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Stemilt’s Kyle Mathison orchestrates cherry harvest under a full moon

Stemilt-Moon-Cherries--pouch-bag

In the life of a cherry grower, it’s not every day that everything aligns just as you would want them to. However, for fourth-generation Stemilt cherry grower Kyle Mathison and his high-altitude Moon cherries, this year’s harvest is shaping up exactly the way he would prefer if he could have scripted it.

That’s because July 18 will have a full moon. This is the lunar phase that Mathison prefers to harvest his cherries under, as he finds the extra gravitational pull from the moon boosts his cherry trees’ ability to deliver energy to the growing fruits in the form of carbohydrates. The result is jumbo-sized cherries with higher sugars, acids, and aromatics to deliver a memorable dessert eating experience.

“There’s no better time to harvest cherries than around a full moon,” Mathison, who has been farming cherries on Stemilt Hill in Wenatchee, WA, for more than four decades, said in a press release. “A full moon brings energy with it, and that energy pulls nutrients from the roots of cherry trees right into the fruit. The result is large and firm cherries that are truly world famous. Each cherry explodes with flavor when you bite into it.”Stemilt-Moon-Cherries--pouch-bag

Mathison just started harvesting cherries from his unique Amigos Orchards in Wenatchee, located 2,640 feet above sea level and higher, or literally a half mile closer to the moon. These cherries are the latest freshly harvested cherries in Washington state, and though coming off the tree earlier than they typically do, will still take Stemilt’s cherry harvest into early August. In a normal year where Washington cherries start in June, cherry harvest at Amigos would go into September.

The start of harvest at Amigos also signals the start of Stemilt’s A Half Mile Closer to the Moon cherry program, where premium cherries from high-altitudes are packed into specially marked pouch bags to offer retailers with a unique story to share with shoppers, and a grand finale to cherry season. This is the fifth year Stemilt has packed “Moon cherries.”

Named after the Spanish word for friends, the Amigos orchards overlook the Columbia River and town of Wenatchee not too far from the family’s original homestead on Stemilt Hill. In the cherry world, any orchard planted above 1,800 feet is considered high-elevation. Having already surpassed that height, Mathison began planting cherries at even higher elevations in 2002 in order to stretch the availability of Stemilt cherries.

New this year, Stemilt has a Moon cherry video to help retailers tell the farm to fork story of these special cherries with their shoppers on social and digital channels. The video features Kyle and West Mathison and the unique geography, farming practices, and unmatched passion Kyle has for growing Moon cherries.

Not only is his 2016 Moon cherry harvest aligning with the ideal lunar cycle, but the growing conditions all summer long have been a dream at Amigos. Mathison’s crop will produce jumbo-sized cherries with high firmness, sugars, acids and true dessert qualities.

“They are going to wow consumers,” Roger Pepperl, Stemilt marketing director, said in the release. “Sweetheart, Skeena and Staccato are the varieties grown by Kyle at Amigos, and all three have benefitted from near-perfect growing conditions this year. Warm but not hot days followed by cool nights and the added benefit of being fueled by Kyle’s prescription natural fertilizer made at his nearby compost farm result in fantastic cherries. We’re excited to deliver consumers with this final and memorable taste of Stemilt cherries through our branded A Half Mile Closer to the Moon program. It’s an exciting way to finish off another great cherry season.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

New tasty yellow cherry tomato developed

“Yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as tasty as they look. While visiting DeRuiter’s high tech trials at the Expo Agroalimentaria last month, visitors could taste the DRO948TS .

The DRO948TS is forthcoming from the Mexican high tech breeding pipeline. “High tech is the premium segment in Mexico’s greenhouse horticulture, it currently covers around 10 percent of the market. The acreage is stable, but is still expanding moderately year by year; a reason for us to develop high tech varieties that are dedicated to the Mexican market”, said DeRuiter’s Thijs Peekstok when explaining to us why the breeder has its own Mexican program. “Mexico is the most important supplier of greenhouse produce for North America, and the customers are demanding the same high quality product as they are used to from the domestic production. But Mexican growers demand special varieties that can also cope with the specific climates of their countries. We are very proud that we can now show the first results of this program!”

