Blog Archives

Organic supply might not keep up with demand

Because of difficulty in finding suitable land, one of the biggest obstacles for suppliers of organic produce is meeting demand.

That theme was top of mind during a breakout session featuring suppliers at the recent Organic Produce Summit, held in Monterey, CA. Titled “Organic Produce Innovation: Next Generation, Next Geography,” a trio of speakers and moderator Nate Lewis of the Organic Trade Association explored the topic. The OTA executive began the discussion asking the group what the biggest challenge is with organic produce.

“Available ground is the biggest challenge,” said Jerrett Stoffel, vice president of operations for Taylor Farms in Salinas, CA. He noted that most of the conventional ground that is relatively easy to transition to organic production has already been converted. Taylor Farms continues to look for new ground but it is difficult to find, and much more expensive to convert.

Greg Holzman, founder of Purity Organics, said he travels extensively and continually tries to convince growers all over the world to switch to organic production. As such the company sources extensively from Central America and South America for its eponymous juices. Purity Organics only has an organic option that it offers to its customers, so it really can’t help growers market their transitional product.

Soren Bjorn, executive vice president of Driscoll Strawberry Associates Inc. in Watsonville, CA, said that is not the case with his firm. Because of some very conservative residue standards by some export buyers, he said transitional fruit is a good match for Driscoll’s export sales, which does help the company “sell” the concept of organic production to its growers. However, Driscoll’s relies on growers all over the world for its output and each of those growers must make their own business decision about growing organic berries. The company does have an aggressive program, especially in Mexico, to help new growers get started, which may help alleviate some supply issues in the future.

Lewis of OTA noted that the trade association is working with the federal government on standards that will allow for the marketing of transitional fruit as growers move their production from conventional to organic. While this may convince some growers to transition from conventional to organic, he said this idea has detractors as some practitioners do not want to cannibalize organic sales nor create an “organic light” category.

Bjorn believes genetics, technology and geography will play important roles in increasing the supply of organic berries. He said genetic research resulting in new varieties could allow production on marginal land, and should help increase yields as well. He also said that advancements in the use of bio-pesticides will help organic berries deal with pest pressures. Advancements in technology, Bjorn said, could help growers move the crop out of the soil and into potted production, which may allow a version of factory farming and greatly increase the supply of available land. The company is also continually exploring new regions of the world where strawberry production, including organic production, may take root.

Stoffel said that organic spinach is having a very difficult time because of disease problems for which there is no solution for organic production. At this point in time, he said “organic spinach is probably not a sustainable crop.”

The suppliers also talked about climate change and discussed its impact on both conventional and organic production. Lewis said warming temperatures have allowed the state of Washington to have a crop landscape that rivals California. While a warming trend in more northern locations may open up land for fruit and vegetable production of all kinds, other areas are getting too warm to grow some traditional crops. Even in Oxnard, CA, Bjorn said there are fields that no longer get much ocean cooling and so they are no longer suitable for strawberry production.

Stoffel said moving to areas that are now warmer may offer some opportunities, but generally those crop windows are shorter and require a lot more planning.

The three panelists took a much different view of the direction each of their individual companies will be taking in the near and distant future. Bjorn said Driscoll’s is concentrating on its four berry crops — strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and blackberries — with no plans to diversify. Holzman said Purity Organics is always looking to add to its stable of operations and added that the firm’s papaya production is on the rise. Stoffel indicated that Taylor Farms will basically grow anything it can sell. “We are driven by consumer tastes,” he said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Asia Fruit Logistica registers highest ever demand

Asia Fruit Logistica registers highest ever demand

Meeting top-quality buyers, suppliers and service providers in one place is a challenge. But consider the number and value of the business opportunities that present themselves when that challenge is met. Asia Fruit Logistica is the unique fresh fruit and vegetable business hub to achieve this goal in Asia.

Asia’s leading trade show for the fresh fruit and vegetable business, which takes place at AsiaWorld-Expo Center in Hong Kong on 4-6 September 2013, is seeing more demand for stand space than ever before.

Companies from 34 countries and all five continents have already registered to exhibit at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, with exhibitors from Ecuador, Morocco and Cyprus making their debut appearance at the show.

