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FDA warning letters: Drug residues in dairy cows

Two dairy operations were recently sent warning letters from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and both referred to unacceptably high drug residues in the tissues of slaughtered cows.

In a June 30, 2016, warning letter, FDA’s Denver District Office told Morwai Dairy LLC of Fort Lupton, CO, that violations of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) were found during a four-day investigation of the operation in April.

Specifically, the agency stated that a dairy cow sold for slaughter as food on or about Jan. 20, 2016, was later found to have 2.04 parts per million (ppm) of defuroylceftiofur (an antibiotic) in the kidney tissue and 0.673 ppm of flunixin (an anti-inflammatory drug) in the liver tissue.

Dairy cowsHowever, FDA has established a tolerance in cattle of 0.4 ppm for residues of desfuroylceftiofur in kidney tissue and 0.125 ppm for flunixin in liver tissue …,” the letter pointed out. The presence of these drugs at those levels causes the food to be adulterated, FDA added.

The warning letter also mentioned that the Morwai Dairy had failed to maintain written treatment records for a specific cow and that a signed affidavit had indicated that fresh pen treatment logs were being discarded after a certain period.

“Food from animals held under such conditions is adulterated …” under the FD&C Act, the agency noted.

FDA’s Detroit Office sent a warning letter dated June 28, 2016, to Robin Martin of Snover, MI, regarding FD&C Act violations inspectors had identified after visiting his dairy operation on April 26, 28 and May 4, 2016.

A culled dairy cow sold for slaughter as food on or about July 28, 2015, was found to have desfuroylceftiofur (a marker residue for ceftiofur) at 5.48 ppm in the kidney tissue, the letter stated, although the FDA tolerance level for residues of that drug in cattle kidney tissue is 0.4 ppm.

Further, the agency stated that the dairy failed to maintain treatment records and that expired animal drugs were found on-site. Food from animals held under such conditions is considered adulterated under federal regulations, FDA noted.

A written response from the dairy dated May 23, 2016, detailed several operational changes that were being implemented in response to the agency’s observations from the inspection. However, FDA found the response inadequate “due to the lack of documentation illustrating the inclusion of indications for use, dosage given, and route of administration into your record keeping practices.”

Recipients of FDA warning letters have 15 working days from receipt to respond with details of the procedures they have taken, or will take, to correct the current violations and prevent them from recurring.

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Food Safety News

Chinese Demand for Dairy Products Spurs U.S. Exports

What happens when 1.36 billion people in China migrate toward cities, draw middle-class wages and shift toward “Western” foods such as ice cream, cheese pizza and strawberry-flavored milk? One result: larger profits for U.S. dairy processors, who, like dairy exporters in other countries, are charging record prices for their products at home and abroad, according to Bloomberg News.

China’s growing thirst for milk helped push American dairy exports to a record $ 6.7 billion in 2013, according to the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC). January U.S. dairy exports were 35 percent higher than a year earlier, putting the month’s exports ahead of the staggering 30-percent annual growth Bloomberg News reported in 2013.

According to the 2014 Tetra Pak Dairy Index, China is just one plane of opportunity. The $ 3.69 price tag on the average gallon of whole milk sold in April 2014 is 7.5 percent more than just a year before, the highest since September 2011. In just three years, when Tetra Pak’s research predicts global dairy demand will overtake production, prices could be even loftier — especially in China, the world’s top dairy importer.

This does not mean all is rosy with U.S. dairy exports; sales to China declined 24 percent during August. However, year-to-date (January-August) exports by volume for 2014 are still 21-percent greater than last year, prices remain high, and there are still reasons to retain a positive long view.

Demand for Dairy Products Grows in China

What’s behind this trend and how can U.S. processors benefit? Milk and cheese are relatively new to the Chinese diet, says Todd Shilk, dairy category manager at Tetra Pak U.S. and Canada, but consumers’ taste for them is growing. A wave of Western culture has swept into the country, bringing with it dairy-based foods. Baskin-Robbins and Pizza Hut have ambitious Chinese expansion plans; drinking milk is increasingly viewed as healthy — especially for kids — and has caught on with an increasingly affluent middle class.

Tetra Pak research shows that most liquid milk consumed in China (76 percent) is ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated, which holds advantages over traditional pasteurization. When pasteurized traditionally, dairy products are heated and then packaged. This milk must be continuously refrigerated and still has a brief shelf life (5-15 days).

UHT dairy products are briefly heated to high temperatures, then filled into aseptic, shelf-stable cartons, lasting up to a year without refrigeration or preservatives. Traditionally, most milk exports to Asia have been powder; over the past 15 years, however, UHT milk exports have grown steadily and should continue to climb by 3.1 percent CAGR from 2013 to 2016, according to the Dairy Index.

UHT milk suits China’s transport infrastructure, which cannot support quick delivery of chilled dairy. And Chinese consumption of UHT milk jumped from 18 million pounds in 2010 to about 331 million pounds in 2013. The USDEC suggests this could quadruple again to 1.3 billion pounds by 2020. UHT milk also empowers use of renewable packaging materials and offers lighter weight and independence from refrigeration. This type of packaging delivers benefits throughout the supply chain.

Ross Christieson, USDEC senior vice president of market research and analysis, says that rapid growth in China’s shelf-stable milk market is a gold mine for U.S. dairy exporters.

“The U.S. industry produces large volumes of UHT-treated milk annually, yet we have played only a minor role in serving booming Chinese consumption,” he says. “Chinese buyers have expressed growing interest in U.S. supply to meet spiraling demand.”

