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MI Raw Milk Cheddar Cheese Recalled for Potential Listeria Risk

Farm Country Cheese House of Lakeview, MI, is recalling about 1,136 pounds of Raw Milk Cheddar because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The Raw Milk Cheddar was distributed in Michigan, specifically in the Grand Rapids and Detroit metro areas, through retail stores and specialty shops.

The Raw Milk Cheddar in question is packaged under two different labels. The first label will have Farm Country Cheese House logo on the far left-hand side, and the product name (Raw Milk Cheddar) will be written on top of the label. This product is sold as an 8-oz. block.

This product has a “Use By Date” on the back of the cheese. The dates are between Oct. 28, 2015, and Dec. 5, 2015. This label will also have a Julian Date in the lower right-hand corner. These Julian dates are as follows: 14301, 14302, 14308, 14309, 14324, 14325, 14332, 14336, and 14339.

The second label will have Farm Country Cheese House logo on the far left-hand side, and the product name (Raw Milk Cheddar) written in white over a light-blue banner. This label will have the “Use By Date” on the back; it will not have a Julian Date. The “Use By Date” dates are between Oct. 28, 2015, and Dec. 5, 2015. This product will be packaged in 8-oz. blocks and 5-lb. loafs.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was the result of a routine sampling program by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which revealed that the finished products contained the bacteria. Farm Country Cheese House has ceased production and distribution of the product while FDA and the company continue their investigation into to what caused the problem.

Consumers who have purchased Farm Country Cheese House Raw Milk Cheddar are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at (989) 352-7779, or email to [email protected], Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST.

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

Wegmans, Hy-Vee promote cheese plates

To assist customers entertaining over the holidays, retailers are advertising cheeses, cheese kits and cheese boards.

The latest issue of Wegmans Menu Magazine, also available online, gives suggestions for building a cheese tray using one soft ripened cheese, one hard cheese, one washed cheese and one blue cheese, along with pairings like almonds, sausage bites and wine.

Time-crunched customers can also order cheese trays from the retailer. The Holiday Cheese Quartet includes two new French cheeses — the Bourbon-washed Pie d’Angloys and the Cremeux de Bourgogne — from Wegmans’ cheese caves and an Organic Fourme d’Ambert and Organic Gouda.

Hy-Vee is promoting topped Brie kits in its weekly ad.

Haggen Northwest Fresh has packaged cheese boards that also include extras like nuts, spreads and fruit. The boards come in three themes: Brie Lover’s Dream, Cheddar Flavor Flight and Savory & Sweet.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarket News

Supermarket News

Wegmans, Hy-Vee promote cheese plates

To assist customers entertaining over the holidays, retailers are advertising cheeses, cheese kits and cheese boards.

The latest issue of Wegmans Menu Magazine, also available online, gives suggestions for building a cheese tray using one soft ripened cheese, one hard cheese, one washed cheese and one blue cheese, along with pairings like almonds, sausage bites and wine.

Time-crunched customers can also order cheese trays from the retailer. The Holiday Cheese Quartet includes two new French cheeses — the Bourbon-washed Pie d’Angloys and the Cremeux de Bourgogne — from Wegmans’ cheese caves and an Organic Fourme d’Ambert and Organic Gouda.

Hy-Vee is promoting topped Brie kits in its weekly ad.

Haggen Northwest Fresh has packaged cheese boards that also include extras like nuts, spreads and fruit. The boards come in three themes: Brie Lover’s Dream, Cheddar Flavor Flight and Savory & Sweet.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarket News

Supermarket News

Wegmans, Hy-Vee promote cheese plates

To assist customers entertaining over the holidays, retailers are advertising cheeses, cheese kits and cheese boards.

The latest issue of Wegmans Menu Magazine, also available online, gives suggestions for building a cheese tray using one soft ripened cheese, one hard cheese, one washed cheese and one blue cheese, along with pairings like almonds, sausage bites and wine.

Time-crunched customers can also order cheese trays from the retailer. The Holiday Cheese Quartet includes two new French cheeses — the Bourbon-washed Pie d’Angloys and the Cremeux de Bourgogne — from Wegmans’ cheese caves and an Organic Fourme d’Ambert and Organic Gouda.

Hy-Vee is promoting topped Brie kits in its weekly ad.

