could. But it’s true — we have to start charging a fee for pick-up orders… We hope you agree it’s worth it.”

The service lets shoppers choose their groceries online or via a mobile app. Pick-up clients then go to their store, and their groceries are loaded into their cars.

The Peapod email encourages users to sign up for the Peapod Pod Pass, which charges a fee for unlimited home delivery or pickup services. A three-month Pod Pass costs $ 39; six-month, $ 59; and one year, $ 99.

Peapod is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ahold.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Peapod to charge for store pick-up

Online grocer Peapod will implement a fee for its store pickup service beginning Sept. 2.

Store pick-up customers will be charged $ 2.95, with a minimum order size of $ 60. The service – available at Ahold’s Stop & Shop and Giant stores- previously was free, with no minimum order.

Peapod announced the change in an email to customers:

“We kept it as close to free as we possibly could. But it’s true — we have to start charging a fee for pick-up orders… We hope you agree it’s worth it.”

The service lets shoppers choose their groceries online or via a mobile app. Pick-up clients then go to their store, and their groceries are loaded into their cars.

The Peapod email encourages users to sign up for the Peapod Pod Pass, which charges a fee for unlimited home delivery or pickup services. A three-month Pod Pass costs $ 39; six-month, $ 59; and one year, $ 99.

Peapod is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ahold.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Peapod to charge for store pick-up

Online grocer Peapod will implement a fee for its store pickup service beginning Sept. 2.

Store pick-up customers will be charged $ 2.95, with a minimum order size of $ 60. The service – available at Ahold’s Stop & Shop and Giant stores- previously was free, with no minimum order.

Peapod announced the change in an email to customers:

“We kept it as close to free as we possibly could. But it’s true — we have to start charging a fee for pick-up orders… We hope you agree it’s worth it.”

The service lets shoppers choose their groceries online or via a mobile app. Pick-up clients then go to their store, and their groceries are loaded into their cars.

The Peapod email encourages users to sign up for the Peapod Pod Pass, which charges a fee for unlimited home delivery or pickup services. A three-month Pod Pass costs $ 39; six-month, $ 59; and one year, $ 99.

Peapod is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ahold.

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Judge Dismisses Charge Against Minnesota Raw-Milk Farmer Despite Probation Violations

Michael Hartmann, the Gibbon, MN, farmer who admitted breaking state law by selling raw milk and other unpasteurized dairy products to consumers, has avoided jail time and been released from probation.

Sibley County District Court Judge Erica MacDonald determined Wednesday after a hearing in Gaylord, MN, that Hartmann should not be assessed further penalties for his actions, and she dismissed a charge against him of probation violation.

Defense attorney Zenas Baer called the judge’s decision a “rebuke of the state.”

“The court affirmed the bedrock principle that the state cannot insert itself into a private transaction between consenting adults to buy a natural product, or interfere with the type of foods that a parent might choose to nourish their family with,” Baer said.

Assistant Sibley County Attorney Donald Lannoye took a very different view.

“It’s our position that court orders need to be followed,” he said. “And that when they aren’t followed, consequences need to be imposed. When a court finds that a person violates a court order and does nothing about it, we believe that calls into question the legitimacy of the court order.”

Judge MacDonald had ruled earlier this spring that Hartmann was violating terms of his probation by continuing to sell raw milk away from his farm and not cooperating with the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, which continues to investigate his activities. Minnesota law only allows on-farm sales of raw milk.

In 2012, Hartmann pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor counts of illegally selling raw milk and raw milk products and selling beef and pork without a license. That action was part of a plea agreement which reduced a nine-count complaint to the two misdemeanor counts and headed off a jury trial.

At that time, Hartmann was fined $ 585 and sentenced to unsupervised probation for six months. He also agreed to follow all state licensing and labeling laws.

Raw milk and raw milk products from his farm had been linked to an E. coli outbreak in 2010, which sickened at least eight people. Later that year, three people were sickened with Campylobacter and four with Cryptosporiduim parasites, both of which were reportedly found on his farm.

After the E. coli outbreak was linked to Hartmann’s dairy operation and inspectors reportedly found objectionable conditions there, Hartmann was ordered to stop selling raw milk until the problems were fixed. He maintained that no E. coli was ever found in his raw milk and that his products have not made anyone ill.

Food Safety News

Prosecutor Dismisses Charge of Animal Cruelty Against Undercover Investigator

The Humane Society of the United States recently ranked Colorado’s animal-protection laws among the top 10 for overall effectiveness. But, this past Friday, the Weld County Prosecutor’s Office determined that timing provisions in those laws are not enough to justify charging an undercover animal-rights investigator with animal cruelty.

