Blog Archives

Domestic Judges Won’t Tamper With COOL: But Keeping It Could be Costly

Another day, another ruling on so-called Country-of-origin labeling (COOL) of muscle cuts of meat.

The latest is a decision by the U.S Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit not to rehear the dispute. That means, unless the U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue, that domestic courts are fine with U.S. Department of Agriculture rules that require producers to keep track and report on the label on the birthplace, residence, and location at passing for each hunk of meat sold at retail in the U.S. regardless of the burden or cost.

However, the World Trade Organization sees those very provisions as illegal non-tariff barriers to trade. Canada and Mexico recently won another round of WTO rulings that many manufacturers and agricultural interests fear will allow those countries to impose crippling retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports.

It means instead of just being a regulatory cost falling on the meat industry and its consumers, COOL could result in Canada and Mexico being able to collect billions of dollars of extra tariffs or taxes from a wide variety of U.S. industries.

WTO may impose such tariffs to punish countries that violate their trade agreements.

That’s caused a broad coalition of the U.S. manufacturing and agricultural industry to begin lobbying Congress for changes that to make COOL WTO compliant before early next year when those tariffs might become a reality.

Original supporters of COOL, including the Farm Bureau and United Stockgrowers of America, are buoyed by its support from domestic judges and oppose changes to accommodate WTO.

Food Safety News

Russia sets up domestic food aid programme

Turkish export Russia +30%
Russia sets up domestic food aid programme

In the first nine months of this year, Turkey exported 30% more fruit and vegetables to Russia. That means Russia has a share of 53% in Turkish export. Moroccan exporters are more cautious. Although the country is looking to increase export to Russia, exporters also fear a repetition of last year’s events, when the Russian market was flooded with fruit from Morocco, Egypt, South Africa and Turkey, causing many exporters to suffer losses. Prices in Russia showed varying trends in September, with lemons, for instance, getting 25% more expensive, while prices for oranges and grapes went down. Russia is also looking to set up a domestic food aid programme, with the government buying products for social organizations. And a shipment of illegal top fruit was intercepted in the city of Tula. The apples were confiscated, the pears sent back.

The EU made a complaint to the World Trade Organization (WTO) about the Russian boycott of Polish fruit and vegetables. Russia says it blocks trade because of diseases, but according to the EU, the measures are disproportional, because only 0.1% of shipments were found to be contaminated. This is about the extra sanctions against Poland, in addition to the boycott in response to the European sanctions.

Ukraine will not impose countersanctions
Ukraine also objected to the tougher Russian rules. Ukraine adjusted its phytosanitary control system in response to the trade agreement with the EU. The Eastern European country is convinced that additional Russian sanctions will follow, as announced last week. Ukraine says it will not take countermeasures. Russian import is inspected according to protocols, without political interference. For the export, Ukraine will look for new markets, including Belarus and Kazakhstan.

Polish apples intercepted
In Tula, a city south of Moscow, a large shipment of apples and pears from Poland was discovered. The apples were being stored in the city. The fruit was intended to be sold in the city. The inspection confiscated 96 boxes of apples, the Conference pears will be sent back.

Huge price differences Moscow
Prices for fruit and vegetables in Moscow show widely differing trends. According to the federal statistics bureau, a number of prices have gone down in September, while other products have become significantly more expensive. Cucumber prices went up by 5.8%, bananas became 6% more expensive, and lemons take the biscuit with a 25% increase. Other products got cheaper. Prices for grapes went down (-19.3%), carrots, potatoes, cabbage, beets and onions got 7.2-13.1% cheaper. Prices for pears, garlic, tomatoes and oranges decreased by 4.2%.

Russia sets up domestic food aid
The government in Moscow has adopted a plan to set up an internal food aid programme. Within the context of this programme, the state will buy agricultural products for social institutions, and invest in the food aid infrastructure. Another purpose of the programme, however, is to support the domestic agriculture industry within the WTO rules.

