Blog Archives

China finds first case of “kiwifruit rot” in NZ shipment

The Tianjin Entry-Exit Inspection Bureau has announced the interception of two lots of New Zealand-grown kiwifruit, citing the existence of “kiwifruit rot bacteria”.

In a release dated July 18, the bureau said it was the first ever interception of this nature in Tianjin and the country.

The authority claimed the fungal disease Botrytis phariadothide was found in batches of green and gold kiwifruit.

The bureau said while domestic market demand had prompted substantial kiwifruit import growth in recent years, if the pathogen recently found in these shipments were to enter domestic production areas it would cause “incalculable damage”.

The release said it could also be present in apples, persimmons and red eucalyptus trees.

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

China to allow Chilean prunes in “natural condition”

While Chile has been selling prunes to the Chinese market since 2010 only tenderized fruit has been allowed until now.

According to the Chile Prunes Association, Chinese authorities have finally authorized imports of prunes that have been dried under “natural conditions”.

“Currently, 90% of prunes imported by China from the rest of the world are of this ‘natural condition’ type, which is why this new understanding between AQSIQ and SAG opens an important market for this product, which makes us very content with the new possibility of exports opened in that country,” says Chilean Agriculture Minister Carlos Furche.

Demand for health products is on the rise in China, bringing with it demand for dried fruits. Chinese consumers have historically eaten local dried ‘Wumei’ prunes, but in recent years there have been imports of the Western-style prunes Chile and other countries produce which are called ‘Ximei’ in the Asian nation.

“Our country, once again, is opening international markets with strong arguments for quality, seriousness and reliability. This news allows us to substantially increase our export potential in China,” said Chile Prunes president Pedro Pablo Diaz.

“Chile has an FTA which allows us to have a 0% tariff, and just this year California will produce 40% of its normal production, so availability of exports will be much lower and consequently, there will be a greater opportunity for Chile,” added Chile Prunes executive director Andrés Rodríguez.

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

Subway Investigating Reports of Doctored Expiration Dates in China

Chinese media are reporting that workers at a Subway sub-sandwich fast-food chain outlet in Beijing were doctoring expiration labels and serving meat and vegetables beyond their expiration date. Subway officials stated on Monday that they were investigating the claims, according to Reuters.

Subway is just the latest in a recent string of fast-food chains with alleged problems related to expired food in China. In July, a Chinese TV report exposed the same practice apparently occurring at Chinese McDonald’s and KFC outlets.

That scandal traced back to a subsidiary of U.S. food supplier OSI Group. McDonald’s made a high-profile decision to cut ties with the company for its Chinese operations. Ultimately, six employees of the subsidiary were arrested for their alleged involvement in mixing outdated meat with fresher supplies.

The subsidiary, Shanghai Husi Food Co., also supplied food to Chinese franchises of other big-name chains, including Pizza Hut, Starbucks, Burger King and 7-Eleven.

Subway would not confirm or deny the reports on Monday, stating that the company needed more time to investigate the claims. Regulators in Beijing have also launched an investigation.

Food Safety News

APHIS to talk apples with China

APHIS to talk apples with China

The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is ramping up talks with China, the world’s largest producer of apples, to allow both countries to ship more of the produce item across borders, but the U.S. apple industry is happy about it, reports Pro Agriculture’s Bill Tomson this morning.

APHIS officials confirmed Monday that they are preparing to meet with officials from China’s General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ), in San Francisco, in January. The conversation will likely expand on an agreement reached between APHIS and AQSIQ , in October, which reopened China to red and golden delicious apples from Washington state.

China produced about 33 million metric tons of apples in 2010 — roughly half of the world’s supply — while the United States was a distant second, producing about 4.2 million metric tons, according to United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization data.  But China is a much bigger consumer of apples than exporter, according to the USDA, and the country will likely ship mostly Fuji apples to the United States, which will not add up to much — about 10,000 tons per year. The U.S., meanwhile, is the world’s largest exporter of fresh apples.

