Blog Archives

Kroger executives tout growth in own brand

From remaking private brands with more “personality,” to burgeoning digital and natural/organic strategies, Kroger’s “to-do” list is longer than its “accomplished” list, officials of the retailer said. “That’s the thing that’s so exciting for us,” CEO Rodney McMullen said in an address to financial analysts and investors late last month in Cincinnati. “The things that we are working on are getting better, and the …

Why Subscribe To SN Digital Access?

Digital Access gives you unlimited online access to our most premium news and analysis such as Kroger executives tout growth in own brand. This includes in-depth stories and insights from our team of editors and guest writers as well as free eNewsletters, blogs, real-time polls, archives and more. In addition you will also receive a complimentary copy of SN’s salary survey sent to you by email.

Click here to read the FAQ page if you have any questions (opens in a new window)

Attention Paid Print Subscribers:  While you have already been granted free access to SN we ask that you register now. We promise it will only take a few minutes! Or visit your profile and add your print magazine account number and zip code.

Already registered? here.

Supermarket News

Kroger executives tout growth in own brand

From remaking private brands with more “personality,” to burgeoning digital and natural/organic strategies, Kroger’s “to-do” list is longer than its “accomplished” list, officials of the retailer said. “That’s the thing that’s so exciting for us,” CEO Rodney McMullen said in an address to financial analysts and investors late last month in Cincinnati. “The things that we are working on are getting better, and the …

Why Subscribe To SN Digital Access?

Digital Access gives you unlimited online access to our most premium news and analysis such as Kroger executives tout growth in own brand. This includes in-depth stories and insights from our team of editors and guest writers as well as free eNewsletters, blogs, real-time polls, archives and more. In addition you will also receive a complimentary copy of SN’s salary survey sent to you by email.

Click here to read the FAQ page if you have any questions (opens in a new window)

Attention Paid Print Subscribers:  While you have already been granted free access to SN we ask that you register now. We promise it will only take a few minutes! Or visit your profile and add your print magazine account number and zip code.

Already registered? here.

Supermarket News

Kroger executives tout growth in own brand

From remaking private brands with more “personality,” to burgeoning digital and natural/organic strategies, Kroger’s “to-do” list is longer than its “accomplished” list, officials of the retailer said. “That’s the thing that’s so exciting for us,” CEO Rodney McMullen said in an address to financial analysts and investors late last month in Cincinnati. “The things that we are working on are getting better, and the …

Why Subscribe To SN Digital Access?

Digital Access gives you unlimited online access to our most premium news and analysis such as Kroger executives tout growth in own brand. This includes in-depth stories and insights from our team of editors and guest writers as well as free eNewsletters, blogs, real-time polls, archives and more. In addition you will also receive a complimentary copy of SN’s salary survey sent to you by email.

Click here to read the FAQ page if you have any questions (opens in a new window)

Attention Paid Print Subscribers:  While you have already been granted free access to SN we ask that you register now. We promise it will only take a few minutes! Or visit your profile and add your print magazine account number and zip code.

Already registered? here.

Supermarket News

Gallery: New Kroger, Delhaize America executives and other trending stories

Video: Analyst foresees some Walmart ‘cannibalization’

BB&T Capital’s Andrew Wolf, in this video shot during SN’s 2014 Analysts Roundtable, says it’s “too soon to say” how Walmart’s new focus on its Neighborhood Markets will affect the performance of its Supercenters, but he does expect some “cannibalization” to occur. He also discusses Whole Food Market’s move toward more competitive prices, and its increased competition from Mariano’s, Sprouts and others, plus convention retailers with greater emphasis on natural/organic.

See the full video

Supermarket News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Defense Attorneys for Former PCA Executives Allege Government Misconduct

Defense attorneys in the criminal prosecution of former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives are charging that the document dumps they’ve been receiving from prosecutors lately amount to government misconduct.

With only one week to go before jury selection is supposed to begin in the fraud and conspiracy case against the former PCA executives, the defense claims that discovery abuses by the government are so egregious that the court should dismiss the indictment.

In a 20-page joint motion to dismiss the indictment for “Post-Stevens Discovery Abuses,” attorneys for the accused allege that their clients’ due process rights have been “inalterably compromised by systematic discovery abuses by the government.”

