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Hen housing trade offs: Food safety, workers and consumers

As it turns out, the food stores and restaurant chains promising to sell only cage-free eggs by some date in the future and egg producers have been doing their due diligence when it comes to the housing of laying hens.

Recently released findings of the Laying Hen Housing Research Project by the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply looks at the advantages and disadvantages of three types of hen housing in five areas:

  • chickensonrun_406x250

    Cage-free does not mean the same thing as free range.

    animal health and well-being;

  • food safety and quality;
  • environmental impact;
  • worker health and safety; and
  • food affordability.

The three housing types included in the study were conventional cages that are also called battery cages, enriched colony set ups, and cage-free aviary operations. The research was conducted over two years and involved two flocks living in type of each housing system.

Hens in all the housing systems shed Salmonella at similar rates and the prevalence of Salmonella associated with egg shells was low and did not differ between housing systems, according to the researchers.

The highest environmental microbial levels were found in the aviary system litter area and on the enriched system scratch pad. Aviary floor eggs also had significantly higher levels of microorganisms that other types of eggs sampled.

batterycage_406x250

This is an example of a battery cage egg operation.

Housing systems did not influence the rate of egg quality decline though 12 weeks of extended storage and U.S. egg quality standards and grades were found to be adequate for all three housing systems.

The coalition — led by McDonald’s, Cargill Kitchen Solutions, the American Humane Association, Michigan State University, the University of California-Davis and the Center for Food Integrity — also found housing types did not result in differences in the immune systems of hens or the effectiveness of their Salmonella vaccinations.

Aviary forage areas and scratch pads in enriched colonies had the highest levels of total aerobes and coliform. Aviary floor eggs had the highest total aerobes and coliform levels.

The researchers also found the dry belt manure removal system impeded the detention of Campylobacter spp.

“It’s important to note that management practices likely had the greatest influence on environmental and off shell microbiology,” said the researchers. They said egg quality was not effected by the housing type, but hen dietary nutritional changes did make a difference.

In findings outside the food safety concerns, the study found cage-free aviary eggs would cost consumers 36 percent more than conventional battery cages. Enriched systems would cost 14 percent more than conventional.

The higher costs are driven by higher feed, labor, pullet and capital costs.

Worker health and safety is another major downside for cage free systems. The study found workers were exposed to significantly higher concentrations of airborne particles and endotoxin — toxic components of bacteria — when working in aviary houses than in conventional or enriched houses.

Workers tasked with gathering eggs from floors also faced “ergonomic challenges” in addition to respiratory hazards.

The research focused on indoor only systems because those are the most commonly used in commercial egg production.

All housing types were studied at the same location, a farm in the Midwest. Funding came from the Center for Food Integrity, which provided about $ 3 million each for MSU and UC-Davis. The conventional housing accommodated about 200,000 hens while the aviary and enriched units each housed 50,000 hens.

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Food Safety News

Programs connect consumers to locally grown products

New York state government is sending a strong message to consumers in the Empire State, encouraging them to take advantage of the Empire State’s rich agricultural heritage and bounty. The message: buy local.

Launched in 1996, the Pride of New York program has branded New York agricultural commodities by providing instant recognition for products grown and consumed in New York. “Be part of the Pride. Look for products displaying the ‘Pride of New York’ logo when you shop and support your neighbors — BuyLocal2Farmers’ markets provide consumers with community-based opportunities to purchase fresh produce grown in New York. Seen here is the Union Square Farmers’ Market. (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)the generations of family farms and food processors who have made New York state one of America’s leading suppliers of food and agricultural products,” the Pride website states.

Last year, approximately 2,800 members participated in the Pride of New York program. Participants include farmers, food processors, vineyards and wineries, retailers, foodservice organizations, wholesalers and distributors, agri-tourism destinations, culinary arts programs and related trade associations.

Restaurants have actively embraced the program and continually promote locally grown products on their menus and in advertisements. A rich heritage of ethnic diversity and culture has earned New York the solid reputation as one of the most “foodie” locations in the nation.

On May 21, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that consumers can easily locate a wealth of information about local businesses using New York-produced commodities by visiting www.Open.Ny.Gov. The comprehensive open data portal was launched this past March and continues to be updated.

“With summer right around the corner, I encourage New Yorkers to pick up fresh produce at a local farmers’ market, raise their glasses at a local brewery, or visit a neighborhood vineyard, and support our state’s growing agriculture, tourism and beverage industries,” Cuomo said. “The state now offers a wide breadth of information on open.ny.gov on local farmers’ markets, wineries, breweries and distilleries, helping New Yorkers, tourism officials and local governments to bring new customers to our state’s small businesses.”

Several interactive maps — including links to New York’s farmers’ markets as well as all retail stores licensed by the New York Department of Agriculture & Markets — are available at the website.

In March, the governor also announced that $ 285,000 was made available for the third year of the “FreshConnect” program, which brings fresh food from New York farms to underserved communities in the Empire State. The purpose of the program is to increase the sale of locally grown food products, improve nutrition and promote economic development. The program fosters development of new farmers’ markets and supports existing markets located within communities in need.

“The FreshConnect program has been a real success in promoting healthy living while supporting the state’s vibrant agricultural industry,” Cuomo said. “This year, the program will provide even more avenues for low-income New Yorkers to purchase affordable, healthy and locally grown food. We are also continuing to support more marketplaces where local farmers can sell their goods and expand their operations. Through this program, more New Yorkers can eat healthy, and New York farmers can sell more products. That is what FreshConnect is all about.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Academia Has Most Food Safety Educators, Government Reaches Most Consumers

According to an analysis by the Partnership for Food Safety Education (PFSE), academia, public health agencies and schools are the most active sources of food safety education in the U.S.

PFSE commissioned North Carolina State University to conduct the survey to identify the organizations most involved with food safety education, the audiences they serve, and the channels they use most frequently to communicate safe food handling messages.

The organization released the results of its “environmental scan” at the 2014 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference on Thursday, Dec. 4.