Source: politico.com

Publication date: 12/24/2014


FreshPlaza.com

China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

Photo report
China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

On a recent trip to China, FreshPlaza was invited to go along and see a greenhouse complex near Lang Fang City in Hebei Province. I was joined by officials from the Chinese Government and Chris Han, Chairman of Xin He Shou Business Development Co and his business partner Alyssa Assen.

Click here to see photo report

The Chinese greenhouse structures are so-called solar houses. They are unheated, but thanks to their design, the warm energy is stored in the clay soil wall of the greenhouse during the day. The warmth that is stored during the day is released at night to keep a good temperature in the greenhouses. On top of this, the farmers will roll down a straw mat over the plastic film at night in order to insulate the structure. This makes the greenhouses very efficient.

The crops inside are grown without any additional chemical crop protection, or chemical fertilizers. The crops are watered with a small irrigation system.

Each of these structures are 80m2 and at this site there are 560 structures just for tomatoes. Each greenhouse produces 150 tonnes of tomatoes. The tomatoes in this greenhouse will be ready just in time for Chinese New Year celebrations. Delicious.

One village will grow tomatoes, while the next one will grow cucumbers or cauliflower or lettuce etc. The structures may look simple but they are very efficient and the vegetables are grown without using chemicals.


The yellow squares attract the pests and are coated with a sticky solution to trap them.

Click here to see photo report

Water and nutrients are fed into the greenhouse through pipes at the end of each row. Woven straw mats are used as doors. and across the roof there are huge straw mats to keep the inside warm when the temperatures drop.

No chemicals are used on plants, so they are as good as organic. Most of these tomatoes go to the high end supermarkets in Beijing.

The Chinese Government is keen to have chemical free vegetables, this makes the growing process slightly longer with a cycle of 7 months until harvest.

In the nearby town of Youg Qing we visited a cucumber farm. Some of the vegetables grown in these greenhouses are exported. The vegetables are taken straight to cold storage after harvest. In China trucks do not pay road tax, they can be driven to Kazakhstan in 5 days and to Russia in 10.

According to my guide the farmers here are well off. Producing the vegetables is cheap and simple, making it easy for unskilled local villagers to work there.


 
The cost of building one of these greenhouse is 10,000 Dollars and that initial expenditure will be recovered within a year. On this site there were 1000 greenhouses growing cucumbers. Each planting takes 9 months to come into maturity and will produce 20 tonnes of cucumber.

Click here to see photo report

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

Photo report
China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

On a recent trip to China, FreshPlaza was invited to go along and see a greenhouse complex near Lang Fang City in Hebei Province. I was joined by officials from the Chinese Government and Chris Han, Chairman of Xin He Shou Business Development Co and his business partner Alyssa Assen.

Click here to see photo report

The Chinese greenhouse structures are so-called solar houses. They are unheated, but thanks to their design, the warm energy is stored in the clay soil wall of the greenhouse during the day. The warmth that is stored during the day is released at night to keep a good temperature in the greenhouses. On top of this, the farmers will roll down a straw mat over the plastic film at night in order to insulate the structure. This makes the greenhouses very efficient.

The crops inside are grown without any additional chemical crop protection, or chemical fertilizers. The crops are watered with a small irrigation system.

Each of these structures are 80m2 and at this site there are 560 structures just for tomatoes. Each greenhouse produces 150 tonnes of tomatoes. The tomatoes in this greenhouse will be ready just in time for Chinese New Year celebrations. Delicious.

One village will grow tomatoes, while the next one will grow cucumbers or cauliflower or lettuce etc. The structures may look simple but they are very efficient and the vegetables are grown without using chemicals.


The yellow squares attract the pests and are coated with a sticky solution to trap them.

Click here to see photo report

Water and nutrients are fed into the greenhouse through pipes at the end of each row. Woven straw mats are used as doors. and across the roof there are huge straw mats to keep the inside warm when the temperatures drop.