Dedication

“Mexico’s high tech growers are increasingly in search of good quality crops, that have a good production, good post-harvest behaviour, are firm and have the right shape”, said Jose Jaime Bocanegra of DeRuiter Mexico. “That is a large criteria, but our Mexican breeding program is really dedicated to creating varieties that fulfil all of these requirements.”


DeRuiter’s Jose Jaime Bocanegra and Homero Benitez at the high tech demonstration of DeRuiter at the Expo AgroAlimentaria 2014 last month.

A trend amongst Mexican High tech growers is the demand for crops that last longer during the season. “All of the growers, whether they grow tomatoes, cucumbers or bell peppers, are all looking for more weeks of harvest. The crop changes are becoming shorter, because the growers want to increase the weeks of supplies to their customers in the U.S. and Canada.”

Beefsteak

One of these long lasting crops that DeRuiter is known for is the Torero beefsteak tomato, a variety with a long, extended harvesting period and continuous quality tomatoes.  The crops sometimes provide 40 weeks of harvest in certain regions.”

In regards to beefsteak, DeRuiter is further strengthening its position on the market with the introduction of Foronti. “This variety has all of the good aspects of Torero, but with a higher production potential and mildew resistance, we give growers another option to choose from.”


Damian Solomon, Harry Kroeker, Hilda Diaz and Thijs Peekstok of De Ruiter.



TOV Merlice + Rootstocks

“But also the coarse TOV variety Merlice has become very big in Mexico”, Bocanegra added. “We are now the leader in this segment with Merlice. The crop is favoured especially with the combination of the Maxifort rootstock. But we are now also introducing the rootstock DR141TX, a rootstock that suits the Mexican market very well. We are working in the centre of Mexico with the high tech growers, they are achieving very good results with the DR141TX due the fact that it really stands out in hot summer conditions, has big potential for high yields, and is enhancing plant endurance.”

Taste!

Also in Mexico, DeRuiter is increasing its focus on the implementation of more taste in the varieties. At the show we had a chance to experience one of the first results of this with the yellow cherry tomato DRO948TS. From our experience, yellow cherry tomatoes are not always as sweet and tasty as they look. The new DRO948TS however has a surprisingly fresh and sweet taste. We were amazed by the good taste, and the visitors couldn’t resist picking them.


This young visitor couldn’t resist the new tasty yellow cherry tomatoes

Bocanegra: “Customers are looking for high brix in this kind of variety, we know that this variety can achieve high brix levels without problems. In normal cases, growers had to increase the EC to achieve higher brix levels, but the DRO948T is producing sugar by itself. On top of this the variety has great potential to produce a high yield as well, the productivity is phenomenal.

“This is one of the first examples coming out of our new breeding pipeline that is combining high yield and taste”, Bocanegra said. “But also presentation and shelf life are very important. We are very confident that we will continue with implementing a balanced combination of all these requirements in our new varieties that are in the pipeline for the future!”.

For more information:
De Ruiter Seeds
Thijs Peekstok
www.deruiterseeds.com
[email protected]

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Boy de Nijs
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Chile: Rains cut cherry export by 15%

Chile: Rains cut cherry export by 15%

Rains on Friday and Saturday in Chile’s cherry growing regions have caused serious damage to the production intended for export. Over the next few days, the losses will be more accurately estimated, as well as the possible impact on other fruits, which is expected to be very minor.

According to preliminary data, FEDEFRUTA expect 15% fewer cherries this season.

In the case of cherries, about 20% of the expected volume this season has been already been shipped; a volume that has been estimated at about 20 million 5 kilo boxes.

The President of the Association of Chilean Fruit Exporters AG (ASOEX), Ronald Bown said: “Preliminary data supplied by the Cherry Committee reveals that in those areas where rainfall has exceeded 20 mm, orchards will suffer losses of between 30% and 50%. In municipalities with rainfall between 10-20 mm, the extent of the damage will be lower.”

The greatest loss is observed in the region of Maule, where it is estimated that, at least, 25% of production can not be exported

Orchards in the Santiago area were the least affected as the harvest was coming to an end and only between 4 and 11 millimetres of rain fell.

However the situation becomes more serious as we move towards the south, for there the cherry harvest was in full swing.

In the O’Higgins Region, where 12 to 30 millimetres of rain fell in the fruit growing areas, it is expected that 20% of cherries for export were damaged. In the region of Maule, meanwhile, the producer / exporter and also director of the Federation, Antonio Walker Prieto says a loss of 25% to 40% due to rainfall in some areas of a much as 43 mm.

