Blog Archives

15 Postal Workers Hospitalized After Eating Potluck Leftovers

At least North Carolina 15 postal workers were taken to the hospital Thursday after consuming food from a Veteran’s Day potluck.

Dozens of employees at a U.S. Post Office on West Pointe Drive in western Mecklenberg County began experiencing nausea, diarrhea and vomiting after eating leftovers from a potluck held Tuesday evening, according to local NBC affiliate WCNC.

The source of the illnesses has yet to be determined. Over 200 people attended the potluck, many of them contributing dishes, which will make the source of the infections hard to trace.

Food from the potluck was refrigerated Tuesday night, and then served again Wednesday, according to WCNC. Some workers complained of stomach pains after eating the leftovers that day.

None of those sickened have a life-threatening illness. 

Food Safety News

Fresh Summit Sensory Experience Contest puts spotlight on healthy eating for kids

Students from the Walker Junior High School in LA Palma, CA, will tackle healthy eating on Friday, Oct. 17 when they put 10 produce-centric recipes to the test at the fourth annual PMA Fresh Summit Sensory Experience Contest. The contest, sponsored by Bolthouse Farms and supported by Disney Consumer Products, features the top 10 recipes submitted by exhibitors that will be judged by the students and 15 key buyers, including Delhaize America, Pro*Act and SuperValu.

“Inspiring children to eat more fresh produce can take many shapes,” Todd Putman, chief commercial officer for Bolthouse Farms, said in a press release. “Whether it’s traditional marketing like the ‘eat brighter!’ movement, or through engagement in contests like this one, it’s our responsibility as an industry to engage tomorrow’s leaders in efforts that lead to a healthier lifestyle.”

“Disney continues to be a leader in inspiring kids and families to eat more nutritious food and live a more active lifestyle, and it’s truly rewarding to see our efforts create real change,” John T. King, vice president of licensing for Disney-branded consumables, added in the release. “It’s exciting to see the kids’ reactions, and we celebrate the industry for creating both inventive and healthy recipes.”

More than 55 produce-centric, kid-friendly recipes were submitted. The top 10 recipes, selected by the buyer judges, will be featured onsite during the Sensory Experience Contest, where the judges, buyers and kids, will place their votes for “Buyers’ Choice” and “Kids’ Choice.” The top 10 recipes can be sampled at the Fresh Ideas in Action Reception at 4 p.m. in Room 303AD of the Anaheim Convention Center. Winners of the Buyers’ Choice and Kids’ Choice awards will be highlighted during the reception and in the Innovation @ Work area located in Lobby B/C of the convention center.

Finalists and recipes are:

  • Alsum Farms & Produce Inc.: Rainbow Potato Pancakes
  • Ball Design: Fresh Fruit Nachos with Honey Yogurt Drizzle
  • Church Bros. LLC: Rainbow Kale Tostada
  • Giorgio Fresh Co.: Mushroom Sauce Pizza with Mozzarella & Cheddar Cheese
  • Green Giant Fresh: Cauliflower & Avocado Croquettes with Honey Dijon & Avocado Aioli
  • Mucci Farms: Cool Summer Treats Made with CUTECUMBERS
  • Sage Fruit Co.: Skinny Breakfast Apple Turnovers
  • Sunkist: Sunkist Orange Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps
  • Wholesum Family Farms: Wholesum Harvest Eggplant Vegetable Balls with Roma Tomato Sauce
  • Wish Farms: Wish Farms Strawberry Blueberry Hazelnut Chocolate Flatbread

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Fresh Summit Sensory Experience Contest puts spotlight on healthy eating for kids

Students from the Walker Junior High School in LA Palma, CA, will tackle healthy eating on Friday, Oct. 17 when they put 10 produce-centric recipes to the test at the fourth annual PMA Fresh Summit Sensory Experience Contest. The contest, sponsored by Bolthouse Farms and supported by Disney Consumer Products, features the top 10 recipes submitted by exhibitors that will be judged by the students and 15 key buyers, including Delhaize America, Pro*Act and SuperValu.

“Inspiring children to eat more fresh produce can take many shapes,” Todd Putman, chief commercial officer for Bolthouse Farms, said in a press release. “Whether it’s traditional marketing like the ‘eat brighter!’ movement, or through engagement in contests like this one, it’s our responsibility as an industry to engage tomorrow’s leaders in efforts that lead to a healthier lifestyle.”

“Disney continues to be a leader in inspiring kids and families to eat more nutritious food and live a more active lifestyle, and it’s truly rewarding to see our efforts create real change,” John T. King, vice president of licensing for Disney-branded consumables, added in the release. “It’s exciting to see the kids’ reactions, and we celebrate the industry for creating both inventive and healthy recipes.”

More than 55 produce-centric, kid-friendly recipes were submitted. The top 10 recipes, selected by the buyer judges, will be featured onsite during the Sensory Experience Contest, where the judges, buyers and kids, will place their votes for “Buyers’ Choice” and “Kids’ Choice.” The top 10 recipes can be sampled at the Fresh Ideas in Action Reception at 4 p.m. in Room 303AD of the Anaheim Convention Center. Winners of the Buyers’ Choice and Kids’ Choice awards will be highlighted during the reception and in the Innovation @ Work area located in Lobby B/C of the convention center.

Finalists and recipes are:

  • Alsum Farms & Produce Inc.: Rainbow Potato Pancakes
  • Ball Design: Fresh Fruit Nachos with Honey Yogurt Drizzle
  • Church Bros. LLC: Rainbow Kale Tostada
  • Giorgio Fresh Co.: Mushroom Sauce Pizza with Mozzarella & Cheddar Cheese
  • Green Giant Fresh: Cauliflower & Avocado Croquettes with Honey Dijon & Avocado Aioli
  • Mucci Farms: Cool Summer Treats Made with CUTECUMBERS
  • Sage Fruit Co.: Skinny Breakfast Apple Turnovers
  • Sunkist: Sunkist Orange Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps
  • Wholesum Family Farms: Wholesum Harvest Eggplant Vegetable Balls with Roma Tomato Sauce
  • Wish Farms: Wish Farms Strawberry Blueberry Hazelnut Chocolate Flatbread

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Eating less meat: Solution to reduce water use?

Eating less meat would protect water resources in dry areas around the world, researchers at Aalto University have found.

Reducing the use of animal products can have a considerable impact on areas suffering scarce water resources, as meat production requires more water than other agricultural products.

“Diet change together with other actions, such as reduction of food losses and waste, may tackle the future challenges of food security,” states researcher Mika Jalava from Aalto University.

Growing population and climate change are likely to increase the pressure on already limited water resources and diet change has been suggested as one of the measures contributing to adequate food security for growing population.

The researchers assessed the impact of diet change on global water resources over four scenarios, where the meat consumption was gradually reduced while diet recommendations in terms of energy supply, proteins and fat were followed. The study published in Environmental Research Letters is the first global-scale analysis with a focus on changes in national diets and their impact on the blue and green water use of food consumption.

Food supply for growing population

Global population is expected to exceed 9 billion by 2050, adding over 2 billion mouths to be fed to the current population, according to the UN. By reducing the animal product contribution in the diet, global green water (rainwater) consumption decreases up to 21 % while for blue water (irrigation water) the reductions would be up to 14 %. In other words, by shifting to vegetarian diet we could secure adequate food supply for an additional 1.8 billion people without increasing the use of water resources. The potential savings are, however, distributed unevenly, and even more important, their potential alleviation on water scarcity varies widely from country to country.

Regional differences

The researchers at Aalto University found substantial regional differences in diet change potential to reduce water use. In Latin America, Europe, Central and Eastern Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa, diet change reduces mainly green water use. In Finland, for example, turning into a meat free diet would decrease the daily green water use of a Finn over 530 litres but at the same time resulting nearly 50 litres increase in blue water use. In the Middle East region, North America, Australia and Oceania, also blue water use would decrease considerably. In South and Southeast Asia, on the other hand, diet change does not result in savings in water use, as in these regions the diet is already largely based on a minimal amount of products.

The research is just published in Environmental Research Letters.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Aalto University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Eating tree nuts results in ‘modest decreases’ in blood fats and sugars, survey finds

Eating tree nuts appears to help reduce two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome, a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes, a new research paper says.

The paper found a “modest decrease” in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet.

The paper, by Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital, was published today in the journal BMJ Open.*

Dr. Sievenpiper said he believes this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining all of the collective evidence of randomized clinical trials on the effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome. After screening 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals, he found 49 randomized control trials with 2,000 participants.

A person is considered to have metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors: low levels of “good” cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Dr. Sievenpiper said the biggest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He said there was no adverse impact on the other risk factors for metabolic syndrome or weight gain, even though nuts are high in calories. Nuts also have a high fat content, but it’s good, or unsaturated, fat.

Tree nuts are such things as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. They do not include peanuts, which are legumes.

In the randomized control studies, patients ate about 50 grams of nuts a day or about 1-1/2 servings. One serving of tree nuts is about ¼ cup or 30 grams. He said that people in North America consume on average less than one serving a day, so this is one way they can adapt their diets to take advantage of the metabolic benefits.

“Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates,” Dr. Sievenpiper said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted tree nuts a qualified health claim for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Tree nuts are also recommended as part of the Mediterranean, Portfolio and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management based on their ability to reduce bad cholesterol.

*This study received funding from the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael’s Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Baltimore leads national movement to encourage healthier eating for children

A couple of Baltimore-area businesses are taking the lead in a national movement, ‘eat brighter!’ to inspire young children and their families to eat healthier.

With the help of friends from Sesame Street, Savage, MD-based fresh produce supplier East Coast Fresh and grocery retailer Mars Supermarkets are putting emphasis — and marketing — in the produce department where Big Bird, Cookie Monster, Elmo and several other furry faces will adorn packages of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Mars is the first retailer to partner with a supplier like East Coast Fresh to offer the ‘eat brighter!’ product in stores.

The ‘eat brighter!’ movement offers royalty-free access to Sesame Street characters and was forged by the Produce Marketing Association, Sesame Workshop and the Partnership for a Healthier America. The initiative is supported by grocery retailers and fresh produce companies across the United States and Canada.

In September, Mars will host an event to kick off the Sesame Street produce promotions in its Wise Avenue store. It will feature activities for children and their families, including a fresh produce scavenger hunt and sampling.

For more information about the event or the ‘eat brighter!’ movement, visit http://www.pma.com/eatbrighter or contact Ashley Boucher at aboucher@pma.com or 302/738-7100, ext. 3092.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

PMA president touts healthy eating at FPFC meeting

CERRITOS, CA — Nearly 300 Southern California produce professionals turned out April 23 for the Fresh Produce & Floral Council’s membership luncheon, held at the Sheraton Cerritos Hotel, here.

Guest speaker for the event was Catherine Burns, president of the Produce Marketing Association, who spoke on an array of subjects ranging from emerging retail trends to the produce industry’s fight against childhood obesity.

Changing the eating habits of today’s children is a top priority, Burns told the crowd, and getting them to eat more fruits and vegetables should be the goal of everyone. She said that no matter what one’s political affiliation, they should “feel blessed that they have an advocate like Michelle Obama in the White House” touting her “Let’s Move!” campaign while working with the Partnership For a Healthier America.

In addition, PMA and Sesame Street have unveiled a national movement called “Eat Brighter” in an attempt to get kids to eat healthier.

“There is no single lightning bolt that can change the world,” Burns said, “but we have to inspire the next generation to eat brighter. If kids see characters like Elmo and Big Bird eating fruits and vegetables, hopefully they’ll say, ‘If they like it, it must be good,’”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

PMA president touts healthy eating at FPFC meeting

CERRITOS, CA — Nearly 300 Southern California produce professionals turned out April 23 for the Fresh Produce & Floral Council’s membership luncheon, held at the Sheraton Cerritos Hotel, here.

Guest speaker for the event was Catherine Burns, president of the Produce Marketing Association, who spoke on an array of subjects ranging from emerging retail trends to the produce industry’s fight against childhood obesity.

Changing the eating habits of today’s children is a top priority, Burns told the crowd, and getting them to eat more fruits and vegetables should be the goal of everyone. She said that no matter what one’s political affiliation, they should “feel blessed that they have an advocate like Michelle Obama in the White House” touting her “Let’s Move!” campaign while working with the Partnership For a Healthier America.

In addition, PMA and Sesame Street have unveiled a national movement called “Eat Brighter” in an attempt to get kids to eat healthier.

“There is no single lightning bolt that can change the world,” Burns said, “but we have to inspire the next generation to eat brighter. If kids see characters like Elmo and Big Bird eating fruits and vegetables, hopefully they’ll say, ‘If they like it, it must be good,’”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

The Lempert Report: Eating out can hurt the health-conscious customer (video)

TGF-FruitImageThe Lempert Report says supermarkets can pick up the slack when chain restaurants offer entrees that are far from nutritious.

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