Haggen Northwest Fresh has packaged cheese boards that also include extras like nuts, spreads and fruit. The boards come in three themes: Brie Lover’s Dream, Cheddar Flavor Flight and Savory & Sweet.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarket News

Supermarket News

Wegmans, Hy-Vee promote cheese plates

To assist customers entertaining over the holidays, retailers are advertising cheeses, cheese kits and cheese boards.

The latest issue of Wegmans Menu Magazine, also available online, gives suggestions for building a cheese tray using one soft ripened cheese, one hard cheese, one washed cheese and one blue cheese, along with pairings like almonds, sausage bites and wine.

Time-crunched customers can also order cheese trays from the retailer. The Holiday Cheese Quartet includes two new French cheeses — the Bourbon-washed Pie d’Angloys and the Cremeux de Bourgogne — from Wegmans’ cheese caves and an Organic Fourme d’Ambert and Organic Gouda.

Hy-Vee is promoting topped Brie kits in its weekly ad.

Haggen Northwest Fresh has packaged cheese boards that also include extras like nuts, spreads and fruit. The boards come in three themes: Brie Lover’s Dream, Cheddar Flavor Flight and Savory & Sweet.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarket News

Supermarket News

Wegmans, Hy-Vee promote cheese plates

To assist customers entertaining over the holidays, retailers are advertising cheeses, cheese kits and cheese boards.

The latest issue of Wegmans Menu Magazine, also available online, gives suggestions for building a cheese tray using one soft ripened cheese, one hard cheese, one washed cheese and one blue cheese, along with pairings like almonds, sausage bites and wine.

Time-crunched customers can also order cheese trays from the retailer. The Holiday Cheese Quartet includes two new French cheeses — the Bourbon-washed Pie d’Angloys and the Cremeux de Bourgogne — from Wegmans’ cheese caves and an Organic Fourme d’Ambert and Organic Gouda.

Hy-Vee is promoting topped Brie kits in its weekly ad.

Haggen Northwest Fresh has packaged cheese boards that also include extras like nuts, spreads and fruit. The boards come in three themes: Brie Lover’s Dream, Cheddar Flavor Flight and Savory & Sweet.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarket News

Supermarket News

Wegmans, Hy-Vee promote cheese plates

To assist customers entertaining over the holidays, retailers are advertising cheeses, cheese kits and cheese boards.

The latest issue of Wegmans Menu Magazine, also available online, gives suggestions for building a cheese tray using one soft ripened cheese, one hard cheese, one washed cheese and one blue cheese, along with pairings like almonds, sausage bites and wine.

Time-crunched customers can also order cheese trays from the retailer. The Holiday Cheese Quartet includes two new French cheeses — the Bourbon-washed Pie d’Angloys and the Cremeux de Bourgogne — from Wegmans’ cheese caves and an Organic Fourme d’Ambert and Organic Gouda.

Hy-Vee is promoting topped Brie kits in its weekly ad.

Haggen Northwest Fresh has packaged cheese boards that also include extras like nuts, spreads and fruit. The boards come in three themes: Brie Lover’s Dream, Cheddar Flavor Flight and Savory & Sweet.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarket News

Supermarket News

CDC Final Update: 5 Listeria Illnesses, Including 1 Death, Linked to Mexican-Style Cheese

Mexican-style dairy products manufactured by Oasis Brands Inc. of Miami, FL, which were recalled for Listeria contamination earlier this year, were linked to five cases of Listeriosis, including one death.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that this outbreak is now over.

Whole-genome sequences of the Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from recalled quesito casero cheese produced by Oasis Brands were found to be highly related to sequences of Listeria strains isolated from one person who became ill in September 2013 and four others who became ill in June through October 2014.

The five cases were reported in Georgia (1), New York (1), Tennessee (2), and Texas (1). Four of the five people were hospitalized, and one death was reported in Tennessee. Three illnesses were related to a pregnancy — one of these was diagnosed in a newborn.

All ill persons were reported to be of Hispanic ethnicity and reported consuming Hispanic-style soft cheese. Two persons who were able to answer questions about specific varieties of Hispanic-style soft cheeses reported consuming quesito casero, though neither could remember the brand.

Although limited information is available about the specific cheese products consumed by ill persons, the whole genome sequencing findings, together with the cheese consumption history of the patients, suggests that these illnesses could have been related to products from Oasis Brands Inc.

