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AU: FTA with Korea to be game-changing for cherry exporters

AU: FTA with Korea to be game-changing for cherry exporters

The cherry season is about to start in Australia, and according to Simon Boughey, CEO of Cherry Growers Australia, “production volumes are expected to be similar to 2012, of 14.5 to 15 thousand tonnes, depending on seasonal fluctuations until late February. All states report a good flowering, so the situation is quite encouraging at the moment.”

Regarding the market situation, Simon says that it is still early to be certain, “but we’ve had lots of enquiries from the Asian region, with plenty of interest from China and Hong Kong. We are also back into the Thai market, but the real game-changer is the FTA signed between Korea and Australia, which will eliminate the 23% import fee and may come into force in early 2015.”

There is also rising demand from other countries in the area, such as Malaysia and the Philippines. “Overall, there is growing demand in Asia, which is easy for us to cover, because we can ship to any Asian destination within 8 to 10 hours, which is a very competitive advantage,” states Simon.

The domestic market is also quite strong. According to Simon, “in the last couple of years 30% of the production has gone to exports and 70% to the domestic market, but we aim towards 50/50. Hong Kong already takes about 50% of our exports and we continue to expand on our four key markets,” concludes Simon Boughley.

For more information:
Simon Boughey
Cherry Growers Australia
Tel: 0061 3 6231 1229
Email: [email protected]

Publication date: 10/24/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

EU exporters fear further Russian bans

Who’s next? Greece?
EU exporters fear further Russian bans

The political battle between EU and Russia has hit the Polish export of fruit and vegetables. So what can we expect next?, is the question being asked by other EU exporters to Russia. “It’s difficult to predict what’s going to happen. A day before the ban on Polish fruit and vegetables was announced, I was sure it wouldn’t happen,” says Irina Koziy from FruitNews.ru, Russian specialized information resource for fresh produce industry.

However there is a hope that there will be a certain agreement between the phyotsanitary departments in Poland and Russia, within the next two months. “The current ban has been enforced in the period when shipments are at their lowest throughout the year,” Irinia continues. During August and September there aren’t a lot of shipments for products like apples and cabbages. The big volumes of these items start to move from October. For stonefruit it is the end of the season, 80% of the volume to Russia has been shipped already, so only 20% is affected.

Poland is the biggest supplier of imported apples to Russia. 80% of the apples in Russia are imported and about 50% of that volume comes from Poland. “I don’t see another source to fill that gap. Poland is a large source for low cost apples for Russian consumers,” concludes Irina.

According to a Belgian potato exporter, “The future for European agro export to Russian does not look good.” He believes the Russians will ban potato imports soon and if this happens there will be not many options left for European exporters as growing seasons have been good in most countries so there is less need for imports.

“The Russian market is always good for large volumes but so far this season we really don’t know where to go.”

The ban came as an absolute surprise for Europe. Russia had not warned beforehand about a possible ban, a European Commission official told reporters in Brussels, adding that the Commission would closely look into the causes for Russia’s embargo.

Russian agricultural watchdog Rosselkhoznadzor said this week it is also considering banning fruit imports from Greece next week due to the repeated supply of fruit contaminated with oriental fruit moths.

“Our experts are currently examining the seriousness of the situation, and assessing the risks. The assessment will be over in a couple of days, at the beginning of next week. After that, there is a possibility of imposing restrictions on Greek fruit imports to Russia,” said Alexei Alexeyenko, Rosselkhoznadzor’s deputy head.

Publication date: 8/1/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

EU exporters fear further Russian bans

Who’s next? Greece?
EU exporters fear further Russian bans

The political battle between EU and Russia has hit the Polish export of fruit and vegetables. So what can we expect next?, is the question being asked by other EU exporters to Russia. “It’s difficult to predict what’s going to happen. A day before the ban on Polish fruit and vegetables was announced, I was sure it wouldn’t happen,” says Irina Koziy from FruitNews.ru, Russian specialized information resource for fresh produce industry.

However there is a hope that there will be a certain agreement between the phyotsanitary departments in Poland and Russia, within the next two months. “The current ban has been enforced in the period when shipments are at their lowest throughout the year,” Irinia continues. During August and September there aren’t a lot of shipments for products like apples and cabbages. The big volumes of these items start to move from October. For stonefruit it is the end of the season, 80% of the volume to Russia has been shipped already, so only 20% is affected.

