Blog Archives

Chinese Citrus Fruit Could be Cleared for U.S. Import: APHIS Invites Comments

China will have to jump through some hoops, but it may soon be able to sell previously barred citrus fruit in the United States, specifically fresh pomelo, mandarin orange, ponkan (tangerine), sweet orange and Satsuma mandarin fruit.

On Thursday, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) published the proposed rule, which would allow the importation of fresh citrus fruit from China into the continental U.S. The agency invited public comment on the rule for 60 days, ending on Oct. 27, 2014.

Currently, APHIS rules on fruits and vegetables do not permit the import of fresh citrus from China into the U.S. out of concern about certain plant pests. APHIS has received a request from China’s national plant protection organization (NPPO) to allow importation of five citrus fruit species into the U.S.

APHIS proposes to let the Chinese fruit into the U.S. under a condition of entry that includes registration of places of production and packing houses, sourcing of pest-free propagative material, inspection for quarantine pests at set intervals by the NPPO, bagging of fruit, safeguarding post-harvest processing and sampling, and importation in commercial consignment.

Chinese fruit growers would also have to trap for several species of Bactrocera fruit flies, and the fruit would have to be treated for those species of fruit flies. Only fruit that was inspected and found free of pests could be shipped to the U.S.

A pest risk assessment conducted by APHIS identified 22 quarantine pests that could use packed citrus from China as a pathway to the U.S. The NPPO in China will have to provide an operational work plan with detailed procedures, including treatment details.

The importation notice contains no information on the actual distribution of Chinese-grown citrus fruit in the U.S. Comments on the proposed rule are being accepted here.

Food Safety News

Chinese Citrus Fruit Could be Cleared for U.S. Import: APHIS Invites Comments

China will have to jump through some hoops, but it may soon be able to sell previously barred citrus fruit in the United States, specifically fresh pomelo, mandarin orange, ponkan (tangerine), sweet orange and Satsuma mandarin fruit.

On Thursday, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) published the proposed rule, which would allow the importation of fresh citrus fruit from China into the continental U.S. The agency invited public comment on the rule for 60 days, ending on Oct. 27, 2014.

Currently, APHIS rules on fruits and vegetables do not permit the import of fresh citrus from China into the U.S. out of concern about certain plant pests. APHIS has received a request from China’s national plant protection organization (NPPO) to allow importation of five citrus fruit species into the U.S.

APHIS proposes to let the Chinese fruit into the U.S. under a condition of entry that includes registration of places of production and packing houses, sourcing of pest-free propagative material, inspection for quarantine pests at set intervals by the NPPO, bagging of fruit, safeguarding post-harvest processing and sampling, and importation in commercial consignment.

Chinese fruit growers would also have to trap for several species of Bactrocera fruit flies, and the fruit would have to be treated for those species of fruit flies. Only fruit that was inspected and found free of pests could be shipped to the U.S.

A pest risk assessment conducted by APHIS identified 22 quarantine pests that could use packed citrus from China as a pathway to the U.S. The NPPO in China will have to provide an operational work plan with detailed procedures, including treatment details.

The importation notice contains no information on the actual distribution of Chinese-grown citrus fruit in the U.S. Comments on the proposed rule are being accepted here.

Food Safety News

Chinese Citrus Fruit Could be Cleared for U.S. Import: APHIS Invites Comments

China will have to jump through some hoops, but it may soon be able to sell previously barred citrus fruit in the United States, specifically fresh pomelo, mandarin orange, ponkan (tangerine), sweet orange and Satsuma mandarin fruit.

On Thursday, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) published the proposed rule, which would allow the importation of fresh citrus fruit from China into the continental U.S. The agency invited public comment on the rule for 60 days, ending on Oct. 27, 2014.

Currently, APHIS rules on fruits and vegetables do not permit the import of fresh citrus from China into the U.S. out of concern about certain plant pests. APHIS has received a request from China’s national plant protection organization (NPPO) to allow importation of five citrus fruit species into the U.S.

APHIS proposes to let the Chinese fruit into the U.S. under a condition of entry that includes registration of places of production and packing houses, sourcing of pest-free propagative material, inspection for quarantine pests at set intervals by the NPPO, bagging of fruit, safeguarding post-harvest processing and sampling, and importation in commercial consignment.

Chinese fruit growers would also have to trap for several species of Bactrocera fruit flies, and the fruit would have to be treated for those species of fruit flies. Only fruit that was inspected and found free of pests could be shipped to the U.S.

A pest risk assessment conducted by APHIS identified 22 quarantine pests that could use packed citrus from China as a pathway to the U.S. The NPPO in China will have to provide an operational work plan with detailed procedures, including treatment details.

The importation notice contains no information on the actual distribution of Chinese-grown citrus fruit in the U.S. Comments on the proposed rule are being accepted here.

Food Safety News

Backlog of citrus cleared at Durban

Plans to improve situation for next year
Backlog of citrus cleared at Durban

As the South African citrus season progresses, again there are delays at the Port of Durban. This is by no means an unusual situation as this happens every year.

One exporter, puts it down to a few different reasons: There is more citrus coming into the port than it can handle, the situation has been exasperated by strict controls for CBS and a lack of planning and cold storage at the port.

A lot of congestion has also been caused by the imbalance of containers, meaning that when the fruit arrives into the port there are simply not enough containers to go round. Mitchell Brooke, Logistics Development Manager at Citrus Growers Association said that the latest backlog has now been cleared by chartering reefer vessels to take fruit to the EU and Russia.

Nicci van Niekerk from FPT agrees that the volume of fruit is too much for Durban port to handle and present cold storage facilities are not adequate, this season FPT had to sub-contact outside cold stores to cope with the demand. She said the increased volumes of citrus being exported in containers because it was supposed to be cheaper has lead to less flexibility.

The lack of cold storage creates another problem, if citrus has been more than four days out of cold storage it must be inspected again for CBS, this is time consuming as there are not enough agricultural inspectors to go around.

Another element which has added to congestion is that NYK and SeaTrade pulled out of a plan to ship 30,000 pallets from Maputo at the beginning of the season, a spokesman from NYK said they pulled out due to lack of clients for the service.

Looking forward to next season there certainly are moves afoot to improve the situation. FPT hope to trial a new fully integrated IT system to control arrivals at the port, ensuring trucks arrive to load a specific vessel not just at random.

There is also the possibility to utilise Moputo and Cape Town ports. According to the exporter, the infrastructure is there, all it needs is for Trans Net to lay on a locomotive to bring the fruit to Cape Town. Both FPT and CGA are in favour of shipping from other ports.

Brooke said that a strategy session is scheduled next month to look at developing infrastructure to, among other things, load containers on the farms to improve the flow at ports and to look at diverting citrus to other ports such as Moputo and Cape town.

Publication date: 8/14/2013
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Wellesley Supermarkets Cleared in E. coli Investigation

In June, Wellesley, MA, was ripe with rumors that one of its supermarkets was the source of three E. coli infections in the community.

Wellesley Health Department sources don’t have much to say about the investigation into those three cases except to say it had nothing to do with any local market.

The local health department heard about the first Wellesley resident to become infected with E. coli from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s surveillance system on June 12. Wellesley’s investigation then turned up two additional E. coli cases.

All three Wellesley E. coli cases involved adults. Children, the elderly and others with compromised immune systems are most at risk from E. coli infection.

Health department sources were not able to say whether the investigation remains open or whether the pathogen’s source was determined, but they were definite about no local supermarket being involved.

Food Safety News