“We were looking to identify as many of the robust sources of consumer education and outreach programming as we could in the United States because it’s very important to how the Partnership does its job and how we plan for the future,” said Shelley Feist, PFSE executive director.

The survey found that academia (including cooperative extension) is the biggest source for consumer educators, followed by public health services, Family and Consumer Sciences teachers and people involved with school food service, the federal government, and non-profit organizations.

One highlight of the research was that most food safety education is done in person. According to the survey, 90 percent of the people who consider themselves food safety educators use face-to-face meetings and presentations.

The next most popular channel was the web, which is used by 36 percent of educators — mostly in the federal government.

Other channels include television, print media, phones and poster displays.

While cooperative extension represents the majority of educators who come in contact with consumers, the survey found that the government reaches the most people on an annual basis (through programs such as Food Safe Families, Cook it Safe and Fight BAC!).

Across the three most active groups, children and families with children are the primary targets for education — important since half of all foodborne illness hospitalizations are children.

One disappointing finding was that half of educators reported that they were not monitoring their organizations’ impact or don’t know whether they are.

“This is an area we all intend to work together on improving,” Feist said.

PFSE plans to host a webinar in February to dig deeper into the data and discuss how to allocate resources in the future.

Food Safety News

Side Delights Steamables are the answer for busy consumers

The NPD Group just released its 29th annual Eating Patterns in America report, and it found that one of the single biggest changes in U.S. eating patterns over the last five years is an increase in meals eaten at home. Side Delights Steamables are well-positioned to take advantage of this trend to satisfy Americans who want fresh, nutritious food. steamables-family-rev-2

“We are eating more meals in our homes, but not cooking more dishes,” Harry Balzer, vice president of The NPD Group and author of the report, said in a press release.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the fresh potato category, where the microwaveable/steamable segment has seen dollar sales shooting up 31 percent for the 52-week period ending Sept. 27, according to data from Nielsen FreshFacts.

Side Delights Steamables are triple washed, fresh, whole, small potatoes in a microwave safe package that is ready to serve in just eight minutes. Steamables also use light-blocker packaging technology to keep potatoes fresher and protected from greening due to harsh store lighting.

Side Delights Steamables come in seven potato varieties: Russet, red, golden, white, purple, fingerling and sweet potatoes. The inclusion of purples, fingerlings and sweet potatoes brings together these rapidly growing specialty potatoes with the on-trend convenience of microwave cooking.

“Retailers have a tremendous opportunity with offering their shoppers more quick and convenient ways to enjoy fresh potatoes,” Kathleen Triou, president and chief executive officer of Fresh Solutions Network, said in the press release. “Side Delights Steamables gives them a complete lineup of gourmet potatoes that appeal to time-starved families as well as Millennial shoppers, all packaged using the latest technology to protect their premium quality.” 

While Triou recommended merchandising Side Delights Steamables in the produce department with other fresh potatoes on an everyday basis, she noted that big volume opportunities come from displaying these high-impulse potatoes near rotisserie chicken in the service deli or adjacent to the ready-to-heat entrees in the meat department.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Side Delights Steamables are the answer for busy consumers

The NPD Group just released its 29th annual Eating Patterns in America report, and it found that one of the single biggest changes in U.S. eating patterns over the last five years is an increase in meals eaten at home. Side Delights Steamables are well-positioned to take advantage of this trend to satisfy Americans who want fresh, nutritious food. steamables-family-2

“We are eating more meals in our homes, but not cooking more dishes,” Harry Balzer, vice president of The NPD Group and author of the report, said in a press release.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the fresh potato category, where the microwaveable/steamable segment has seen dollar sales shooting up 31 percent for the 52-week period ending Sept. 27, according to data from Nielsen FreshFacts.

Side Delights Steamables are triple washed, fresh, whole, small potatoes in a microwave safe package that is ready to serve in just eight minutes. Steamables also use light-blocker packaging technology to keep potatoes fresher and protected from greening due to harsh store lighting.

Side Delights Steamables come in seven potato varieties: Russet, red, golden, white, purple, fingerling and sweet potatoes. The inclusion of purples, fingerlings and sweet potatoes brings together these rapidly growing specialty potatoes with the on-trend convenience of microwave cooking.

“Retailers have a tremendous opportunity with offering their shoppers more quick and convenient ways to enjoy fresh potatoes,” Kathleen Triou, president and chief executive officer of Fresh Solutions Network, said in the press release. “Side Delights Steamables gives them a complete lineup of gourmet potatoes that appeal to time-starved families as well as Millennial shoppers, all packaged using the latest technology to protect their premium quality.” 

While Triou recommended merchandising Side Delights Steamables in the produce department with other fresh potatoes on an everyday basis, she noted that big volume opportunities come from displaying these high-impulse potatoes near rotisserie chicken in the service deli or adjacent to the ready-to-heat entrees in the meat department.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Side Delights Steamables are the answer for busy consumers

The NPD Group just released its 29th annual Eating Patterns in America report, and it found that one of the single biggest changes in U.S. eating patterns over the last five years is an increase in meals eaten at home. Side Delights Steamables are well-positioned to take advantage of this trend to satisfy Americans who want fresh, nutritious food. steamables-family-2

“We are eating more meals in our homes, but not cooking more dishes,” Harry Balzer, vice president of The NPD Group and author of the report, said in a press release.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the fresh potato category, where the microwaveable/steamable segment has seen dollar sales shooting up 31 percent for the 52-week period ending Sept. 27, according to data from Nielsen FreshFacts.

Side Delights Steamables are triple washed, fresh, whole, small potatoes in a microwave safe package that is ready to serve in just eight minutes. Steamables also use light-blocker packaging technology to keep potatoes fresher and protected from greening due to harsh store lighting.

Side Delights Steamables come in seven potato varieties: Russet, red, golden, white, purple, fingerling and sweet potatoes. The inclusion of purples, fingerlings and sweet potatoes brings together these rapidly growing specialty potatoes with the on-trend convenience of microwave cooking.