Poland is the biggest supplier of imported apples to Russia. 80% of the apples in Russia are imported and about 50% of that volume comes from Poland. “I don’t see another source to fill that gap. Poland is a large source for low cost apples for Russian consumers,” concludes Irina.

According to a Belgian potato exporter, “The future for European agro export to Russian does not look good.” He believes the Russians will ban potato imports soon and if this happens there will be not many options left for European exporters as growing seasons have been good in most countries so there is less need for imports.

“The Russian market is always good for large volumes but so far this season we really don’t know where to go.”

The ban came as an absolute surprise for Europe. Russia had not warned beforehand about a possible ban, a European Commission official told reporters in Brussels, adding that the Commission would closely look into the causes for Russia’s embargo.

Russian agricultural watchdog Rosselkhoznadzor said this week it is also considering banning fruit imports from Greece next week due to the repeated supply of fruit contaminated with oriental fruit moths.

“Our experts are currently examining the seriousness of the situation, and assessing the risks. The assessment will be over in a couple of days, at the beginning of next week. After that, there is a possibility of imposing restrictions on Greek fruit imports to Russia,” said Alexei Alexeyenko, Rosselkhoznadzor’s deputy head.

Publication date: 8/1/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Fruit and vegetable exporters tensely await possible sanctions against Russia

Christiaan van Ravenswaaij (Ravex): “Our customers are afraid of disaster just as much as we are”
Fruit and vegetable exporters tensely await possible sanctions against Russia

Fruit and vegetable exporters to the Russian market are tensely awaiting the consequences of the plane crash in Ukraine and the possible sanctions it will entail. “We are constantly keeping an eye on it, following the news, as well as listening to what our own government and the foreign ministers have to say about it,” explains Christiaan van Ravenswaaij, of Ravex International, which has been an exporter of fruit and vegetables to Eastern Europe and Russia for years. He acknowledges the dilemma of the “merchant and the preacher” which the sector is facing, “but our Russian customers find this disaster as terrible as we do. And they cannot do anything about it, even though everyone seems to have an opinion about it.”

“Exports to Russia are traditionally quiet in this period. We are now exporting about 20% of the volume we usually ship in wintertime, mainly to supermarkets around the Moscow region, but this doesn’t help,” adds Christian. He does not exclude possible sanctions. “And if they affect the meat and flower sector, then the fruit and vegetable sector will eventually also be affected. Regardless of whether or not the Russians are responsible, we would not be surprised if sanctions are coming. Threats have often been made in the past, but a time may come when they cannot be avoided. As yet, however, we remain optimistic and we will not give up hope.”

According to Ad van Hamburg of Fenedex, the Association of Dutch exporters, Dutch exporters have an understanding for any possible sanctions and their consequences. “Because of what happened, and especially the aftermath, I can imagine that our members will have understanding for any measures taken. Sanctions are very likely, because there are not many other possibilities. Emotions play a role and these are still fresh after the events, also for Dutch entrepreneurs. What will happen is yet to be seen, but there is understanding about it.”

“If sanctions arrive, we will deal with it as best as we can,” says Herman de Boon, president of the Association of Wholesale Trade in Horticultural Products. “Fortunately, we are fairly diversified and we have many markets, but other companies may have a hard time to keep their heads above water.”

Publication date: 7/23/2014
Author: Izak Heijboer
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Fruit and vegetable exporters tensely await possible sanctions against Russia

Christiaan van Ravenswaaij (Ravex): “Our customers are afraid of disaster just as much as we are”
Fruit and vegetable exporters tensely await possible sanctions against Russia

Fruit and vegetable exporters to the Russian market are tensely awaiting the consequences of the plane crash in Ukraine and the possible sanctions it will entail. “We are constantly keeping an eye on it, following the news, as well as listening to what our own government and the foreign ministers have to say about it,” explains Christiaan van Ravenswaaij, of Ravex International, which has been an exporter of fruit and vegetables to Eastern Europe and Russia for years. He acknowledges the dilemma of the “merchant and the preacher” which the sector is facing, “but our Russian customers find this disaster as terrible as we do. And they cannot do anything about it, even though everyone seems to have an opinion about it.”

“Exports to Russia are traditionally quiet in this period. We are now exporting about 20% of the volume we usually ship in wintertime, mainly to supermarkets around the Moscow region, but this doesn’t help,” adds Christian. He does not exclude possible sanctions. “And if they affect the meat and flower sector, then the fruit and vegetable sector will eventually also be affected. Regardless of whether or not the Russians are responsible, we would not be surprised if sanctions are coming. Threats have often been made in the past, but a time may come when they cannot be avoided. As yet, however, we remain optimistic and we will not give up hope.”

