Blog Archives

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Wegmans customers donate $23,704 to United Way

During the fall 2014 United Way checkout scanning campaign at five Wegmans stores in the Southern Tier of New York, donations totaled $ 23,704, a 23 percent increase over the fall 2013 total.

“These donations directly benefit United Way programs and services in the local community,” Patty Kaminski, Wegmans’ district manager of the Southern Tier stores, said in a press release. “We’re so grateful to our customers and employees for their continued generosity this fall.”

The United Way checkout scanning campaign, which ran during October and early November, allowed customers at Wegmans stores in Corning, Elmira, Hornell, Ithaca, and Johnson City to donate money at checkout. All proceeds go directly to the community fund at the United Way of the Southern Tier, the United Way of Broome County and the United Way of Tompkins County.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

U.S. Apple Association will support customers’ right to choose or not choose GMO

U.S. Apple Association will support customers’ right to choose or not choose GMO

The introduction of non-browning Arctic® Apples to consumers is at least a few years away, but if approved for commercial production by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Apple Association will then support the public’s right to decide whether or not to purchase a genetically modified apple. “If approved, the non-browning apple will be just one more possible option available to consumers,” explains Wendy Brannen, director of consumer health and public relations for the U.S. Apple Association. “We want to convey the vast choices of safe, healthy apples and apple products available to consumers, including dozens of non-GMO apples that will remain on the market.”

The U.S. Apple Association’s stance that consumers decide about Arctic is reliant on the non-browning apple’s safety. The apple passed the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s safety standards, and since there were no concerns, the industry says the choice will be left to consumers. “FDA declared that Arctic apples are safe and that they would offer the same nutrition benefits as non-GMO apples,” explains Brannen, “We have assurance from the developer that these apples would be clearly sold and marketed under the Arctic® label, so their place in the market will simply be a matter of consumer choice.”

The non-browning apple is the first genetically modified apple which may become available to consumers.  Arctic Apples are non-transgenic, as no crossbreeding between species occurs. In order to achieve a non-browning apple, genes are targeted which cause the effect. The U.S. Apple Association says it’s important the industry remain transparent to help provide the public with unbiased information about all apple choices. “We want to help consumers understand and educate themselves on their product choices. Some people may appreciate an apple that doesn’t brown, whereas others may be uncomfortable with a genetically modified product.  Those purchasing decisions are up to them, but we are happy to help direct them toward factual educational resources out there to help them best decide what’s right for them.” 

The Arctic Apple is not yet available to the public as it has not passed deregulation, however with current information it appears the apple will be approved. All other apple purchases will continue to be non-GMO, and consumers will have a clear choice whether to purchase Arctic Apples. “The consumer has the opportunity to purchase applesauce with or without cinnamon. They can buy a sweet or a tart apple based on their preference,” reflects Brannen, “The non-browning apple simply offers another choice for them. Some people will understand that browning is a natural process, but others may not like the browning and may want to try them.”  

For more information:
Wendy Brannen
U.S. Apple Association
Tel: 703-442-8850
[email protected]
www.usapple.org

Publication date: 11/21/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Will customers trust you with their data?

It’s tempting to think of customer data as the new oil.

Combined with advanced analytics, it offers the promise of a truly personalized marketing that both increases effectiveness and eliminates waste. As the rumored $ 3.2 billion valuation of Tesco’s data analysis business Dunnhumby has shown, retailers (and supermarkets in particular) are a valuable source of this data.

Retailers can take a number of practicial steps to earn customers' trust, but the first step must be data security.But customer data isn’t a natural resource. It’s generated by people. And as our connectivity increases, so does our awareness of the data being collected and the erosion of our privacy. With customers increasingly seeking more control over the data they share and with whom, retailers will need to demonstrate to customers that they can be trusted with their data.

There are a number of practical steps that spring to mind:

  1. Make sure you are using the data you already have to improve the customer experience, so it’s clear to customers what value they are receiving in return.
  2. Give your customers more control over their data: Let them opt in, for example, rather than have to opt out, and be very clear what they are opting into.
  3. Only collect the data that’s essential to deliver the benefit to customers, again making clear why you need it.

However, the initial step has to be data security. With the recent spate of high profile data breaches, customers need to be reassured that you take the protection of their data seriously.

While data security can seem a very technical and legal issue, it’s underpinned by a question of mindset. If you view customer data as a commodity, then it’s something to be extracted from customers and traded … and customers will be wary.

But if you view access to customer data as a privilege, then it’s something to be earned and protected … and you’ll inspire more confidence among your customers.

What approach does your business take?

Simon Uwins is a former CMO of fresh&easy and Tesco UK, and author of Creating Loyal Brands (2014). Find him online at www.simonuwins.com.

Supermarket News

Will customers trust you with their data?

It’s tempting to think of customer data as the new oil.

Combined with advanced analytics, it offers the promise of a truly personalized marketing that both increases effectiveness and eliminates waste. As the rumored $ 3.2 billion valuation of Tesco’s data analysis business Dunnhumby has shown, retailers (and supermarkets in particular) are a valuable source of this data.