Turkish export to Russia +30%
In the period from January until September, Turkey exported 916,292 tonnes of vegetables in total. That’s 1% more than the same period last year. 907,238 tonnes were shipped then. Income from export has also gone up by 5%, to more than 434 million euros.

53% of Turkish export went to Russia, which means Russia remains the most important destination. Between January and September 2014, sales of fresh vegetables to Russia increased by 30%, reaching 413,602 tonnes. This increase amounted to 9% of the income, with 229 million euros. After Russia, the most important markets are: Bulgaria with 27 million euros; Germany with over 26 million euros; Ukraine with just over 23 million euros, and Romania with nearly 22 million euros. Tomatoes are the main export product, with 54% of the volume and 65% of the value. The first nine months of last year, 385,887 tonnes of tomatoes were exported, while this year the volume went up by 28% (493,795 tonnes) in the same period. Income from this supply went up by 14%, to over 280 million euros. Bell pepper export amounts to 49 million euros; cucumbers 30 million euros, onions 26 million and courgettes 20 million euros.

New approach Moroccan citrus exporters
The Moroccan export to Russia will get started soon. Authorities have taken measures in order to prevent last season’s mistakes. The authorities fear that Moscow, with the large amount of fruit coming from Egypt, South Africa and Turkey, will become an outlet for Moroccan fresh produce.
Last year, Morocco exported 586,000 tonnes of citrus, and the country increased its export to Russia from 120,000 to 200,000 tonnes of fruit. The Russian market proved unable to take up all the Moroccan fruit. Plummeting prices made the situation worse, causing growers, who worked with consignment sale, to suffer serious losses.

Moroccan authorities have implemented reforms this year. The most important of these is the establishment of a coordinating committee for citrus, bringing together specialists within the entire chain. The committee will closely follow the markets, and occupy itself with logistic aspects and export.

Supermarket Okay opens new branch in Ural
Russian retailer Okay has opened a new branch in Orenburg. The store has an area of 11,630 m2, and a sales area of 7600 m2. There’s room for 35,000 products. Okay comprises 56 hypermarkets and 35 supermarkets.

Publication date: 10/21/2014
Author: Rudolf Mulderij
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

At the PMA Fresh Connections South Africa, recently held in Pretoria, Mr Barthelemy Mumba, Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock of the Republic of Congo’s southern Katanga province, gave a speech on his country’s efforts to attract foreign investment and promote domestic agriculture.

“The Katanga province, with 497,000 square kilometres, is larger than California and 16 times larger than Belgium; it has 12,000,000 hectares of fertile lands, so when talking about economic expansion, our province is a great case study,” affirms Mr Mumba.

Although the country is hampered by some logistical issues, Mr Mumba assures that, fortunately, the most populated areas by the Congo River are not affected by them. This river is the ninth longest in the world and the second largest in terms of water volume. “It provides a fantastic water highway for transport from east to west.”
According to Mr Mumba, another positive aspect about the country is its consolidated democracy. “The Government fights corruption and invests in infrastructure, such as new airports and terminals, and even the South African cement company KPC has invested in the country.”

The long-term goal, in cooperation with South Africa, is to finish with the country’s issues and encourage technological investments in the agricultural sector, from which both countries could mutually benefit, as Katanga’s development would allow South Africa to significantly reduce the cost of imports.

Mr Mumba states that such projects are already underway, including the construction of a fertiliser plant close to Kinshasa and of an agro-business park, “although at the moment most products are still imported, despite our rich resources. With the development of an agro-industry, we would be able not just to supply our market, but also to export to other countries.”

“Katanga is open for business; the Government is aware of the province’s potential and its commitment is to boost agriculture,” concludes Mr Barthelemy Mumba.

Publication date: 9/19/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

At the PMA Fresh Connections South Africa, recently held in Pretoria, Mr Barthelemy Mumba, Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock of the Republic of Congo’s southern Katanga province, gave a speech on his country’s efforts to attract foreign investment and promote domestic agriculture.

“The Katanga province, with 497,000 square kilometres, is larger than California and 16 times larger than Belgium; it has 12,000,000 hectares of fertile lands, so when talking about economic expansion, our province is a great case study,” affirms Mr Mumba.

