Blog Archives

DNE kicks off Australian citrus season

DNE World Fruit LLC kicked off its 2013 Australian summer citrus program with the recent arrival of the first vessel into the port of Long Beach in California.

The season will run from late June through October starting with Daisies and Navels. Daisies will peak on size 70s followed by 54s. Peak promotion period for Daisies will run early July through early August.

Australian Navels will begin arriving early July but due to intermittent rains heavier volume won’t arrive until later in July.

“The quality has been excellent in the packing sheds in Australia,” said Stu Monaghan, Australian citrus program manager for DNE. “We’re seeing high color and great flavor right from the start from each of the growing regions. Peak sizing will be 56s followed by 48s then 72s. We’ll see that shift to higher volumes of 72s and fewer 48s in our August arrivals.”

DNE recommends promoting Aussie Navels from late July through the first week of October. Minneolas will be ready to promote the second week of July through September. Tangelo peak sizes will be 53 followed by 63 and packed in 10-kilo cartons. Three-pound bags are available throughout the program.

As the back-to-school timeframe approaches, Cara Cara Navels and blood oranges will be included in DNE’s Australian citrus lineup.

DNE, a leading importer of Australian citrus, plans to bring in more than 500,000 cartons of Navels for the season along with specialty varieties of Daisies, Minneolas, Cara Caras and blood oranges.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

California citrus crop escapes frost damage

The much-feared devastating freezing temperatures didn’t quite materialize in California’s San Joaquin Valley over the last few nights, and consequently the California citrus crop experienced little damage.

Below-freezing temperatures did prevail for several nights, necessitating the use of frost-protection tools, but the needle didn’t drop low enough or the cold hang around long enough to produce serious damage.

For damage to occur to Mandarin oranges on the tree, temperatures need to stay below 32 degrees for at least four hours. Navel oranges, with their thicker skin, typically don’t experience much damage until temperatures drop to the mid-20s for that four-hour threshold.

Many citrus-growing areas did see temperatures drop into the 20s but only for short periods of time. And most growers were able to use wind machines and irrigation systems to raised grove temperatures a few degrees during critical periods.

On the morning of Jan. 1, California Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelsen said that growers had survived what ended up being the worst of the nights.

“Growers initiated frost protection by 10 p.m. (the night before) in most cases,” he said. “No doubt the early start helped keep temperatures higher throughout the night and with lows not reaching 26 degrees, except in the coldest unprotected areas, we conclude it was a long night but a safe night.”

He added that producers of Mandarins and lemons ran their equipment for about 10 hours that night, with Navel orange growers needing about six hours of frost-protection action.

Some of the areas that typically get the coldest have already been harvested.

“Thirty days makes a difference,” Nelsen said. “Last season a major freeze event occurred the first week of December, thereby creating much more vulnerability for the industry. The past 30 days significant tonnage was harvested from those historic areas of low temperatures, thereby eliminating potential loss.”

The lower cost of fuel this year also helped in the battle as the cost of running the wind machines was considerably less than a year ago.

As the new year dawned, warmer temperatures were in the forecast for the next week and citrus harvest and packing operations were expected to return to normal levels.

The crop estimate for the 2014-15 Navel orange season is 78 million cartons in the San Joaquin Valley and another 5 million cartons in Southern California. Approximately 25 percent of the orange crop has been harvested.

Mandarin tonnage is estimated to be 50 million five-pound cartons this year and approximately 70 percent of the crop remains on the tree.

The California lemon crop has been estimated at 45 million cartons with the vast majority of the lemon tonnage in Ventura County and still on the tree.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California citrus crop escapes frost damage

The much-feared devastating freezing temperatures didn’t quite materialize in California’s San Joaquin Valley over the last few nights, and consequently the California citrus crop experienced little damage.

Below-freezing temperatures did prevail for several nights, necessitating the use of frost-protection tools, but the needle didn’t drop low enough or the cold hang around long enough to produce serious damage.

For damage to occur to Mandarin oranges on the tree, temperatures need to stay below 32 degrees for at least four hours. Navel oranges, with their thicker skin, typically don’t experience much damage until temperatures drop to the mid-20s for that four-hour threshold.