In August 2014, Oasis Brands voluntarily recalled quesito casero (fresh curd) due to possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination after the pathogen was isolated from the quesito casero they produced. In October 2014, the company recalled cuajada en hoja (fresh curd) after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) isolated Listeria monocytogenes from environmental samples collected from the production facility and later recalled various Lacteos Santa Martha and one HonduCrema brand cheese and dairy products.

At this time, Oasis Brands Inc. has ceased manufacturing of all products, including the recalled products.

CDC recommends that consumers do not eat any of the recalled cheese and dairy products and that restaurants and retailers should not sell or serve them.

Food Safety News

Controversy Over Raw-Milk Cheese May Come to a Head

(This article by Lincoln Broadbooks was originally published Sept. 29, 2014, on the Kansas City Star’s Chow Town site and is reposted here with his permission.)

Raw-milk cheese has been in the news over the past couple months. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been reviewing its raw-milk standards for cheese for the past several years, and many think it will soon make a decision that will affect the small artisan cheese producers in the United States and Europe.

The most recent dustup has come by way of a hold by FDA on imports from Europe of certain cheeses it deemed unfit for consumption. FDA’s statement on the issue can be read here.

The “problem” was found in several traditional raw-milk cheeses that we know well, Roquefort being the most well-known. You can read the long list of affected cheeses on FDA Import Alert #12-10 here.

Something called nontoxigenic E. coli is to blame for the hold on these cheeses. At first glance, most people would say, “Well, good, I don’t want cheese to be let into the U.S. that is contaminated with E. coli.” Right? Except that this type of E. coli does not make people sick.

FDA noted that the high levels of this type of E. coli in cheese is a sign that the cheese was produced in unsanitary conditions. But that is not necessarily the case, as the FDA pointed out in 2009. Check out this article here to learn more about FDA’s change of heart.

I am not a microbiologist, but I do know that there are a lot of scary-sounding bacteria in cheese that are perfectly fine to eat, and I am willing to let the cheese makers’ tradition, expertise and vast knowledge of their products be the authority on which bacteria are fine.

Why is that? For one thing, there are many layers of government regulation in Europe, and the cheese culture there has been in place for many hundreds of years. Personally, I don’t think we should take Europe’s lead on too many things, but on this I am willing to yield to their local governments and the European Union.

As far as I know, there are no European cheese producers sending cheese to the U.S. that they would not sell in Europe. I suspect the reason for the lack of news like that is because the layers of EU regulations would not allow it. And it’s a business, and they want to make money. It would be rather obtuse for them to send cheese through U.S. Customs that was “contaminated” by unsanitary production. Sounds like a good way to lose money.

It seems the problem is FDA. Obviously FDA does a lot to ensure the safety of our food supply, and we definitely need some government entity to do that, but shouldn’t the first rule be, “If it is not going to make someone sick, leave it alone”?

And, in most other cases, a warning should be enough for people to make their own choices. Take raw milk and raw-milk cheese, for instance. There are some risks associated with them, especially to the very old, very young and people with immunity problems. But that does not mean we should not have the choice to consume them. A simple warning on a label would do.

While they are at it, they could put warnings on almost every other product that has the potential to make you sick. Which is pretty much everything we eat.

I believe the issue runs deeper than just raw milk and raw-milk cheese. We as a society have become a people who don’t really want choice. We want someone who “knows better” to make the choice for us. It’s easier that way.

But we need to realize that, in most cases, we have the knowledge and common sense to make good sound decisions about what we eat with minimal risk to our heath and lives.

Food Safety News

Mercy Goes After Big Cheese With Video Taken at NM Dairy

The Los Angeles-based Mercy for Animals has a knack for uncovering animal abuse, often in isolated places, that is the kind imposing enough stress and pain to also be a food safety concern and egregious enough to bring condemnation by world-renowned animal-welfare experts.

A week ago, the group shared its latest undercover report and video with the New Mexico Livestock Board. Ray E. Baca, executive director of that state law enforcement agency, told Food Safety News the “workers’ mistreatment of dairy cattle as seen in (the) online video” is now the subject of a Livestock Board investigation.

Baca said the board “takes allegations of animal cruelty very seriously.” Upon completion of the investigation, it will make a report to the Chavez County District Attorney’s Office, which will decide if anyone should be prosecuted.

The investigation involves the Winchester Dairy located near tiny Dexter, NM, about a half-hour south of Roswell, NM. It was there that the undercover video was taken, and Mercy documents the location in a separate video released to the media showing that its operative was present at the dairy as recently as August.