Although the country is hampered by some logistical issues, Mr Mumba assures that, fortunately, the most populated areas by the Congo River are not affected by them. This river is the ninth longest in the world and the second largest in terms of water volume. “It provides a fantastic water highway for transport from east to west.”
According to Mr Mumba, another positive aspect about the country is its consolidated democracy. “The Government fights corruption and invests in infrastructure, such as new airports and terminals, and even the South African cement company KPC has invested in the country.”

The long-term goal, in cooperation with South Africa, is to finish with the country’s issues and encourage technological investments in the agricultural sector, from which both countries could mutually benefit, as Katanga’s development would allow South Africa to significantly reduce the cost of imports.

Mr Mumba states that such projects are already underway, including the construction of a fertiliser plant close to Kinshasa and of an agro-business park, “although at the moment most products are still imported, despite our rich resources. With the development of an agro-industry, we would be able not just to supply our market, but also to export to other countries.”

“Katanga is open for business; the Government is aware of the province’s potential and its commitment is to boost agriculture,” concludes Mr Barthelemy Mumba.

Publication date: 9/19/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

At the PMA Fresh Connections South Africa, recently held in Pretoria, Mr Barthelemy Mumba, Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock of the Republic of Congo’s southern Katanga province, gave a speech on his country’s efforts to attract foreign investment and promote domestic agriculture.

“The Katanga province, with 497,000 square kilometres, is larger than California and 16 times larger than Belgium; it has 12,000,000 hectares of fertile lands, so when talking about economic expansion, our province is a great case study,” affirms Mr Mumba.

Although the country is hampered by some logistical issues, Mr Mumba assures that, fortunately, the most populated areas by the Congo River are not affected by them. This river is the ninth longest in the world and the second largest in terms of water volume. “It provides a fantastic water highway for transport from east to west.”
According to Mr Mumba, another positive aspect about the country is its consolidated democracy. “The Government fights corruption and invests in infrastructure, such as new airports and terminals, and even the South African cement company KPC has invested in the country.”

The long-term goal, in cooperation with South Africa, is to finish with the country’s issues and encourage technological investments in the agricultural sector, from which both countries could mutually benefit, as Katanga’s development would allow South Africa to significantly reduce the cost of imports.

Mr Mumba states that such projects are already underway, including the construction of a fertiliser plant close to Kinshasa and of an agro-business park, “although at the moment most products are still imported, despite our rich resources. With the development of an agro-industry, we would be able not just to supply our market, but also to export to other countries.”

“Katanga is open for business; the Government is aware of the province’s potential and its commitment is to boost agriculture,” concludes Mr Barthelemy Mumba.

Publication date: 9/19/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

At the PMA Fresh Connections South Africa, recently held in Pretoria, Mr Barthelemy Mumba, Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock of the Republic of Congo’s southern Katanga province, gave a speech on his country’s efforts to attract foreign investment and promote domestic agriculture.

“The Katanga province, with 497,000 square kilometres, is larger than California and 16 times larger than Belgium; it has 12,000,000 hectares of fertile lands, so when talking about economic expansion, our province is a great case study,” affirms Mr Mumba.

Although the country is hampered by some logistical issues, Mr Mumba assures that, fortunately, the most populated areas by the Congo River are not affected by them. This river is the ninth longest in the world and the second largest in terms of water volume. “It provides a fantastic water highway for transport from east to west.”
According to Mr Mumba, another positive aspect about the country is its consolidated democracy. “The Government fights corruption and invests in infrastructure, such as new airports and terminals, and even the South African cement company KPC has invested in the country.”

The long-term goal, in cooperation with South Africa, is to finish with the country’s issues and encourage technological investments in the agricultural sector, from which both countries could mutually benefit, as Katanga’s development would allow South Africa to significantly reduce the cost of imports.

Mr Mumba states that such projects are already underway, including the construction of a fertiliser plant close to Kinshasa and of an agro-business park, “although at the moment most products are still imported, despite our rich resources. With the development of an agro-industry, we would be able not just to supply our market, but also to export to other countries.”