Many citrus-growing areas did see temperatures drop into the 20s but only for short periods of time. And most growers were able to use wind machines and irrigation systems to raised grove temperatures a few degrees during critical periods.

On the morning of Jan. 1, California Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelsen said that growers had survived what ended up being the worst of the nights.

“Growers initiated frost protection by 10 p.m. (the night before) in most cases,” he said. “No doubt the early start helped keep temperatures higher throughout the night and with lows not reaching 26 degrees, except in the coldest unprotected areas, we conclude it was a long night but a safe night.”

He added that producers of Mandarins and lemons ran their equipment for about 10 hours that night, with Navel orange growers needing about six hours of frost-protection action.

Some of the areas that typically get the coldest have already been harvested.

“Thirty days makes a difference,” Nelsen said. “Last season a major freeze event occurred the first week of December, thereby creating much more vulnerability for the industry. The past 30 days significant tonnage was harvested from those historic areas of low temperatures, thereby eliminating potential loss.”

The lower cost of fuel this year also helped in the battle as the cost of running the wind machines was considerably less than a year ago.

As the new year dawned, warmer temperatures were in the forecast for the next week and citrus harvest and packing operations were expected to return to normal levels.

The crop estimate for the 2014-15 Navel orange season is 78 million cartons in the San Joaquin Valley and another 5 million cartons in Southern California. Approximately 25 percent of the orange crop has been harvested.

Mandarin tonnage is estimated to be 50 million five-pound cartons this year and approximately 70 percent of the crop remains on the tree.

The California lemon crop has been estimated at 45 million cartons with the vast majority of the lemon tonnage in Ventura County and still on the tree.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

California citrus crop escapes frost damage

The much-feared devastating freezing temperatures didn’t quite materialize in California’s San Joaquin Valley over the last few nights, and consequently the California citrus crop experienced little damage.

Below-freezing temperatures did prevail for several nights, necessitating the use of frost-protection tools, but the needle didn’t drop low enough or the cold hang around long enough to produce serious damage.

For damage to occur to Mandarin oranges on the tree, temperatures need to stay below 32 degrees for at least four hours. Navel oranges, with their thicker skin, typically don’t experience much damage until temperatures drop to the mid-20s for that four-hour threshold.

Many citrus-growing areas did see temperatures drop into the 20s but only for short periods of time. And most growers were able to use wind machines and irrigation systems to raised grove temperatures a few degrees during critical periods.

On the morning of Jan. 1, California Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelsen said that growers had survived what ended up being the worst of the nights.

“Growers initiated frost protection by 10 p.m. (the night before) in most cases,” he said. “No doubt the early start helped keep temperatures higher throughout the night and with lows not reaching 26 degrees, except in the coldest unprotected areas, we conclude it was a long night but a safe night.”

He added that producers of Mandarins and lemons ran their equipment for about 10 hours that night, with Navel orange growers needing about six hours of frost-protection action.

Some of the areas that typically get the coldest have already been harvested.

“Thirty days makes a difference,” Nelsen said. “Last season a major freeze event occurred the first week of December, thereby creating much more vulnerability for the industry. The past 30 days significant tonnage was harvested from those historic areas of low temperatures, thereby eliminating potential loss.”

The lower cost of fuel this year also helped in the battle as the cost of running the wind machines was considerably less than a year ago.

As the new year dawned, warmer temperatures were in the forecast for the next week and citrus harvest and packing operations were expected to return to normal levels.

The crop estimate for the 2014-15 Navel orange season is 78 million cartons in the San Joaquin Valley and another 5 million cartons in Southern California. Approximately 25 percent of the orange crop has been harvested.

Mandarin tonnage is estimated to be 50 million five-pound cartons this year and approximately 70 percent of the crop remains on the tree.

The California lemon crop has been estimated at 45 million cartons with the vast majority of the lemon tonnage in Ventura County and still on the tree.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Mexican citrus affected by weather

Mexican citrus affected by weather

Hurricanes hitting different parts of Mexico’s citrus-producing regions could lead to lighter crops for the 2014-2015 season.