Vietnam will also have a national pavilion at this year’s event for the very first time. Coordinated by the country’s fruit and vegetable association, Vinafruit, the Vietnam pavilion will feature eight exhibitors including exporters and importers from the country.

“We believe that exhibiting at Asia Fruit Logistica is a great opportunity to promote Vietnamese fresh fruit to the world and to all our partners in Asia,” said Vinafruit’s Nauyen Van Ky. “Our exporters are looking forward to securing contracts, and to meeting potential quality partners and clients in Asia and worldwide as well as exchanging experience and know-how.”

With its diverse climate and capacity to produce a wide variety of fruit and vegetables year-round, Vietnam boasts significant export potential. The country has set an ambitious target to increase the value of its overall fruit and vegetable exports to US$ 1.2bn by 2020, from US$ 829m last year.

Dragon fruit, pomelo, mangoes and pineapples as well as sweet potato and other vegetables will be among the key products displayed at the Vietnam pavilion.

Many countries are joining Vietnam with national pavilions at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, including Argentina, Australia, China, Chile, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Greece, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa, Taiwan and the US.

“It’s amazing how big Asia Fruit Logistica has become and how quickly it’s grown,” said Joon Hong Choi of major South Korean importer Sooil Commerce, a regular visitor to the trade show. “Many Korean importers and retailers are visiting to meet with Asian buyers and suppliers as well their suppliers from other parts of the world like Chile and the US. They can meet everybody they need to see at this event.”

With only a few stands still available at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, book now to secure your access to Asia’s leading buyers. Visitors who register online now (www.asiafruitlogistica.com/tickets) save up to 35 per cent on their admission fee.

For more information:
Sinenart Baramirattanachai
Tel: +66 2 941 4600
[email protected] 
www.asiafruitlogistica.com

Publication date: 6/27/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Chinese Demand for Dairy Products Spurs U.S. Exports

What happens when 1.36 billion people in China migrate toward cities, draw middle-class wages and shift toward “Western” foods such as ice cream, cheese pizza and strawberry-flavored milk? One result: larger profits for U.S. dairy processors, who, like dairy exporters in other countries, are charging record prices for their products at home and abroad, according to Bloomberg News.

China’s growing thirst for milk helped push American dairy exports to a record $ 6.7 billion in 2013, according to the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC). January U.S. dairy exports were 35 percent higher than a year earlier, putting the month’s exports ahead of the staggering 30-percent annual growth Bloomberg News reported in 2013.

According to the 2014 Tetra Pak Dairy Index, China is just one plane of opportunity. The $ 3.69 price tag on the average gallon of whole milk sold in April 2014 is 7.5 percent more than just a year before, the highest since September 2011. In just three years, when Tetra Pak’s research predicts global dairy demand will overtake production, prices could be even loftier — especially in China, the world’s top dairy importer.

This does not mean all is rosy with U.S. dairy exports; sales to China declined 24 percent during August. However, year-to-date (January-August) exports by volume for 2014 are still 21-percent greater than last year, prices remain high, and there are still reasons to retain a positive long view.

Demand for Dairy Products Grows in China

What’s behind this trend and how can U.S. processors benefit? Milk and cheese are relatively new to the Chinese diet, says Todd Shilk, dairy category manager at Tetra Pak U.S. and Canada, but consumers’ taste for them is growing. A wave of Western culture has swept into the country, bringing with it dairy-based foods. Baskin-Robbins and Pizza Hut have ambitious Chinese expansion plans; drinking milk is increasingly viewed as healthy — especially for kids — and has caught on with an increasingly affluent middle class.

Tetra Pak research shows that most liquid milk consumed in China (76 percent) is ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated, which holds advantages over traditional pasteurization. When pasteurized traditionally, dairy products are heated and then packaged. This milk must be continuously refrigerated and still has a brief shelf life (5-15 days).

UHT dairy products are briefly heated to high temperatures, then filled into aseptic, shelf-stable cartons, lasting up to a year without refrigeration or preservatives. Traditionally, most milk exports to Asia have been powder; over the past 15 years, however, UHT milk exports have grown steadily and should continue to climb by 3.1 percent CAGR from 2013 to 2016, according to the Dairy Index.