The U.S. Dairy Products Market is Mature

Meanwhile, in the U.S., fluid milk consumption continues a decades-long slide. Bright spots include value-added innovations such as flavored, organic and nutraceutical products. Last year, American milk sales were the lowest since 1984; culprits include fewer people eating breakfast at home (when more than half of fluid milk in the U.S. is consumed). Fewer than 50 percent of adults now drink milk, and whole-milk consumption is half what it was 30 years ago.

U.S. dairy producers should still focus on opportunities in their homeland. Dairy innovation could likely abate the slide in consumption here. As novel milk flavors grabbed Chinese consumers and pushed sales up in that country, similar innovations could work magic in the U.S.

The Tetra Pak Dairy Index shows that the globe is dotted with areas of opportunity, especially in developing areas. U.S. export sales to Mexico, for example, increased 18 percent in August. Most U.S. producers, however, are targeting China, where exports were up 21 percent in the first half of 2014 compared with a year ago and prices are high.

Expansion in Chinese dairy production can’t keep up with demand, Shilk says, adding dairy production there will likely continue lagging for years to come. Eventually, entrepreneurial dairy farmers could close the gap, but, he adds, “in the meantime, the opportunity is there to sell a lot of milk.”

Producers entering the market now can get a jump on building brand loyalty and creating long-term sales opportunities. As U.S. retailers (such as Walmart and Costco) and European counterparts (Tesco, ALDI and Carrefour among them) enter China, they offer a natural path to market for their partner dairies, Shilk says.

Tetra Pak Insights on Chinese Milk Consumption

• Milk isn’t a cultural norm: Nearly all Chinese have some level of lactose intolerance or lactase deficiency, making lactose-free products a must — especially for the kids’ market.

• Consumption tends toward single serve: Most milk in China is consumed in single-serve portion packs, Shilk says. Consumers finish packs in one sitting, so storage isn’t necessary.

• UHT milk is 76 percent of the market: Refrigeration remains relatively uncommon in the country; shelf-safe UHT-processed milk is the norm. Seventy percent of chilled milk is home-delivered or sold in specialty shops.

• China is the world’s largest flavored milk market: Chinese consumers are on track to consume 4.13 million liters in 2014, according to a Tetra Pak report commissioned from Compass Products and Packages. Flavored milk is considered an area of competitive advantage for the U.S. (the top flavored milk consumer) over New Zealand (the top dairy exporter) to China, the report says.

Food Safety News

Chinese Demand for Dairy Products Spurs U.S. Exports

What happens when 1.36 billion people in China migrate toward cities, draw middle-class wages and shift toward “Western” foods such as ice cream, cheese pizza and strawberry-flavored milk? One result: larger profits for U.S. dairy processors, who, like dairy exporters in other countries, are charging record prices for their products at home and abroad, according to Bloomberg News.

China’s growing thirst for milk helped push American dairy exports to a record $ 6.7 billion in 2013, according to the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC). January U.S. dairy exports were 35 percent higher than a year earlier, putting the month’s exports ahead of the staggering 30-percent annual growth Bloomberg News reported in 2013.

According to the 2014 Tetra Pak Dairy Index, China is just one plane of opportunity. The $ 3.69 price tag on the average gallon of whole milk sold in April 2014 is 7.5 percent more than just a year before, the highest since September 2011. In just three years, when Tetra Pak’s research predicts global dairy demand will overtake production, prices could be even loftier — especially in China, the world’s top dairy importer.

This does not mean all is rosy with U.S. dairy exports; sales to China declined 24 percent during August. However, year-to-date (January-August) exports by volume for 2014 are still 21-percent greater than last year, prices remain high, and there are still reasons to retain a positive long view.

Demand for Dairy Products Grows in China

What’s behind this trend and how can U.S. processors benefit? Milk and cheese are relatively new to the Chinese diet, says Todd Shilk, dairy category manager at Tetra Pak U.S. and Canada, but consumers’ taste for them is growing. A wave of Western culture has swept into the country, bringing with it dairy-based foods. Baskin-Robbins and Pizza Hut have ambitious Chinese expansion plans; drinking milk is increasingly viewed as healthy — especially for kids — and has caught on with an increasingly affluent middle class.

Tetra Pak research shows that most liquid milk consumed in China (76 percent) is ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated, which holds advantages over traditional pasteurization. When pasteurized traditionally, dairy products are heated and then packaged. This milk must be continuously refrigerated and still has a brief shelf life (5-15 days).

UHT dairy products are briefly heated to high temperatures, then filled into aseptic, shelf-stable cartons, lasting up to a year without refrigeration or preservatives. Traditionally, most milk exports to Asia have been powder; over the past 15 years, however, UHT milk exports have grown steadily and should continue to climb by 3.1 percent CAGR from 2013 to 2016, according to the Dairy Index.

UHT milk suits China’s transport infrastructure, which cannot support quick delivery of chilled dairy. And Chinese consumption of UHT milk jumped from 18 million pounds in 2010 to about 331 million pounds in 2013. The USDEC suggests this could quadruple again to 1.3 billion pounds by 2020. UHT milk also empowers use of renewable packaging materials and offers lighter weight and independence from refrigeration. This type of packaging delivers benefits throughout the supply chain.

Ross Christieson, USDEC senior vice president of market research and analysis, says that rapid growth in China’s shelf-stable milk market is a gold mine for U.S. dairy exporters.

“The U.S. industry produces large volumes of UHT-treated milk annually, yet we have played only a minor role in serving booming Chinese consumption,” he says. “Chinese buyers have expressed growing interest in U.S. supply to meet spiraling demand.”

The U.S. Dairy Products Market is Mature

Meanwhile, in the U.S., fluid milk consumption continues a decades-long slide. Bright spots include value-added innovations such as flavored, organic and nutraceutical products. Last year, American milk sales were the lowest since 1984; culprits include fewer people eating breakfast at home (when more than half of fluid milk in the U.S. is consumed). Fewer than 50 percent of adults now drink milk, and whole-milk consumption is half what it was 30 years ago.