Orange production in Mexico, most of which is centred in the state of Veracruz, is forecast at 4.3 million metric tons, according to a report from the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. Production for the previous season is estimated at 4.3 MMT, and the report points to cold weather and drought conditions as factors in the slight decline. In fact, dry conditions, as well as rising production costs and volatile returns, have caused many growers to abandon their orange groves this year. Yields are expected to reach 13.3 metric tons per hectare for the 2014-2015 season, while the previous season’s yields reached 13.6 metric tons per hectare.

The lime crop for 2014-2015 is expected to be about the same as the one from the previous season. Both crops are estimated at 2.2 MMT. Grapefruit production is expected to reach 420,000 MT for the 2014-2015 season, a slight drop from the previous season’s production. Yields are also expected to take a dip, with 2014-2015 grapefruit yields forecast at 24.2 metric tons per hectare, while the previous season’s yields are estimated at 24.7 metric tons per hectare.

Publication date: 12/24/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

“Spanish citrus sales more difficult than last year”

Gert Bouman, Frutaria:
“Spanish citrus sales more difficult than last year”

Demand for Spanish citrus is currently lagging far behind. That’s what Gert Bouman of Spanish private producer Frutaria says. He points to the recession in Europe as an explanation for the difficult sales – “even worse than last season” – because of which, quite simply, less fruit is sold. “But export to markets outside Europe is also difficult.”


“Of course we see nothing is being sold to Russia. Large volumes weren’t going there anyway, but the produce still has to be sold in other countries. Countries like Poland are also lagging behind this year. The mood is just very lacklustre,” Gert says.  ”We are very busy, but it’s all at very low prices. At the moment, we are fully focusing on retail, because there is little demand on the markets, and you only get low prices. But you’re also seeing promotions on 2 kilos for 99 cents in supermarkets in the Netherlands and Germany. You have to wonder whether that’s good for the industry. The consumer thinks this is the price for an orange, undervaluing the product.”


“The production runs in the south of Spain are good. We ended the Clementine season, and stopped with good quality Navelinas. Now we’re getting the Clemenvilla season started, and we’ve begun with the Salustianas,” Gert says. He thinks a further reorganization of the Spanish citrus sector is unavoidable. The past five years, many cooperatives and private companies have disappeared, a trend which will only continue. With prices like that, there’s no future in the sector, and nobody is enthusiastic about investing in citrus productions, quite the contrary.”


For more information:
Gert Bouman
Frutaria
T: (+34) 661 252 509
M: (+34) 661 252 509
[email protected]
www.frutaria.com

Publication date: 12/17/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Turkish citrus exports up, shift east

Turkish citrus exports up, shift east

Short lemon crops in South America and South Africa has generated good opportunities for Turkish citrus exporters this season. Total lemon exports have been up this year, and prices have been good – though decreasing demand from Europe means more of Turkey’s exports are going to the Middle East and Asia.
 
“Our lemons have enjoyed high demand and good prices all over the global market,” said Ayse Ozler of Ozler. “Demand from the Middle East, Europe and Asia has been quite good, higher than in previous seasons, in fact.” Turkish lemon suppliers typically start exporting their fruit during September, about a month and a half before Spanish lemons edged them out of Europe. While prices at the beginning of that export window typically start at 0.70 Euro, prices this season were around 1.20 Euro at the outset of the season.
 
“Volumes from the Southern Hemisphere were low this year because of a frost in Argentina that cut their volumes by about 40 percent,” explained Ayse. “South African supplies of lemons also ran out early, so the gap in supplies was big, and prices for Turkish lemons were the highest we’ve seen.” Last year’s Turkish lemon crop was also affected by frost, so local demand was already strong when the export window came around, further driving up prices. The early boon resulted in 30 percent more lemon export volume out of Turkey, when compared to the previous season.
 