Using a hidden camera, Mercy’s operative recorded workers abusing the cows, even stabbing them with screwdrivers and dragging “downer” cows with a tractor in some of the most sickening video seen since the one showing a front-end loader shoving cows into the kill box at a Chico, CA, slaughterhouse emerged in 2010. (That undercover investigation, carried out by the Humane Society of the United States, resulted in the largest beef recall in history from the supplier to the National School Lunch Program.)

Since Mercy revealed the Winchester video, the dairy fired the workers who are shown abusing cows in the video and apparently temporarily shut down operations and relocated its cows. And yesterday, Mercy launched a public relations campaign regarding the disturbing incident.

The immediate targets of the campaign are the nation’s top pizza chains such as Domino’s, Pizza Hut and Papa John’s. That’s because they get much of their cheese from Denver-based Leprino Foods, the world’s largest producer of mozzarella. Mercy’s website now carries its slickly produced “Slice of Cruelty” campaign aimed at sharing the sickening abuse video with activists (and consumers).

Mercy’s PR experts know their social media strategy will usually bring a response from corporate targets in fairly short order. By early afternoon on Wednesday, Leprino Foods, noting that the company “cares deeply about the health and welfare of the animals on the farms that supply our milk,” announced that because of the animal abuse, it had terminated all shipments from Winchester Dairy. “Leprino Foods is not receiving any milk from this operation,” the company said.

At the same time, Leprino expressed confidence in New Mexico dairy farmers. “This incident does not reflect the daily care and comfort that New Mexico dairy farmers provide their cows,” the Leprino statement said. “The farm has taken quick and decisive action. Information about the incident was immediately shared with the proper New Mexico authorities, who are conducting an investigation so that the individuals responsible can be held accountable for their actions.”

Meanwhile, Tim McIntyre, vice president of communications for Domino’s, said that while no act of cruelty can ever be condoned, this was an isolated incident at one dairy farm out of 47,000 in the U.S. He said Mercy should be thanked for bringing the behavior of the workers to light, but he also noted they have been fired, the report is being thoroughly investigated, and the dairy has moved its herd to the care of other farms.

“What we do know is it is not an issue with our cheese supplier (Leprino’s),” McIntyre said.

Mercy last mixed it up with a state’s dairy industry early this year in Idaho where it unsuccessfully opposed a new agricultural protection law designed to prevent these sorts of undercover investigations. In its attempts to prevent passage of the law, Mercy released additional video from its 2012 undercover investigation of Bettencourt Dairy showing workers sexually molesting animals.

That upset the Idaho Dairymen’s Association, which said it showed that Mercy’s goals are more about hurting the dairy industry and its brands than protecting animals. Bettencourt fired the five workers involved in that incident, and they were subsequently convicted of animal abuse but apparently without the molestation video ever figuring in the criminal investigation.

Release of the sexual molestation video also backfired on Mercy as the Idaho Legislature joined Utah, Iowa and Missouri in passing what critics call “ag-gag” laws making it illegal to go undercover and shoot video of animal agricultural operations without permission from the owner. (North Dakota, Montana and Kansas have earlier versions of agricultural protection laws that were passed in 1990-91.)

Idaho’s new law is currently being challenged by other animal-rights groups and media organizations for its potential violations of the First and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

This time, however, Mercy’s PR professionals say their video evidence “was immediately turned over” to New Mexico officials. They also vetted the serious nature of the abuse by having it reviewed by arguably the world’s best-known animal-welfare expert, Colorado State University’s Dr. Temple Grandin.

She said that kicking and shocking the cows and holding them above the ground was “definitely abusive” and that the bellowing indicated the animals were in “severe distress.” Grandin also sees the blame going beyond the fired workers to “mismanagement” for failure to provide proper training and equipment.

Nathan Runkle, the president of Mercy, blamed Leprino Foods for allowing “a culture of cruelty to flourish in its cheese supply chain.”

Livestock abuse like that depicted on the video is a misdemeanor under New Mexico law and can become a felony with repeat offenses, or if the animal cruelty involves “intentionally or maliciously torturing, mutilating, or poisoning an animal or maliciously killing an animal.”

Only after the investigation is complete will the New Mexico Livestock Board or the Chavez County District Attorney’s Office have more to say, according to Baca.