U.S. dairy producers should still focus on opportunities in their homeland. Dairy innovation could likely abate the slide in consumption here. As novel milk flavors grabbed Chinese consumers and pushed sales up in that country, similar innovations could work magic in the U.S.

The Tetra Pak Dairy Index shows that the globe is dotted with areas of opportunity, especially in developing areas. U.S. export sales to Mexico, for example, increased 18 percent in August. Most U.S. producers, however, are targeting China, where exports were up 21 percent in the first half of 2014 compared with a year ago and prices are high.

Expansion in Chinese dairy production can’t keep up with demand, Shilk says, adding dairy production there will likely continue lagging for years to come. Eventually, entrepreneurial dairy farmers could close the gap, but, he adds, “in the meantime, the opportunity is there to sell a lot of milk.”

Producers entering the market now can get a jump on building brand loyalty and creating long-term sales opportunities. As U.S. retailers (such as Walmart and Costco) and European counterparts (Tesco, ALDI and Carrefour among them) enter China, they offer a natural path to market for their partner dairies, Shilk says.

Tetra Pak Insights on Chinese Milk Consumption

• Milk isn’t a cultural norm: Nearly all Chinese have some level of lactose intolerance or lactase deficiency, making lactose-free products a must — especially for the kids’ market.

• Consumption tends toward single serve: Most milk in China is consumed in single-serve portion packs, Shilk says. Consumers finish packs in one sitting, so storage isn’t necessary.

• UHT milk is 76 percent of the market: Refrigeration remains relatively uncommon in the country; shelf-safe UHT-processed milk is the norm. Seventy percent of chilled milk is home-delivered or sold in specialty shops.

• China is the world’s largest flavored milk market: Chinese consumers are on track to consume 4.13 million liters in 2014, according to a Tetra Pak report commissioned from Compass Products and Packages. Flavored milk is considered an area of competitive advantage for the U.S. (the top flavored milk consumer) over New Zealand (the top dairy exporter) to China, the report says.

Food Safety News

Raw Milk Bill Brought Back in America’s Dairy State

Buoyed by the partial acquittal of Sauk County raw milk producer Vernon Hershberger, a Wisconsin state senator is going to try again to make it legal to sell unpasteurized milk and milk products in the Diary State.

West Bend Republican Sen. Glenn Grothman has dropped a bill into the Wisconsin Legislature that would allow limited sales of raw milk and raw milk products, which he claims are recommended by nutritionists and chiropractors for health benefits.

“Unfortunately, there is a law on the books where technically it’s still illegal to sell raw milk in the state of Wisconsin,” says Grothman. His bill would permit the sale of unpasteurized milk from farms registered with the state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. The same farms would sell buttermilk, kefir, yogurt, ice cream, butter and cheese made with raw milk.

Grothman’s bill, which won’t go to a public hearing until Fall, would allow on the farm sales directly to consumers, but would continue to ban retail sales in stores or farmer’s markets.

A dairy farm that sells raw milk directly to consumers would risk losing their license. The Grothman bill sets up an exemption to that possibility by allowing those interested in selling raw milk to register with DATCP.

The Senator claims farms that register will be under the same requirements, as they would normally have for producing grade A milk regarding cleanliness, temperature, and other safety requirements.

The bill also sets up criteria for clean containers, proper labeling, a posted sign, and compliance with all state rules. As Wisconsin is the nation’s largest dairy state, Grothman will face strong opposition by the multi-billion dollar pasteurized milk industry, which claims raw milk’s frequent outbreaks gives their product a bad name.

A spokesman for the Wisconsin Safe Milk Coalition say it is impossible to make raw milk safe. The Wisconsin Legislature passed a raw milk bill in 2010, but former Gov. Jim Doyle vetoed it. Attempts by Grothman and others since then to permit raw milk have since failed to go anywhere. A task force appointed by Doyle outlined what it would take to make raw milk both safe and legal in Wisconsin, but Grothman has ignored those stiffer requirements and other raw milk advocates.

Scott Walker, the current governor, has indicated he could sign a raw milk bill with sufficient safe guards in it. Unlike most state legislatures in the Midwest, the Wisconsin Legislature meets periodically throughout the year.

Food Safety News

Recalled Mexican-Style Dairy Linked to Death, 3 Listeria Illnesses

Mexican-style dairy products manufactured by Oasis Brands, Inc. that were recalled for Listeria contamination earlier this year have now been linked to three cases of Listeria, including one death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The illnesses occurred in September 2013, and June and August of 2014, and spread across New York, Tennessee and Texas. The patient from Tennessee died, and all three patients were hospitalized.

All three ill people were identified as being of Hispanic ethnicity and the two surviving patients reported eating Mexican-style soft cheese, but could not remember the brand.

In August 2014, Oasis Brands recalled a quesito casero product for possible contamination of Listeria. On October 6, the company recalled a cuajada en hoja product for the same reason, and then it recalled a number of other cheese products under the Lacteos Santa Martha brand name 10 days later.

Whole-genome sequencing of product samples from Oasis Brands suggests a possible link between those products and the illnesses. CDC says that the investigation is still ongoing.

Food Safety News

Recalled Mexican-Style Dairy Linked to Death, 3 Listeria Illnesses

Mexican-style dairy products manufactured by Oasis Brands, Inc. that were recalled for Listeria contamination earlier this year have now been linked to three cases of Listeria, including one death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The illnesses occurred in September 2013, and June and August of 2014, and spread across New York, Tennessee and Texas. The patient from Tennessee died, and all three patients were hospitalized.