According to Ad van Hamburg of Fenedex, the Association of Dutch exporters, Dutch exporters have an understanding for any possible sanctions and their consequences. “Because of what happened, and especially the aftermath, I can imagine that our members will have understanding for any measures taken. Sanctions are very likely, because there are not many other possibilities. Emotions play a role and these are still fresh after the events, also for Dutch entrepreneurs. What will happen is yet to be seen, but there is understanding about it.”

“If sanctions arrive, we will deal with it as best as we can,” says Herman de Boon, president of the Association of Wholesale Trade in Horticultural Products. “Fortunately, we are fairly diversified and we have many markets, but other companies may have a hard time to keep their heads above water.”

Publication date: 7/23/2014
Author: Izak Heijboer
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Opportunities and difficulties for exporters in the Middle East

Opportunities and difficulties for exporters in the Middle East

For the French fruit producer and exporter Blue Whale, as well as for many others, the Middle East has become an area of great interest with key trading partners. It is, however, a region with many countries in different circumstances offering various conditions for exporters.

“In the Middle East, only a few countries are able to import quantities of quality fruit and pay the right price; countries such as Saudi Arabia or the United Arab Emirates, where the situation looks stable, and there is no risk of currency crisis (as linked to US$ ), are among them,” explains Marc Peyres, of Blue Whale.

Marc affirms that, “it is difficult to assess whether economic difficulties significantly affect the fresh fruit business, as for us, the most influential factors are the fruit supply, the currency situation (Euro against US$ ) or when the stock from the Southern Hemisphere will become available.”

Naturally, both the global and the domestic situations affect the Gulf area. “Dubai, for instance, is a big regional hub, and if countries around it suffer crises, it disturbs regional business. On the other hand, if Europe’s currency offers better conditions, less fruit is imported from America and other regional markets (e.g. Iran apples etc.) resulting in a better balance between supply and demand for me,” assures Marc.

In the end, political turbulences are bad for everybody, but mostly for the local population. “Political and economic circumstances, like the weather, are always changing, so businesses need to learn to be flexible and to adapt,” concludes Marc.
For his part, a South African citrus exporter dealing with the Middle East, stated that, “all our customers are nervous about the situation in Iraq, as more than 20% of fruit re-exported out of Dubai goes to Iraq. If the Iraq conflict escalates, this business will be affected.”

Meanwhile, the Syrian conflict has been ongoing for 4 years and it has led to businesses not being able to sell on the scale that they could before. “The Syrian conflict has definitely affected the fruit/vegetable business between Turkey and the Middle East, in particular for lemons,” affirms the exporter. “The current situation in Egypt, however, has not affected its export business too much.”

The bulk of trade in the Middle East is done in Saudi Arabian Riyals (SR) and UAE Dirhams (Dhs) both of which are strong and fixed to the US$ permanently at US$ 1.00 = SR/Dhs 3.674. The Kuwaiti Dinar and the Oman/Qatar/Bahrain currencies are all very strong, as well.

In terms of logistics, transportation problems can occur when trucking, for example, from Turkey to the Middle East, as the trucks have to go through Syria, which is a risk. Likewise, trucking into Iraq entails similar risks and this increases the cost and prices of fruit.

All in all, and as stated by Marc Peyres, the Middle East is a region offering great opportunities for business, but also where companies need to be prepared to be flexible to tackle any problems that are always sure to surface.

Publication date: 7/11/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Mexican exporters meet with Philly importers to discuss weekly liner service

Driven by Mexico’s expanding economy, 10 major fruit exporters from Mexico toured the Philadelphia Port complex and one of the nation’s largest produce-storage and packing facilities in Vineland, NJ. The exporters also met in small groups with 15 importers from the Philadelphia region — speed-dating style — in an effort to find the right business match for their perishable products.

“We came here to find the right people to take care of our product. We are proud of what we produce and we need to know it will be treated well,” Jose Garibay, a berry grower and exporter from Mexico, said in a press release. “I’m certain — with consolidation — we can make this work.”

The tour is the culmination of a year-long effort spearheaded by Ship Philly First, a non-profit, membership organization of private business owners who operate port-related companies in the Delaware Valley, the Mexican consulate of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Regional Port Authority and ProMexico, the economic development arm of Mexico.