“The crop damage will be clearer after three days, so we are assessing the situation,” says Walker, chairman of Fruséptima. “What we can anticipate is that the loss is great.”

In the case of blueberries, export estimates for the current 2014-2015 campaign supplied by the Blueberry Committee are of 99,500 tonnes; an increase of 35%  on last season. So far, 4,500 tonnes have been exported, which represents 80% more than on the same date last year. This volume is in line with the Committee’s estimates for these first weeks of the season.

Executive Secretary of the Blueberry Committee, Andrés Armstrong, said: “The impact of the rains this weekend will delay the harvest by one or two days and will require the use of applications to prevent fruit decay, a customary procedure when such events take place during the harvest period.”

Meanwhile, the estimated impact on production volumes which may have affected some varieties is under evaluation and will be reported in the “Harvest and Export Report of the Blueberry Committee” this week.

Lastly, the president of ASOEX said: “This weather phenomenon has been a blow for us at the beginning of the season, but we hope to be able to meet our commitments in the shipment of fruit to all international markets.”

Publication date: 12/2/2014


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Double-digit increase anticipated for Chilean cherry imports

The Chilean Cherry Committee, an entity associated with the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, commonly referred to as ASOEX, expects total exports of fresh cherries from Chile to reach 100,000 tons this year. As the second-largest export market for Chile, North America anticipates a 45 percent increase in volume over the 2013-14 season.

To support this dramatic growth, the Chilean Cherry Committee is pursuing a targeted promotion campaign across the United States and Canada, with increased funding earmarked for retail promotions.312-CHERRIES

“Thanks to an extraordinarily successful harvest, we’re going to see increased volume and promotions in North America,” said Karen Brux, North America managing director for the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association. “The Chilean Cherry Committee is committed to expanding the North American market for Chilean cherries, and we have promotion funding available for retailers to make that happen. We’re in the process of meeting with retailers to confirm holiday promotions.”

This year’s strong harvest is great news for the Chilean cherry industry, which was hard hit in 2013 by a devastating freeze. Brux said the initial estimate for 2013-14 season was 85,000 tons, but after the freeze, this dropped to 68,000 tons. With Chile on track to export at least 100,000 tons during the 2014-15 season, this is a significant step for the industry.

“It’s also great news for North American retailers who want to offer their shoppers a beautiful, premium, great-tasting fruit over the holiday season,” Brux added.

Chile is one of the largest cherry exporters in the world. Fresh cherries from Chile are available in December and January, with export peaks expected from weeks 49 through 51. The Chilean Cherry Committee is offering holiday-themed point-of-sale merchandising materials that encourage shoppers to “bring home the cherry best,” which is its marketing call to action for holiday promotions. Supporting recipes, images and other materials are available for both in-store and online marketing.

The Chilean Cherry Committee was formed under the auspices of the ASOEX, which is based in Santiago, Chile. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association is its North American counterpart and directs all marketing and promotional activities for fresh Chilean fruit in the U.S. and Canada. More information about cherries and other fruits from Chile is available at www.fruitsfromchile.com.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Double-digit increase anticipated for Chilean cherry imports

The Chilean Cherry Committee, an entity associated with the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, commonly referred to as ASOEX, expects total exports of fresh cherries from Chile to reach 100,000 tons this year. As the second-largest export market for Chile, North America anticipates a 45 percent increase in volume over the 2013-14 season.

To support this dramatic growth, the Chilean Cherry Committee is pursuing a targeted promotion campaign across the United States and Canada, with increased funding earmarked for retail promotions.312-CHERRIES

“Thanks to an extraordinarily successful harvest, we’re going to see increased volume and promotions in North America,” said Karen Brux, North America managing director for the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association. “The Chilean Cherry Committee is committed to expanding the North American market for Chilean cherries, and we have promotion funding available for retailers to make that happen. We’re in the process of meeting with retailers to confirm holiday promotions.”

This year’s strong harvest is great news for the Chilean cherry industry, which was hard hit in 2013 by a devastating freeze. Brux said the initial estimate for 2013-14 season was 85,000 tons, but after the freeze, this dropped to 68,000 tons. With Chile on track to export at least 100,000 tons during the 2014-15 season, this is a significant step for the industry.

