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NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


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NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

FDA Warning Letters: Drug Residues Top List of Problems at Food Firms

Illegal drug residues in dairy cows slaughtered for meat were the main problem cited in recent warning letters from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to firms found in violation of regulations stipulated by the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

Letters to four dairy producers warned that illegal levels of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs had been found in the muscles and edible tissues of cows sold by the companies for slaughter. Other problems identified in recently posted warning letters included improper handling of acidified foods, improper handling of low-acid canned foods, unsanitary production conditions and misbranding of infant formula.

The firms whose product contained illegal levels of drugs included El-Vi Farms, LLC and Reuben R. Zimmerman, both of New York, Kelly Hills Dairy Inc. of Kansas and Noel D. Elmore of Kentucky.

FDA wrote to El-Vi Farms of Newark, NY, notifying the firm that samples of uncooked edible kidney tissue from a cow it sold for slaughter as food contained 4.16 parts per million (ppm) of ceftiofur, an animal antibiotic. This level was more than ten times the acceptable limit of .4 parts per million for this drug in edible kidneys.

The agency also found that E-Vi was administering ceftifur to animals in doses not authorized by the drug label and that it was not keeping proper treatment records for its animals.

Reuben R. Zimmerman, owner of his company bearing the same name, was warned that a cow sold for slaughter from his dairy facility contained .63 ppm of penicillin in its edible kidney tissue (the acceptable limit is .05 ppm), 1.3 ppm of the anti-inflammatory flunixin in its liver tissue, where the limit of the drug is .125 ppm, and .0293 ppm of flunixin in the muscle tissue, which can’t contain more than .025 ppm.

The Zimmerman facility was also found to be administering penicillin in doses not approved by its labeling and not keeping proper medical treatment records for its animals.

In its letter to Kelly Hills Dairy, Inc. of Seneca, KS, FDA notified the company that penicillin residues of .515 ppm in uncooked edible tissues of a dairy cow sold for slaughter.

FDA wrote to Noel Elmore Farms of Glasgow, KY, that said the company had sold a dairy cow for slaughter for use as food whose tissue samples contained levels of penicillin at .215 ppm in its kidney (the legal limit is .05 ppm).

The FDA investigation also found that on July 5, 2011, the company wrote a letter certifying that it was not marketing livestock with illegal drug residues. That letter covered the dairy cow whose tissue was later found to contain illegal levels of penicillin.

FDA also told all companies whose dairy cows contained illegal drug levels that they were using doses of drugs beyond what has been approved by their labels.

“Our investigation also found that you hold animals under conditions that are so inadequate that medicated animals bearing potentially harmful drug residues are likely to enter the food supply,” said the agency to each of the firms.

FDA also wrote letters to other firms citing other food safety violations.

KIZ Foods Limited of Bhavnagar, India received a letter notifying it that it was not following regulations for the production of acidified foods.

Specifically, the company did not provide required records of its heat processing and control of pH, salt, sugar and preservative levels for its garlic past, ginger paste and ginger garlic paste to FDA. The firm also didn’t have personnel who have been certified in activities involving acidification, pH control, heat treatment and critical factors, another requirement.

FDA also found that KIZ did not conduct required pH testing, did not examine containers to make sure they are protected from contamination or leakage, did not mark product with a code identifying where and when it was produced, did not maintain equipment in a manner that will prevent it from contamination, did not clean food contact surfaces frequently enough and did not provide adequate hand washing facilities or hand drying stations for employees. Further, the firm did not take adequate steps to prevent pests from entering the facility and had not constructed its facility in a manner that allows for proper cleaning. 

FDA wrote to Vella Cheese Company of Sonoma, CA, telling the company it had not followed proper production requirements for low-acid foods. Specifically, the company had not registered with FDA as a commercial processor of low-acid foods, had not notified FDA of its processing methods, including sterilization procedures and temperature controls.

“Scheduled processes must be established by qualified persons having expert knowledge acquired through appropriate training and experience in the thermal processing of low-acid foods in hermetically sealed containers,” wrote FDA in its letter.

Finally, FDA wrote to Nestle Infant Nutrition informing the company its Gerber Good Start Gentle Infant Formula is misbranded because it made health claims not authorized by FDA. The product’s label claimed it helped “reduce risk of developing allergies” and that the 100% whey partially hydrolyzed it contains may reduce the risk of atopic dermatitis, statements that were not authorized by FDA.