Prosecutors dismissed the charge against Taylor Radig, a contract investigator for the group Compassion Over Killing, just before a jury trial that might have occurred as early as this week. She was charged in November after an investigation by the Weld County Sheriff’s office found the Compassion Over Killing investigator waited too long before reporting apparent mistreatment of calves at a cattle facility located about 60 miles north of Denver.

The county district attorney’s office issued a statement saying that, while the sheriff had sufficient probable cause to arrest Radig, it was the opinion of the DA’s office that it was not likely that the offense could be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

The investigator, whose videotape of the acts of animal cruelty was turned over to the sheriff’s office about two months after it occurred, was charged with a Class 1 misdemeanor. Radig worked as a temporary employee at the Quanah Cattle Co. near Kersey, CO, from July to September 2013. After her initial report, three men who worked at Quanah were charged with animal cruelty by the county and fired by the company.

Colorado does not have a so-called “ag-gag” law, which often have quick reporting mandates. The Centennial State does require animal abuse to be reported in a timely manner. Animal welfare groups that do investigations into alleged abuse say they need time to show a pattern of activity which is not possible when instant reporting is required.

The case Radig was investigating largely involved mistreatment during the transport of calves, and the acts depicted in the videotape were roundly condemned by cattle and agricultural groups in Colorado.

Food Safety News

Women Executives Take Charge at NEW Forum

RANCHO PALOS VERDES, Calif. — Women executives need to work more effectively to make sure their employees as well as corporate executives know what they’ve accomplished, Lori Raya, president of the Vons division of Safeway, said here Thursday at the 2013 Executive Leaders Forum sponsored by the Network of Executive Women.

“Years ago I spoke with the [former] chief executive officer of Safeway [Steve Burd], who told me I wasn’t delivering the kind of results my [male] predecessor had delivered. That’s when I realized he thought that because I was telling him what our team had done, rather than making clear what my leadership had done.


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“I learned I should have taken more credit — that I needed to be more bold and to speak up more while always being respectful.

“I used to let male executives lead the conversation. But now I feel the need to speak up as a leader. In fact, learning that was career-changing for me — that they want me to take charge.”

When Robert Edwards, Safeway’s new CEO, asked a group of executives what was right and wrong with the company, “he noticed that when one manager shared a negative opinion, nearly everyone leaned back while I was the only one who leaned forward and gave my own opinion,” Raya said. “That’s the kind of behavior CEOs expect, and it’s what they respect and appreciate.”

People at Safeway have recognized her boldness, Raya added. “My boss once said I don’t work for anyone — that I follow my own path — and it’s true that one attribute at which I excel is defiance. The people who work for me know I’m there to do the right thing for them and that I stand up for them, and they respond to me because I do that.”

Raya made her remarks as part of a panel discussing what makes female leaders effective.

Read more: Safeway Names Raya President of Vons

Katy Barclay, senior vice president, human resources, for Kroger Co., Cincinnati, agreed with Raya that women “ought to flex a lot — to be bold and to speak your mind, to distinguish between what your team did and what you did.”

“We have to strike that balance.”

Barclay recalled what she called a bizarre incident during her previous career at General Motors when, during a labor negotiating session, her boss whispered in her ear, “Working with you, I don’t feel like I’m working with a woman.”

“He meant it as a compliment,” she said, “but I was shocked. I realized I was tamping down my gender, and that was a turning point for me. I determined I would not do that anymore — that I would not let anyone feel anything other than that they were working with a woman.

“So I changed and made sure I was more energized in my interactions with people and that my personality came out more. As a result of that change, people rallied around me and sought out my advice more often.”

Read more: Kroger’s Barclay Chairs HR Group

Anne Fink, senior vice president of PepsiCo Sales, who was moderating the panel, said she has seen the power women can accumulate by being themselves “and not apologizing for it.”

Discussing her role as a leader, Raya said she spends up to four days a week at Vons’ stores.

“I try to remember when I was working in a store and how I felt when an executive came in. So when I go to a store, I go into a fact-finding mode and ask them how I can communicate with them. I also spend time walking around the office to find out each person’s passions, so I can figure out how I can best communicate my goals to my team.

“And the team has to adapt itself to the fact I don’t spend so much time in the office because you can’t sit in an office and know how ready your people are to move to the next level — they have to learn how to work when you’re not there.”

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