UHT milk suits China’s transport infrastructure, which cannot support quick delivery of chilled dairy. And Chinese consumption of UHT milk jumped from 18 million pounds in 2010 to about 331 million pounds in 2013. The USDEC suggests this could quadruple again to 1.3 billion pounds by 2020. UHT milk also empowers use of renewable packaging materials and offers lighter weight and independence from refrigeration. This type of packaging delivers benefits throughout the supply chain.

Ross Christieson, USDEC senior vice president of market research and analysis, says that rapid growth in China’s shelf-stable milk market is a gold mine for U.S. dairy exporters.

“The U.S. industry produces large volumes of UHT-treated milk annually, yet we have played only a minor role in serving booming Chinese consumption,” he says. “Chinese buyers have expressed growing interest in U.S. supply to meet spiraling demand.”

The U.S. Dairy Products Market is Mature

Meanwhile, in the U.S., fluid milk consumption continues a decades-long slide. Bright spots include value-added innovations such as flavored, organic and nutraceutical products. Last year, American milk sales were the lowest since 1984; culprits include fewer people eating breakfast at home (when more than half of fluid milk in the U.S. is consumed). Fewer than 50 percent of adults now drink milk, and whole-milk consumption is half what it was 30 years ago.

U.S. dairy producers should still focus on opportunities in their homeland. Dairy innovation could likely abate the slide in consumption here. As novel milk flavors grabbed Chinese consumers and pushed sales up in that country, similar innovations could work magic in the U.S.

The Tetra Pak Dairy Index shows that the globe is dotted with areas of opportunity, especially in developing areas. U.S. export sales to Mexico, for example, increased 18 percent in August. Most U.S. producers, however, are targeting China, where exports were up 21 percent in the first half of 2014 compared with a year ago and prices are high.

Expansion in Chinese dairy production can’t keep up with demand, Shilk says, adding dairy production there will likely continue lagging for years to come. Eventually, entrepreneurial dairy farmers could close the gap, but, he adds, “in the meantime, the opportunity is there to sell a lot of milk.”

Producers entering the market now can get a jump on building brand loyalty and creating long-term sales opportunities. As U.S. retailers (such as Walmart and Costco) and European counterparts (Tesco, ALDI and Carrefour among them) enter China, they offer a natural path to market for their partner dairies, Shilk says.

Tetra Pak Insights on Chinese Milk Consumption

• Milk isn’t a cultural norm: Nearly all Chinese have some level of lactose intolerance or lactase deficiency, making lactose-free products a must — especially for the kids’ market.

• Consumption tends toward single serve: Most milk in China is consumed in single-serve portion packs, Shilk says. Consumers finish packs in one sitting, so storage isn’t necessary.

• UHT milk is 76 percent of the market: Refrigeration remains relatively uncommon in the country; shelf-safe UHT-processed milk is the norm. Seventy percent of chilled milk is home-delivered or sold in specialty shops.

• China is the world’s largest flavored milk market: Chinese consumers are on track to consume 4.13 million liters in 2014, according to a Tetra Pak report commissioned from Compass Products and Packages. Flavored milk is considered an area of competitive advantage for the U.S. (the top flavored milk consumer) over New Zealand (the top dairy exporter) to China, the report says.

Food Safety News

Chinese Demand for Dairy Products Spurs U.S. Exports

What happens when 1.36 billion people in China migrate toward cities, draw middle-class wages and shift toward “Western” foods such as ice cream, cheese pizza and strawberry-flavored milk? One result: larger profits for U.S. dairy processors, who, like dairy exporters in other countries, are charging record prices for their products at home and abroad, according to Bloomberg News.

China’s growing thirst for milk helped push American dairy exports to a record $ 6.7 billion in 2013, according to the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC). January U.S. dairy exports were 35 percent higher than a year earlier, putting the month’s exports ahead of the staggering 30-percent annual growth Bloomberg News reported in 2013.

According to the 2014 Tetra Pak Dairy Index, China is just one plane of opportunity. The $ 3.69 price tag on the average gallon of whole milk sold in April 2014 is 7.5 percent more than just a year before, the highest since September 2011. In just three years, when Tetra Pak’s research predicts global dairy demand will overtake production, prices could be even loftier — especially in China, the world’s top dairy importer.

