Blog Archives

US: Larger orange production expected in 2014-2015

The latest USDA orange forecast predicts the 2014-2015 crop will be slightly bigger than the 2013-2014 one.

Last season’s orange production in the United States reached 156.4 million boxes, and, if the the latest USDA forecast pans out, the upcoming season’s production will be 2.5 percent larger than that. Production for the 2014-2015 orange season is expected to reach 160.4 million boxes, with gains in both Valencia and non-Valencia orange production. Florida, the state with the largest production of oranges in the country, is expected to have 108.0 million boxes of oranges for the upcoming season.

Grapefruit production is forecast to dip to 24.8 million boxes for the upcoming season – down from the previous season’s production of 25.4 million boxes. Florida’s production of grapefruit is expected to decrease only slightly, from 15.7 million boxes last season to 15.0 million boxes for 2014-2015.

Lemon production is expected to decrease by 800,000 boxes for the upcoming season, with production in California, the state that grows the most lemons, remaining unchanged at 19.0 million boxes.

FreshPlaza.com

Solid December market expected for western veg supplies

As expected, the break in vegetable demand at the end of November brought the lettuce market down to earth, but a solid market is expected as the Christmas pull begins the week of Dec. 8-12.

Vic Smith of JV Smith Cos., a large vegetable grower headquartered in Yuma, AZ, told The Produce News Dec. 5 that the early-season quality problems that limited supplies have cleared up. Those issues resulted in decreased volume and a demand-exceed-supply situation for the Thanksgiving pull.

“We had temperatures five to 15 degrees above normal [during much of the growing season],” he said. “This meant most fields started seven to 14 days ahead of schedule and the quality we had in November was a challenge.”

While that situation is in the past, the desert areas of California and Arizona did get some rain over the first few days of December.

“We like water, but we like to be in control of applying it when and where we need it,” Smith said. “This rain could produce some mildew issues.”

Hence he expects a strong market as the calls for increased holiday supplies begin next week, with a potential for expected volume to take even a slight hit.

Echoing those same sentiments was Mark McBride, who handles sales for Coastline Produce, a Salinas, CA, firm with desert production in the winter. He agreed that the early short supply situation had solved itself, which was reflected in lettuce prices around the $ 10 market during this post-Thanksgiving week, when demand is typically light.

“But the market is starting to get stronger,” he said Dec. 5.

By the week of Dec. 8 and continuing through the week of Dec. 15, McBride expects a strong market for lettuce and many other leaf items. However, he doesn’t expect it to rise to the pre-Thanksgiving level of $ 20-$ 30 per carton, at least not for the lettuces.

Cauliflower and celery are a different story.

“Even this week when demand for everything is very low, those two items were in a demand-exceeds-supply situation,” he said. “Supplies could get very tight moving forward.”

The Market News Service Report for Thursday, Dec. 4, gave testament to that. Cauliflower was trading at $ 27-$ 30 per 12-count carton, while the celery f.o.b. was listed at $ 17 to $ 20 for a carton of two dozen stalks. Both items are very popular throughout the holiday season, so demand is expected to continue to be very strong and most likely will outpace supply.

For consumers looking for a bargain vegetable item, broccoli is the best bet. After Thanksgiving, the price dipped to well below a break-even level with the f.o.b. market running at $ 7-$ 8 per carton. While it should also get a holiday boost, supplies are currently plentiful.

McBride of Coastline said it probably won’t be until the Christmas pull is over before supply and demand on most vegetable crops gets back into line. But again, that’s three weeks away and the ensuing weather will play a big role.

As McBride was speaking with The Produce News, the California and Arizona desert production regions had a forecast for more rain next week. How much rains falls and when it falls will have a big impact on the market price moving forward.

McBride said a shower late in the day is not nearly as disruptive as an early-morning rain that keeps the harvesters out of the fields.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Solid December market expected for western veg supplies

As expected, the break in vegetable demand at the end of November brought the lettuce market down to earth, but a solid market is expected as the Christmas pull begins the week of Dec. 8-12.

Vic Smith of JV Smith Cos., a large vegetable grower headquartered in Yuma, AZ, told The Produce News Dec. 5 that the early-season quality problems that limited supplies have cleared up. Those issues resulted in decreased volume and a demand-exceed-supply situation for the Thanksgiving pull.