Together they are working to create weekly liner service between Philadelphia and Veracruz, Mexico, to generate more business for both ports and to bypass crippling congestion for trucks at the border. While the proposed five-day ocean crossing is cheaper, faster, cleaner and safer than traveling the countries’ highways, a regular shipping service between the two cities has not been available for an estimated 40 years.

Ship Philly First President Larry Antonucci, president of 721 Logistics, and former President Fred Sorbello, chief executive officer of Mullica Hill Group Cos., welcomed the visitors, along with Carlos Giralt, Mexican consul of Philadelphia, and Martin Caro, deputy trade and investment commissioner for ProMexico. Jack Murphy of Maersk and Anthony DeBari of MSC — shipping lines that have an interest in creating an ocean route between the two cities — also attended.

“10 billion a year in bilateral trade already exists between Mexico and our region. An ocean route makes a lot of sense,” said Sorbello, whose company is one of the largest meat importers in the United States. The next step, he added, is a trade mission for regional importers to Veracruz in July, which should solidify professional relationships.

Rusty Lucca, president of Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage, hosted approximately 80 guests at his 325,000-square-foot facility in Vineland. Visitors watched clementines from Chile and avocados from Mexico rumble down spotless assembly lines before being bagged, labeled and readied for distribution to major retailers, such as Walmart, Costco, ShopRite, Acme and Krogers.

“Exporters need to know their perishable products are taken care of, that they are placed in a clean, secure facility with state-of-the-art temperature control,” said Lucca, who provided a Mexican lunch for all in his 100-seat on-site cafeteria. “They also need to know their produce will be repacked in the most attractive way. This visit is an insurance policy. I am not the only game in town, but I am representative of the quality of warehousing and value-added service that is available in this region.”

Located on 44-acres in Vineland, Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage receives more than 200,000 pallets of fruit annually from around the world.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Mexican exporters meet with Philly importers to discuss weekly liner service

Driven by Mexico’s expanding economy, 10 major fruit exporters from Mexico toured the Philadelphia Port complex and one of the nation’s largest produce-storage and packing facilities in Vineland, NJ. The exporters also met in small groups with 15 importers from the Philadelphia region — speed-dating style — in an effort to find the right business match for their perishable products.

“We came here to find the right people to take care of our product. We are proud of what we produce and we need to know it will be treated well,” Jose Garibay, a berry grower and exporter from Mexico, said in a press release. “I’m certain — with consolidation — we can make this work.”

The tour is the culmination of a year-long effort spearheaded by Ship Philly First, a non-profit, membership organization of private business owners who operate port-related companies in the Delaware Valley, the Mexican consulate of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Regional Port Authority and ProMexico, the economic development arm of Mexico.

Together they are working to create weekly liner service between Philadelphia and Veracruz, Mexico, to generate more business for both ports and to bypass crippling congestion for trucks at the border. While the proposed five-day ocean crossing is cheaper, faster, cleaner and safer than traveling the countries’ highways, a regular shipping service between the two cities has not been available for an estimated 40 years.

Ship Philly First President Larry Antonucci, president of 721 Logistics, and former President Fred Sorbello, chief executive officer of Mullica Hill Group Cos., welcomed the visitors, along with Carlos Giralt, Mexican consul of Philadelphia, and Martin Caro, deputy trade and investment commissioner for ProMexico. Jack Murphy of Maersk and Anthony DeBari of MSC — shipping lines that have an interest in creating an ocean route between the two cities — also attended.

“10 billion a year in bilateral trade already exists between Mexico and our region. An ocean route makes a lot of sense,” said Sorbello, whose company is one of the largest meat importers in the United States. The next step, he added, is a trade mission for regional importers to Veracruz in July, which should solidify professional relationships.

Rusty Lucca, president of Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage, hosted approximately 80 guests at his 325,000-square-foot facility in Vineland. Visitors watched clementines from Chile and avocados from Mexico rumble down spotless assembly lines before being bagged, labeled and readied for distribution to major retailers, such as Walmart, Costco, ShopRite, Acme and Krogers.

“Exporters need to know their perishable products are taken care of, that they are placed in a clean, secure facility with state-of-the-art temperature control,” said Lucca, who provided a Mexican lunch for all in his 100-seat on-site cafeteria. “They also need to know their produce will be repacked in the most attractive way. This visit is an insurance policy. I am not the only game in town, but I am representative of the quality of warehousing and value-added service that is available in this region.”

Located on 44-acres in Vineland, Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage receives more than 200,000 pallets of fruit annually from around the world.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.