This does not mean all is rosy with U.S. dairy exports; sales to China declined 24 percent during August. However, year-to-date (January-August) exports by volume for 2014 are still 21-percent greater than last year, prices remain high, and there are still reasons to retain a positive long view.

Demand for Dairy Products Grows in China

What’s behind this trend and how can U.S. processors benefit? Milk and cheese are relatively new to the Chinese diet, says Todd Shilk, dairy category manager at Tetra Pak U.S. and Canada, but consumers’ taste for them is growing. A wave of Western culture has swept into the country, bringing with it dairy-based foods. Baskin-Robbins and Pizza Hut have ambitious Chinese expansion plans; drinking milk is increasingly viewed as healthy — especially for kids — and has caught on with an increasingly affluent middle class.

Tetra Pak research shows that most liquid milk consumed in China (76 percent) is ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated, which holds advantages over traditional pasteurization. When pasteurized traditionally, dairy products are heated and then packaged. This milk must be continuously refrigerated and still has a brief shelf life (5-15 days).

UHT dairy products are briefly heated to high temperatures, then filled into aseptic, shelf-stable cartons, lasting up to a year without refrigeration or preservatives. Traditionally, most milk exports to Asia have been powder; over the past 15 years, however, UHT milk exports have grown steadily and should continue to climb by 3.1 percent CAGR from 2013 to 2016, according to the Dairy Index.

UHT milk suits China’s transport infrastructure, which cannot support quick delivery of chilled dairy. And Chinese consumption of UHT milk jumped from 18 million pounds in 2010 to about 331 million pounds in 2013. The USDEC suggests this could quadruple again to 1.3 billion pounds by 2020. UHT milk also empowers use of renewable packaging materials and offers lighter weight and independence from refrigeration. This type of packaging delivers benefits throughout the supply chain.

Ross Christieson, USDEC senior vice president of market research and analysis, says that rapid growth in China’s shelf-stable milk market is a gold mine for U.S. dairy exporters.

“The U.S. industry produces large volumes of UHT-treated milk annually, yet we have played only a minor role in serving booming Chinese consumption,” he says. “Chinese buyers have expressed growing interest in U.S. supply to meet spiraling demand.”

The U.S. Dairy Products Market is Mature

Meanwhile, in the U.S., fluid milk consumption continues a decades-long slide. Bright spots include value-added innovations such as flavored, organic and nutraceutical products. Last year, American milk sales were the lowest since 1984; culprits include fewer people eating breakfast at home (when more than half of fluid milk in the U.S. is consumed). Fewer than 50 percent of adults now drink milk, and whole-milk consumption is half what it was 30 years ago.

U.S. dairy producers should still focus on opportunities in their homeland. Dairy innovation could likely abate the slide in consumption here. As novel milk flavors grabbed Chinese consumers and pushed sales up in that country, similar innovations could work magic in the U.S.

The Tetra Pak Dairy Index shows that the globe is dotted with areas of opportunity, especially in developing areas. U.S. export sales to Mexico, for example, increased 18 percent in August. Most U.S. producers, however, are targeting China, where exports were up 21 percent in the first half of 2014 compared with a year ago and prices are high.

Expansion in Chinese dairy production can’t keep up with demand, Shilk says, adding dairy production there will likely continue lagging for years to come. Eventually, entrepreneurial dairy farmers could close the gap, but, he adds, “in the meantime, the opportunity is there to sell a lot of milk.”

Producers entering the market now can get a jump on building brand loyalty and creating long-term sales opportunities. As U.S. retailers (such as Walmart and Costco) and European counterparts (Tesco, ALDI and Carrefour among them) enter China, they offer a natural path to market for their partner dairies, Shilk says.

Tetra Pak Insights on Chinese Milk Consumption

• Milk isn’t a cultural norm: Nearly all Chinese have some level of lactose intolerance or lactase deficiency, making lactose-free products a must — especially for the kids’ market.

• Consumption tends toward single serve: Most milk in China is consumed in single-serve portion packs, Shilk says. Consumers finish packs in one sitting, so storage isn’t necessary.

• UHT milk is 76 percent of the market: Refrigeration remains relatively uncommon in the country; shelf-safe UHT-processed milk is the norm. Seventy percent of chilled milk is home-delivered or sold in specialty shops.