“We had temperatures five to 15 degrees above normal [during much of the growing season],” he said. “This meant most fields started seven to 14 days ahead of schedule and the quality we had in November was a challenge.”

While that situation is in the past, the desert areas of California and Arizona did get some rain over the first few days of December.

“We like water, but we like to be in control of applying it when and where we need it,” Smith said. “This rain could produce some mildew issues.”

Hence he expects a strong market as the calls for increased holiday supplies begin next week, with a potential for expected volume to take even a slight hit.

Echoing those same sentiments was Mark McBride, who handles sales for Coastline Produce, a Salinas, CA, firm with desert production in the winter. He agreed that the early short supply situation had solved itself, which was reflected in lettuce prices around the $ 10 market during this post-Thanksgiving week, when demand is typically light.

“But the market is starting to get stronger,” he said Dec. 5.

By the week of Dec. 8 and continuing through the week of Dec. 15, McBride expects a strong market for lettuce and many other leaf items. However, he doesn’t expect it to rise to the pre-Thanksgiving level of $ 20-$ 30 per carton, at least not for the lettuces.

Cauliflower and celery are a different story.

“Even this week when demand for everything is very low, those two items were in a demand-exceeds-supply situation,” he said. “Supplies could get very tight moving forward.”

The Market News Service Report for Thursday, Dec. 4, gave testament to that. Cauliflower was trading at $ 27-$ 30 per 12-count carton, while the celery f.o.b. was listed at $ 17 to $ 20 for a carton of two dozen stalks. Both items are very popular throughout the holiday season, so demand is expected to continue to be very strong and most likely will outpace supply.

For consumers looking for a bargain vegetable item, broccoli is the best bet. After Thanksgiving, the price dipped to well below a break-even level with the f.o.b. market running at $ 7-$ 8 per carton. While it should also get a holiday boost, supplies are currently plentiful.

McBride of Coastline said it probably won’t be until the Christmas pull is over before supply and demand on most vegetable crops gets back into line. But again, that’s three weeks away and the ensuing weather will play a big role.

As McBride was speaking with The Produce News, the California and Arizona desert production regions had a forecast for more rain next week. How much rains falls and when it falls will have a big impact on the market price moving forward.

McBride said a shower late in the day is not nearly as disruptive as an early-morning rain that keeps the harvesters out of the fields.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chinese garlic crop is largest in four years with lower prices expected

Prices for Chinese garlic have reached historic highs in recent years due to light crops, but this year’s crop is expected to be up in volume by about 35 percent with a corresponding drop in price, according to Jim Provost, managing partner of I Love Produce in West Grove, PA.

For the past three years, prices for Chinese garlic have been “stronger than they have ever been” previously, said Mr. Provost, who had just returned from a three-week visit to China when he spoke with The Produce News in late June.

ILP-Peeled-garlic-grading-aILP Peeled garlic grading after cooling.U.S. Department of Agriculture market reports show that “Chinese prices have been very strong, right up there compared to what California garlic is typically marketed at in a normal year,” he said.

Those strong prices are one reason for this year’s increase in production, he said. As with farmers in many places, when Chinese farmers “see there is money to be made, they plant more.”

In addition to the increased acreage, crop yields are particularly high this year, he said.

“This year was a convergence of not only the amount of acreage planted” but of higher yields as well, “so the combination of the two has led to the biggest crop in four years,” Provost said.

Planting acreage is about 20 percent higher than last year, and yields are up 10-15 percent, according to Provost. The net increase is expected to be in the range of 1 million to 1.5 million metric tons.

It is not a record crop, however, but more of a return to a typical crop, he said.

Provost said he expects to receive the first peeled garlic of the season from China the week of July 8 and the first fresh garlic the week of July 15. He expects I Love Produce to be the first company to have new-crop Chinese garlic available in the United States.

After three years of “relatively tight” supplies with prices “comparable to domestically grown garlic,” this year will be “an entirely different deal, with garlic at least 30 percent cheaper on average,” Provost said. “The quality is excellent and the size is very good, so it is time to promote garlic again. We are offering ads for peeled garlic, bulk garlic and packaged five-bulb netted garlic.”