No chemicals are used on plants, so they are as good as organic. Most of these tomatoes go to the high end supermarkets in Beijing.

The Chinese Government is keen to have chemical free vegetables, this makes the growing process slightly longer with a cycle of 7 months until harvest.

In the nearby town of Youg Qing we visited a cucumber farm. Some of the vegetables grown in these greenhouses are exported. The vegetables are taken straight to cold storage after harvest. In China trucks do not pay road tax, they can be driven to Kazakhstan in 5 days and to Russia in 10.

According to my guide the farmers here are well off. Producing the vegetables is cheap and simple, making it easy for unskilled local villagers to work there.


 
The cost of building one of these greenhouse is 10,000 Dollars and that initial expenditure will be recovered within a year. On this site there were 1000 greenhouses growing cucumbers. Each planting takes 9 months to come into maturity and will produce 20 tonnes of cucumber.

Click here to see photo report

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

Photo report
China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

On a recent trip to China, FreshPlaza was invited to go along and see a greenhouse complex near Lang Fang City in Hebei Province. I was joined by officials from the Chinese Government and Chris Han, Chairman of Xin He Shou Business Development Co and his business partner Alyssa Assen.

Click here to see photo report

The Chinese greenhouse structures are so-called solar houses. They are unheated, but thanks to their design, the warm energy is stored in the clay soil wall of the greenhouse during the day. The warmth that is stored during the day is released at night to keep a good temperature in the greenhouses. On top of this, the farmers will roll down a straw mat over the plastic film at night in order to insulate the structure. This makes the greenhouses very efficient.

The crops inside are grown without any additional chemical crop protection, or chemical fertilizers. The crops are watered with a small irrigation system.

Each of these structures are 80m2 and at this site there are 560 structures just for tomatoes. Each greenhouse produces 150 tonnes of tomatoes. The tomatoes in this greenhouse will be ready just in time for Chinese New Year celebrations. Delicious.

One village will grow tomatoes, while the next one will grow cucumbers or cauliflower or lettuce etc. The structures may look simple but they are very efficient and the vegetables are grown without using chemicals.


The yellow squares attract the pests and are coated with a sticky solution to trap them.

Click here to see photo report

Water and nutrients are fed into the greenhouse through pipes at the end of each row. Woven straw mats are used as doors. and across the roof there are huge straw mats to keep the inside warm when the temperatures drop.

No chemicals are used on plants, so they are as good as organic. Most of these tomatoes go to the high end supermarkets in Beijing.

The Chinese Government is keen to have chemical free vegetables, this makes the growing process slightly longer with a cycle of 7 months until harvest.

In the nearby town of Youg Qing we visited a cucumber farm. Some of the vegetables grown in these greenhouses are exported. The vegetables are taken straight to cold storage after harvest. In China trucks do not pay road tax, they can be driven to Kazakhstan in 5 days and to Russia in 10.

According to my guide the farmers here are well off. Producing the vegetables is cheap and simple, making it easy for unskilled local villagers to work there.


 
The cost of building one of these greenhouse is 10,000 Dollars and that initial expenditure will be recovered within a year. On this site there were 1000 greenhouses growing cucumbers. Each planting takes 9 months to come into maturity and will produce 20 tonnes of cucumber.

Click here to see photo report

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

Photo report
China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

On a recent trip to China, FreshPlaza was invited to go along and see a greenhouse complex near Lang Fang City in Hebei Province. I was joined by officials from the Chinese Government and Chris Han, Chairman of Xin He Shou Business Development Co and his business partner Alyssa Assen.

Click here to see photo report

The Chinese greenhouse structures are so-called solar houses. They are unheated, but thanks to their design, the warm energy is stored in the clay soil wall of the greenhouse during the day. The warmth that is stored during the day is released at night to keep a good temperature in the greenhouses. On top of this, the farmers will roll down a straw mat over the plastic film at night in order to insulate the structure. This makes the greenhouses very efficient.