“Katanga is open for business; the Government is aware of the province’s potential and its commitment is to boost agriculture,” concludes Mr Barthelemy Mumba.

Publication date: 9/19/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

At the PMA Fresh Connections South Africa, recently held in Pretoria, Mr Barthelemy Mumba, Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock of the Republic of Congo’s southern Katanga province, gave a speech on his country’s efforts to attract foreign investment and promote domestic agriculture.

“The Katanga province, with 497,000 square kilometres, is larger than California and 16 times larger than Belgium; it has 12,000,000 hectares of fertile lands, so when talking about economic expansion, our province is a great case study,” affirms Mr Mumba.

Although the country is hampered by some logistical issues, Mr Mumba assures that, fortunately, the most populated areas by the Congo River are not affected by them. This river is the ninth longest in the world and the second largest in terms of water volume. “It provides a fantastic water highway for transport from east to west.”
According to Mr Mumba, another positive aspect about the country is its consolidated democracy. “The Government fights corruption and invests in infrastructure, such as new airports and terminals, and even the South African cement company KPC has invested in the country.”

The long-term goal, in cooperation with South Africa, is to finish with the country’s issues and encourage technological investments in the agricultural sector, from which both countries could mutually benefit, as Katanga’s development would allow South Africa to significantly reduce the cost of imports.

Mr Mumba states that such projects are already underway, including the construction of a fertiliser plant close to Kinshasa and of an agro-business park, “although at the moment most products are still imported, despite our rich resources. With the development of an agro-industry, we would be able not just to supply our market, but also to export to other countries.”

“Katanga is open for business; the Government is aware of the province’s potential and its commitment is to boost agriculture,” concludes Mr Barthelemy Mumba.

Publication date: 9/19/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

At the PMA Fresh Connections South Africa, recently held in Pretoria, Mr Barthelemy Mumba, Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock of the Republic of Congo’s southern Katanga province, gave a speech on his country’s efforts to attract foreign investment and promote domestic agriculture.

“The Katanga province, with 497,000 square kilometres, is larger than California and 16 times larger than Belgium; it has 12,000,000 hectares of fertile lands, so when talking about economic expansion, our province is a great case study,” affirms Mr Mumba.

Although the country is hampered by some logistical issues, Mr Mumba assures that, fortunately, the most populated areas by the Congo River are not affected by them. This river is the ninth longest in the world and the second largest in terms of water volume. “It provides a fantastic water highway for transport from east to west.”
According to Mr Mumba, another positive aspect about the country is its consolidated democracy. “The Government fights corruption and invests in infrastructure, such as new airports and terminals, and even the South African cement company KPC has invested in the country.”

The long-term goal, in cooperation with South Africa, is to finish with the country’s issues and encourage technological investments in the agricultural sector, from which both countries could mutually benefit, as Katanga’s development would allow South Africa to significantly reduce the cost of imports.

Mr Mumba states that such projects are already underway, including the construction of a fertiliser plant close to Kinshasa and of an agro-business park, “although at the moment most products are still imported, despite our rich resources. With the development of an agro-industry, we would be able not just to supply our market, but also to export to other countries.”

“Katanga is open for business; the Government is aware of the province’s potential and its commitment is to boost agriculture,” concludes Mr Barthelemy Mumba.

Publication date: 9/19/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

Congo aims to attract foreign investment to develop domestic agriculture

At the PMA Fresh Connections South Africa, recently held in Pretoria, Mr Barthelemy Mumba, Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock of the Republic of Congo’s southern Katanga province, gave a speech on his country’s efforts to attract foreign investment and promote domestic agriculture.

“The Katanga province, with 497,000 square kilometres, is larger than California and 16 times larger than Belgium; it has 12,000,000 hectares of fertile lands, so when talking about economic expansion, our province is a great case study,” affirms Mr Mumba.