All three ill people were identified as being of Hispanic ethnicity and the two surviving patients reported eating Mexican-style soft cheese, but could not remember the brand.

In August 2014, Oasis Brands recalled a quesito casero product for possible contamination of Listeria. On October 6, the company recalled a cuajada en hoja product for the same reason, and then it recalled a number of other cheese products under the Lacteos Santa Martha brand name 10 days later.

Whole-genome sequencing of product samples from Oasis Brands suggests a possible link between those products and the illnesses. CDC says that the investigation is still ongoing.

Food Safety News

Recalled Mexican-Style Dairy Linked to Death, 3 Listeria Illnesses

Mexican-style dairy products manufactured by Oasis Brands, Inc. that were recalled for Listeria contamination earlier this year have now been linked to three cases of Listeria, including one death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The illnesses occurred in September 2013, and June and August of 2014, and spread across New York, Tennessee and Texas. The patient from Tennessee died, and all three patients were hospitalized.

All three ill people were identified as being of Hispanic ethnicity and the two surviving patients reported eating Mexican-style soft cheese, but could not remember the brand.

In August 2014, Oasis Brands recalled a quesito casero product for possible contamination of Listeria. On October 6, the company recalled a cuajada en hoja product for the same reason, and then it recalled a number of other cheese products under the Lacteos Santa Martha brand name 10 days later.

Whole-genome sequencing of product samples from Oasis Brands suggests a possible link between those products and the illnesses. CDC says that the investigation is still ongoing.

Food Safety News

Recalled Mexican-Style Dairy Linked to Death, 3 Listeria Illnesses

Mexican-style dairy products manufactured by Oasis Brands, Inc. that were recalled for Listeria contamination earlier this year have now been linked to three cases of Listeria, including one death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The illnesses occurred in September 2013, and June and August of 2014, and spread across New York, Tennessee and Texas. The patient from Tennessee died, and all three patients were hospitalized.

All three ill people were identified as being of Hispanic ethnicity and the two surviving patients reported eating Mexican-style soft cheese, but could not remember the brand.

In August 2014, Oasis Brands recalled a quesito casero product for possible contamination of Listeria. On October 6, the company recalled a cuajada en hoja product for the same reason, and then it recalled a number of other cheese products under the Lacteos Santa Martha brand name 10 days later.

Whole-genome sequencing of product samples from Oasis Brands suggests a possible link between those products and the illnesses. CDC says that the investigation is still ongoing.

Food Safety News

Arturi joins Allegiance in dairy role

Allegiance Retail Services on Tuesday said it has appointed Jaclyn “Jackie” Arturi as category manager — dairy.

Jaclyn "Jackie" ArturiArturi’s 20-year career in the supermarket industry began in 1994 when she joined Stop & Shop as a cashier. Over the next 13 years, she held positions in customer service, file maintenance and opened the bakery departments at the Stop & Shop’s Aberdeen and Secaucus stores.

In 2008, Arturi joined C&S Wholesale Grocers, where she spent more than two years as a grocery buyer, prior to becoming GM/HBC alternate source buyer in 2011. Most recently, she was a frozen buyer for White Rose Food.

Steve Hungerbuhler, VP — dairy/deli/frozen for Allegiance, said, “I am proud to welcome Jackie to Allegiance. Her past experience and knowledge will enhance the dairy merchandising we provide to our stores.”

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Arturi joins Allegiance in dairy role

Allegiance Retail Services on Tuesday said it has appointed Jaclyn “Jackie” Arturi as category manager — dairy.

Jaclyn "Jackie" ArturiArturi’s 20-year career in the supermarket industry began in 1994 when she joined Stop & Shop as a cashier. Over the next 13 years, she held positions in customer service, file maintenance and opened the bakery departments at the Stop & Shop’s Aberdeen and Secaucus stores.

In 2008, Arturi joined C&S Wholesale Grocers, where she spent more than two years as a grocery buyer, prior to becoming GM/HBC alternate source buyer in 2011. Most recently, she was a frozen buyer for White Rose Food.

Steve Hungerbuhler, VP — dairy/deli/frozen for Allegiance, said, “I am proud to welcome Jackie to Allegiance. Her past experience and knowledge will enhance the dairy merchandising we provide to our stores.”

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Latest Raw Milk Outbreak Blamed on Minnesota Dairy Farm

A Minnesota dairy farm’s raw milk is being blamed for six illnesses, including three that have been laboratory confirmed as Campylobacter jejuni bacteria, according to state epidemiologists.

The outbreak attributed to raw milk was reported Tuesday by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH), which said routine disease surveillance was responsible for detecting the six illnesses and linking them to consumption of raw dairy products from the Dennis Jaloszyski dairy farm, located near Cambridge.

The illnesses were reported to state health authorities by local health care providers.

Minnesota Department of Health inspectors visited the farm to finding out how many people purchased the raw milk and to notify them of the outbreak. Jaloszyski claims he does not maintain customer lists, prompting the state to urge anyone who purchased the raw milk to throw it away.

When MDH contacted the six individuals to inquire about potential causes of their illnesses, all reported that they had consumed raw milk from the Jaloszynski Farm.

“We’re concerned that people may be continuing to get sick after consuming products from this farm,” said Trisha Robinson, a foodborne illness epidemiologist with MDH.

“While we are very concerned about the illnesses associated with this farm, this also is about the inherent risk for foodborne illness from any raw milk consumption,” Robinson said. “Drinking raw milk or eating products made from raw milk can expose you to a variety of pathogens that can result in anything from a few days of diarrhea to kidney failure and death. People need to think carefully about those risks before consuming raw dairy products from any source, and people need to know that the risks are especially high for young children.”