Defense attorneys compare “discovery abuses” in the PCA case with those made by Department of Justice (DOJ) attorneys in the prosecution of former U.S. Senator Ted Stevens (R-AK). In that high-profile case, Attorney General Eric Holder eventually moved to have the guilty verdict against Stevens set aside and the indictment dismissed with prejudice because of prosecutorial wrongdoing.

Prosecutors have not directly responded to this latest round of allegations by the defense, but they did suggest that their late naming of an expert witness could be remedied by granting a continuance. The trial is currently scheduled to begin with jury selection on July 14.

In the expert witness dispute — involving Dr. Ian Williams — the defense has also asked for exclusion of the witness. Williams is the nation’s top epidemiologist at the U.S. Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta.

But the defense claims the government has failed to disclose exculpatory and impeachment evidence in enough time for its effective use at trial. For example, the government has known for some time that one source — the Golden Peanut Co. — supplied peanuts to both PCA and ConAgra.

ConAgra had to recall its Peter Pan and Great Value brands for Salmonella contamination in 2006-07, two years before PCA’s problem with Salmonella-contaminated peanut butters and peanut paste surfaced.

“I was thinking about that one PGGE-matching isolate found in a PCA product, in January 2009,” U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) microbiologist Karen Satterwhite wrote in an email to colleagues. “PCA and ConAgra had a common peanut supplier (Golden Peanut), so the fact that the same Salmonella strain was (at different times) found at both manufacturers … it actually supports the theory that the contamination source was raw peanuts — not a water leak — and thus supports the theory that the roster wasn’t killing Salmonella.”

A separate email sent to FDA personnel a couple days later on Feb. 13, 2009, said the agency would not do any testing or sampling at Golden Peanut because it was among the peanut businesses thought to be doing only blanching. That decision was counter to information in an earlier Jan. 14 email from FDA’s Robert Neligan.

He reported that PCA in September 2008 was grinding peanuts previously roasted by Golden in Blakely, GA. The peanut paste order was cancelled while it was in progress, leaving PCA with 22,288 pounds of product to transfer into drums. Neligan tracked the lot numbers containing the “hot” load, adding, “Of interest: it’s plausible that the Salmonella Typh is coming from Golden Peanut Co. here in Blakely. We need to get into Golden Peanut also.”

Until now, the defense says they’d only seen the email saying there’d be no sampling or testing at Golden Peanut. They said that, standing alone, that email “appears innocuous; however, placing it into context with the other emails reveals that it is exculpatory.”

“The government’s decision to withhold this critical piece of the puzzle is tantamount to misconduct,” Thomas J. Bondurant, Jr., defense attorney for Stewart Parnell, the former PCA president and chief executive officer.

According to information filed in defense motions just before the Fourth of July weekend, the government has turned over thousands of new documents to the defense attorneys, some as recently as June 30, or just two weeks before trial.

Peanut broker Michael Parnell’s attorney, Edward D. Tolley, said that documents contained on a hard drive on June 30 should have “been turned over long ago.”

“On a different point, counsel writes to advise the Court that the receipt of 150,000 or so pages nine days before trial places counsel in an untenable position,” Tolley wrote. “If counsel does not review the material, then counsel has become ineffective; most importantly, it is impossible for counsel to review 150,000 documents in a short period of time while preparing for trial on an otherwise voluminous case.”

The third former PCA executive charged in the case is Mary Wilkerson, the company’s former quality control manager. All three are charged in a February 2013 indictment that included a total of 76 federal felony counts.

The 2008-09 Salmonella outbreak involving PCA products sickened 700 and killed nine. After a four-year investigation, the government charged the former executives with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing adulterated and misbranded food into interstate commerce.

Food Safety News

Defense Attorneys for Former PCA Executives Allege Government Misconduct

Defense attorneys in the criminal prosecution of former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives are charging that the document dumps they’ve been receiving from prosecutors lately amount to government misconduct.

With only one week to go before jury selection is supposed to begin in the fraud and conspiracy case against the former PCA executives, the defense claims that discovery abuses by the government are so egregious that the court should dismiss the indictment.

In a 20-page joint motion to dismiss the indictment for “Post-Stevens Discovery Abuses,” attorneys for the accused allege that their clients’ due process rights have been “inalterably compromised by systematic discovery abuses by the government.”

Defense attorneys compare “discovery abuses” in the PCA case with those made by Department of Justice (DOJ) attorneys in the prosecution of former U.S. Senator Ted Stevens (R-AK). In that high-profile case, Attorney General Eric Holder eventually moved to have the guilty verdict against Stevens set aside and the indictment dismissed with prejudice because of prosecutorial wrongdoing.

Prosecutors have not directly responded to this latest round of allegations by the defense, but they did suggest that their late naming of an expert witness could be remedied by granting a continuance. The trial is currently scheduled to begin with jury selection on July 14.

In the expert witness dispute — involving Dr. Ian Williams — the defense has also asked for exclusion of the witness. Williams is the nation’s top epidemiologist at the U.S. Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta.

But the defense claims the government has failed to disclose exculpatory and impeachment evidence in enough time for its effective use at trial. For example, the government has known for some time that one source — the Golden Peanut Co. — supplied peanuts to both PCA and ConAgra.

ConAgra had to recall its Peter Pan and Great Value brands for Salmonella contamination in 2006-07, two years before PCA’s problem with Salmonella-contaminated peanut butters and peanut paste surfaced.

“I was thinking about that one PGGE-matching isolate found in a PCA product, in January 2009,” U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) microbiologist Karen Satterwhite wrote in an email to colleagues. “PCA and ConAgra had a common peanut supplier (Golden Peanut), so the fact that the same Salmonella strain was (at different times) found at both manufacturers … it actually supports the theory that the contamination source was raw peanuts — not a water leak — and thus supports the theory that the roster wasn’t killing Salmonella.”

A separate email sent to FDA personnel a couple days later on Feb. 13, 2009, said the agency would not do any testing or sampling at Golden Peanut because it was among the peanut businesses thought to be doing only blanching. That decision was counter to information in an earlier Jan. 14 email from FDA’s Robert Neligan.

He reported that PCA in September 2008 was grinding peanuts previously roasted by Golden in Blakely, GA. The peanut paste order was cancelled while it was in progress, leaving PCA with 22,288 pounds of product to transfer into drums. Neligan tracked the lot numbers containing the “hot” load, adding, “Of interest: it’s plausible that the Salmonella Typh is coming from Golden Peanut Co. here in Blakely. We need to get into Golden Peanut also.”

Until now, the defense says they’d only seen the email saying there’d be no sampling or testing at Golden Peanut. They said that, standing alone, that email “appears innocuous; however, placing it into context with the other emails reveals that it is exculpatory.”

“The government’s decision to withhold this critical piece of the puzzle is tantamount to misconduct,” Thomas J. Bondurant, Jr., defense attorney for Stewart Parnell, the former PCA president and chief executive officer.

According to information filed in defense motions just before the Fourth of July weekend, the government has turned over thousands of new documents to the defense attorneys, some as recently as June 30, or just two weeks before trial.

Peanut broker Michael Parnell’s attorney, Edward D. Tolley, said that documents contained on a hard drive on June 30 should have “been turned over long ago.”

“On a different point, counsel writes to advise the Court that the receipt of 150,000 or so pages nine days before trial places counsel in an untenable position,” Tolley wrote. “If counsel does not review the material, then counsel has become ineffective; most importantly, it is impossible for counsel to review 150,000 documents in a short period of time while preparing for trial on an otherwise voluminous case.”

The third former PCA executive charged in the case is Mary Wilkerson, the company’s former quality control manager. All three are charged in a February 2013 indictment that included a total of 76 federal felony counts.

The 2008-09 Salmonella outbreak involving PCA products sickened 700 and killed nine. After a four-year investigation, the government charged the former executives with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing adulterated and misbranded food into interstate commerce.

Food Safety News

N.J. group honors three executives

NJFC Industry Achievement Award winner Joe Sheridan of Wakefern, left, with Linda Doherty, NJFC, and Industry Achievement Award winners John Ruane of Ahold USA and Joe Sofia of Wegmans.

The New Jersey Food Council on Thursday presented Industry Achievement Awards to three local executives from Wakefern Food Corp., Ahold USA and Wegmans Food Markets.


CONNECT WITH SN ON LINKEDIN

Join SN’s LinkedIn Group to network with industry professionals.


Joe Sheridan, president and COO, Wakefern; Joe Sofia, VP, Wegmans; and John Ruane, SVP of fresh merchandising, Ahold USA, were honored with Industry Achievement Awards at the association’s “Night of Distinction” in Somerset, N.J. The event drew nearly 600 guests, including prominent food industry executives, and featured N.J. State Sen. Jennifer Beck giving a special presentation.

“This distinguished class of food industry leaders is being recognized for their continued achievements in the ultra-competitive N.J. marketplace,” said NJFC president Linda Doherty, in a statement.

Award presenters included Dave Delaus, CIO, Wegmans; James Keenoy, director of marketing and external communications, Stop & Shop; and Joe Colalillo, owner of ShopRite of Hunterdon County and chairman of Wakefern.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Coborn’s hires 3 new executives

Coborn’s Inc., St. Cloud, Minn., said Friday it is expanding its leadership team with three new executives to help the company continue to grow and deal with the evolving shopping landscape.

The new executives are:

Corborn's CFO Tom Velin• Tom Velin, CFO. Velin succeeds Pam Osborn, who left Coborn’s at the end of 2013. Velin was previously senior vice president and CFO at Experian Health Carte, Minneapolis. He also was a CFO and senior executive at SPS Commerce in Minneapolis, Advance Duplication Services in Plymouth, Minn., and August Technology Corp. in Bloomington, Minn. In the mid-1990s, he gained some grocery-related experience when he was the CFO and assistant secretary at Lloyd’s Barbeque Company in Mendota Heights, Minn.

Coborn's CIO Dale Monson• Dale Monson, VP, information technology, a new position. Monson was previously SVP and CIO for Oriental Trading, Omaha, Neb. He has more than 25 years of technology and 17 years of e-commerce marketing, technology and enterprise-level application development experience. 

Coborn's EVP of sales Greg SandenoGreg Sandeno, EVP, sales, a new title. Sandeno was previously president and CEO at C&K Market, Brookings, Ore. He has also held leadership roles with Nash Finch Co., Minneapolis, and the Portland, Ore.-based Fred Meyer division of Kroger Co.


CONNECT WITH SN ON LINKEDIN

Join SN’s LinkedIn Group to network with industry professionals.


Velin and Monson’s appointments are effective March 3. Sandeno’s appointment is effective March 10. All three report to Chris Coborn, president and CEO of Coborn’s.

Coborn’s operates 48 stores in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

E&H Promotes Two Executives

WOOSTER, Ohio — E&H Family Group here, which operates Buehler’s Fresh Foods and 12 Ace hardware Dan Shanahanstores, has promoted the COOs of its two divisions to president: Dan Shanahan as president of the 14-store supermarket division and Scott Buehler as president of E&H Hardware Group.

Both had been named COO of their respective divisions a year ago but were given the title of president “to make it clearer they are functioning as leaders of those divisions,” a Scott Buehlercompany spokesman told SN.

Buehler’s formed E&H Family Group in 2011 when it had six Ace hardware stores connected to its supermarkets. The company added three freestanding hardware locations in 2012 and three more last year, along with a single new supermarket. A new Ace store is planned for 2014 in Avon Lake, Ohio, the company said.

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Loblaw Shifts Key Executives

BRAMPTON, Ontario — Loblaw Cos. here said Wednesday it has named Grant Froese and Mark Butler to the newly created roles of chief administrative officer and executive vice president, integration, respectively.

Froese, a 35-year Loblaw veteran, most recently was executive vice president of Loblaw’s Discount Division. He assumes responsibility for supply chain, IT and SAP implementation, as well as the division support functions of control brands, e-commerce, goods not for resale, off-shore procurement and marketing.


CONNECT WITH SN ON LINKEDIN

Join SN’s LinkedIn Group to network with industry professionals.


Butler, a 37-year veteran of Loblaw, will take on the responsibility for planning the integration of Shoppers Drug Mart, which Loblaw earlier this year had agreed to acquire. He will also lead the team charged with delivering synergies. He most recently was executive vice president, Conventional Division.

“Mark Butler is a seasoned operator with deep expertise and relationships in the key areas we have targeted for synergies. We are committed to achieving the targets we have outlined and I am confident that Mark and his team will deliver on those objectives,” said Vicente Trius, president, Loblaw.

Read more: Loblaw Eyes Growth in Shoppers Buy

Of Froese, Truis said his “combination of deep operational and merchandising experience is an ideal fit as we ramp up the IT rollout to our store network and drive our efficiency agenda to become a more agile company.”

Garry Senecal becomes executive vice president, Conventional Division, succeeding Butler, and continues to lead the health and wellness team.

Andrew Iacobucci becomes executive vice president, Discount Division, succeeding Froese. Iacobucci joined Loblaw in 2005 and has been a leader in the Discount division since 2011.

Having successfully completed the design and build phases of the supply chain and IT infrastructure project, Peter McMahon, chief operating officer, will be leaving the company.

“As chief operating officer, Peter was instrumental in the revitalization of our supply chain and the development of the SAP platform and digital strategy,” said Trius. “We thank Peter for his commitment and contribution to the company, and wish him the very best in his future endeavors.”

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Criminal Trial of Four PCA Executives Might Be Delayed

Federal courts in Georgia have a number of important criminal trials this fall, and it seems that Athens attorney Edward D. Tolley is involved in all of them.

Tolley, who represents defendant Michael Parnell in the criminal trial of four former Peanut Corporation of America executives, filed a motion last week suggesting that the U.S. District Court hold a Sept. 4 status conference because of his crowded schedule.

Federal Judge W. Louis Sands agreed with the suggestion, but not the date. Instead Sands set Aug. 14 at 4:30 p.m. as the date and time for a telephonic status conference among parties in the case. And perhaps because Tolley is so busy, Sands gave the attorney the assignment of notifying the parties and setting up the conference.

“When everyone is connected, please telephone chambers and we will proceed with the conference,” says Sands’ order to Tolley.

In addition to defending Parnell, PCA’s vice president and peanut broker, Tolley is the lead defense counsel for Ray Adams, a man charged with distribution of the poison “ricin” to the public, who goes to trial Sept. 23 in the Northern District of Georgia. Tolley is also lead counsel in another federal trial beginning Nov. 4 in the Southern District that could take eight weeks.

The criminal trial against the four former PCA executives is scheduled to begin Oct. 7, but brothers Stewart and Michael Parnell have petitioned the court for separate trials. Stewart Parnell was the chief executive of the now defunct company.

Judge Sands hinted that he is open to some rescheduling. In an order signed last Thursday, he denied several defense motions for failing to include memorandums of law citing supporting authorities as required by court rules. However, he added that if the parties needed additional time to file preliminary motions, he’d entertain a written motion to modify the scheduling order.

Sands acted on several motions, most of which remain sealed, regarding defendant Mary Wilkerson. The former quality control officer at PCA’s Blakely, GA, plant is charged with two counts of obstruction of justice. She claims through attorney Thomas G. Ledford that the government has not provided meaningful pre-trial discovery.

In a description of the sealed order, it appears that Sands may have approved payment for technical services to help Wilkerson make sense of the approximately three million documents the government has collected in the case.

The fourth defendant is Samuel Lightsey, the former Blakely, GA, plant manger for PCA. Together, the four are charged with 76 federal felony counts in the aftermath of a Salmonella outbreak that was linked to PCA after sickening at least 700 people and killing nine.

Food Safety News

Women Executives Take Charge at NEW Forum

RANCHO PALOS VERDES, Calif. — Women executives need to work more effectively to make sure their employees as well as corporate executives know what they’ve accomplished, Lori Raya, president of the Vons division of Safeway, said here Thursday at the 2013 Executive Leaders Forum sponsored by the Network of Executive Women.

“Years ago I spoke with the [former] chief executive officer of Safeway [Steve Burd], who told me I wasn’t delivering the kind of results my [male] predecessor had delivered. That’s when I realized he thought that because I was telling him what our team had done, rather than making clear what my leadership had done.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


“I learned I should have taken more credit — that I needed to be more bold and to speak up more while always being respectful.

“I used to let male executives lead the conversation. But now I feel the need to speak up as a leader. In fact, learning that was career-changing for me — that they want me to take charge.”

When Robert Edwards, Safeway’s new CEO, asked a group of executives what was right and wrong with the company, “he noticed that when one manager shared a negative opinion, nearly everyone leaned back while I was the only one who leaned forward and gave my own opinion,” Raya said. “That’s the kind of behavior CEOs expect, and it’s what they respect and appreciate.”

People at Safeway have recognized her boldness, Raya added. “My boss once said I don’t work for anyone — that I follow my own path — and it’s true that one attribute at which I excel is defiance. The people who work for me know I’m there to do the right thing for them and that I stand up for them, and they respond to me because I do that.”

Raya made her remarks as part of a panel discussing what makes female leaders effective.

Read more: Safeway Names Raya President of Vons

Katy Barclay, senior vice president, human resources, for Kroger Co., Cincinnati, agreed with Raya that women “ought to flex a lot — to be bold and to speak your mind, to distinguish between what your team did and what you did.”

“We have to strike that balance.”

Barclay recalled what she called a bizarre incident during her previous career at General Motors when, during a labor negotiating session, her boss whispered in her ear, “Working with you, I don’t feel like I’m working with a woman.”

“He meant it as a compliment,” she said, “but I was shocked. I realized I was tamping down my gender, and that was a turning point for me. I determined I would not do that anymore — that I would not let anyone feel anything other than that they were working with a woman.

“So I changed and made sure I was more energized in my interactions with people and that my personality came out more. As a result of that change, people rallied around me and sought out my advice more often.”

Read more: Kroger’s Barclay Chairs HR Group

Anne Fink, senior vice president of PepsiCo Sales, who was moderating the panel, said she has seen the power women can accumulate by being themselves “and not apologizing for it.”

Discussing her role as a leader, Raya said she spends up to four days a week at Vons’ stores.

“I try to remember when I was working in a store and how I felt when an executive came in. So when I go to a store, I go into a fact-finding mode and ask them how I can communicate with them. I also spend time walking around the office to find out each person’s passions, so I can figure out how I can best communicate my goals to my team.

“And the team has to adapt itself to the fact I don’t spend so much time in the office because you can’t sit in an office and know how ready your people are to move to the next level — they have to learn how to work when you’re not there.”

Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Government Brings Out Everything It Has on Former PCA Executives

The federal government has sealed some recent proceedings involving defendant Mary Wilkerson in the criminal case against four former Peanut Corporation of America.

The former quality control manger for the PCA peanut processing plant at Blakely, GA was charged with two felony counts of obstruction of justice, the smallest slice of the government’s 76-count federal felony indictment against all four defendants.  The other three are brothers Stewart and Michael Parnell and plant manager Samuel Lightsey.

The criminal case against the four is being heard in the federal trial court for the Middle District of Georgia, not far from the Blakely plant that in 2008-09 shipped peanut butter and peanut paste that was contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium. The poisoned peanut butter killed nine people and sickened another 700 in a nationwide outbreak.

Judge W. Louis Sands scheduled a June 25 ex parte hearing with Wilkerson, her attorney, and government prosecutors, but that meeting was apparently cancelled. Still, sealed records now raise the question of whether Wilkerson might go from defendant to witness for the government before the trial begins.

Government and defense attorneys have also differed in their views on all the documents being produced as part of pre-trial discovery. Sands granted the government extra time to do its document dump of everything the enforcement agencies and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has on PCA.

The information amounts to 80 gigabytes, or 93,000 documents, including many that were seized by the FBI when it executed search warrants during the outbreak. Some were recovered using “forensic hard drives,” which mirror documents and emails found on confiscated devices.

While the government asked for more discovery time, it opposed giving the defendants the same break by extending their deadline for pre-trial motions by two weeks to July 29. Attorneys for Stewart Parnell, the former chief executive officer of the defunct peanut company, said they needed more time because the two-and-half to three million documents they’ve already received are in an unsearchable format.

The government said the defense should not need more time because except for 14 additional CDs provided on June 17, all the other documents were provided to the defendants when they were charged last February.

In other pre-trial action, defense attorneys notified the court that John James Farmer III, a former science official for U.S. Public Health, would be called as an expert witness. Also, attorneys for Parnell said PCA’s food safety manual and insurance policies would be introduced at trial.

Food Safety News