Retailers can take a number of practicial steps to earn customers' trust, but the first step must be data security.But customer data isn’t a natural resource. It’s generated by people. And as our connectivity increases, so does our awareness of the data being collected and the erosion of our privacy. With customers increasingly seeking more control over the data they share and with whom, retailers will need to demonstrate to customers that they can be trusted with their data.

There are a number of practical steps that spring to mind:

  1. Make sure you are using the data you already have to improve the customer experience, so it’s clear to customers what value they are receiving in return.
  2. Give your customers more control over their data: Let them opt in, for example, rather than have to opt out, and be very clear what they are opting into.
  3. Only collect the data that’s essential to deliver the benefit to customers, again making clear why you need it.

However, the initial step has to be data security. With the recent spate of high profile data breaches, customers need to be reassured that you take the protection of their data seriously.

While data security can seem a very technical and legal issue, it’s underpinned by a question of mindset. If you view customer data as a commodity, then it’s something to be extracted from customers and traded … and customers will be wary.

But if you view access to customer data as a privilege, then it’s something to be earned and protected … and you’ll inspire more confidence among your customers.

What approach does your business take?

Simon Uwins is a former CMO of fresh&easy and Tesco UK, and author of Creating Loyal Brands (2014). Find him online at www.simonuwins.com.

Supermarket News

Will customers trust you with their data?

It’s tempting to think of customer data as the new oil.

Combined with advanced analytics, it offers the promise of a truly personalized marketing that both increases effectiveness and eliminates waste. As the rumored $ 3.2 billion valuation of Tesco’s data analysis business Dunnhumby has shown, retailers (and supermarkets in particular) are a valuable source of this data.

Retailers can take a number of practicial steps to earn customers' trust, but the first step must be data security.But customer data isn’t a natural resource. It’s generated by people. And as our connectivity increases, so does our awareness of the data being collected and the erosion of our privacy. With customers increasingly seeking more control over the data they share and with whom, retailers will need to demonstrate to customers that they can be trusted with their data.

There are a number of practical steps that spring to mind:

  1. Make sure you are using the data you already have to improve the customer experience, so it’s clear to customers what value they are receiving in return.
  2. Give your customers more control over their data: Let them opt in, for example, rather than have to opt out, and be very clear what they are opting into.
  3. Only collect the data that’s essential to deliver the benefit to customers, again making clear why you need it.

However, the initial step has to be data security. With the recent spate of high profile data breaches, customers need to be reassured that you take the protection of their data seriously.

While data security can seem a very technical and legal issue, it’s underpinned by a question of mindset. If you view customer data as a commodity, then it’s something to be extracted from customers and traded … and customers will be wary.

But if you view access to customer data as a privilege, then it’s something to be earned and protected … and you’ll inspire more confidence among your customers.

What approach does your business take?

Simon Uwins is a former CMO of fresh&easy and Tesco UK, and author of Creating Loyal Brands (2014). Find him online at www.simonuwins.com.

Supermarket News

Will customers trust you with their data?

It’s tempting to think of customer data as the new oil.

Combined with advanced analytics, it offers the promise of a truly personalized marketing that both increases effectiveness and eliminates waste. As the rumored $ 3.2 billion valuation of Tesco’s data analysis business Dunnhumby has shown, retailers (and supermarkets in particular) are a valuable source of this data.

Retailers can take a number of practicial steps to earn customers' trust, but the first step must be data security.But customer data isn’t a natural resource. It’s generated by people. And as our connectivity increases, so does our awareness of the data being collected and the erosion of our privacy. With customers increasingly seeking more control over the data they share and with whom, retailers will need to demonstrate to customers that they can be trusted with their data.

There are a number of practical steps that spring to mind:

  1. Make sure you are using the data you already have to improve the customer experience, so it’s clear to customers what value they are receiving in return.
  2. Give your customers more control over their data: Let them opt in, for example, rather than have to opt out, and be very clear what they are opting into.
  3. Only collect the data that’s essential to deliver the benefit to customers, again making clear why you need it.

However, the initial step has to be data security. With the recent spate of high profile data breaches, customers need to be reassured that you take the protection of their data seriously.

While data security can seem a very technical and legal issue, it’s underpinned by a question of mindset. If you view customer data as a commodity, then it’s something to be extracted from customers and traded … and customers will be wary.

But if you view access to customer data as a privilege, then it’s something to be earned and protected … and you’ll inspire more confidence among your customers.

What approach does your business take?

Simon Uwins is a former CMO of fresh&easy and Tesco UK, and author of Creating Loyal Brands (2014). Find him online at www.simonuwins.com.

Supermarket News

Will customers trust you with their data?

It’s tempting to think of customer data as the new oil.

Combined with advanced analytics, it offers the promise of a truly personalized marketing that both increases effectiveness and eliminates waste. As the rumored $ 3.2 billion valuation of Tesco’s data analysis business Dunnhumby has shown, retailers (and supermarkets in particular) are a valuable source of this data.

Retailers can take a number of practicial steps to earn customers' trust, but the first step must be data security.But customer data isn’t a natural resource. It’s generated by people. And as our connectivity increases, so does our awareness of the data being collected and the erosion of our privacy. With customers increasingly seeking more control over the data they share and with whom, retailers will need to demonstrate to customers that they can be trusted with their data.