Although the country is hampered by some logistical issues, Mr Mumba assures that, fortunately, the most populated areas by the Congo River are not affected by them. This river is the ninth longest in the world and the second largest in terms of water volume. “It provides a fantastic water highway for transport from east to west.”
According to Mr Mumba, another positive aspect about the country is its consolidated democracy. “The Government fights corruption and invests in infrastructure, such as new airports and terminals, and even the South African cement company KPC has invested in the country.”

The long-term goal, in cooperation with South Africa, is to finish with the country’s issues and encourage technological investments in the agricultural sector, from which both countries could mutually benefit, as Katanga’s development would allow South Africa to significantly reduce the cost of imports.

Mr Mumba states that such projects are already underway, including the construction of a fertiliser plant close to Kinshasa and of an agro-business park, “although at the moment most products are still imported, despite our rich resources. With the development of an agro-industry, we would be able not just to supply our market, but also to export to other countries.”

“Katanga is open for business; the Government is aware of the province’s potential and its commitment is to boost agriculture,” concludes Mr Barthelemy Mumba.

Publication date: 9/19/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Ancient nomads spread earliest domestic grains along Silk Road: Findings push back earliest known East-West interaction by 2,000 years

Charred grains of barley, millet and wheat deposited nearly 5,000 years ago at campsites in the high plains of Kazakhstan show that nomadic sheepherders played a surprisingly important role in the early spread of domesticated crops throughout a mountainous east-west corridor along the historic Silk Road, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

“Our findings indicate that ancient nomadic pastoralists were key players in an east-west network that linked innovations and commodities between present-day China and southwest Asia,” said study co-author Michael Frachetti, PhD, an associate professor of archaeology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University and principal investigator on the research project.

“Ancient wheat and broomcorn millet, recovered in nomadic campsites in Kazakhstan, show that prehistoric herders in Central Eurasia had incorporated both regional crops into their economy and rituals nearly 5,000 years ago, pushing back the chronology of interaction along the territory of the ‘Silk Road’ more than 2,000 years,” Frachetti said.

The study, to be published April 2 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, establishes that several strains of ancient grains and peas had made their way across Eurasia thousands of years earlier than previously documented.

While these crops have been known to exist much earlier in ancient China and Southwest Asia, finding them intermingled in the Bronze Age burials and households of nomadic pastoralists provides some of the earliest concrete signs for east-west interaction in the vast expanse of Eurasian mountains and the first botanical evidence for farming among Bronze Age nomads.

Bread wheat, cultivated at least 6,000 years ago in Southwest Asia, was absent in China before 2500 B.C. while broomcorn millet, domesticated 8,000 years ago in China, is missing in southwest Asia before 2000 B.C. This study documents that ancient grains from eastern China and soutwest Asia had made their way to Kazakhstan in the center of the continent by 2700-2500 B.C. (nearly 5,000 years ago).

“This study starts to rewrite the model for economic change across Eurasia,” said first author Robert Spengler, PhD, a paleoethnobotanist and research associate in Arts & Sciences at WUSTL.

“It illustrates that nomads had diverse economic systems and were important for reshaping economic spheres more generally.”

Findings are based on archaeobotanical data collected from four Bronze Age pastoralist campsites in Central Eurasian steppe/mountains: Tasbas and Begash in the highlands of Kazakhstan and Ojakly and Site 1211/1219 in Turkmenistan.

“This is one of the first systematic applications of archaeobotany in the region, making the potential for further future discovery very exciting,” Spengler said.

Frachetti and a team of WUSTL researchers led the on-site excavations, working closely with archaeologists based in Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan and Italy. Spengler conducted the paleoethnobotany laboratory work at WUSTL, under the directorship of Gayle J. Fritz, PhD, professor of archaeology and expert in human-plant relationships.