Food Safety News

Parmesan Cheese Recalled for Potential Salmonella Contamination

4C Foods Corp. of Brooklyn, NY, is recalling 6-oz. glass jars of 4C Grated Cheese HomeStyle Parmesan, UPC 0-41387-32790-8 with code dates BEST BY JUL 21 2016 and JUL 22 2016, due to possible contamination with Salmonella. This recall does not impact any other 4C cheese products.

The potential risk was brought to 4C’s attention by FDA during routine testing. This recall affects 308 cases that were shipped of the affected date codes. No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

On July 24, 2014, the product was distributed to: IA, IL, MI, MN, ND, NE, SD and WI through retail stores.

The item is packed as 12 glass jars per case with the code dates BEST BY JUL 21 2016 and JUL 22 2016 located on jar back side toward bottom portion.

Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses.

Consumers do not need to return the product to the store where it was purchased. Instead, consumers are urged to dispose of the recalled product and its container. Please contact 4C Foods at 1-718-272-7800, ext. 176, Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (EDT), for a replacement or full refund and for general inquiries.

Food Safety News

DOJ Files Injunction Against Michigan Cheese Company to Stop Distribution

The U.S. Justice Department (DOJ) filed a civil complaint in Michigan federal court on Friday against S. Serra Cheese Co. of Clinton Township, MI, and owners Stefano and Fina Serra, to prevent the distribution of allegedly adulterated cheese products. The complaint was filed by request from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The DOJ claims that the company’s Italian cheeses, including ricotta, provolone, mozzarella and primo sale, are manufactured in “insanity conditions” and that the firm’s procedures “are inadequate to ensure the safety of its products.”

“The presence of potentially harmful pathogens in food and processing facilities poses a serious risk to the public health,” said Assistant Attorney General Stuart Delery of the DOJ’s Civil Division. “The Department of Justice will continue to bring enforcement actions against food manufacturers who do not follow the necessary procedures to comply with food safety laws.”

Such a complaint sets out the government’s allegations, and, if the case were to proceed to trial, the government would need to prove them by a preponderance of the evidence.

Two FDA inspections in 2013 found that the company “repeatedly failed to reduce the risk of contamination from two potentially dangerous types of bacteria: Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua,” according to the complaint.

“Although the strains of E. coli found in cheese samples collected from the company’s facility were non-pathogenic, their presence indicates that the facility is insanitary and contaminated with filth,” the complaint states. “In addition, the presence of L. innocua indicates insanitary conditions and a work environment that could support the growth of L. monocytogenes, an organism that poses a life-threatening health hazard because it is the causal agent for the disease listeriosis, a serious encephalitic disease.”

Results of FDA inspections of the facility in January 2013 were detailed in a June 6, 2013, warning letter addressed to Fina Serra as the co-owner and manager of the company. The letter noted a number of “serious violations” of Current Good Manufacturing Practices, the non-toxigenic E. coli test results, structural problems in the manufacturing plant, and inadequate cleaning and sanitation practices.

The DOJ complaint further states that the most recent FDA inspection this past November found that “cleaning and sanitizing operations for utensils and equipment were not performed in a manner that protects against contamination of food and food contact surfaces.”

Fina Serra reportedly responded to FDA’s letter, but the agency did not find her response to be sufficient.

The government is represented by Dan Baeza of the Civil Division’s Consumer Protection Branch and Assistant U.S. Attorney Peter Caplan for the Eastern District of Michigan, with the assistance of Assistant Chief Counsel for Enforcement Christopher Fanelli of the Food and Drug Division, Office of General Counsel, Department of Health and Human Services.

Food Safety News

Raw Goat Milk Cheese Recalled for Possible E. coli Contamination

The Southwestern Wisconsin Dairy Goat Products Cooperative of Mt. Sterling, WI, is recalling Raw Milk Mild Cheddar Cheese Lot Code 103-114 because it may be contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O111:H8 bacteria.

The recall was initiated after a case of two five-pound loaves in the original packaging was collected on July 8 from an offsite warehouse. The product sample tested positive for Shiga toxin and was contaminated with E. coli O111:H8.

This product was distributed in the Midwest and Southwest regions of the U.S. and sent through distributorship in Wisconsin and Georgia. From these two states, this product was then sent to retail stores in the Midwest and Southwest.

This product was packed as an 8-oz. cryovac retail-size piece with the code 103-114 on a sticker attached to the side of the cheese. This product is all white in appearance and has a front and back separate label. The back label is a black-and-white nutrition and ingredient label and the front label is a yellow-and-blue colored label with the Mt. Sterling Coop Creamery brand name.