“Retailers have a tremendous opportunity with offering their shoppers more quick and convenient ways to enjoy fresh potatoes,” Kathleen Triou, president and chief executive officer of Fresh Solutions Network, said in the press release. “Side Delights Steamables gives them a complete lineup of gourmet potatoes that appeal to time-starved families as well as Millennial shoppers, all packaged using the latest technology to protect their premium quality.” 

While Triou recommended merchandising Side Delights Steamables in the produce department with other fresh potatoes on an everyday basis, she noted that big volume opportunities come from displaying these high-impulse potatoes near rotisserie chicken in the service deli or adjacent to the ready-to-heat entrees in the meat department.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Side Delights Steamables are the answer for busy consumers

The NPD Group just released its 29th annual Eating Patterns in America report, and it found that one of the single biggest changes in U.S. eating patterns over the last five years is an increase in meals eaten at home. Side Delights Steamables are well-positioned to take advantage of this trend to satisfy Americans who want fresh, nutritious food. steamables-family-2

“We are eating more meals in our homes, but not cooking more dishes,” Harry Balzer, vice president of The NPD Group and author of the report, said in a press release.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the fresh potato category, where the microwaveable/steamable segment has seen dollar sales shooting up 31 percent for the 52-week period ending Sept. 27, according to data from Nielsen FreshFacts.

Side Delights Steamables are triple washed, fresh, whole, small potatoes in a microwave safe package that is ready to serve in just eight minutes. Steamables also use light-blocker packaging technology to keep potatoes fresher and protected from greening due to harsh store lighting.

Side Delights Steamables come in seven potato varieties: Russet, red, golden, white, purple, fingerling and sweet potatoes. The inclusion of purples, fingerlings and sweet potatoes brings together these rapidly growing specialty potatoes with the on-trend convenience of microwave cooking.

“Retailers have a tremendous opportunity with offering their shoppers more quick and convenient ways to enjoy fresh potatoes,” Kathleen Triou, president and chief executive officer of Fresh Solutions Network, said in the press release. “Side Delights Steamables gives them a complete lineup of gourmet potatoes that appeal to time-starved families as well as Millennial shoppers, all packaged using the latest technology to protect their premium quality.” 

While Triou recommended merchandising Side Delights Steamables in the produce department with other fresh potatoes on an everyday basis, she noted that big volume opportunities come from displaying these high-impulse potatoes near rotisserie chicken in the service deli or adjacent to the ready-to-heat entrees in the meat department.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Side Delights Steamables are the answer for busy consumers

The NPD Group just released its 29th annual Eating Patterns in America report, and it found that one of the single biggest changes in U.S. eating patterns over the last five years is an increase in meals eaten at home. Side Delights Steamables are well-positioned to take advantage of this trend to satisfy Americans who want fresh, nutritious food. steamables-family-2

“We are eating more meals in our homes, but not cooking more dishes,” Harry Balzer, vice president of The NPD Group and author of the report, said in a press release.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the fresh potato category, where the microwaveable/steamable segment has seen dollar sales shooting up 31 percent for the 52-week period ending Sept. 27, according to data from Nielsen FreshFacts.

Side Delights Steamables are triple washed, fresh, whole, small potatoes in a microwave safe package that is ready to serve in just eight minutes. Steamables also use light-blocker packaging technology to keep potatoes fresher and protected from greening due to harsh store lighting.

Side Delights Steamables come in seven potato varieties: Russet, red, golden, white, purple, fingerling and sweet potatoes. The inclusion of purples, fingerlings and sweet potatoes brings together these rapidly growing specialty potatoes with the on-trend convenience of microwave cooking.

“Retailers have a tremendous opportunity with offering their shoppers more quick and convenient ways to enjoy fresh potatoes,” Kathleen Triou, president and chief executive officer of Fresh Solutions Network, said in the press release. “Side Delights Steamables gives them a complete lineup of gourmet potatoes that appeal to time-starved families as well as Millennial shoppers, all packaged using the latest technology to protect their premium quality.” 

While Triou recommended merchandising Side Delights Steamables in the produce department with other fresh potatoes on an everyday basis, she noted that big volume opportunities come from displaying these high-impulse potatoes near rotisserie chicken in the service deli or adjacent to the ready-to-heat entrees in the meat department.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Consumers Urged to Go Antibiotic-Free With Their Thanksgiving Turkey

Public health advocates are calling on consumers to go antibiotic-free with their traditional Thanksgiving dinner.

Earlier this week, the Pew Charitable Trusts posted its three reasons to buy a Thanksgiving turkey raised without antibiotics — the main one being that consumers can influence food producers to curb the overuse of antibiotics in livestock raised for food by “voting with their wallets.”

The concern is not with antibiotic residue — something for which the U.S. Department of Agriculture inspects — but that overuse of antibiotics on farms contributes to the rise in antibiotic-resistant bugs, foodborne and otherwise.

This is not the first year such groups have made the plea. Last November, set against the backdrop of the outbreak of multi-drug resistant Salmonella Heidelberg linked to Foster Farms brand chicken that sickened 634 people, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) suggested that Americans choose USDA Organic or turkey sold under a “No Antibiotics Administered” label.

This year, healthcare professionals are also taking a stance on antibiotics used on farms. The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Sharing Antimicrobial Reports for Pediatric Stewardship (SHARPS) group created a pledge for pharmacists and physicians to “Celebrate Thanksgiving this year by purchasing (or encouraging my Thanksgiving host to purchase) a turkey raised without the routine use of antibiotics” and to educate the food service managers at their healthcare facilities about antibiotic stewardship and discuss the importance of purchasing meat raised without the routine use of antibiotics.

Over the summer, Cargill announced that it would stop using antibiotics for growth promotion in raising its turkeys. While not agreeing to go entirely antibiotic-free — the drugs will still be used for treating illnesses and for disease prevention — the company became the first major U.S. turkey producer to have a USDA Process Verified program for no antibiotics used for growth promotion.

Cargill stated that its Honeysuckle White and Shady Brook Farms brand turkeys would be available without the growth-promoting antibiotics this Thanksgiving and that all of the company’s flocks will be raised without growth-promoting antibiotics by the end of 2015.

Some advocates, such as Steven Roach, a senior analyst with Keep Antibiotics Working, have argued that Cargill’s changes aren’t enough. He told Food Safety News this past summer that he wanted the company to show more commitment to reducing overall antibiotic use by tracking the amount used before and after the end of growth promotion.

As with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Guidance #213, which phases out the use of the drugs for certain uses, there are concerns that antibiotic use won’t decrease because it will simply be labeled as “disease prevention” in place of “growth promotion.”

Food Safety News

Florida fresh production keeps consumers well-stocked into winter

The Sunshine State has a lot to brag about when it comes to production of fresh produce. “Florida’s unique advantage is that we are the predominant U.S. source for fresh-market vegetables in the fall, winter and early spring months,” said Thomas Perny, marketing specialist with the Division of Marketing & Development, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. “Our favorable winter climate facilitates growing a wide variety of vegetables during a time when most states are experiencing cold conditions. Florida’s fruits and vegetables are known for their high quality and freshness.”

Perny said most of Florida’s fruits and vegetables are grown south of Interstate 4. “Citrus is grown more in the central and south-central counties, and vegetables grown from the south-central to southeast/southwest counties,” he told The Produce News. “Palm Beach County is Florida’s leading agricultural county, and Polk County is the leading citrus producer.”

extra-ov-picA produce truck in a field near Immokalee, FL. A host of commodities was being harvested at press time.Perny said a host of commodities as being harvested at press time, including avocados, cucumbers, eggplant, herbs, white and colored grapefruit, Navel oranges, tangerines, Bell and specialty peppers, squash, sugar cane, fall crop watermelon and various tropical fruits. Tomato production is winding down in north Florida and ramping up in south Florida.

“Crops that should start to ship in November, in addition to the above, are sweet corn, strawberries, radishes, Iceberg and Romaine lettuce and tangelos,” he said.

Weather has affected some harvest windows. “Wet August and September conditions caused some delays in getting fall and winter vegetable crops planted in central and southwest/southeast Florida,” Perny stated. “Generally, we have noted about a one-week harvesting delay in the start of select fresh-market vegetables. Affected crops so far appear to be only fall watermelons and squash. Drier weather over the past several weeks has aided in the harvesting of north Florida and panhandle field crops and helped the planting of winter vegetables such as cabbage, strawberries and greens in the Putnam, Flagler and Bradford county areas.”

A spot check of Florida commodities at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s terminal market report does not show adverse quality issues, Perny commented. “Grapefruits are reported to be on the small side, but have good quality,” he added.

Perny said the general rule of thumb is that approximately 20 percent of fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed within the state, with 80 percent moving to out-of-state and international markets. “Florida’s leading export nation for fresh-market commodity shipments is Canada,” he said.

With such a vast array of fresh items, Florida consumers have no difficulty sourcing locally grown and available produce. “Consumers are definitely more interested in where their food is grow and its freshness/quality,” Perny explained. “Restaurants are marketing using locally grown ingredients. Some menus are featuring all Fresh from Florida meals. Most Florida grocery stores are marketing local connections by featuring grower profiles in their stores and buying local fresh products.”

Perny was asked how the department defines what is locally grown. “One of Florida’s 300 agricultural commodities,” he responded. “So the answer would be in state. Most consumers are surprised to find out how quickly our produce reaches their favorite grocer or fruit stand. A vegetable picked today can be on Florida grocery shelves tomorrow and in Michigan in 48-72 hours. The state enjoys an excellent interstate highway system that runs the entire length of Florida, which facilitates the quick and timely shipments to the Midwest, Northeast and Canadian markets.”

To promote Florida fresh produce, the department engages in retail advertising promotions with most eastern U.S. and Canadian grocery stores, conducts international retail promotions in Asia, Europe and Canada and actively engages in in-state and out-of-state media advertising. Perny said Florida restaurant promotions feature Fresh from Florida commodities. Agriculture association events and industry trade shows are sponsored and attended.

“This year’s Fresh from Florida retail agricultural promotions will continue to support U.S. and Canadian grocers with print promotion of Florida fresh market commodities but will add a new emphasis on more product samplings within select Florida, U.S. and international grocery store locations,” he added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Florida fresh production keeps consumers well-stocked into winter

The Sunshine State has a lot to brag about when it comes to production of fresh produce. “Florida’s unique advantage is that we are the predominant U.S. source for fresh-market vegetables in the fall, winter and early spring months,” said Thomas Perny, marketing specialist with the Division of Marketing & Development, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. “Our favorable winter climate facilitates growing a wide variety of vegetables during a time when most states are experiencing cold conditions. Florida’s fruits and vegetables are known for their high quality and freshness.”

Perny said most of Florida’s fruits and vegetables are grown south of Interstate 4. “Citrus is grown more in the central and south-central counties, and vegetables grown from the south-central to southeast/southwest counties,” he told The Produce News. “Palm Beach County is Florida’s leading agricultural county, and Polk County is the leading citrus producer.”

extra-ov-picA produce truck in a field near Immokalee, FL. A host of commodities was being harvested at press time.Perny said a host of commodities as being harvested at press time, including avocados, cucumbers, eggplant, herbs, white and colored grapefruit, Navel oranges, tangerines, Bell and specialty peppers, squash, sugar cane, fall crop watermelon and various tropical fruits. Tomato production is winding down in north Florida and ramping up in south Florida.

“Crops that should start to ship in November, in addition to the above, are sweet corn, strawberries, radishes, Iceberg and Romaine lettuce and tangelos,” he said.

Weather has affected some harvest windows. “Wet August and September conditions caused some delays in getting fall and winter vegetable crops planted in central and southwest/southeast Florida,” Perny stated. “Generally, we have noted about a one-week harvesting delay in the start of select fresh-market vegetables. Affected crops so far appear to be only fall watermelons and squash. Drier weather over the past several weeks has aided in the harvesting of north Florida and panhandle field crops and helped the planting of winter vegetables such as cabbage, strawberries and greens in the Putnam, Flagler and Bradford county areas.”

A spot check of Florida commodities at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s terminal market report does not show adverse quality issues, Perny commented. “Grapefruits are reported to be on the small side, but have good quality,” he added.

Perny said the general rule of thumb is that approximately 20 percent of fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed within the state, with 80 percent moving to out-of-state and international markets. “Florida’s leading export nation for fresh-market commodity shipments is Canada,” he said.

With such a vast array of fresh items, Florida consumers have no difficulty sourcing locally grown and available produce. “Consumers are definitely more interested in where their food is grow and its freshness/quality,” Perny explained. “Restaurants are marketing using locally grown ingredients. Some menus are featuring all Fresh from Florida meals. Most Florida grocery stores are marketing local connections by featuring grower profiles in their stores and buying local fresh products.”

Perny was asked how the department defines what is locally grown. “One of Florida’s 300 agricultural commodities,” he responded. “So the answer would be in state. Most consumers are surprised to find out how quickly our produce reaches their favorite grocer or fruit stand. A vegetable picked today can be on Florida grocery shelves tomorrow and in Michigan in 48-72 hours. The state enjoys an excellent interstate highway system that runs the entire length of Florida, which facilitates the quick and timely shipments to the Midwest, Northeast and Canadian markets.”

To promote Florida fresh produce, the department engages in retail advertising promotions with most eastern U.S. and Canadian grocery stores, conducts international retail promotions in Asia, Europe and Canada and actively engages in in-state and out-of-state media advertising. Perny said Florida restaurant promotions feature Fresh from Florida commodities. Agriculture association events and industry trade shows are sponsored and attended.

“This year’s Fresh from Florida retail agricultural promotions will continue to support U.S. and Canadian grocers with print promotion of Florida fresh market commodities but will add a new emphasis on more product samplings within select Florida, U.S. and international grocery store locations,” he added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Florida fresh production keeps consumers well-stocked into winter

The Sunshine State has a lot to brag about when it comes to production of fresh produce. “Florida’s unique advantage is that we are the predominant U.S. source for fresh-market vegetables in the fall, winter and early spring months,” said Thomas Perny, marketing specialist with the Division of Marketing & Development, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. “Our favorable winter climate facilitates growing a wide variety of vegetables during a time when most states are experiencing cold conditions. Florida’s fruits and vegetables are known for their high quality and freshness.”

Perny said most of Florida’s fruits and vegetables are grown south of Interstate 4. “Citrus is grown more in the central and south-central counties, and vegetables grown from the south-central to southeast/southwest counties,” he told The Produce News. “Palm Beach County is Florida’s leading agricultural county, and Polk County is the leading citrus producer.”

extra-ov-picA produce truck in a field near Immokalee, FL. A host of commodities was being harvested at press time.Perny said a host of commodities as being harvested at press time, including avocados, cucumbers, eggplant, herbs, white and colored grapefruit, Navel oranges, tangerines, Bell and specialty peppers, squash, sugar cane, fall crop watermelon and various tropical fruits. Tomato production is winding down in north Florida and ramping up in south Florida.

“Crops that should start to ship in November, in addition to the above, are sweet corn, strawberries, radishes, Iceberg and Romaine lettuce and tangelos,” he said.

Weather has affected some harvest windows. “Wet August and September conditions caused some delays in getting fall and winter vegetable crops planted in central and southwest/southeast Florida,” Perny stated. “Generally, we have noted about a one-week harvesting delay in the start of select fresh-market vegetables. Affected crops so far appear to be only fall watermelons and squash. Drier weather over the past several weeks has aided in the harvesting of north Florida and panhandle field crops and helped the planting of winter vegetables such as cabbage, strawberries and greens in the Putnam, Flagler and Bradford county areas.”

A spot check of Florida commodities at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s terminal market report does not show adverse quality issues, Perny commented. “Grapefruits are reported to be on the small side, but have good quality,” he added.

Perny said the general rule of thumb is that approximately 20 percent of fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed within the state, with 80 percent moving to out-of-state and international markets. “Florida’s leading export nation for fresh-market commodity shipments is Canada,” he said.

With such a vast array of fresh items, Florida consumers have no difficulty sourcing locally grown and available produce. “Consumers are definitely more interested in where their food is grow and its freshness/quality,” Perny explained. “Restaurants are marketing using locally grown ingredients. Some menus are featuring all Fresh from Florida meals. Most Florida grocery stores are marketing local connections by featuring grower profiles in their stores and buying local fresh products.”

Perny was asked how the department defines what is locally grown. “One of Florida’s 300 agricultural commodities,” he responded. “So the answer would be in state. Most consumers are surprised to find out how quickly our produce reaches their favorite grocer or fruit stand. A vegetable picked today can be on Florida grocery shelves tomorrow and in Michigan in 48-72 hours. The state enjoys an excellent interstate highway system that runs the entire length of Florida, which facilitates the quick and timely shipments to the Midwest, Northeast and Canadian markets.”

To promote Florida fresh produce, the department engages in retail advertising promotions with most eastern U.S. and Canadian grocery stores, conducts international retail promotions in Asia, Europe and Canada and actively engages in in-state and out-of-state media advertising. Perny said Florida restaurant promotions feature Fresh from Florida commodities. Agriculture association events and industry trade shows are sponsored and attended.

“This year’s Fresh from Florida retail agricultural promotions will continue to support U.S. and Canadian grocers with print promotion of Florida fresh market commodities but will add a new emphasis on more product samplings within select Florida, U.S. and international grocery store locations,” he added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Florida fresh production keeps consumers well-stocked into winter

The Sunshine State has a lot to brag about when it comes to production of fresh produce. “Florida’s unique advantage is that we are the predominant U.S. source for fresh-market vegetables in the fall, winter and early spring months,” said Thomas Perny, marketing specialist with the Division of Marketing & Development, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. “Our favorable winter climate facilitates growing a wide variety of vegetables during a time when most states are experiencing cold conditions. Florida’s fruits and vegetables are known for their high quality and freshness.”

Perny said most of Florida’s fruits and vegetables are grown south of Interstate 4. “Citrus is grown more in the central and south-central counties, and vegetables grown from the south-central to southeast/southwest counties,” he told The Produce News. “Palm Beach County is Florida’s leading agricultural county, and Polk County is the leading citrus producer.”

extra-ov-picA produce truck in a field near Immokalee, FL. A host of commodities was being harvested at press time.Perny said a host of commodities as being harvested at press time, including avocados, cucumbers, eggplant, herbs, white and colored grapefruit, Navel oranges, tangerines, Bell and specialty peppers, squash, sugar cane, fall crop watermelon and various tropical fruits. Tomato production is winding down in north Florida and ramping up in south Florida.

“Crops that should start to ship in November, in addition to the above, are sweet corn, strawberries, radishes, Iceberg and Romaine lettuce and tangelos,” he said.

Weather has affected some harvest windows. “Wet August and September conditions caused some delays in getting fall and winter vegetable crops planted in central and southwest/southeast Florida,” Perny stated. “Generally, we have noted about a one-week harvesting delay in the start of select fresh-market vegetables. Affected crops so far appear to be only fall watermelons and squash. Drier weather over the past several weeks has aided in the harvesting of north Florida and panhandle field crops and helped the planting of winter vegetables such as cabbage, strawberries and greens in the Putnam, Flagler and Bradford county areas.”

A spot check of Florida commodities at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s terminal market report does not show adverse quality issues, Perny commented. “Grapefruits are reported to be on the small side, but have good quality,” he added.

Perny said the general rule of thumb is that approximately 20 percent of fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed within the state, with 80 percent moving to out-of-state and international markets. “Florida’s leading export nation for fresh-market commodity shipments is Canada,” he said.

With such a vast array of fresh items, Florida consumers have no difficulty sourcing locally grown and available produce. “Consumers are definitely more interested in where their food is grow and its freshness/quality,” Perny explained. “Restaurants are marketing using locally grown ingredients. Some menus are featuring all Fresh from Florida meals. Most Florida grocery stores are marketing local connections by featuring grower profiles in their stores and buying local fresh products.”

Perny was asked how the department defines what is locally grown. “One of Florida’s 300 agricultural commodities,” he responded. “So the answer would be in state. Most consumers are surprised to find out how quickly our produce reaches their favorite grocer or fruit stand. A vegetable picked today can be on Florida grocery shelves tomorrow and in Michigan in 48-72 hours. The state enjoys an excellent interstate highway system that runs the entire length of Florida, which facilitates the quick and timely shipments to the Midwest, Northeast and Canadian markets.”

To promote Florida fresh produce, the department engages in retail advertising promotions with most eastern U.S. and Canadian grocery stores, conducts international retail promotions in Asia, Europe and Canada and actively engages in in-state and out-of-state media advertising. Perny said Florida restaurant promotions feature Fresh from Florida commodities. Agriculture association events and industry trade shows are sponsored and attended.

“This year’s Fresh from Florida retail agricultural promotions will continue to support U.S. and Canadian grocers with print promotion of Florida fresh market commodities but will add a new emphasis on more product samplings within select Florida, U.S. and international grocery store locations,” he added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Florida fresh production keeps consumers well-stocked into winter

The Sunshine State has a lot to brag about when it comes to production of fresh produce. “Florida’s unique advantage is that we are the predominant U.S. source for fresh-market vegetables in the fall, winter and early spring months,” said Thomas Perny, marketing specialist with the Division of Marketing & Development, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. “Our favorable winter climate facilitates growing a wide variety of vegetables during a time when most states are experiencing cold conditions. Florida’s fruits and vegetables are known for their high quality and freshness.”

Perny said most of Florida’s fruits and vegetables are grown south of Interstate 4. “Citrus is grown more in the central and south-central counties, and vegetables grown from the south-central to southeast/southwest counties,” he told The Produce News. “Palm Beach County is Florida’s leading agricultural county, and Polk County is the leading citrus producer.”

extra-ov-picA produce truck in a field near Immokalee, FL. A host of commodities was being harvested at press time.Perny said a host of commodities as being harvested at press time, including avocados, cucumbers, eggplant, herbs, white and colored grapefruit, Navel oranges, tangerines, Bell and specialty peppers, squash, sugar cane, fall crop watermelon and various tropical fruits. Tomato production is winding down in north Florida and ramping up in south Florida.

“Crops that should start to ship in November, in addition to the above, are sweet corn, strawberries, radishes, Iceberg and Romaine lettuce and tangelos,” he said.

Weather has affected some harvest windows. “Wet August and September conditions caused some delays in getting fall and winter vegetable crops planted in central and southwest/southeast Florida,” Perny stated. “Generally, we have noted about a one-week harvesting delay in the start of select fresh-market vegetables. Affected crops so far appear to be only fall watermelons and squash. Drier weather over the past several weeks has aided in the harvesting of north Florida and panhandle field crops and helped the planting of winter vegetables such as cabbage, strawberries and greens in the Putnam, Flagler and Bradford county areas.”

A spot check of Florida commodities at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s terminal market report does not show adverse quality issues, Perny commented. “Grapefruits are reported to be on the small side, but have good quality,” he added.

Perny said the general rule of thumb is that approximately 20 percent of fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed within the state, with 80 percent moving to out-of-state and international markets. “Florida’s leading export nation for fresh-market commodity shipments is Canada,” he said.

With such a vast array of fresh items, Florida consumers have no difficulty sourcing locally grown and available produce. “Consumers are definitely more interested in where their food is grow and its freshness/quality,” Perny explained. “Restaurants are marketing using locally grown ingredients. Some menus are featuring all Fresh from Florida meals. Most Florida grocery stores are marketing local connections by featuring grower profiles in their stores and buying local fresh products.”

Perny was asked how the department defines what is locally grown. “One of Florida’s 300 agricultural commodities,” he responded. “So the answer would be in state. Most consumers are surprised to find out how quickly our produce reaches their favorite grocer or fruit stand. A vegetable picked today can be on Florida grocery shelves tomorrow and in Michigan in 48-72 hours. The state enjoys an excellent interstate highway system that runs the entire length of Florida, which facilitates the quick and timely shipments to the Midwest, Northeast and Canadian markets.”

To promote Florida fresh produce, the department engages in retail advertising promotions with most eastern U.S. and Canadian grocery stores, conducts international retail promotions in Asia, Europe and Canada and actively engages in in-state and out-of-state media advertising. Perny said Florida restaurant promotions feature Fresh from Florida commodities. Agriculture association events and industry trade shows are sponsored and attended.

“This year’s Fresh from Florida retail agricultural promotions will continue to support U.S. and Canadian grocers with print promotion of Florida fresh market commodities but will add a new emphasis on more product samplings within select Florida, U.S. and international grocery store locations,” he added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Florida fresh production keeps consumers well-stocked into winter

The Sunshine State has a lot to brag about when it comes to production of fresh produce. “Florida’s unique advantage is that we are the predominant U.S. source for fresh-market vegetables in the fall, winter and early spring months,” said Thomas Perny, marketing specialist with the Division of Marketing & Development, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. “Our favorable winter climate facilitates growing a wide variety of vegetables during a time when most states are experiencing cold conditions. Florida’s fruits and vegetables are known for their high quality and freshness.”

Perny said most of Florida’s fruits and vegetables are grown south of Interstate 4. “Citrus is grown more in the central and south-central counties, and vegetables grown from the south-central to southeast/southwest counties,” he told The Produce News. “Palm Beach County is Florida’s leading agricultural county, and Polk County is the leading citrus producer.”

extra-ov-picA produce truck in a field near Immokalee, FL. A host of commodities was being harvested at press time.Perny said a host of commodities as being harvested at press time, including avocados, cucumbers, eggplant, herbs, white and colored grapefruit, Navel oranges, tangerines, Bell and specialty peppers, squash, sugar cane, fall crop watermelon and various tropical fruits. Tomato production is winding down in north Florida and ramping up in south Florida.

“Crops that should start to ship in November, in addition to the above, are sweet corn, strawberries, radishes, Iceberg and Romaine lettuce and tangelos,” he said.

Weather has affected some harvest windows. “Wet August and September conditions caused some delays in getting fall and winter vegetable crops planted in central and southwest/southeast Florida,” Perny stated. “Generally, we have noted about a one-week harvesting delay in the start of select fresh-market vegetables. Affected crops so far appear to be only fall watermelons and squash. Drier weather over the past several weeks has aided in the harvesting of north Florida and panhandle field crops and helped the planting of winter vegetables such as cabbage, strawberries and greens in the Putnam, Flagler and Bradford county areas.”

A spot check of Florida commodities at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s terminal market report does not show adverse quality issues, Perny commented. “Grapefruits are reported to be on the small side, but have good quality,” he added.

Perny said the general rule of thumb is that approximately 20 percent of fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed within the state, with 80 percent moving to out-of-state and international markets. “Florida’s leading export nation for fresh-market commodity shipments is Canada,” he said.

With such a vast array of fresh items, Florida consumers have no difficulty sourcing locally grown and available produce. “Consumers are definitely more interested in where their food is grow and its freshness/quality,” Perny explained. “Restaurants are marketing using locally grown ingredients. Some menus are featuring all Fresh from Florida meals. Most Florida grocery stores are marketing local connections by featuring grower profiles in their stores and buying local fresh products.”

Perny was asked how the department defines what is locally grown. “One of Florida’s 300 agricultural commodities,” he responded. “So the answer would be in state. Most consumers are surprised to find out how quickly our produce reaches their favorite grocer or fruit stand. A vegetable picked today can be on Florida grocery shelves tomorrow and in Michigan in 48-72 hours. The state enjoys an excellent interstate highway system that runs the entire length of Florida, which facilitates the quick and timely shipments to the Midwest, Northeast and Canadian markets.”

To promote Florida fresh produce, the department engages in retail advertising promotions with most eastern U.S. and Canadian grocery stores, conducts international retail promotions in Asia, Europe and Canada and actively engages in in-state and out-of-state media advertising. Perny said Florida restaurant promotions feature Fresh from Florida commodities. Agriculture association events and industry trade shows are sponsored and attended.

“This year’s Fresh from Florida retail agricultural promotions will continue to support U.S. and Canadian grocers with print promotion of Florida fresh market commodities but will add a new emphasis on more product samplings within select Florida, U.S. and international grocery store locations,” he added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Florida fresh production keeps consumers well-stocked into winter

The Sunshine State has a lot to brag about when it comes to production of fresh produce. “Florida’s unique advantage is that we are the predominant U.S. source for fresh-market vegetables in the fall, winter and early spring months,” said Thomas Perny, marketing specialist with the Division of Marketing & Development, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. “Our favorable winter climate facilitates growing a wide variety of vegetables during a time when most states are experiencing cold conditions. Florida’s fruits and vegetables are known for their high quality and freshness.”

Perny said most of Florida’s fruits and vegetables are grown south of Interstate 4. “Citrus is grown more in the central and south-central counties, and vegetables grown from the south-central to southeast/southwest counties,” he told The Produce News. “Palm Beach County is Florida’s leading agricultural county, and Polk County is the leading citrus producer.”

extra-ov-picA produce truck in a field near Immokalee, FL. A host of commodities was being harvested at press time.Perny said a host of commodities as being harvested at press time, including avocados, cucumbers, eggplant, herbs, white and colored grapefruit, Navel oranges, tangerines, Bell and specialty peppers, squash, sugar cane, fall crop watermelon and various tropical fruits. Tomato production is winding down in north Florida and ramping up in south Florida.

“Crops that should start to ship in November, in addition to the above, are sweet corn, strawberries, radishes, Iceberg and Romaine lettuce and tangelos,” he said.

Weather has affected some harvest windows. “Wet August and September conditions caused some delays in getting fall and winter vegetable crops planted in central and southwest/southeast Florida,” Perny stated. “Generally, we have noted about a one-week harvesting delay in the start of select fresh-market vegetables. Affected crops so far appear to be only fall watermelons and squash. Drier weather over the past several weeks has aided in the harvesting of north Florida and panhandle field crops and helped the planting of winter vegetables such as cabbage, strawberries and greens in the Putnam, Flagler and Bradford county areas.”

A spot check of Florida commodities at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s terminal market report does not show adverse quality issues, Perny commented. “Grapefruits are reported to be on the small side, but have good quality,” he added.

Perny said the general rule of thumb is that approximately 20 percent of fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed within the state, with 80 percent moving to out-of-state and international markets. “Florida’s leading export nation for fresh-market commodity shipments is Canada,” he said.

With such a vast array of fresh items, Florida consumers have no difficulty sourcing locally grown and available produce. “Consumers are definitely more interested in where their food is grow and its freshness/quality,” Perny explained. “Restaurants are marketing using locally grown ingredients. Some menus are featuring all Fresh from Florida meals. Most Florida grocery stores are marketing local connections by featuring grower profiles in their stores and buying local fresh products.”

Perny was asked how the department defines what is locally grown. “One of Florida’s 300 agricultural commodities,” he responded. “So the answer would be in state. Most consumers are surprised to find out how quickly our produce reaches their favorite grocer or fruit stand. A vegetable picked today can be on Florida grocery shelves tomorrow and in Michigan in 48-72 hours. The state enjoys an excellent interstate highway system that runs the entire length of Florida, which facilitates the quick and timely shipments to the Midwest, Northeast and Canadian markets.”

To promote Florida fresh produce, the department engages in retail advertising promotions with most eastern U.S. and Canadian grocery stores, conducts international retail promotions in Asia, Europe and Canada and actively engages in in-state and out-of-state media advertising. Perny said Florida restaurant promotions feature Fresh from Florida commodities. Agriculture association events and industry trade shows are sponsored and attended.

“This year’s Fresh from Florida retail agricultural promotions will continue to support U.S. and Canadian grocers with print promotion of Florida fresh market commodities but will add a new emphasis on more product samplings within select Florida, U.S. and international grocery store locations,” he added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Florida fresh production keeps consumers well-stocked into winter

The Sunshine State has a lot to brag about when it comes to production of fresh produce. “Florida’s unique advantage is that we are the predominant U.S. source for fresh-market vegetables in the fall, winter and early spring months,” said Thomas Perny, marketing specialist with the Division of Marketing & Development, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. “Our favorable winter climate facilitates growing a wide variety of vegetables during a time when most states are experiencing cold conditions. Florida’s fruits and vegetables are known for their high quality and freshness.”

Perny said most of Florida’s fruits and vegetables are grown south of Interstate 4. “Citrus is grown more in the central and south-central counties, and vegetables grown from the south-central to southeast/southwest counties,” he told The Produce News. “Palm Beach County is Florida’s leading agricultural county, and Polk County is the leading citrus producer.”

extra-ov-picA produce truck in a field near Immokalee, FL. A host of commodities was being harvested at press time.Perny said a host of commodities as being harvested at press time, including avocados, cucumbers, eggplant, herbs, white and colored grapefruit, Navel oranges, tangerines, Bell and specialty peppers, squash, sugar cane, fall crop watermelon and various tropical fruits. Tomato production is winding down in north Florida and ramping up in south Florida.

“Crops that should start to ship in November, in addition to the above, are sweet corn, strawberries, radishes, Iceberg and Romaine lettuce and tangelos,” he said.

Weather has affected some harvest windows. “Wet August and September conditions caused some delays in getting fall and winter vegetable crops planted in central and southwest/southeast Florida,” Perny stated. “Generally, we have noted about a one-week harvesting delay in the start of select fresh-market vegetables. Affected crops so far appear to be only fall watermelons and squash. Drier weather over the past several weeks has aided in the harvesting of north Florida and panhandle field crops and helped the planting of winter vegetables such as cabbage, strawberries and greens in the Putnam, Flagler and Bradford county areas.”

A spot check of Florida commodities at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s terminal market report does not show adverse quality issues, Perny commented. “Grapefruits are reported to be on the small side, but have good quality,” he added.

Perny said the general rule of thumb is that approximately 20 percent of fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed within the state, with 80 percent moving to out-of-state and international markets. “Florida’s leading export nation for fresh-market commodity shipments is Canada,” he said.

With such a vast array of fresh items, Florida consumers have no difficulty sourcing locally grown and available produce. “Consumers are definitely more interested in where their food is grow and its freshness/quality,” Perny explained. “Restaurants are marketing using locally grown ingredients. Some menus are featuring all Fresh from Florida meals. Most Florida grocery stores are marketing local connections by featuring grower profiles in their stores and buying local fresh products.”

Perny was asked how the department defines what is locally grown. “One of Florida’s 300 agricultural commodities,” he responded. “So the answer would be in state. Most consumers are surprised to find out how quickly our produce reaches their favorite grocer or fruit stand. A vegetable picked today can be on Florida grocery shelves tomorrow and in Michigan in 48-72 hours. The state enjoys an excellent interstate highway system that runs the entire length of Florida, which facilitates the quick and timely shipments to the Midwest, Northeast and Canadian markets.”

To promote Florida fresh produce, the department engages in retail advertising promotions with most eastern U.S. and Canadian grocery stores, conducts international retail promotions in Asia, Europe and Canada and actively engages in in-state and out-of-state media advertising. Perny said Florida restaurant promotions feature Fresh from Florida commodities. Agriculture association events and industry trade shows are sponsored and attended.

“This year’s Fresh from Florida retail agricultural promotions will continue to support U.S. and Canadian grocers with print promotion of Florida fresh market commodities but will add a new emphasis on more product samplings within select Florida, U.S. and international grocery store locations,” he added.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com