Currently, there is a glut of last year’s garlic from China on the market, as importers are cleaning up old inventories in anticipation of this year’s larger crop, according to Provost.

“In order to provide our customers the freshest garlic, I made a trip to China in early June to inspect the new crop and settle some purchases with our growers,” he said.

Provost said that in addition to looking at new-crop garlic, he had a couple of other purposes in going to China in early June. One was to attend the Asian Fruit Congress in Qingdao in the Shandong province of China, a coastal city of about 8 million people located about midway between Beijing and Shanghai. At the conference, he said, there were guest speakers who talked about marketing in China, with a focus on second-tier cities such as Quingdao.

In addition, I Love Produce has “a couple of offices in China” through which it exports U.S.-grown fruit into China.

“So I spend more time in China than I used to because … the export side is a larger focus of what we are doing,” Provost said.

China is “an important market for U.S. food products and is now our number one agricultural customer, according to the USDA,” he said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Double-digit increases expected for U.S. imports of Chilean cherries

The Chilean Cherry Committee, an entity associated with the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, expects total exports of fresh cherries from Chile to reach 100,000 tons this year. As the second-largest export market for Chile, North America anticipates a 45 percent increase in volume over the 2013/14 season.

To support this dramatic growth, the Chilean Cherry Committee is pursuing a targeted promotion campaign across the United States and Canada, with increased funding earmarked for retail promotions.

chileancherries “Thanks to an extraordinarily successful harvest, we’re going to see increased volume and promotions in North America,” Karen Brux, managing director of North America for the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “The Chilean Cherry Committee is committed to expanding the North American market for Chilean cherries, and we have promotion funding available for retailers to make that happen. We’re in the process of meeting with retailers to confirm holiday promotions.”

This year’s strong harvest is positive news for the Chilean cherry industry, which was hard hit in 2013 by a devastating freeze.

“The initial estimate for 2013-14 was 85,000 tons, but after the freeze this dropped to 68,000 tons,” Brux said in the press release. “With Chile on track to export at least 100,000 tons during the 2014-15 season, this is a significant step for the industry. It’s also great news for North American retailers, who want to offer their shoppers a beautiful, premium, great-tasting fruit over the holiday season.”

Chile is the largest cherry exporter in the Southern Hemisphere and the second-largest exporter of cherries in the world. Fresh cherries from Chile are available in December and January, with export peaks expected from weeks 49-51.

The Chilean Cherry Committee is offering holiday-themed point-of-sale merchandising materials that encourage shoppers to “bring home the cherry best.” Supporting recipes, images and other materials are available for both in-store and online marketing.

The Chilean Cherry Committee was formed under the auspices of ASOEX, which is based in Santiago, Chile. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association is its North American counterpart and directs all marketing and promotional activities for fresh Chilean fruit in the United States and Canada.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Double-digit increases expected for U.S. imports of Chilean cherries

The Chilean Cherry Committee, an entity associated with the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, expects total exports of fresh cherries from Chile to reach 100,000 tons this year. As the second-largest export market for Chile, North America anticipates a 45 percent increase in volume over the 2013/14 season.

To support this dramatic growth, the Chilean Cherry Committee is pursuing a targeted promotion campaign across the United States and Canada, with increased funding earmarked for retail promotions.

chileancherries “Thanks to an extraordinarily successful harvest, we’re going to see increased volume and promotions in North America,” Karen Brux, managing director of North America for the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “The Chilean Cherry Committee is committed to expanding the North American market for Chilean cherries, and we have promotion funding available for retailers to make that happen. We’re in the process of meeting with retailers to confirm holiday promotions.”

This year’s strong harvest is positive news for the Chilean cherry industry, which was hard hit in 2013 by a devastating freeze.

“The initial estimate for 2013-14 was 85,000 tons, but after the freeze this dropped to 68,000 tons,” Brux said in the press release. “With Chile on track to export at least 100,000 tons during the 2014-15 season, this is a significant step for the industry. It’s also great news for North American retailers, who want to offer their shoppers a beautiful, premium, great-tasting fruit over the holiday season.”

Chile is the largest cherry exporter in the Southern Hemisphere and the second-largest exporter of cherries in the world. Fresh cherries from Chile are available in December and January, with export peaks expected from weeks 49-51.