“Finding this diverse crop assemblage at Tasbas and Begash illustrates first evidence for the westward spread of East Asian and Southwest Asian crops eastward, and the surprise is that it is nomads who are the agents of change,” Frachetti said.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Washington University in St. Louis. The original article was written by Gerry Everding. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Frosty outlook marks domestic citrus

Growers in Florida and California are anticipating a drop in citrus production this season. “This year has been extremely difficult for the industry. We had a very early frost snap that’s affected production,” said Joel Nelsen, CEO of the California Citrus Mutual growers association. “In fact, we believe we lost roughly 25% to 30% of the navel orange crop, 40% or so of the remaining mandarin crop — which is the tangerines or clementines, however you wish to …

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Supermarket News

“Chilean fruit will cost more in the domestic market”

“Chilean fruit will cost more in the domestic market”

The president of the Federation of Fruit Producers (Fedefruta), Cristián Allendes, made this statement, while offering the balance of the effects of the frost provided by the Ministry of Agriculture last Tuesday.

Allendes stressed that the losses for the sector amount to 1 billion dollars, and not the 800 million reported by the Minister, Luis Mayol.


He added that at least 50,000 jobs will be lost, and not 27,000 as originally expected.

The union leader requested the Government not to minimise the effects of the frost and affirmed that there will definitely be price increases. “Yes, fruit will cost more in the domestic market.”

“All throughout November, December and January, prices will be higher regarding peaches, nectarines and plums, because there will be shortages. There will be half the volumes of a normal year, so it is impossible for them to cost the same,” affirmed Allendes.

“Terror campaign”
Meanwhile, the spokesperson of the Vega Central, Arturo Guerrero, stated that the price increases for fruits and vegetables cannot yet be observed, and that in his opinion, we are witnessing a terror campaign whose effects will only be part of the contingency.

“I believe that there is no need to promote a consumerist terror campaign, because these markets do not work like that. People need to have alternatives for consumption,” he declared.


He added that “Santiago, the Metropolitan Region, has every article available all year round. It is a luxury.”

Something in which both unions and Government agreed is that up to 22% of the volumes for export have been damaged.

Fuente: Cooperativa.cl

Publication date: 10/22/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Italy: Ready to start with domestic grape supply

Peviani
Italy: Ready to start with domestic grape supply

“The 2013 season of Egyptian grapes was satisfactory both in terms of quality and quantity. We were in fact able to sell 100% more than 2012. Unfortunately, the fact that big quantities of produce from India were available at the same time from big Dutch importers led to a decrease in prices,” said the managers of Peviani.



Sophia grapes.

“The Italian market reacted rather well both in terms of volumes and in terms of prices, meaning that this product has finally entered in the assortment of domestic retailers. The socio-political situation in Egypt definitely did not help, especially towards the end of the season, though actually 95% of the programme was honoured nonetheless thanks to the professionalism and the effort of our suppliers.”



Sophia (white) and Midnight Beauty (black) grapes on field.

The arrival of the domestic produce

The production of table grapes in Puglia is currently generally good and the ripening period is average. “At the end of week 29 (20th July) we started harvesting Victoria grapes. Quality is really good and we have waited until now to reach the perfect sugar content (Brix). In the meantime we have started harvesting the first white seedless (Sugraone) and black (Midnight Beauty) grapes.”




Victoria and Midnight Beauty grapes.

This year, we will start harvesting another two varieties of seedless grapes and many other varieties are being observed in the experimental fields of the company. “The interest in seedless grapes is increasing, but it is important to rely on the right varieties to avoid expensive mistakes. We monitor all of the main production areas worldwide so we keep updated: our objective is to consider a wide time window, from mid July to the end of November with good quality seedless grapes.”





Midnight and Superior S grapes.

Despite the fact that production costs in Italy are rather high, the company feels that new interesting markets are opening outside of Europe, which can help increasing the sales of good produce.


“Grapes with a particularly pleasant taste are quite successful, and we have introduced two varieties in the Premium range of a number of chains both in Italy and abroad. Italia and Red Globe grapes are also looking good, we just need the right weather. This is what we wish for and this is why we are committed.”


Below: Sophia grapes.

Contacts:
Peviani

Via Lombardia, 7/9
27010 Siziano (PV) – Italy
Tel.: +39 (0)382 6785259
Fax: +39 (0)2 57760379
Andrea Peviani
Email: [email protected]
Ettore Guzzi
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.peviani.it

Publication date: 7/24/2013


FreshPlaza.com