Consumers who may have purchased this product with the code date listed are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-608-734-3151.

No illnesses have been reported to date. E. coli O111:H8 is one of the six STEC strains that have been deemed to be of serious health concern as it can cause diarrheal illness, often with bloody stools, and may lead to more severe complications such as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals and can lead to severe kidney damage and even death.

Food Safety News

Raw Goat Milk Cheese Recalled for Possible E. coli Contamination

The Southwestern Wisconsin Dairy Goat Products Cooperative of Mt. Sterling, WI, is recalling Raw Milk Mild Cheddar Cheese Lot Code 103-114 because it may be contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O111:H8 bacteria.

The recall was initiated after a case of two five-pound loaves in the original packaging was collected on July 8 from an offsite warehouse. The product sample tested positive for Shiga toxin and was contaminated with E. coli O111:H8.

This product was distributed in the Midwest and Southwest regions of the U.S. and sent through distributorship in Wisconsin and Georgia. From these two states, this product was then sent to retail stores in the Midwest and Southwest.

This product was packed as an 8-oz. cryovac retail-size piece with the code 103-114 on a sticker attached to the side of the cheese. This product is all white in appearance and has a front and back separate label. The back label is a black-and-white nutrition and ingredient label and the front label is a yellow-and-blue colored label with the Mt. Sterling Coop Creamery brand name.

Consumers who may have purchased this product with the code date listed are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-608-734-3151.

No illnesses have been reported to date. E. coli O111:H8 is one of the six STEC strains that have been deemed to be of serious health concern as it can cause diarrheal illness, often with bloody stools, and may lead to more severe complications such as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals and can lead to severe kidney damage and even death.

Food Safety News

Raw Goat Milk Cheese Recalled for Possible E. coli Contamination

The Southwestern Wisconsin Dairy Goat Products Cooperative of Mt. Sterling, WI, is recalling Raw Milk Mild Cheddar Cheese Lot Code 103-114 because it may be contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O111:H8 bacteria.

The recall was initiated after a case of two five-pound loaves in the original packaging was collected on July 8 from an offsite warehouse. The product sample tested positive for Shiga toxin and was contaminated with E. coli O111:H8.

This product was distributed in the Midwest and Southwest regions of the U.S. and sent through distributorship in Wisconsin and Georgia. From these two states, this product was then sent to retail stores in the Midwest and Southwest.

This product was packed as an 8-oz. cryovac retail-size piece with the code 103-114 on a sticker attached to the side of the cheese. This product is all white in appearance and has a front and back separate label. The back label is a black-and-white nutrition and ingredient label and the front label is a yellow-and-blue colored label with the Mt. Sterling Coop Creamery brand name.

Consumers who may have purchased this product with the code date listed are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-608-734-3151.

No illnesses have been reported to date. E. coli O111:H8 is one of the six STEC strains that have been deemed to be of serious health concern as it can cause diarrheal illness, often with bloody stools, and may lead to more severe complications such as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals and can lead to severe kidney damage and even death.

Food Safety News

Raw Goat Milk Cheese Recalled for Possible E. coli Contamination

The Southwestern Wisconsin Dairy Goat Products Cooperative of Mt. Sterling, WI, is recalling Raw Milk Mild Cheddar Cheese Lot Code 103-114 because it may be contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O111:H8 bacteria.

The recall was initiated after a case of two five-pound loaves in the original packaging was collected on July 8 from an offsite warehouse. The product sample tested positive for Shiga toxin and was contaminated with E. coli O111:H8.

This product was distributed in the Midwest and Southwest regions of the U.S. and sent through distributorship in Wisconsin and Georgia. From these two states, this product was then sent to retail stores in the Midwest and Southwest.

This product was packed as an 8-oz. cryovac retail-size piece with the code 103-114 on a sticker attached to the side of the cheese. This product is all white in appearance and has a front and back separate label. The back label is a black-and-white nutrition and ingredient label and the front label is a yellow-and-blue colored label with the Mt. Sterling Coop Creamery brand name.

Consumers who may have purchased this product with the code date listed are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-608-734-3151.

No illnesses have been reported to date. E. coli O111:H8 is one of the six STEC strains that have been deemed to be of serious health concern as it can cause diarrheal illness, often with bloody stools, and may lead to more severe complications such as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals and can lead to severe kidney damage and even death.