The Chilean Cherry Committee is offering holiday-themed point-of-sale merchandising materials that encourage shoppers to “bring home the cherry best.” Supporting recipes, images and other materials are available for both in-store and online marketing.

The Chilean Cherry Committee was formed under the auspices of ASOEX, which is based in Santiago, Chile. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association is its North American counterpart and directs all marketing and promotional activities for fresh Chilean fruit in the United States and Canada.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Double-digit increases expected for U.S. imports of Chilean cherries

The Chilean Cherry Committee, an entity associated with the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, expects total exports of fresh cherries from Chile to reach 100,000 tons this year. As the second-largest export market for Chile, North America anticipates a 45 percent increase in volume over the 2013/14 season.

To support this dramatic growth, the Chilean Cherry Committee is pursuing a targeted promotion campaign across the United States and Canada, with increased funding earmarked for retail promotions.

chileancherries “Thanks to an extraordinarily successful harvest, we’re going to see increased volume and promotions in North America,” Karen Brux, managing director of North America for the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “The Chilean Cherry Committee is committed to expanding the North American market for Chilean cherries, and we have promotion funding available for retailers to make that happen. We’re in the process of meeting with retailers to confirm holiday promotions.”

This year’s strong harvest is positive news for the Chilean cherry industry, which was hard hit in 2013 by a devastating freeze.

“The initial estimate for 2013-14 was 85,000 tons, but after the freeze this dropped to 68,000 tons,” Brux said in the press release. “With Chile on track to export at least 100,000 tons during the 2014-15 season, this is a significant step for the industry. It’s also great news for North American retailers, who want to offer their shoppers a beautiful, premium, great-tasting fruit over the holiday season.”

Chile is the largest cherry exporter in the Southern Hemisphere and the second-largest exporter of cherries in the world. Fresh cherries from Chile are available in December and January, with export peaks expected from weeks 49-51.

The Chilean Cherry Committee is offering holiday-themed point-of-sale merchandising materials that encourage shoppers to “bring home the cherry best.” Supporting recipes, images and other materials are available for both in-store and online marketing.

The Chilean Cherry Committee was formed under the auspices of ASOEX, which is based in Santiago, Chile. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association is its North American counterpart and directs all marketing and promotional activities for fresh Chilean fruit in the United States and Canada.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Double-digit increases expected for U.S. imports of Chilean cherries

The Chilean Cherry Committee, an entity associated with the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, expects total exports of fresh cherries from Chile to reach 100,000 tons this year. As the second-largest export market for Chile, North America anticipates a 45 percent increase in volume over the 2013/14 season.

To support this dramatic growth, the Chilean Cherry Committee is pursuing a targeted promotion campaign across the United States and Canada, with increased funding earmarked for retail promotions.

chileancherries “Thanks to an extraordinarily successful harvest, we’re going to see increased volume and promotions in North America,” Karen Brux, managing director of North America for the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “The Chilean Cherry Committee is committed to expanding the North American market for Chilean cherries, and we have promotion funding available for retailers to make that happen. We’re in the process of meeting with retailers to confirm holiday promotions.”

This year’s strong harvest is positive news for the Chilean cherry industry, which was hard hit in 2013 by a devastating freeze.

“The initial estimate for 2013-14 was 85,000 tons, but after the freeze this dropped to 68,000 tons,” Brux said in the press release. “With Chile on track to export at least 100,000 tons during the 2014-15 season, this is a significant step for the industry. It’s also great news for North American retailers, who want to offer their shoppers a beautiful, premium, great-tasting fruit over the holiday season.”

Chile is the largest cherry exporter in the Southern Hemisphere and the second-largest exporter of cherries in the world. Fresh cherries from Chile are available in December and January, with export peaks expected from weeks 49-51.

The Chilean Cherry Committee is offering holiday-themed point-of-sale merchandising materials that encourage shoppers to “bring home the cherry best.” Supporting recipes, images and other materials are available for both in-store and online marketing.

The Chilean Cherry Committee was formed under the auspices of ASOEX, which is based in Santiago, Chile. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association is its North American counterpart and directs all marketing and promotional activities for fresh Chilean fruit in the United States and Canada.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Double-digit increases expected for U.S. imports of Chilean cherries

The Chilean Cherry Committee, an entity associated with the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, expects total exports of fresh cherries from Chile to reach 100,000 tons this year. As the second-largest export market for Chile, North America anticipates a 45 percent increase in volume over the 2013/14 season.

To support this dramatic growth, the Chilean Cherry Committee is pursuing a targeted promotion campaign across the United States and Canada, with increased funding earmarked for retail promotions.

chileancherries “Thanks to an extraordinarily successful harvest, we’re going to see increased volume and promotions in North America,” Karen Brux, managing director of North America for the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “The Chilean Cherry Committee is committed to expanding the North American market for Chilean cherries, and we have promotion funding available for retailers to make that happen. We’re in the process of meeting with retailers to confirm holiday promotions.”

This year’s strong harvest is positive news for the Chilean cherry industry, which was hard hit in 2013 by a devastating freeze.

“The initial estimate for 2013-14 was 85,000 tons, but after the freeze this dropped to 68,000 tons,” Brux said in the press release. “With Chile on track to export at least 100,000 tons during the 2014-15 season, this is a significant step for the industry. It’s also great news for North American retailers, who want to offer their shoppers a beautiful, premium, great-tasting fruit over the holiday season.”

Chile is the largest cherry exporter in the Southern Hemisphere and the second-largest exporter of cherries in the world. Fresh cherries from Chile are available in December and January, with export peaks expected from weeks 49-51.

The Chilean Cherry Committee is offering holiday-themed point-of-sale merchandising materials that encourage shoppers to “bring home the cherry best.” Supporting recipes, images and other materials are available for both in-store and online marketing.

The Chilean Cherry Committee was formed under the auspices of ASOEX, which is based in Santiago, Chile. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association is its North American counterpart and directs all marketing and promotional activities for fresh Chilean fruit in the United States and Canada.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Double-digit increases expected for U.S. imports of Chilean cherries

The Chilean Cherry Committee, an entity associated with the Chilean Fruit Exporters Association, expects total exports of fresh cherries from Chile to reach 100,000 tons this year. As the second-largest export market for Chile, North America anticipates a 45 percent increase in volume over the 2013/14 season.

To support this dramatic growth, the Chilean Cherry Committee is pursuing a targeted promotion campaign across the United States and Canada, with increased funding earmarked for retail promotions.

chileancherries “Thanks to an extraordinarily successful harvest, we’re going to see increased volume and promotions in North America,” Karen Brux, managing director of North America for the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association, said in a press release. “The Chilean Cherry Committee is committed to expanding the North American market for Chilean cherries, and we have promotion funding available for retailers to make that happen. We’re in the process of meeting with retailers to confirm holiday promotions.”

This year’s strong harvest is positive news for the Chilean cherry industry, which was hard hit in 2013 by a devastating freeze.

“The initial estimate for 2013-14 was 85,000 tons, but after the freeze this dropped to 68,000 tons,” Brux said in the press release. “With Chile on track to export at least 100,000 tons during the 2014-15 season, this is a significant step for the industry. It’s also great news for North American retailers, who want to offer their shoppers a beautiful, premium, great-tasting fruit over the holiday season.”

Chile is the largest cherry exporter in the Southern Hemisphere and the second-largest exporter of cherries in the world. Fresh cherries from Chile are available in December and January, with export peaks expected from weeks 49-51.

The Chilean Cherry Committee is offering holiday-themed point-of-sale merchandising materials that encourage shoppers to “bring home the cherry best.” Supporting recipes, images and other materials are available for both in-store and online marketing.

The Chilean Cherry Committee was formed under the auspices of ASOEX, which is based in Santiago, Chile. The Chilean Fresh Fruit Association is its North American counterpart and directs all marketing and promotional activities for fresh Chilean fruit in the United States and Canada.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Vegetable supplies expected to be tight through Thanksgiving

With California’s coastal and San Joaquin Valley vegetable deals winding down prior to the volume coming on in the desert deals, many items are in a demand-exceeds-supply situation that could remain in effect through Thanksgiving.

On Monday, Oct. 27, the Iceberg lettuce market hit $ 20 f.o.b. and there is every indication it could go much higher over the next couple of weeks. While demand was solid the week of Oct. 27-31, it will only increase as the Thanksgiving pull is felt. Thanksgiving demand is expected to pick up around Nov. 11 and supplies are expected to be short.

Mark McBride, who is on the sales desk for Coastline Produce in Salinas, CA, and a longtime veteran in the vegetable business, said warm weather and the California drought have combined to create “a very challenging situation.”

He explained that fields have been running ahead of schedule for the last couple of months because of warm weather.

“We are running out of acres to harvest,” he said Oct. 29.

He further explained that the drought and changing cropping patterns have reduced the fall vegetable deal in Huron in the San Joaquin Valley “to a fraction of what it used to be. Say what you want about Huron, but it played a very important role.”

Today more and more grower-shippers have tried to extend their coastal deals and switch directly from the California coast to desert production in California and Arizona in the fall.

The California drought has also led to decreased San Joaquin Valley acreage causing the October-November time slot occupied by Huron to shrink considerably.

McBride said celery from the Oxnard to Santa Maria corridor appears to be in good shape, as are green onions from Mexico, “but the leaf items, cauliflower and broccoli to some extent, are short and I don’t see that changing until after Thanksgiving.”

Douglas Schaefer, president of EJ’s Produce Sales Inc. in Phoenix, told The Produce News Oct. 29 that a very difficult situation was brewing.  

“Salinas is about finished, yields from Huron are off and Yuma is late,” Schaefer said, noting that late August and early September rains in Arizona greatly affected planting schedules and threw everyone off.  “It’s all because of H20.”  

He said these factors — Arizona getting too much water and California not getting enough — are going to lead to a very short situation for the rest of November.  

In addition, Schaefer said many other crops, including watermelons and tomatoes, are having supply issues leading to high prices.

When asked how high the market could go on lettuce, Schaefer said the sky is the limit. “It’s like a hot air balloon,” he quipped. “How high is it going to go? Until it runs out of oxygen.”

Schaefer added that he is already getting inquiries for the Thanksgiving pull with retailers and wholesalers trying to set up advance sales beginning during the week of Nov. 7.  

“Strap on your boots and fasten your seat belts,” he said, indicating that a wild ride is in the works.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Vegetable supplies expected to be tight through Thanksgiving

With California’s coastal and San Joaquin Valley vegetable deals winding down prior to the volume coming on in the desert deals, many items are in a demand-exceeds-supply situation that could remain in effect through Thanksgiving.

On Monday, Oct. 27, the Iceberg lettuce market hit $ 20 f.o.b. and there is every indication it could go much higher over the next couple of weeks. While demand was solid the week of Oct. 27-31, it will only increase as the Thanksgiving pull is felt. Thanksgiving demand is expected to pick up around Nov. 11 and supplies are expected to be short.

Mark McBride, who is on the sales desk for Coastline Produce in Salinas, CA, and a longtime veteran in the vegetable business, said warm weather and the California drought have combined to create “a very challenging situation.”

He explained that fields have been running ahead of schedule for the last couple of months because of warm weather.

“We are running out of acres to harvest,” he said Oct. 29.

He further explained that the drought and changing cropping patterns have reduced the fall vegetable deal in Huron in the San Joaquin Valley “to a fraction of what it used to be. Say what you want about Huron, but it played a very important role.”

Today more and more grower-shippers have tried to extend their coastal deals and switch directly from the California coast to desert production in California and Arizona in the fall.

The California drought has also led to decreased San Joaquin Valley acreage causing the October-November time slot occupied by Huron to shrink considerably.

McBride said celery from the Oxnard to Santa Maria corridor appears to be in good shape, as are green onions from Mexico, “but the leaf items, cauliflower and broccoli to some extent, are short and I don’t see that changing until after Thanksgiving.”

Douglas Schaefer, president of EJ’s Produce Sales Inc. in Phoenix, told The Produce News Oct. 29 that a very difficult situation was brewing.  

“Salinas is about finished, yields from Huron are off and Yuma is late,” Schaefer said, noting that late August and early September rains in Arizona greatly affected planting schedules and threw everyone off.  “It’s all because of H20.”  

He said these factors — Arizona getting too much water and California not getting enough — are going to lead to a very short situation for the rest of November.  

In addition, Schaefer said many other crops, including watermelons and tomatoes, are having supply issues leading to high prices.

When asked how high the market could go on lettuce, Schaefer said the sky is the limit. “It’s like a hot air balloon,” he quipped. “How high is it going to go? Until it runs out of oxygen.”

Schaefer added that he is already getting inquiries for the Thanksgiving pull with retailers and wholesalers trying to set up advance sales beginning during the week of Nov. 7.  

“Strap on your boots and fasten your seat belts,” he said, indicating that a wild ride is in the works.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Vegetable supplies expected to be tight through Thanksgiving

With California’s coastal and San Joaquin Valley vegetable deals winding down prior to the volume coming on in the desert deals, many items are in a demand-exceeds-supply situation that could remain in effect through Thanksgiving.

On Monday, Oct. 27, the Iceberg lettuce market hit $ 20 f.o.b. and there is every indication it could go much higher over the next couple of weeks. While demand was solid the week of Oct. 27-31, it will only increase as the Thanksgiving pull is felt. Thanksgiving demand is expected to pick up around Nov. 11 and supplies are expected to be short.

Mark McBride, who is on the sales desk for Coastline Produce in Salinas, CA, and a longtime veteran in the vegetable business, said warm weather and the California drought have combined to create “a very challenging situation.”

He explained that fields have been running ahead of schedule for the last couple of months because of warm weather.

“We are running out of acres to harvest,” he said Oct. 29.

He further explained that the drought and changing cropping patterns have reduced the fall vegetable deal in Huron in the San Joaquin Valley “to a fraction of what it used to be. Say what you want about Huron, but it played a very important role.”

Today more and more grower-shippers have tried to extend their coastal deals and switch directly from the California coast to desert production in California and Arizona in the fall.

The California drought has also led to decreased San Joaquin Valley acreage causing the October-November time slot occupied by Huron to shrink considerably.

McBride said celery from the Oxnard to Santa Maria corridor appears to be in good shape, as are green onions from Mexico, “but the leaf items, cauliflower and broccoli to some extent, are short and I don’t see that changing until after Thanksgiving.”

Douglas Schaefer, president of EJ’s Produce Sales Inc. in Phoenix, told The Produce News Oct. 29 that a very difficult situation was brewing.  

“Salinas is about finished, yields from Huron are off and Yuma is late,” Schaefer said, noting that late August and early September rains in Arizona greatly affected planting schedules and threw everyone off.  “It’s all because of H20.”  

He said these factors — Arizona getting too much water and California not getting enough — are going to lead to a very short situation for the rest of November.  

In addition, Schaefer said many other crops, including watermelons and tomatoes, are having supply issues leading to high prices.

When asked how high the market could go on lettuce, Schaefer said the sky is the limit. “It’s like a hot air balloon,” he quipped. “How high is it going to go? Until it runs out of oxygen.”

Schaefer added that he is already getting inquiries for the Thanksgiving pull with retailers and wholesalers trying to set up advance sales beginning during the week of Nov. 7.  

“Strap on your boots and fasten your seat belts,” he said, indicating that a wild ride is in the works.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Vegetable supplies expected to be tight through Thanksgiving

With California’s coastal and San Joaquin Valley vegetable deals winding down prior to the volume coming on in the desert deals, many items are in a demand-exceeds-supply situation that could remain in effect through Thanksgiving.

On Monday, Oct. 27, the Iceberg lettuce market hit $ 20 f.o.b. and there is every indication it could go much higher over the next couple of weeks. While demand was solid the week of Oct. 27-31, it will only increase as the Thanksgiving pull is felt. Thanksgiving demand is expected to pick up around Nov. 11 and supplies are expected to be short.

Mark McBride, who is on the sales desk for Coastline Produce in Salinas, CA, and a longtime veteran in the vegetable business, said warm weather and the California drought have combined to create “a very challenging situation.”

He explained that fields have been running ahead of schedule for the last couple of months because of warm weather.

“We are running out of acres to harvest,” he said Oct. 29.

He further explained that the drought and changing cropping patterns have reduced the fall vegetable deal in Huron in the San Joaquin Valley “to a fraction of what it used to be. Say what you want about Huron, but it played a very important role.”

Today more and more grower-shippers have tried to extend their coastal deals and switch directly from the California coast to desert production in California and Arizona in the fall.

The California drought has also led to decreased San Joaquin Valley acreage causing the October-November time slot occupied by Huron to shrink considerably.

McBride said celery from the Oxnard to Santa Maria corridor appears to be in good shape, as are green onions from Mexico, “but the leaf items, cauliflower and broccoli to some extent, are short and I don’t see that changing until after Thanksgiving.”

Douglas Schaefer, president of EJ’s Produce Sales Inc. in Phoenix, told The Produce News Oct. 29 that a very difficult situation was brewing.  

“Salinas is about finished, yields from Huron are off and Yuma is late,” Schaefer said, noting that late August and early September rains in Arizona greatly affected planting schedules and threw everyone off.  “It’s all because of H20.”  

He said these factors — Arizona getting too much water and California not getting enough — are going to lead to a very short situation for the rest of November.  

In addition, Schaefer said many other crops, including watermelons and tomatoes, are having supply issues leading to high prices.

When asked how high the market could go on lettuce, Schaefer said the sky is the limit. “It’s like a hot air balloon,” he quipped. “How high is it going to go? Until it runs out of oxygen.”

Schaefer added that he is already getting inquiries for the Thanksgiving pull with retailers and wholesalers trying to set up advance sales beginning during the week of Nov. 7.  

“Strap on your boots and fasten your seat belts,” he said, indicating that a wild ride is in the works.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

South Africa: Increased volumes of grapes expected

South Africa: Increased volumes of grapes expected

South Africa’s table grape crop is expected to be up on last season by 4-7%. Last season the country had to deal with adverse weather which affected volumes, this season’s volumes are more online with the volumes from the 2012/13 season and will be boosted by new planting coming into production.

According to Rhomona Gounden from SATI, harvesting will begin seven days earlier than normal. the total volume is expected to be between 52.9 and 54.3 million (4.5 equivalent boxes).

A few weeks ago the Orange River Region suffered from hail storms, despite this the volumes are expected to increase from 15 million carton last season to 16.5-16.8 million cartons this year.

An updated second crop estimate will be published early December 2014.
 
 
For more information:
Rhomona Gounden
SATI
Email: [email protected]
 

 

Publication date: 10/21/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Kiwifruit prices expected to decline as imports hit the market

Kurt Cappelluti, sales manager at Stellar Distributing Inc. in Madera, CA, said marketplace dynamics will be changing by the end of October as kiwifruit imports from Italy continue to arrive in the United States.

“The glut is two weeks away,” he told The Produce News Oct. 13.

Stellar Distributing was established in the 1990s by parent company Catania Worldwide, which began operations in Toronto in 1929. Today, the third generation of the Catania family moves an extensive array of fresh produce to the global marketplace. The company is now headquartered in Mississauga, ON.

Stellar Distributing grows and markets kiwifruit and figs. The company also markets chestnuts, limes, apricots, pomegranates and persimmons. As a company, Stellar is vertically integrated, working with an extensive network of growers and suppliers in both the northern and southern hemispheres.

“Kiwi consumption continues to grow,” Paul Catania Jr., owner of Catania Worldwide, told The Produce News. “More and more people are growing the Gold variety.” Globally, he said Italy is the second-largest producer of kiwifruit. “U.S. kiwi will always have a home,” he added.

Cappelluti said the 2014 kiwifruit season has been a good one, and California production ramped up in early October. He said Stellar has been moving 25 loads of quality kiwifruit per week. Sales of California kiwifruit will continue through the end of April.

“The kiwi deal has been strong,” he stated. “But I see the deal crashing in the next two to three weeks.”

California and Italy are both Northern Hemisphere producers, and Cappelluti said Italian producers expect overall volume will be up approximately 15 percent this season. As a result, he said the United States will surely see increased competition from exports for shelf space at retail. Pricing, he added, is expected to decline as Italian exports are received in the United States.

“We want to be fair to all global growers,” he said, adding that Stellar also imports kiwifruit from Chile, New Zealand, France and Greece. “I don’t want to see a severe crash in the United States.”

As prices begin to fall, Cappelluti said it will be important for retailers to work with companies that can deliver promised volume.

“Choose wisely,” he said. “It’s important to go to companies that specialize in kiwi.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.