“It’s also great news for North American retailers who want to offer their shoppers a beautiful, premium, great-tasting fruit over the holiday season,” Brux added.

Chile is one of the largest cherry exporters in the world. Fresh cherries from Chile are available in December and January, with export peaks expected from weeks 49 through 51. The Chilean Cherry Committee is offering holiday-themed point-of-sale merchandising materials that encourage shoppers to “bring home the cherry best,” which is its marketing call to action for holiday promotions. Supporting recipes, images and other materials are available for both in-store and online marketing.

The Chilean Cherry Committee was formed under the auspices of the ASOEX, which is based in Santiago, Chile. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association is its North American counterpart and directs all marketing and promotional activities for fresh Chilean fruit in the U.S. and Canada. More information about cherries and other fruits from Chile is available at www.fruitsfromchile.com.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

US (WA): Cherry season off to rocky start

US (WA): Cherry season off to rocky start

Poor pollination and rain have meant fewer-than-normal quantities of cherries from Washington this month. Demand for fruit has outpaced supplies, but despite diminished quantities this month, growers are hoping July will bring better volumes.

“We’ve had a diminished crop so far,” said Stemilt Growers’ Roger Pepperl. “We had poor pollination, and then rain took out some of our June cherries.” While exact numbers on how much of this month’s crop was affected weren’t available, Pepperl said it was a significant amount. But he noted that Stemilt’s cherry season, that’s planned to go into late-August or early-September, should see increased volumes of fruit in July.

Similarly, Columbia Marketing International’s Bob Mast expects the latter half of the season to be much better than the beginning.

“We’ve been off to a slow start, and we hope to ramp things up when the weather turns,” said Mast. “It’s going to be important for retailers to catch up with sales that have been lost due to lack of availability, so the hope is to get late season sales going.” The weather Mast mentioned has included inopportune rain. While precipitation has slowed down the harvesting of fruit, it’s also made for cracked fruit that needs to be culled. The more fruit that is weeded out because it’s cracked, the less fruit available on the market. That’s caused problems for retailers who want to take advantage of strong demand ahead of the Fourth of July holiday.

“Supplies from California finished off pretty quickly, so demand for the volume coming out of the Pacific Northwest picked up rapidly,” explained Mast. “We’re frustrated because retailers want to get fruit into the system for the Fourth of July, so we’re looking to transition into our later season varieties.” With diminished volumes of fruit, pricing has been high. But less fruit per tree has also meant that the cherries that do make it to stores are larger and of very good quality.

“This is some of the best quality fruit we’ve seen in a while,” said James Michael, vice president of marketing for Northwest Cherries. “Fewer buds and fewer cherries per tree means better quality, so the fruit on shelves is incredible, and that’s fueling demand.” Increased demand and good quality fruit have been the bright spots to a beginning of the season that has seen lower volumes. Now growers are hoping to get past the rough start and finish the season strong.

“It’s been a bad June so far,” said Pepperl, “but we anticipate having a good July.”

Publication date: 6/26/2013
Author: Carlos Nunez
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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AU: FTA with Korea to be game-changing for cherry exporters

AU: FTA with Korea to be game-changing for cherry exporters

The cherry season is about to start in Australia, and according to Simon Boughey, CEO of Cherry Growers Australia, “production volumes are expected to be similar to 2012, of 14.5 to 15 thousand tonnes, depending on seasonal fluctuations until late February. All states report a good flowering, so the situation is quite encouraging at the moment.”

Regarding the market situation, Simon says that it is still early to be certain, “but we’ve had lots of enquiries from the Asian region, with plenty of interest from China and Hong Kong. We are also back into the Thai market, but the real game-changer is the FTA signed between Korea and Australia, which will eliminate the 23% import fee and may come into force in early 2015.”

There is also rising demand from other countries in the area, such as Malaysia and the Philippines. “Overall, there is growing demand in Asia, which is easy for us to cover, because we can ship to any Asian destination within 8 to 10 hours, which is a very competitive advantage,” states Simon.

The domestic market is also quite strong. According to Simon, “in the last couple of years 30% of the production has gone to exports and 70% to the domestic market, but we aim towards 50/50. Hong Kong already takes about 50% of our exports and we continue to expand on our four key markets,” concludes Simon Boughley.