The crops inside are grown without any additional chemical crop protection, or chemical fertilizers. The crops are watered with a small irrigation system.

Each of these structures are 80m2 and at this site there are 560 structures just for tomatoes. Each greenhouse produces 150 tonnes of tomatoes. The tomatoes in this greenhouse will be ready just in time for Chinese New Year celebrations. Delicious.

One village will grow tomatoes, while the next one will grow cucumbers or cauliflower or lettuce etc. The structures may look simple but they are very efficient and the vegetables are grown without using chemicals.


The yellow squares attract the pests and are coated with a sticky solution to trap them.

Click here to see photo report

Water and nutrients are fed into the greenhouse through pipes at the end of each row. Woven straw mats are used as doors. and across the roof there are huge straw mats to keep the inside warm when the temperatures drop.

No chemicals are used on plants, so they are as good as organic. Most of these tomatoes go to the high end supermarkets in Beijing.

The Chinese Government is keen to have chemical free vegetables, this makes the growing process slightly longer with a cycle of 7 months until harvest.

In the nearby town of Youg Qing we visited a cucumber farm. Some of the vegetables grown in these greenhouses are exported. The vegetables are taken straight to cold storage after harvest. In China trucks do not pay road tax, they can be driven to Kazakhstan in 5 days and to Russia in 10.

According to my guide the farmers here are well off. Producing the vegetables is cheap and simple, making it easy for unskilled local villagers to work there.


 
The cost of building one of these greenhouse is 10,000 Dollars and that initial expenditure will be recovered within a year. On this site there were 1000 greenhouses growing cucumbers. Each planting takes 9 months to come into maturity and will produce 20 tonnes of cucumber.

Click here to see photo report

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

Photo report
China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

On a recent trip to China, FreshPlaza was invited to go along and see a greenhouse complex near Lang Fang City in Hebei Province. I was joined by officials from the Chinese Government and Chris Han, Chairman of Xin He Shou Business Development Co and his business partner Alyssa Assen.

Click here to see photo report

The Chinese greenhouse structures are so-called solar houses. They are unheated, but thanks to their design, the warm energy is stored in the clay soil wall of the greenhouse during the day. The warmth that is stored during the day is released at night to keep a good temperature in the greenhouses. On top of this, the farmers will roll down a straw mat over the plastic film at night in order to insulate the structure. This makes the greenhouses very efficient.

The crops inside are grown without any additional chemical crop protection, or chemical fertilizers. The crops are watered with a small irrigation system.

Each of these structures are 80m2 and at this site there are 560 structures just for tomatoes. Each greenhouse produces 150 tonnes of tomatoes. The tomatoes in this greenhouse will be ready just in time for Chinese New Year celebrations. Delicious.

One village will grow tomatoes, while the next one will grow cucumbers or cauliflower or lettuce etc. The structures may look simple but they are very efficient and the vegetables are grown without using chemicals.


The yellow squares attract the pests and are coated with a sticky solution to trap them.

Click here to see photo report

Water and nutrients are fed into the greenhouse through pipes at the end of each row. Woven straw mats are used as doors. and across the roof there are huge straw mats to keep the inside warm when the temperatures drop.

No chemicals are used on plants, so they are as good as organic. Most of these tomatoes go to the high end supermarkets in Beijing.

The Chinese Government is keen to have chemical free vegetables, this makes the growing process slightly longer with a cycle of 7 months until harvest.

In the nearby town of Youg Qing we visited a cucumber farm. Some of the vegetables grown in these greenhouses are exported. The vegetables are taken straight to cold storage after harvest. In China trucks do not pay road tax, they can be driven to Kazakhstan in 5 days and to Russia in 10.

According to my guide the farmers here are well off. Producing the vegetables is cheap and simple, making it easy for unskilled local villagers to work there.