Common symptoms of Campylobacter infection include fever, diarrhea (sometimes bloody), abdominal pain, malaise, and vomiting. Symptoms generally begin 2-5 days after consumption of contaminated food. Symptoms last for about a week in most people but last for up to three weeks in 20 percent of cases.

In addition, Campylobacter infection occasionally results in complications such as arthritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome, which is characterized by the sudden onset of paralysis. Anyone who believes they may have become ill with Campylobacter should contact his or her healthcare provider.

Food Safety News

Dairy Products Recalled for Possible Listeria Contamination

Oasis Brands, Inc. of Miami, FL is recalling select lots of various Lacteos Santa Martha products with Best by dates of 07/01/14 through 12/31/14, because the products has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.

The recalled products were distributed in Florida, Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina from April 1st thought October 14, 2014 to distributors and retail stores. The products can be identified by the batch ID code (best used by date) sticker on the label of the plastic bag of 07/01/14 through 12/31/14.

Queso Seco Centroamericano (Dry White Cheese) 1Lb UPC 876593 001874
Queso Seco Olanchano (Dry Cheese) 1Lb UPC 635349 000840
Queso Seco Hondureno (Dry Cheese) 12oz UPC 876593 001690
Quesito Casero (Fresh Curd) 12oz UPC 635349 000406
My Queso (Latin Flavor Cheese) 1Lb UPC 635349 000406
Queso Cuzcatlan (Salvadorean Flavor Cheese) 1Lb UPC 635349 000406
Queso para Freir (Cheese for Frying) 12oz UPC 635349 000758
Queso Fresco (Fresh Cheese) 12oz UPC 635349 000703
Cuajada en Hoja Queso Casero Hecho a Mano (Fresh Curd) 12oz UPC 635349 000895
Crema Centroamericana (Soft Blend Dairy Spread) 1Lb UPC 876593 001898
Mantequilla Hondurena (Honduran Style Cream) 1Lb UPC 635349 000772
Crema Nica (Grade A Cultured Cream) 1Lb UPC 635349 000468
HonduCrema Olanchana (Olanchana Style Soft Blend Dairy Spread) 1Lb UPC 635349 000598
Crema Guatemalteca (Guatemalan Style Cream) 1Lb UPC 635349 000819
Crema GuateLinda (Guatemalan Style Cream) 1Lb UPC 635349 000390
Crema Cuzcatlan (Salvadorean Style Cream) 1Lb UPC 635349 000444

 

FDA is investigating illnesses associated with the product.

The recall is the result of routine sampling by The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Food Inspectors and subsequent FDA environmental samples that revealed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes. The company ceased production and distribution of the product as FDA and the company continue their investigation as to what caused the problem.

Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

Children in KY E. Coli Outbreak Drank Milk From Raw Milk Dairy

The five Kentucky children hospitalized in an E. coli outbreak earlier this month all consumed milk from the same raw milk dairy, according to multiple reports and the mother of one of the sickened children.

The Kentucky Department for Public Health has not announced the source of the outbreak. Microbial testing of animals, milk samples, and environmental samples from the dairy in question came back negative for E. coli.

Since tests at the dairy did not reveal any contamination, the state health department did not order the dairy to suspend sales.

The state health department has not returned calls from Food Safety News looking for updates on the outbreak investigation. On Thursday, a spokesman for the Lincoln Trail District Health Department in Elizabethtown, KY, said that the state health department would be publishing an update by Friday, but it had not yet surfaced as of Monday evening.

Because no additional illnesses have been reported since the outbreak announcement, the source of contamination is not believed to pose a continuing public health threat, the spokesman said.

Amy Nordyke, the mother of an 18-month-old boy hospitalized in the outbreak, told Food Safety News that each of the children sickened in the outbreak belong to families in the same food club that allows legal access to raw milk from one dairy.

Raw milk is not legal to sell at retail in Kentucky, but residents can buy into food clubs — or herd shares — through which raw milk can be legally purchased.

Nordyke’s son fell ill with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a kidney disease associated with severe E. coli infections. He spent most of September in the hospital, but was discharged last week and is recovering.

Nordyke said three other children from her family’s food club were checked into the same children’s hospital at the same time as her son. Each of those children was also given raw milk by their parents, she said.

After the five children fell ill in early September, the food club advised its members to dispose of any remaining raw milk as a precaution, according to well-respected raw milk journalist David Gumpert. The club did not order any more milk for two weeks, but recently began ordering it again, Gumpert said.

Food Safety News will continue to watch for an update from the Kentucky Department for Public Health. As with many foodborne illness outbreaks, the investigation may not uncover enough evidence to conclusively pinpoint a source.

Young children are more susceptible to foodborne illness compared to healthy adults due to having developing immune systems. Populations with greater susceptibility to foodborne pathogens also include pregnant women, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, raw milk is 150 times more likely to cause foodborne illness compared to pasteurized milk, and it hospitalizes 13 times more individuals than pasteurized dairy products.

Food Safety News

Mercy Goes After Big Cheese With Video Taken at NM Dairy

The Los Angeles-based Mercy for Animals has a knack for uncovering animal abuse, often in isolated places, that is the kind imposing enough stress and pain to also be a food safety concern and egregious enough to bring condemnation by world-renowned animal-welfare experts.

A week ago, the group shared its latest undercover report and video with the New Mexico Livestock Board. Ray E. Baca, executive director of that state law enforcement agency, told Food Safety News the “workers’ mistreatment of dairy cattle as seen in (the) online video” is now the subject of a Livestock Board investigation.

Baca said the board “takes allegations of animal cruelty very seriously.” Upon completion of the investigation, it will make a report to the Chavez County District Attorney’s Office, which will decide if anyone should be prosecuted.