The situation is now different, with Spanish and Italian supplies driving Turkish citrus out of Europe for the year and bringing down prices. But Ayse explained that the importance of Europe is diminishing for Turkish growers. Competition from Spanish fruit and tightened regulations concerning maximum residue limits has steadily decreased the amount of fruit that Turkish exporters ship to Europe. Russia used to be a big market, but problems there, both recent and long-standing, have made it an unattractive destination for Turkish traders. The major areas of expansion are now the Middle East and Asia.
 
“Demand from Europe is reducing, which could be due to prices and the promotion that Spanish fruit gets,” said Ayse. “But the Middle East and Asia have been accepting of this and are curious about our citrus, so the demand there has been increasing as they are happy with the quality of our fruit.”

For more information:


Ayse Ozler
Özler Ziraat
Tel: +90-322-454-77-41
Email: [email protected]
www.hasat.net
 

Author: Yzza Ibrahim / Carlos Nunez


 

Publication date: 12/12/2014
Author: Yzza Ibrahim
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Good news for California citrus growers

Good news for California citrus growers

Toward the end of 2011, Mark Hoddle, an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside, first released into a citrus grove on campus a batch of Pakistani wasps that are natural enemies of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), the vector of a bacterium that causes Huanglongbing (HLB), a lethal citrus disease.

Now on Tuesday, Dec. 16, Hoddle, the director of UCR’s Center for Invasive Species Research, is poised to release in the same grove the wasp Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis, a second species of ACP natural enemy, also from the Punjab region of Pakistan.  Shortly after 9 a.m., Chancellor Kim A. Wilcox will release the first set of the new wasps from a vial into the grove. Media representatives may arrive as early as 8:30 a.m.

The new wasp attacks the second and third developmental stages of immature ACP (called nymphs) whereas Tamarixia attacks the larger nymphs in the fourth and fifth stages of development. ACP nymphs have five developmental stages, or instars, after they hatch from the egg.

Successful biocontrol of citrus pests in California sometimes requires more than one species of natural enemy because citrus is grown in a variety of different habitats – hot desert areas like Coachella, cooler coastal zones like Ventura, and intermediate areas like Riverside/Redlands and northern San Diego County.

Around 300 male and female wasps will be released on Dec. 16. Hoddle and his team will open vials of the wasps to allow them to fly into the citrus orchard to start hunting for ACP nymphs.

Source: ucr.edu

Publication date: 12/10/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico buying 3 Florida citrus producers

Alico Inc. said it is acquiring three Florida citrus producers, making the U.S. agribusiness one of the country’s largest suppliers of oranges. The company said that it is paying about $ 363 million for orange producers that will boost the company’s production to 10 million boxes of oranges a year, close to 10% of Florida’s annual output.

The deals, which include almost 28,000 acres of land, come at a difficult time for the citrus industry in Florida, the top supplier of U.S. oranges and orange juice. A bacterial disease—citrus greening—has devastated production and driven up prices of oranges, hurting demand for orange juice. U.S. sales for the once ubiquitous breakfast beverage fell to the lowest level in at least 16 years in the season that ended in September, according to Nielsen data.

The largest acquisition is of Orange-Co LP, which includes 20,263 acres. Alico will pay $ 274 million for the company, financing the deal with debt and a $ 97 million sale of its sugar-cane assets. Alico grows citrus and sugar cane, raises cattle, and manages land in Florida.

Alico also bought Gator Grove, a deal that closed in September and was financed with cash, and is buying Silver Nip Citrus, which is owned by 734 Agriculture LLC. A unit of 734 Agriculture, 734 Investors, is Alico’s majority shareholder.

To increase productivity, Alico will plant new trees on the land it has acquired, he said.

Sales of the juice continue to slump, however. U.S. consumers bought 37.05 million gallons of orange juice in the four weeks ended Oct. 25, down 9.4% from a similar period a year earlier, according to Nielsen data published in November by the Florida Department of Citrus.

An increase in Florida production, “if we could ever get there,” would help drive down prices and spur demand, said Jack Scoville, a vice president at brokerage Price Futures Group.

Source: wsj.com

Publication date: 12/4/2014


FreshPlaza.com