Food Safety News

Raw Goat Milk Cheese Recalled for Possible E. coli Contamination

The Southwestern Wisconsin Dairy Goat Products Cooperative of Mt. Sterling, WI, is recalling Raw Milk Mild Cheddar Cheese Lot Code 103-114 because it may be contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O111:H8 bacteria.

The recall was initiated after a case of two five-pound loaves in the original packaging was collected on July 8 from an offsite warehouse. The product sample tested positive for Shiga toxin and was contaminated with E. coli O111:H8.

This product was distributed in the Midwest and Southwest regions of the U.S. and sent through distributorship in Wisconsin and Georgia. From these two states, this product was then sent to retail stores in the Midwest and Southwest.

This product was packed as an 8-oz. cryovac retail-size piece with the code 103-114 on a sticker attached to the side of the cheese. This product is all white in appearance and has a front and back separate label. The back label is a black-and-white nutrition and ingredient label and the front label is a yellow-and-blue colored label with the Mt. Sterling Coop Creamery brand name.

Consumers who may have purchased this product with the code date listed are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-608-734-3151.

No illnesses have been reported to date. E. coli O111:H8 is one of the six STEC strains that have been deemed to be of serious health concern as it can cause diarrheal illness, often with bloody stools, and may lead to more severe complications such as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals and can lead to severe kidney damage and even death.

Food Safety News

French Cheese Recalled in Canada for Possible E. coli Contamination

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced Monday that La Fromagerie Hamel is recalling La Fromagerie Hamel brand “St-Felicien lait cru France (Rhone-Alpes)” cheese from the marketplace due to possible E. coli O26:H11 contamination.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product, which was distributed to retail outlets in Quebec.

Consumers should not consume the recalled product described below:

La Fromagerie Hamel “St-Felicien lait cru France (Rhone-Alpes),” 180 g, 11772104, Best Before 19/08/2014, no UPC.

Check to see if you have recalled product in your home. Recalled product should be thrown out or returned to the store where it was purchased.

Food contaminated with E. coli O26:H11 may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps and watery to bloody diarrhea. In severe cases of illness, some people may have seizures or strokes, need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis or live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

This recall was triggered by a recall in another country. CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the agency will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

Food Safety News

French Cheese Recalled in Canada for Possible E. coli Contamination

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced Monday that La Fromagerie Hamel is recalling La Fromagerie Hamel brand “St-Felicien lait cru France (Rhone-Alpes)” cheese from the marketplace due to possible E. coli O26:H11 contamination.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product, which was distributed to retail outlets in Quebec.

Consumers should not consume the recalled product described below:

La Fromagerie Hamel “St-Felicien lait cru France (Rhone-Alpes),” 180 g, 11772104, Best Before 19/08/2014, no UPC.

Check to see if you have recalled product in your home. Recalled product should be thrown out or returned to the store where it was purchased.

Food contaminated with E. coli O26:H11 may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps and watery to bloody diarrhea. In severe cases of illness, some people may have seizures or strokes, need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis or live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

This recall was triggered by a recall in another country. CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the agency will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

Food Safety News

Cheese Distributed in Ontario and Quebec Recalled for Potential Listeria

A cheese recall issued on June 24, 2014, was updated Tuesday to include an additional product. This additional information was identified during the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) food safety investigation.

Unicer Foods Ltd. is recalling “Queijo de Mistura” Cheese, a product of Portugal, from the marketplace due to possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Consumers should not consume the recalled product described below.

The following product has been distributed in Ontario. There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

Recalled product

Brand Product Size UPC Codes
Extra “Queijo de Mistura”
A combination of cow’s, sheep’s and goat’s milk
Variable None Lot: 02EGMUAUMT
Production: 14/05/14

Some product packages may not bear a code. Consumers who are unsure if they have purchased the affected product are advised to contact their retailer.

The cheese previously recalled by Unicer Foods on June 24 was “Queijo de Vaca” whole cow’s milk cheese in variable sizes with Best Before: 14/10/14, Lot: 14BPMTAUMT, Production: 14/05/14, and distributed in Ontario and Quebec.

What you should do

Check to see if you have recalled product in your home. Recalled product should be thrown out or returned to the store where it was purchased.

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache and neck stiffness. Pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, the infection can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn or even stillbirth. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

Learn more about the health risks at: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/information-for-consumers/fact-sheets/food-poisoning/eng/1331151916451/1331152055552

Background

This recall was triggered by the CFIA inspection activities. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

More information

Food Safety News