The investigation involves the Winchester Dairy located near tiny Dexter, NM, about a half-hour south of Roswell, NM. It was there that the undercover video was taken, and Mercy documents the location in a separate video released to the media showing that its operative was present at the dairy as recently as August.

Using a hidden camera, Mercy’s operative recorded workers abusing the cows, even stabbing them with screwdrivers and dragging “downer” cows with a tractor in some of the most sickening video seen since the one showing a front-end loader shoving cows into the kill box at a Chico, CA, slaughterhouse emerged in 2010. (That undercover investigation, carried out by the Humane Society of the United States, resulted in the largest beef recall in history from the supplier to the National School Lunch Program.)

Since Mercy revealed the Winchester video, the dairy fired the workers who are shown abusing cows in the video and apparently temporarily shut down operations and relocated its cows. And yesterday, Mercy launched a public relations campaign regarding the disturbing incident.

The immediate targets of the campaign are the nation’s top pizza chains such as Domino’s, Pizza Hut and Papa John’s. That’s because they get much of their cheese from Denver-based Leprino Foods, the world’s largest producer of mozzarella. Mercy’s website now carries its slickly produced “Slice of Cruelty” campaign aimed at sharing the sickening abuse video with activists (and consumers).

Mercy’s PR experts know their social media strategy will usually bring a response from corporate targets in fairly short order. By early afternoon on Wednesday, Leprino Foods, noting that the company “cares deeply about the health and welfare of the animals on the farms that supply our milk,” announced that because of the animal abuse, it had terminated all shipments from Winchester Dairy. “Leprino Foods is not receiving any milk from this operation,” the company said.

At the same time, Leprino expressed confidence in New Mexico dairy farmers. “This incident does not reflect the daily care and comfort that New Mexico dairy farmers provide their cows,” the Leprino statement said. “The farm has taken quick and decisive action. Information about the incident was immediately shared with the proper New Mexico authorities, who are conducting an investigation so that the individuals responsible can be held accountable for their actions.”

Meanwhile, Tim McIntyre, vice president of communications for Domino’s, said that while no act of cruelty can ever be condoned, this was an isolated incident at one dairy farm out of 47,000 in the U.S. He said Mercy should be thanked for bringing the behavior of the workers to light, but he also noted they have been fired, the report is being thoroughly investigated, and the dairy has moved its herd to the care of other farms.

“What we do know is it is not an issue with our cheese supplier (Leprino’s),” McIntyre said.

Mercy last mixed it up with a state’s dairy industry early this year in Idaho where it unsuccessfully opposed a new agricultural protection law designed to prevent these sorts of undercover investigations. In its attempts to prevent passage of the law, Mercy released additional video from its 2012 undercover investigation of Bettencourt Dairy showing workers sexually molesting animals.

That upset the Idaho Dairymen’s Association, which said it showed that Mercy’s goals are more about hurting the dairy industry and its brands than protecting animals. Bettencourt fired the five workers involved in that incident, and they were subsequently convicted of animal abuse but apparently without the molestation video ever figuring in the criminal investigation.

Release of the sexual molestation video also backfired on Mercy as the Idaho Legislature joined Utah, Iowa and Missouri in passing what critics call “ag-gag” laws making it illegal to go undercover and shoot video of animal agricultural operations without permission from the owner. (North Dakota, Montana and Kansas have earlier versions of agricultural protection laws that were passed in 1990-91.)

Idaho’s new law is currently being challenged by other animal-rights groups and media organizations for its potential violations of the First and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

This time, however, Mercy’s PR professionals say their video evidence “was immediately turned over” to New Mexico officials. They also vetted the serious nature of the abuse by having it reviewed by arguably the world’s best-known animal-welfare expert, Colorado State University’s Dr. Temple Grandin.

She said that kicking and shocking the cows and holding them above the ground was “definitely abusive” and that the bellowing indicated the animals were in “severe distress.” Grandin also sees the blame going beyond the fired workers to “mismanagement” for failure to provide proper training and equipment.

Nathan Runkle, the president of Mercy, blamed Leprino Foods for allowing “a culture of cruelty to flourish in its cheese supply chain.”

Livestock abuse like that depicted on the video is a misdemeanor under New Mexico law and can become a felony with repeat offenses, or if the animal cruelty involves “intentionally or maliciously torturing, mutilating, or poisoning an animal or maliciously killing an animal.”

Only after the investigation is complete will the New Mexico Livestock Board or the Chavez County District Attorney’s Office have more to say, according to Baca.

Food Safety News

FDA Warning Letters: Dairy Farm, Seafood Processor, Dietary Supplement Manufacturers

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently published warning letters issued to a dairy farm, a seafood company and two dietary supplement makers.   

R Style Holsteins of Edison, OH, received a warning letter after selling a cow for slaughter that was considered adulterated because of unacceptable levels of drug residues in its liver.

FDA cited Stock Island Lobster Company of Key West, FL, for “serious violations of the seafood Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) regulation.”

These violations were failing to list critical points and critical limits in the company’s HACCP plan and failing to follow monitoring procedures for King Mackerel, FDA stated. These include determining the location of harvest for each lot at the time of receipt, determining the adequacy of ice surrounding the product twice daily, and making and keeping an accurate record for the internal temperature of the fish at time of receipt.

Big Easy Confections of Covington, LA, received a warning letter about “serious violations of the Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) regulations” for dietary supplements. Most of the letter states that the company’s response to the issues from May 27 failed to include supporting documentation for changes made.

The facility also failed to conduct at least one appropriate test or examination to verify the identity of any component that is a dietary ingredient prior to its use, according to the agency. One of the company’s products was also considered misbranded because its label did not identify it with the term “dietary supplement” or include the name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer or distributor.