For more information:
Simon Boughey
Cherry Growers Australia
Tel: 0061 3 6231 1229
Email: [email protected]

Publication date: 10/24/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


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What to expect in the sweet cherry market for the 2015 Chinese New Year?

What to expect in the sweet cherry market for the 2015 Chinese New Year?

With greater volumes than last season and a celebration that will come very “late”. The question is: How much of the Chilean supply will be available for the Chinese New Year (CNY)?

Large volumes

With a record volume of 46,617 tons and an increasing share of the total exported volume, ended the 2013/14 season for the Chilean sweet cherries in the market of China/HK. Despite registering 38% more volume than the previous year, this figure does not reflect the total export potential of Chile, due to the frost last September. Therefore, if no major weather events occur, it is expected that this figure be much higher this season.

A celebration later than usual

Since the date of the CNY, varies according to the lunar calendar, it is not fixed, and it changes to the date with new moon closest to the day in between the winter solstice (Northernt H.) and the spring equinox (Northern H.), that is the new moon nearest to the period between February 3rd and 5th. In 2015 it will be February 19th. In 1996 was the last time when CNY was celebrated so late, being 2007 the nearest year when the CNY was celebrated a day before (Feb. 18th). Should be remembered that until the week before CNY 92% of the total volume of sweet cherries shipped to China/HK arrives.

Higher prices near the CNY, but not as much as last year

During the 2013/14 season Historical prices for Chilean sweet cherries were recorded, especially during the weeks before the celebration of the CNY. Although this could be explained by the growing demand in this market, the uncertainty present at the start of the season, due to poor knowledge of the actual damage caused by the frost could be another reason. The high prices recorded for the first shipments of the 2013/14 season are proof of this.

During the present US season in China/HK, which have just ended, high prices were also recorded, however this has been due to lower production. Therefore it is necessary to strengthen the efforts in fruit quality, distribution and logistics, so that when facing a significant increase in the volumes from Chile, the importers found no quality problems, or don’t get over-stock with fruit.

How will the market behaviour be after CNY?

Last season, the price fell sharply on the three weeks after the Chinese New Year, and then close with high prices for the last batch of good quality. However, after 2015 CNY, the Chinese market would only receive a portion equivalent to less than 1% of the total exports shipped in a regular season, compared with a 4% on average recorded in previous seasons after CNY.

Source: www.iqonsulting.com

Publication date: 9/16/2014


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Chile: Stonefruit exports fell 57% and cherry exports grew 32%

Fruit season ends
Chile: Stonefruit exports fell 57% and cherry exports grew 32%

As every year, September 1 marks the beginning of a new Chilean export season. Following is a review of the numbers of the species that have already closed their season and are getting ready for the next one.



Species 2012/13 
2013/14 %Var
Table grapes
852.519 728.314  -15%
Blueberries 86.949
74.380
 -14%
Cherries 51.948 68.537
  32%
Stone fruits 
211.203 90.815
 -57%

Table grapes: 

The 2013/14 Chilean table grape export season had a 15% decline in volume when compared to the previous season because of the frosts in September that affected the fruit in its most vulnerable state. Despite that decline, the highest peak in exports of the last 3 years, 75,033 tons, was reached in week 13. Another notable aspect of this season was the significant increase in Peruvian exports, which went from 148,500 to 222,894 tons, a 50% increase that exceeded the most positive expectations. 

Blueberries: 

Chilean blueberry exports this season dropped 14% when compared to the previous year and amounted to 74,380 tons. Blueberry production was affected by the frost in September, the Lobesia botrana and the port strike in summer. 

Cherries: 

Cherry exports increased by 32%, a figure that was lower than initial estimates. Expectations are that shipments will increase in the 2014/15 season if weather conditions are good. The big question, however, is: what will happen in the Chinese New Year? Next year, the Chinese New Year will take place on February 19, i.e. at week 8, 3 to 4 weeks later than in previous seasons, when Chile’s campaign is in its final phase. 

Stonefruits: 

The stonefruits had the biggest decline among the species analysed. Their season started before time and was 2 weeks shorter. Exports declined by 57% on average. Apricot exports were the most affected (-77 %) and peach exports the least (-44%). Nectarines exports decreased by 58%, while plums decreased by 60% or 69,800 tons. 

Source: iQonsulting

Publication date: 9/4/2014


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