 
The cost of building one of these greenhouse is 10,000 Dollars and that initial expenditure will be recovered within a year. On this site there were 1000 greenhouses growing cucumbers. Each planting takes 9 months to come into maturity and will produce 20 tonnes of cucumber.

Click here to see photo report

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

Photo report
China: Greenhouse tour, Lang Fang City in Hebei Province

On a recent trip to China, FreshPlaza was invited to go along and see a greenhouse complex near Lang Fang City in Hebei Province. I was joined by officials from the Chinese Government and Chris Han, Chairman of Xin He Shou Business Development Co and his business partner Alyssa Assen.

Click here to see photo report

The Chinese greenhouse structures are so-called solar houses. They are unheated, but thanks to their design, the warm energy is stored in the clay soil wall of the greenhouse during the day. The warmth that is stored during the day is released at night to keep a good temperature in the greenhouses. On top of this, the farmers will roll down a straw mat over the plastic film at night in order to insulate the structure. This makes the greenhouses very efficient.

The crops inside are grown without any additional chemical crop protection, or chemical fertilizers. The crops are watered with a small irrigation system.

Each of these structures are 80m2 and at this site there are 560 structures just for tomatoes. Each greenhouse produces 150 tonnes of tomatoes. The tomatoes in this greenhouse will be ready just in time for Chinese New Year celebrations. Delicious.

One village will grow tomatoes, while the next one will grow cucumbers or cauliflower or lettuce etc. The structures may look simple but they are very efficient and the vegetables are grown without using chemicals.


The yellow squares attract the pests and are coated with a sticky solution to trap them.

Click here to see photo report

Water and nutrients are fed into the greenhouse through pipes at the end of each row. Woven straw mats are used as doors. and across the roof there are huge straw mats to keep the inside warm when the temperatures drop.

No chemicals are used on plants, so they are as good as organic. Most of these tomatoes go to the high end supermarkets in Beijing.

The Chinese Government is keen to have chemical free vegetables, this makes the growing process slightly longer with a cycle of 7 months until harvest.

In the nearby town of Youg Qing we visited a cucumber farm. Some of the vegetables grown in these greenhouses are exported. The vegetables are taken straight to cold storage after harvest. In China trucks do not pay road tax, they can be driven to Kazakhstan in 5 days and to Russia in 10.

According to my guide the farmers here are well off. Producing the vegetables is cheap and simple, making it easy for unskilled local villagers to work there.


 
The cost of building one of these greenhouse is 10,000 Dollars and that initial expenditure will be recovered within a year. On this site there were 1000 greenhouses growing cucumbers. Each planting takes 9 months to come into maturity and will produce 20 tonnes of cucumber.

Click here to see photo report

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

South Africa: First apples to China in January

South Africa: First apples to China in January

Last week Hortgro announced that South African apples would gain entry to the Chinese market, the authorities on both sides are just finalising the list of certified producers and packhouses and carrying out inspections.

Any grower in South Africa is free to send apples to China as long as they have registered and have the correct certifications.

Jacques du Preez from Hortgro said, all going well, the first shipments will start in January 2015, in line with the export season for South African apples, “As with any new market, we will most likely start off slowly and build up the volumes.” 

The varieties being shipped will most likely be Royal Gala, Fuji and Granny Smiths. Du Preez said that China would not be an easy market as they already produce huge volumes of apples domestically.

He hopes that now that everything is in place China will soon be open to pears as well, “Most of the growers who are already registered for apples also produce pears.”

As for volumes, South Africa should see a normal production this year after an off year last season. “We will most likely send a bit less to Europe due to the abundance on the market already because of high European production and the Russian ban, but the volumes to the UK should be back to normal after being down last season due to Chile’s abundance of small fruit.”

“Africa is also a growing market so we will send more there too.” Russia is also open to South African exporters but Du Preez does not expect exports there to significantly increase.

For more information:
Jacques du Preez
HORTGRO
Eamil: [email protected]
Tel: +27 82 864 8149

Publication date: 12/9/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com