Another dietary supplement manufacturer, EnerHealth Botanicals of Longmont, CO, faced “serious violations of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.” FDA determined that five of the company’s products — including “Parasite Purge Herbal Remedy” and “Daily Immune Support” — are “promoted for conditions that cause them to be drugs” and are “not generally recognized as safe and effective for the … referenced uses.”

FDA goes on to state that even if the products did not have therapeutic claims that make them “unapproved new drugs,” they would still be considered adulterated because they were not prepared, packed or held under conditions that meet CGMP regulations.

After inspecting the facility in July 2013, FDA found that EnerHealth, among other things, failed to conduct at least one appropriate test or examination to verify the identity of a dietary ingredient, failed to prepare and follow a written master manufacturing record (MMR), and failed to establish and follow written procedures for packing and labeling, holding and distributing, handling returned dietary supplements, and review and investigation of product complaints. Also, FDA found parts of the responses provided by the company in August and October 2012 to be inadequate.

In the 2014 letter, FDA added that two products are misbranded and that even if the “Daily Immune Support” and “Lung Renewal Herbal Remedy” products were not “unapproved new drugs, they would still be misbranded foods.” All four products failed to have the term “dietary supplement” on their labels. “Lung Renewal Herbal Remedy,” “EchinOsha,” and “Liver Cleanse” also failed to have nutrition labeling. And the “Daily Immune Support” label faced some issues with ingredient declaration, namely that it included botanical ingredients, but not the part of the plant from which each is derived, the agency stated.

In each letter, FDA requested that the farms and companies provide written responses detailing steps taken to bring them into compliance with food safety laws and regulations, to correct violations cited in the letters, and to prevent their recurrence.

Recipients of the warning letters have 15 working days from receipt to outline specific steps they have taken to come into compliance with the law.

Food Safety News

Wisconsin Raw Milk Dairy Farmer’s Business Improves After Prosecution

What’s Wisconsin’s “raw milk outlaw” been up to since the state appeals court upheld his misdemeanor conviction on July 17 and imposed a $ 1,000 fine?

Well, according to a recent profile by the Wisconsin State Journal, Vernon Hershberger is back home on the farm with his 10 children building up membership in his raw milk buyers club called Grazin Acres LLC.

Since the Loganville, WI, raw milk dairy farmer was found not guilty 13 months ago of producing milk, operating a dairy plant, and selling food in a retail establishment, all without licenses, his raw milk business has increased by 25 percent to about 325 families.

All the charges stem from a 2010 raid on his dairy farm, including breaking the holding order the state Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection placed on products. That’s the only charge that resulted in a conviction by the Sauk County jury, and Hershberger lost on appeal.

Hershberger credits his business growth with the relationships he built while the state pursued charges against him, including jurors, sheriff’s deputies, and others. The State Journal reported that Hershberger has emerged from his confrontation with prosecutors as “the face of the growing raw milk industry in Wisconsin and the nation.”

The newspaper states that raw milk advocates believe there has been a dramatic fall-off in enforcement actions since the Hershberger trial. Because he was acquitted on the licensing counts, Hershberger came out against Rep. Sen. Glenn Grothman’s bill to ease restrictions on licensed raw milk dairies.

Food Safety News

Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes

Finland’s love of milk has been traced back to 2500 BC thanks to high-tech techniques to analyse residues preserved in fragments of ancient pots.

The Finns are the world’s biggest milk drinkers today but experts had previously been unable to establish whether prehistoric dairy farming was possible in the harsh environment that far north, where there is snow for up to four months a year.

Research by the Universities of Bristol and Helsinki, published July 30 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, is the first of its kind to identify that dairying took place at this latitude — 60 degrees north of the equator.

This is equally as far north as Canada’s Northwestern territories, Anchorage in Alaska, Southern Greenland and near Yakutsk in Siberia.

Researchers used a series of techniques, not just to analyse the ancient pots, but also to look at modern-day Finnish peoples’ ability to digest milk into adulthood.

By comparing the residues found in the walls of cooking pots from two separate eras and cultures, dating to circa 3900 BC to 3300 BC and circa 2500 BC, it was evident that the more recent pottery fragments showed evidence of milk fats.

This coincided with the transition from a culture of hunting and fishing — relying mainly on marine foods — to the arrival of ‘Corded Ware’ settlements which we now know saw the introduction of animal domestication.

Lead author Dr Lucy Cramp, from the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bristol University, said: “This is remarkable evidence which proves that four and a half thousand years ago, Stone Age people must have been foddering and sheltering domesticated animals over harsh winters, in conditions that even nowadays we would find challenging.”

The results also drew a connection between the ‘Corded Ware’ farming settlers — who were likely to have been genetically different to the hunting and fishing communities — and modern day Finns.

Fellow researcher Dr Volker Heyd added: “Our results show a clear link between an incoming pre-historic population, milk drinking and the ability to digest milk in adulthood still visible in the genetic distribution of modern Finland, which remains one of the highest consumers of dairy products in the world.”

Professor Richard Evershed, from the School of Chemistry said: “It never ceases to amaze me that these sensitive chemical signatures of changing human life survive in the archaeological record for thousands of years. And it leaves one pondering what was motivating the people to move into these challenging regions?”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bristol. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes

Finland’s love of milk has been traced back to 2500 BC thanks to high-tech techniques to analyse residues preserved in fragments of ancient pots.

The Finns are the world’s biggest milk drinkers today but experts had previously been unable to establish whether prehistoric dairy farming was possible in the harsh environment that far north, where there is snow for up to four months a year.

Research by the Universities of Bristol and Helsinki, published July 30 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, is the first of its kind to identify that dairying took place at this latitude — 60 degrees north of the equator.