• China is the world’s largest flavored milk market: Chinese consumers are on track to consume 4.13 million liters in 2014, according to a Tetra Pak report commissioned from Compass Products and Packages. Flavored milk is considered an area of competitive advantage for the U.S. (the top flavored milk consumer) over New Zealand (the top dairy exporter) to China, the report says.

Food Safety News

Citrus import demand up and growing in the United States

While per capita consumption of fresh citrus has declined since 1980, total U.S. consumption of citrus fruits has increased 20 percent since that time, according to a report titled “U.S. Citrus Import Demand: Seasonality and Substitution,” compiled by Katherine L. Baldwin, formerly of the Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, was presented at the Southern Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting in Birmingham, AL, in February 2012.

Imported-Navels-cut-fruitImported summer Navel oranges from DNE World Fruit.Over the same period, total U.S. production of citrus fruits has been flat to declining, including the virtual disbandment of the U.S. commercial lime industry.

In order to fulfill domestic fresh citrus demand, imported citrus has increased in importance, accounting for more than 20 percent of total domestic consumption in the 2009-10 crop year.

Today citrus fruits make up one-fifth of all fresh fruit consumed in the United States.

Using quarterly U.S. import data for several citrus commodities, researchers for the report employed a demand model and evaluated aspects of seasonality.

All citrus fruits exhibit some seasonality in their imports, which is a result of peak harvesting schedules of exporters.

According to the USDA Economic Research Service, oranges in both fresh and juice form alone account for nearly 10 percent of total per capita fruit consumption.

Orange imports in 2009-10 were 10 times higher than levels seen in 1980-81. Regardless, imports still only account for a minute 6 percent share of U.S. consumption, up from only 1 percent in 1980-81. The motivation for increased imports is largely a matter of seasonality. Peak import season begins in July after the end of the California Navel season and ends in October when the harvesting of Florida’s early-season varieties begins.

South Africa, Chile, Mexico and Australia are the top sources for U.S. orange imports. South Africa has been the largest supplier of fresh oranges to the U.S. market essentially since 2003. Its entrance into the U.S. market began with the 2000 passage of the African Growth Opportunity Act, under which all imports of oranges from South Africa enter the U.S. duty-free. Interestingly, the top four fresh orange suppliers receive preferential trade status, and all but South Africa export under free trade agreements.

Amongst all citrus fruits produced in the United States, grapefruit is unique in that both domestic production and consumption are falling. Indeed, the long-term decline in U.S. grapefruit production is a product of weak U.S. consumer demand. Even with declining domestic demand, the U.S. remains the world’s second-largest producer of grapefruit.

Around 70 percent of the U.S. grapefruit crop is grown in Florida, with Texas and California accounting for 20 and 10 percent, respectively. Bearing acreage has declined an average of 7 percent each year since 2005-06 in Florida, but seems to have stabilized in California and Texas. In total, U.S. grapefruit production has declined by 50 percent since the 2000-01 marketing year. The report noted numerous reasons for the decline in demand, including fear of drug interaction.

Although tariffs vary seasonally for grapefruit, more than 99 percent of grapefruit imports enter the U.S. under duty-free status. With declining consumer demand, it is not surprising that imports of grapefruit are small, accounting for around 3 percent of U.S. fresh grapefruit consumption.

U.S. production of lemons remains strong, supplying more than 90 percent of domestic consumption needs and even making the U.S. the fifth-largest exporter of fresh lemons and limes in the world. Nearly all U.S. lemons are produced in California and Arizona, with the season running from August through July, and with Californian producers able to store production long enough to partially supply the high-demand summer season. Imports tend to be highest during the summer months. However, U.S. production is just gearing up for harvest at that time, and domestic supplies are at their lowest. Despite rising import demand during the summer months, imports only account for around 10 percent of U.S. consumption. Mexico and Chile are the primary sources of U.S. lemon imports, with both countries able to ship lemons duty-free through free trade agreements.

As with lemons, the U.S. mandarin and tangerine industry is on a trend of increasing both production and consumption. However, imports make up a significant portion of U.S. mandarin consumption, and the fruits are typically consumed fresh.

Worldwide, mandarins are known for being easy to peel and readily separating into different sections, which makes them convenient to eat in fresh form. Moreover, many different countries in the world produce their own particular varieties of mandarins, including Satsumas, clementines and numerous tangerine hybrids.