They agency said Nestle Infant Nutrition already submitted a petition requesting to assert a link between the whey product and a reduced risk of allergy in infants because there was not sufficient scientific evidence to support the claim. The agency also said there is no evidence linking the specific whey product in the formula to reduced risk of atopic dermatitis, only linking whey-protein to the condition.

FDA said the packaging failed to include the required statement, in bold type: “should not be fed to infants who are allergic to milk or to infants with existing milk allergy symptoms.”

All companies who received these recent warning letters were asked to respond to the letter within 15 working days outlining steps they will take to correct these violations. 

Food Safety News

U.S. Marshals Seize Food at Two VA Firms, Citing Rodent and Insect Infestations

U.S. Marshals have seized food at two Virginia companies after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found the premises were infested with rodents and insects. The seized food was removed  from Gourmet Provisions, LLC, and Royal Cup, Inc., under warrants issued by the U.S. District Court for Western Virginia. FDA initiated the action on Sept. 16.

During the most recent inspection, FDA investigators found widespread rodent and insect activity, unclean equipment and structural defects. Effective measures had not been taken to exclude insects and rodents from the facility and to protect food products and food contact surfaces from contamination.

“These companies have a responsibility for the safety and quality of their products,” said Melinda K. Plaisier, FDA associate commissioner for regulatory affairs. “When firms do not uphold this responsibility, the FDA will take actions that demonstrate its commitment to assuring consumers that foods they buy are prepared, packaged, and held under sanitary conditions.”

Some of the seized goods had been under an embargo by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

The two businesses are located on the same premises in Waynesboro, VA. Gourmet Provisions manufactures and packages ice cream cones and stores other finished food products in its warehouse. Royal Cup stores coffee service items in a separate area within the Gourmet Provisions warehouse. Gourmet Provisions does business as Matt’s Supreme Cones.

To date, no illnesses have been associated with these products. Illnesses or adverse events related to use of these products should be reported to FDA at [email protected] or by calling 240-402-2405.

Food Safety News

Spain: Large citrus firms negotiate with growers after fine

Spain: Large citrus firms negotiate with growers after fine

The Valencian Growers Association (AVA-Asaja) and the Protected Plant Varieties Club (CVVP), formed by the sector’s largest Valencian citrus exporters, started a round of negotiations on Friday regarding the conflict which has been on-going for the past few years and which has been resolved with a penalty fine from the Commission for Fair Competition (CNC) to two firms and the CVVP.

The CNC has penalised some of the largest citrus producers from the Region of Valencia for their setting of restrictions on the distribution channels of the Nadorcott mandarin, one of the most valued in the market, as well as for forcing producers and traders of this variety to carry out formal procedures which are “not necessary to secure the rights which these large firms have as licensees.”

The fine amounts to more than five million Euro, divided between Nadorcott Protection -83,147 Euro-, Carpa Dorada -5,426 Euro-, and the CVVP, with 4.97 million. This association is led by the Martinavarro group and other large citrus exporters, such as Vicente Giner and Cañamás Hermanos.

The Nadorcott mandarin has been patented in Europe since 2006 and the patent’s holder is a firm belonging to the king of Morocco, Mohammed VI. The European approval of the variety’s registration, which Spanish citrus producers fought against, not only entailed 15 million in four years in royalties for the Moroccan firm, but the start of a war between Spanish producers to control the sales of this late variety, which is harvested after clementines and consequently reach very good prices. Its production is estimated to reach 120,000 tonnes, valued at around 300 million Euro.

AVA-Asaja does not dispute the right of large firms to charge fees for the seedlings that are sold, as licensees, but refuses for this right to apply also to the trading process, which is why it filed the complaint.

The CNC explains in its resolution that Carpa Dorada, managed by the Martinavarro family, is the exclusive licensee for the exploitation in Spain and Portugal of the Nadorcott mandarin, while the CVVP is an association formed by growers and traders devoted to the development of this and other protected varieties.


It states that, as a result of the implementation of an identification system in 2004, as well as supplementary controls carried out by CVVP, “producers and traders of Nadorcott mandarins have been forced to accept certain restrictions on its distribution channels.”

Additionally, these operators were forced to “to supply information, endure inspections and make unnecessary investments for the enforcement of the rights protected by the plant variety legislation, as they affect the production and sales of the harvested fruit.”

The resolution urges the three penalised entities “to eliminate the identified restrictions for the fruit’s sales and to refrain from introducing equivalent ones in the future.”


Source: Eleconomista

Publication date: 7/17/2013


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