This is equally as far north as Canada’s Northwestern territories, Anchorage in Alaska, Southern Greenland and near Yakutsk in Siberia.

Researchers used a series of techniques, not just to analyse the ancient pots, but also to look at modern-day Finnish peoples’ ability to digest milk into adulthood.

By comparing the residues found in the walls of cooking pots from two separate eras and cultures, dating to circa 3900 BC to 3300 BC and circa 2500 BC, it was evident that the more recent pottery fragments showed evidence of milk fats.

This coincided with the transition from a culture of hunting and fishing — relying mainly on marine foods — to the arrival of ‘Corded Ware’ settlements which we now know saw the introduction of animal domestication.

Lead author Dr Lucy Cramp, from the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bristol University, said: “This is remarkable evidence which proves that four and a half thousand years ago, Stone Age people must have been foddering and sheltering domesticated animals over harsh winters, in conditions that even nowadays we would find challenging.”

The results also drew a connection between the ‘Corded Ware’ farming settlers — who were likely to have been genetically different to the hunting and fishing communities — and modern day Finns.

Fellow researcher Dr Volker Heyd added: “Our results show a clear link between an incoming pre-historic population, milk drinking and the ability to digest milk in adulthood still visible in the genetic distribution of modern Finland, which remains one of the highest consumers of dairy products in the world.”

Professor Richard Evershed, from the School of Chemistry said: “It never ceases to amaze me that these sensitive chemical signatures of changing human life survive in the archaeological record for thousands of years. And it leaves one pondering what was motivating the people to move into these challenging regions?”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bristol. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes

Finland’s love of milk has been traced back to 2500 BC thanks to high-tech techniques to analyse residues preserved in fragments of ancient pots.

The Finns are the world’s biggest milk drinkers today but experts had previously been unable to establish whether prehistoric dairy farming was possible in the harsh environment that far north, where there is snow for up to four months a year.

Research by the Universities of Bristol and Helsinki, published July 30 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, is the first of its kind to identify that dairying took place at this latitude — 60 degrees north of the equator.

This is equally as far north as Canada’s Northwestern territories, Anchorage in Alaska, Southern Greenland and near Yakutsk in Siberia.

Researchers used a series of techniques, not just to analyse the ancient pots, but also to look at modern-day Finnish peoples’ ability to digest milk into adulthood.

By comparing the residues found in the walls of cooking pots from two separate eras and cultures, dating to circa 3900 BC to 3300 BC and circa 2500 BC, it was evident that the more recent pottery fragments showed evidence of milk fats.

This coincided with the transition from a culture of hunting and fishing — relying mainly on marine foods — to the arrival of ‘Corded Ware’ settlements which we now know saw the introduction of animal domestication.

Lead author Dr Lucy Cramp, from the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bristol University, said: “This is remarkable evidence which proves that four and a half thousand years ago, Stone Age people must have been foddering and sheltering domesticated animals over harsh winters, in conditions that even nowadays we would find challenging.”

The results also drew a connection between the ‘Corded Ware’ farming settlers — who were likely to have been genetically different to the hunting and fishing communities — and modern day Finns.

Fellow researcher Dr Volker Heyd added: “Our results show a clear link between an incoming pre-historic population, milk drinking and the ability to digest milk in adulthood still visible in the genetic distribution of modern Finland, which remains one of the highest consumers of dairy products in the world.”

Professor Richard Evershed, from the School of Chemistry said: “It never ceases to amaze me that these sensitive chemical signatures of changing human life survive in the archaeological record for thousands of years. And it leaves one pondering what was motivating the people to move into these challenging regions?”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bristol. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes

Finland’s love of milk has been traced back to 2500 BC thanks to high-tech techniques to analyse residues preserved in fragments of ancient pots.

The Finns are the world’s biggest milk drinkers today but experts had previously been unable to establish whether prehistoric dairy farming was possible in the harsh environment that far north, where there is snow for up to four months a year.

Research by the Universities of Bristol and Helsinki, published July 30 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, is the first of its kind to identify that dairying took place at this latitude — 60 degrees north of the equator.

This is equally as far north as Canada’s Northwestern territories, Anchorage in Alaska, Southern Greenland and near Yakutsk in Siberia.

Researchers used a series of techniques, not just to analyse the ancient pots, but also to look at modern-day Finnish peoples’ ability to digest milk into adulthood.

By comparing the residues found in the walls of cooking pots from two separate eras and cultures, dating to circa 3900 BC to 3300 BC and circa 2500 BC, it was evident that the more recent pottery fragments showed evidence of milk fats.

This coincided with the transition from a culture of hunting and fishing — relying mainly on marine foods — to the arrival of ‘Corded Ware’ settlements which we now know saw the introduction of animal domestication.

Lead author Dr Lucy Cramp, from the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bristol University, said: “This is remarkable evidence which proves that four and a half thousand years ago, Stone Age people must have been foddering and sheltering domesticated animals over harsh winters, in conditions that even nowadays we would find challenging.”

The results also drew a connection between the ‘Corded Ware’ farming settlers — who were likely to have been genetically different to the hunting and fishing communities — and modern day Finns.

Fellow researcher Dr Volker Heyd added: “Our results show a clear link between an incoming pre-historic population, milk drinking and the ability to digest milk in adulthood still visible in the genetic distribution of modern Finland, which remains one of the highest consumers of dairy products in the world.”

Professor Richard Evershed, from the School of Chemistry said: “It never ceases to amaze me that these sensitive chemical signatures of changing human life survive in the archaeological record for thousands of years. And it leaves one pondering what was motivating the people to move into these challenging regions?”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bristol. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily