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South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

This year has been difficult in most markets for South African citrus producers, particularly the EU, with the CBS issue. Justin Chadwick, of South Africa’s Citrus Growers Association, explains that “we’ve had to implement a series of measures that are making citrus shipping to the EU more difficult and costly and people are already considering alternatives.”

Justin says that “fortunately, the eastern markets are starting to grow with volumes almost doubling this year. This includes China, which has strict requirements, but where we are shipping a lot of oranges and other citrus fruits, but some soft citrus and lemons are sensitive to cold treatments which limits what we can send.” He affirms that “there seems to be a shortage in the supply of lemons all around the world, and in China they are in high demand, so we’ve had an amazing year overall, we probably could have sold our lemon crop twice.”


Justin Chadwick at China FVF(right), with Anton Rabe, HortGro and Richard Owen, PMA

Meanwhile, at the other side of the scale, grapefruit continues to disappoint. Justin believes that “consumers don’t currently favour that kind of fruit. The only exception is South Korea, where our exports have considerably increased, from 60,000 cartons last year to 400,000 this year.”

Regarding oranges, South Africa has achieved a record crop this year, reaching 15.2 million 15kg cartons. The market conditions have been very difficult, firstly in the EU but also the US had a large crop.

According to Justin, “the main issue is that we ship 45 million cartons a year to the EU, and there’s no market that will take that sort of volume; the EU also demands very specific sizes and quality, which the eastern markets don’t want, so finding alternative markets is not easy.”

He states that a couple of weeks ago, export figures to the EU were 14% down, and production from its competitors in the Southern Hemisphere, like Australia and South America, is also on the rise. “Competition in the U.S. market, for example, based on quality and service, is huge, but it also offers opportunities for us all to expand.”

Publication date: 11/25/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

This year has been difficult in most markets for South African citrus producers, particularly the EU, with the CBS issue. Justin Chadwick, of South Africa’s Citrus Growers Association, explains that “we’ve had to implement a series of measures that are making citrus shipping to the EU more difficult and costly and people are already considering alternatives.”

Justin says that “fortunately, the eastern markets are starting to grow with volumes almost doubling this year. This includes China, which has strict requirements, but where we are shipping a lot of oranges and other citrus fruits, but some soft citrus and lemons are sensitive to cold treatments which limits what we can send.” He affirms that “there seems to be a shortage in the supply of lemons all around the world, and in China they are in high demand, so we’ve had an amazing year overall, we probably could have sold our lemon crop twice.”


Justin Chadwick at China FVF(right), with Anton Rabe, HortGro and Richard Owen, PMA

Meanwhile, at the other side of the scale, grapefruit continues to disappoint. Justin believes that “consumers don’t currently favour that kind of fruit. The only exception is South Korea, where our exports have considerably increased, from 60,000 cartons last year to 400,000 this year.”

Regarding oranges, South Africa has achieved a record crop this year, reaching 15.2 million 15kg cartons. The market conditions have been very difficult, firstly in the EU but also the US had a large crop.

According to Justin, “the main issue is that we ship 45 million cartons a year to the EU, and there’s no market that will take that sort of volume; the EU also demands very specific sizes and quality, which the eastern markets don’t want, so finding alternative markets is not easy.”

He states that a couple of weeks ago, export figures to the EU were 14% down, and production from its competitors in the Southern Hemisphere, like Australia and South America, is also on the rise. “Competition in the U.S. market, for example, based on quality and service, is huge, but it also offers opportunities for us all to expand.”

Publication date: 11/25/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

South Africa doubles citrus exports to the East

This year has been difficult in most markets for South African citrus producers, particularly the EU, with the CBS issue. Justin Chadwick, of South Africa’s Citrus Growers Association, explains that “we’ve had to implement a series of measures that are making citrus shipping to the EU more difficult and costly and people are already considering alternatives.”

Justin says that “fortunately, the eastern markets are starting to grow with volumes almost doubling this year. This includes China, which has strict requirements, but where we are shipping a lot of oranges and other citrus fruits, but some soft citrus and lemons are sensitive to cold treatments which limits what we can send.” He affirms that “there seems to be a shortage in the supply of lemons all around the world, and in China they are in high demand, so we’ve had an amazing year overall, we probably could have sold our lemon crop twice.”


Justin Chadwick at China FVF(right), with Anton Rabe, HortGro and Richard Owen, PMA

Meanwhile, at the other side of the scale, grapefruit continues to disappoint. Justin believes that “consumers don’t currently favour that kind of fruit. The only exception is South Korea, where our exports have considerably increased, from 60,000 cartons last year to 400,000 this year.”

Regarding oranges, South Africa has achieved a record crop this year, reaching 15.2 million 15kg cartons. The market conditions have been very difficult, firstly in the EU but also the US had a large crop.

According to Justin, “the main issue is that we ship 45 million cartons a year to the EU, and there’s no market that will take that sort of volume; the EU also demands very specific sizes and quality, which the eastern markets don’t want, so finding alternative markets is not easy.”

He states that a couple of weeks ago, export figures to the EU were 14% down, and production from its competitors in the Southern Hemisphere, like Australia and South America, is also on the rise. “Competition in the U.S. market, for example, based on quality and service, is huge, but it also offers opportunities for us all to expand.”

Publication date: 11/25/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Salmonella Outbreak from Live Poultry Doubles to 251 Cases

At least 251 people in 37 states have been found ill with one of three strains of Salmonella in connection to live chicks and ducklings sold by Cincinnati-based Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That number is up from the 126 cases reported last month. Of the 251 people found sick, at least 32 percent have been hospitalized.