While most mandarins consumed in the U.S. are domestically grown, seasonal imports account for nearly 30 percent of consumption. Unlike other citrus varieties, mandarins do not store well on the tree and should be harvested soon after maturity. For this reason, the U.S. marketing season for mandarins is shorter than it is for other citrus varieties. Nearly half of U.S. mandarin imports come from Spain, with Chile, Morocco and Peru accounting for most of the remainder.

Imports from Spain represent nearly all of the clementine variety, which are in high demand by U.S. consumers because they are seedless. Total U.S. imports tend to peak November through January when the bulk of Spain’s crop is marketed. A smaller peak occurs in July and August when Chilean clementine and Peruvian tangelos enter the market.

More than 80 percent of citrus imports enter the U.S. under duty-free status due to various trade agreements.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

US (WA): Higher pear volumes met with strong demand

Washington’s pear crop will likely be larger than what was anticipated at the beginning of the season. As growers move into the latter part of the season, they’re finding consumer demand this year to be good.

“Demand has been pretty great,” said Sky Johnson of Borton Fruit. “Volume estimates this year have increased this season, and we see that with the amount of Bartletts we’re moving this year.” Early estimates put this year’s Washington pear crop at 18.7 million boxes, but the estimate was updated to 20.2 million boxes once harvesting was underway. Though that would put production below last year’s crop, it’s still slightly above the five-year average for the state. Part of the reason for good yields this year has been good weather, which has also helped with quality.

“With the good weather, we’re seeing great sugar in the fruit,” said Johnson. “Sizing has also been on the larger side.” With good quality and strong demand, prices have also been good.

“Pricing has been relatively strong,” said Johnson. “We have been very happy with where prices have been.” At the end of last week, prices were mostly between $ 24.00 and $ 26.00 for a carton of Bartlett pears, while Anjou pears commanded higher prices, mostly between $ 26.00 and $ 30.00 per carton.

For more information:

Sky Johnson

Borton Fruit

+1 509 966 3905

FreshPlaza.com

US (WA): Higher pear volumes met with strong demand

Washington’s pear crop will likely be larger than what was anticipated at the beginning of the season. As growers move into the latter part of the season, they’re finding consumer demand this year to be good.

“Demand has been pretty great,” said Sky Johnson of Borton Fruit. “Volume estimates this year have increased this season, and we see that with the amount of Bartletts we’re moving this year.” Early estimates put this year’s Washington pear crop at 18.7 million boxes, but the estimate was updated to 20.2 million boxes once harvesting was underway. Though that would put production below last year’s crop, it’s still slightly above the five-year average for the state. Part of the reason for good yields this year has been good weather, which has also helped with quality.

“With the good weather, we’re seeing great sugar in the fruit,” said Johnson. “Sizing has also been on the larger side.” With good quality and strong demand, prices have also been good.

“Pricing has been relatively strong,” said Johnson. “We have been very happy with where prices have been.” At the end of last week, prices were mostly between $ 24.00 and $ 26.00 for a carton of Bartlett pears, while Anjou pears commanded higher prices, mostly between $ 26.00 and $ 30.00 per carton.

For more information:

Sky Johnson

Borton Fruit

+1 509 966 3905

FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

Brazilian consumers now also demand premium quality papayas

For the Brazilian association Brapex, mostly devoted to the production and export of papayas, Europe is a very important market, with 80% of its total shipments, which go mostly to Spain, Portugal, the UK and Germany. “The EU market has been fairly stable in terms of sales for the past three years, and with visits to events and fairs we aim to continue boosting them,” says Franco Fiorot, executive director of the firm.

According to Franco, Brazilian papayas are one of the most renowned worldwide, but “demand in Brazil has also increased as a direct result of the growing purchasing power of domestic consumers. While in the past Brazilians bought lower quality fruit and exported the better quality, nowadays this trend is changing and they also demand premium quality.”


Regarding the current potential of the Russian market, Franco explains that Brapex already started working with Russian importers about three years ago, but that it entails some difficulties because to export to this country it is essential to have the right contacts.

In the papaya market, Brazil’s main competitor is Mexico; Franco, however, assures that “when it comes to technical and climatic factors, and taking into account that they are able to ensure year-round supply of top quality produce, Brazil has a competitive advantage.”

Brapex is currently developing a new variety  to improve the flavour and increase the productivity as well as the resistance to plagues. “We are trying to find a variety that will perfectly combine not only a good taste, but also shelf life so that it can easily be exported,” states Mr Fiorot.

More information

Brapex

Tel +55 (27) 99984-1991

Publication date: 10/3/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Significant increase in demand for Honey pomelos

Allfresch Group
Significant increase in demand for Honey pomelos

The UK-headquartered Allfresch Group of companies has built a strong reputation in Europe for the Red Dragon brand of Chinese Honey pomelos over the last seven years, and that has in turn helped transform the fruit from a speciality item to a mainstream commodity in the European markets. There has been a significant increase in volumes over the years.

“We are very proud to have been extremely instrumental in creating awareness of this mouth-watering fruit and bringing it to the fore of the European marketplace,” says Commercial Director Ben Reed.

Grown in the mountainous Fujian province, Red Dragon pomelos are tested for pesticide residues prior to export at a certified laboratory in Xiamen, and packed according to the highest possible standards.

“Since the Red Dragon brand was introduced in 2007, many exciting developments have been initiated. Today it is the preferred brand in many countries, primarily based on the consistent product quality,” says the firm’s spokesman.

The Allfresch Group describes Red Dragon pomelos as juicy and sweet with a light fragrant taste. The brand is GlobalGAP, Haccp and ISO-9000 certified, and available from September to February.

In addition to the Honey Pomelo, the Allfresch Group have also become a dominant force in Chinese Chestnuts also in the Red Ragon brand. This fruit is available from October to January in 5 Kg Mesh or Gunny bags and 1Kg Mesh bags.

With the Group’s Chinese operation and Joint Venture partner Intafresh, that is headed up by Andy Chen, they are also able to offer a direct sourcing option for those customers who require it.

Red Dragon Chinese pomelos and chestnuts are distributed across the UK and continental Europe.

For more information:

Europe
Klayton Sands
[email protected]esh.co.uk
+44 (0) 1952 460 608

China – Direct Sourcing
Andy Chen
[email protected]

Publication date: 9/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Drivend by demand, commission extends Potato Lovers’ Month

The Idaho Potato Commission’s annual Potato Lovers’ Month display contest has become so successful, with so many stores participating, that it has become necessary to expand the promotion to eight weeks, rather than just four weeks in February.

Last year, demand for Idaho potatoes during the February promotion was so great it essentially reached the limit of the capacity of Idaho potato packing facilities to meet the demand. Therefore, for the 2015 Potato Lovers’ Month, the contest period will be extended to eight weeks. It will start mid-January and continue into mid-March.

17-IDPot-IPC-Retail-Seth-PeSeth PemslerPotato Lovers’ Month, now in its 24th year, “has grown exponentially,” said Seth Pemsler, vice president of retail for the Idaho Potato Commission. “It is now the largest display contest in all the U.S. in fruits and vegetables,” and that success is expected to continue.  For 2015, “we will hopefully add some new customers, which we are always trying to do.”

According to Frank Muir, president of the commission, Prior to 2005, the average number of displays for the annual Potato Lovers’ Month display contest was 600. From 2006 to 2012, there were an average of 2,000 displays. “The last two years, we have averaged 4,500. A big part of that is we now have Walmart as a major partner in that event.”

The commission will continue to work with Hormel as a partner for the Potato Lovers’ Month promotion, Pemsler told The Produce News.

As an adjunct to the national contest, “we do individual contests with retailers,” Pemsler said. “We go to retailers and say, ‘If you convince your chain to participate, we will give you an internal contest,’ and the retailer can still participate in the national contest,” he said. “That will continue to expand.”

Elaborating on the reason for extending the time period for the Potato Lovers’ Month contest to eight  weeks, Pemsler said that the number of participating stores has increased so  much in the past two years that “our shippers can’t pack that fast. We actually missed some opportunities this year” because there was not enough volume available to meet the additional demand. By expanding the promotion to eight weeks, “the Idaho shipping community can meet the increasing demand” generated by the Potato Lovers’ Month promotions.

The Potato Lovers’ Month promotion — and many other commission programs — couldn’t be executed without the field team, Pemsler said.