There are a number of practical steps that spring to mind:

  1. Make sure you are using the data you already have to improve the customer experience, so it’s clear to customers what value they are receiving in return.
  2. Give your customers more control over their data: Let them opt in, for example, rather than have to opt out, and be very clear what they are opting into.
  3. Only collect the data that’s essential to deliver the benefit to customers, again making clear why you need it.

However, the initial step has to be data security. With the recent spate of high profile data breaches, customers need to be reassured that you take the protection of their data seriously.

While data security can seem a very technical and legal issue, it’s underpinned by a question of mindset. If you view customer data as a commodity, then it’s something to be extracted from customers and traded … and customers will be wary.

But if you view access to customer data as a privilege, then it’s something to be earned and protected … and you’ll inspire more confidence among your customers.

What approach does your business take?

Simon Uwins is a former CMO of fresh&easy and Tesco UK, and author of Creating Loyal Brands (2014). Find him online at www.simonuwins.com.

Supermarket News

Will customers trust you with their data?

It’s tempting to think of customer data as the new oil.

Combined with advanced analytics, it offers the promise of a truly personalized marketing that both increases effectiveness and eliminates waste. As the rumored $ 3.2 billion valuation of Tesco’s data analysis business Dunnhumby has shown, retailers (and supermarkets in particular) are a valuable source of this data.

Retailers can take a number of practicial steps to earn customers' trust, but the first step must be data security.But customer data isn’t a natural resource. It’s generated by people. And as our connectivity increases, so does our awareness of the data being collected and the erosion of our privacy. With customers increasingly seeking more control over the data they share and with whom, retailers will need to demonstrate to customers that they can be trusted with their data.

There are a number of practical steps that spring to mind:

  1. Make sure you are using the data you already have to improve the customer experience, so it’s clear to customers what value they are receiving in return.
  2. Give your customers more control over their data: Let them opt in, for example, rather than have to opt out, and be very clear what they are opting into.
  3. Only collect the data that’s essential to deliver the benefit to customers, again making clear why you need it.

However, the initial step has to be data security. With the recent spate of high profile data breaches, customers need to be reassured that you take the protection of their data seriously.

While data security can seem a very technical and legal issue, it’s underpinned by a question of mindset. If you view customer data as a commodity, then it’s something to be extracted from customers and traded … and customers will be wary.

But if you view access to customer data as a privilege, then it’s something to be earned and protected … and you’ll inspire more confidence among your customers.

What approach does your business take?

Simon Uwins is a former CMO of fresh&easy and Tesco UK, and author of Creating Loyal Brands (2014). Find him online at www.simonuwins.com.

Supermarket News

Do you pamper your customers and neglect your employees?

We were walking through a beautiful new supermarket with one of our clients a few weeks back. As in most new markets we see, it was a gleaming palace, complete with great customer amenities and the latest in new departments and offers. It was physically beautiful from a design standpoint … until we went into the back room, where the “new” abruptly stopped. Cement floors, unfinished walls, spartan break rooms with folding tables and chairs and communications that were decidedly legal — driven by rules and regulations, not motivation.

By contrast, we had a chance to take a behind the scenes tour at Disney World recently. As most know, Disney is renowned for delivering a great customer experience. They refer to their guest experience as The Show, with cast members and guests. Backstage is treated with the same care as on-stage, with some of the most immaculate stock rooms we’ve ever seen. There were numerous associate programs being trained and promoted in the back of the house, including creating “Five Star Stories,” along with constant reminders on product knowledge, white glove care and creating engagements with the guest.

Backstage was viewed as an opportunity for internal branding and Disney states that:

 “Our brand is our cast and our cast is our magic.”

Most retailers will state that their customers are their most important focus. But, what about your people who must deliver on that promise? What cues do you send to your people on how important they are? How do you show them you care? What kind of training programs do you have that focus on guest engagement? Product knowledge? Customer service? Their own advancement?

A successful business really needs to be thought about from the inside out. The only way to deliver great customer service is to have great programs for your own people. It’s no secret that the best service experiences in retail (Publix, Wegmans, Container Store, Whole Foods, REI, Nordstrom, etc.) also routinely show up as The Best Places to Work.

How can we possibly expect to have our associates take care of customers if we don’t take care of our associates?

Are you paying as much attention to your people as you do to your customers? What programs do you have in place for your associates?

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Supermarket News

WinCo customers sound off on self-checkout

WinCo Foods has begun adding self-checkout stations to all its stores, and the retailer asked Facebook fans for feedback on the experience. While the reaction was mostly positive, some customers disliked the new machines.

For many fans, self-checkout is a convenient option when purchasing a small number of items.

Some have encountered technical issues when using the machines.

Others worry that WinCo will cut back on staffing at stores with a self-checkout option.

There were also fans who like the option but offered suggestions for improving the experience.

Beyond the customer experience, there are many considerations when a store considers self-checkout stations, from decreased merchandising options to reports that such machines lead to increased theft, according to The Telegraph.

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