Illnesses developed between February 4, 2014 and June 4, 2014. Any illnesses that developed after June 4 may not have been counted yet.

The ill range in age from younger than one year old to 95 years. Thirty-nine percent of those ill are 10 years old or younger.

Young children are especially vulnerable to pathogens regularly found on live poultry.

The CDC encourages anyone handling poultry to wash their hands with soap and hot water immediately afterwards. Adults are advised to supervise children carefully when handling poultry to make sure they follow those recommended procedures.

Below is a distribution map of illnesses by state, a timetable for illness onset dates, and a short video produced by Food Safety News on the risks associated with improperly handling live poultry.

Persons infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Infantis or Newport, by state as of June 25, 2014

Persons infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Infantis or Newport, by date of illness onset as of June 25, 2014

Food Safety News

Salmonella Outbreak from Live Poultry Doubles to 251 Cases

At least 251 people in 37 states have been found ill with one of three strains of Salmonella in connection to live chicks and ducklings sold by Cincinnati-based Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That number is up from the 126 cases reported last month. Of the 251 people found sick, at least 32 percent have been hospitalized.

Illnesses developed between February 4, 2014 and June 4, 2014. Any illnesses that developed after June 4 may not have been counted yet.

The ill range in age from younger than one year old to 95 years. Thirty-nine percent of those ill are 10 years old or younger.

Young children are especially vulnerable to pathogens regularly found on live poultry.

The CDC encourages anyone handling poultry to wash their hands with soap and hot water immediately afterwards. Adults are advised to supervise children carefully when handling poultry to make sure they follow those recommended procedures.

Below is a distribution map of illnesses by state, a timetable for illness onset dates, and a short video produced by Food Safety News on the risks associated with improperly handling live poultry.

Persons infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Infantis or Newport, by state as of June 25, 2014

Persons infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Infantis or Newport, by date of illness onset as of June 25, 2014

Food Safety News

Fresh Farms adds new items to winter lineup, doubles cucumber volume

Fresh Farms in Nogales, AZ, has just finished its seventh year in business. “We are still growing and have plans to continue to grow,” said Jerry Havel, director of sales and marketing.

This year, the company has added “several new items that we think will really add to our mix and make stopping at Fresh Farms more attractive,” he said.

Fresh Farms has also increased volume on some items. Most notably, “we have doubled our cucumber production,” Havel said. “We were big in cucumbers. Fresh-FarmsAt the Fresh Farms sales office in Rio Rico, AZ, with Jerry Havel (front) are Mayra Beltran, Robert Hernandez, Martha Noriega, Al Voll and Marco Serrano. (Photo by John Groh)Now we are very large in cucumbers.”

The cucumbers and most of the other items are grown by the Molina family of Hermosillo, Sonora, who own Fresh Farms and who have substantial farming operations in Mexico.

“Eggplant, Roma tomatoes and pickles are from outside growers,” he said.

While there have been weather issues in some growing areas in Mexico, “in our area we were fine. We had no issues” with inclement weather, Havel said. “We are in Sonora, and most of the bad weather was in Sinaloa.”

Several other items, including some of the new additions, started before the end of November. Among those were English cucumbers, eggplant, Roma tomatoes, fresh pickles and hard shell squash, including Butternut, Acorn, Spaghetti and Kabocha.

“Our eggplant, green bean and Roma tomato programs are all out of Culiacan, Sinaloa,” Havel said. The hard shell squash is “all out of Sonora,“ some coming from Hermosillo and some from Guaymas.

Fresh Farms started its fresh pickle program last year, but it was just for the latter half of the season. This year, the program started at the beginning of the season, in November, and will run through the winter and into April, Havel said.

The same is true of the Roma tomato program. This year, “we are starting at the beginning of the season rather than the end of the season.” That not only gives Fresh Farms Romas for a more extended period but also increases the overall volume the company is shipping.

Eggplant this year started in November and will run clear through into May, he said.

Fresh Farms’ soft squash program is about the same this year as it has been in the past, Havel said. “Our big increases are in cucumbers and the new items that we will be doing.”

The company will also have an increase in bell pepper volume this winter, he said. Those had already started and would continue into April. They are grown in shade houses in Hermosillo and Guaymas.

In green beans, as in cucumbers, “we have doubled” the volume for the current season.

In summary, Havel said, “we just have more volume of great quality product,” and that growth is driven by demand “from our clients.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Case Count Nearly Doubles in Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Funeral

At least 67 attendees of a funeral held in Alabama last weekend are now known to have been sickened by Salmonella, up from the 36 illnesses state health officials reported Wednesday.

The Alabama Department of Health confirmed Friday that Salmonella was indeed the cause of the illnesses, and identified the strain as Salmonella Heidelberg. Specimens isolated from five patients who attended the funeral have tested positive for S. Heidelberg.

The outbreak was detected after a local hospital reported a spike in patients reporting fever, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Funeral attendees who fell ill are now known to have been hospitalized in 10 states.

“Several people continue to be hospitalized, some in serious condition,” reported ADPH in a press release Friday.

According to the Department, at least 100 people attended the funeral, which was held at Eastern Star Baptist Church in York, AL July 6.

While the investigation into the source of the bacteria is ongoing, preliminary findings show that it was introduced via cross-contamination during meal preparation.

“If you attended this event and are ill, please contact your physician,” advised Dr. Mary McIntyre, Assistant State Health Officer for Disease Control and Prevention.

Food Safety News