Among the commission’s other retail programs is “our category management initiative, our new data initiative, which is very helpful to retailers. But the way we execute all these things requires our field team,” he said.

The field team consists of people who “grew up doing exactly what the people they are calling on do,” Pemsler continued. “All of our field people — retail and foodservice — come from the industry. ” On the retail side they have been produce directors, “and they have been distributors on the foodservice side, so they have phenomenal knowledge and credibility. They act as consultants to their counterparts.”

The commission is giving increased attention to the Hispanic marketplace in its retail programs. “We did extensive research to identify and understand the Hispanic consumer, and what we learned was the Hispanic consumers are very brand conscious,” and when it comes to produce “they are extremely brand conscious because there are so few bands,” Pemsler said. The Hispanic consumers “skew very heavily toward the perception that a brand is better and Idaho is the best brand.”

To make retailers that have stores with Hispanic demographics aware of those facts, the commission “created a presentation that explains what Hispanic consumers are looking for and how the retailers are missing opportunities if they are not making sure Idaho potatoes are present and visible in those stores, he said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Drivend by demand, commission extends Potato Lovers’ Month

The Idaho Potato Commission’s annual Potato Lovers’ Month display contest has become so successful, with so many stores participating, that it has become necessary to expand the promotion to eight weeks, rather than just four weeks in February.

Last year, demand for Idaho potatoes during the February promotion was so great it essentially reached the limit of the capacity of Idaho potato packing facilities to meet the demand. Therefore, for the 2015 Potato Lovers’ Month, the contest period will be extended to eight weeks. It will start mid-January and continue into mid-March.

17-IDPot-IPC-Retail-Seth-PeSeth PemslerPotato Lovers’ Month, now in its 24th year, “has grown exponentially,” said Seth Pemsler, vice president of retail for the Idaho Potato Commission. “It is now the largest display contest in all the U.S. in fruits and vegetables,” and that success is expected to continue.  For 2015, “we will hopefully add some new customers, which we are always trying to do.”

According to Frank Muir, president of the commission, Prior to 2005, the average number of displays for the annual Potato Lovers’ Month display contest was 600. From 2006 to 2012, there were an average of 2,000 displays. “The last two years, we have averaged 4,500. A big part of that is we now have Walmart as a major partner in that event.”

The commission will continue to work with Hormel as a partner for the Potato Lovers’ Month promotion, Pemsler told The Produce News.

As an adjunct to the national contest, “we do individual contests with retailers,” Pemsler said. “We go to retailers and say, ‘If you convince your chain to participate, we will give you an internal contest,’ and the retailer can still participate in the national contest,” he said. “That will continue to expand.”

Elaborating on the reason for extending the time period for the Potato Lovers’ Month contest to eight  weeks, Pemsler said that the number of participating stores has increased so  much in the past two years that “our shippers can’t pack that fast. We actually missed some opportunities this year” because there was not enough volume available to meet the additional demand. By expanding the promotion to eight weeks, “the Idaho shipping community can meet the increasing demand” generated by the Potato Lovers’ Month promotions.

The Potato Lovers’ Month promotion — and many other commission programs — couldn’t be executed without the field team, Pemsler said.

Among the commission’s other retail programs is “our category management initiative, our new data initiative, which is very helpful to retailers. But the way we execute all these things requires our field team,” he said.

The field team consists of people who “grew up doing exactly what the people they are calling on do,” Pemsler continued. “All of our field people — retail and foodservice — come from the industry. ” On the retail side they have been produce directors, “and they have been distributors on the foodservice side, so they have phenomenal knowledge and credibility. They act as consultants to their counterparts.”

The commission is giving increased attention to the Hispanic marketplace in its retail programs. “We did extensive research to identify and understand the Hispanic consumer, and what we learned was the Hispanic consumers are very brand conscious,” and when it comes to produce “they are extremely brand conscious because there are so few bands,” Pemsler said. The Hispanic consumers “skew very heavily toward the perception that a brand is better and Idaho is the best brand.”

To make retailers that have stores with Hispanic demographics aware of those facts, the commission “created a presentation that explains what Hispanic consumers are looking for and how the retailers are missing opportunities if they are not making sure Idaho potatoes are present and visible in those stores, he said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.