Blog Archives

China finds first case of “kiwifruit rot” in NZ shipment

The Tianjin Entry-Exit Inspection Bureau has announced the interception of two lots of New Zealand-grown kiwifruit, citing the existence of “kiwifruit rot bacteria”.

In a release dated July 18, the bureau said it was the first ever interception of this nature in Tianjin and the country.

The authority claimed the fungal disease Botrytis phariadothide was found in batches of green and gold kiwifruit.

The bureau said while domestic market demand had prompted substantial kiwifruit import growth in recent years, if the pathogen recently found in these shipments were to enter domestic production areas it would cause “incalculable damage”.

The release said it could also be present in apples, persimmons and red eucalyptus trees.

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

www.freshfruitportal.com

FreshFruitPortal.com

Oneonta Starr Ranch Growers’ pears to start first week of August

A new crop of pears is coming on in the Northwest, and Oneonta Starr Ranch Growers will soon be shipping exceptional fruit in all varieties. OSRG Marketing Director Scott Marboe said Bartlett harvest will start the first week of August, with first loads going out the week of Aug. 8.SR-Bartlett

“The Bartletts are beautiful this year,” Marboe said in a press release. “They’re clean, with great size, and we have lots of 90 and larger fruit. Also, our Starkrimson will start close to the same harvest window, giving consumers a great selection of snack-perfect pears.”

 In addition to the earlier varieties, Marboe said the Anjous are exceptionally clean this year.  “We did have a drop during the spring heat, so volume will be down in the Hood River area,” he said. “However, the great size and clean crop will make up for that.”

The Bosc crop, which is expected to start shipping the first week of September, “looks great,” Marboe said. “Comice are down in volume, but the fruit look to have excellent size, and they will start Aug. 29.”

Red and Green Anjous will start Sept. 12, followed by Seckels and Forelles Sept. 19. For the Seckel variety, a new two-pound pouch bag is being offered this year.

“A number of people were asking for additional varieties in pouch bags to add to displays,” Marboe said. “Pouch is proving to be a great impulse buy in the pear category, and many of our top retail customers are seeing added sales and category increases when displayed,” he added.

“We’re looking forward to a great pear season, and we have some exciting promotions lined up for this fall,” Marboe said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

First Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed in Listeria Outbreak Linked to Caramel Apples

The first wrongful death lawsuit has been filed in California against Safeway Inc. over those commercially produced and prepackaged caramel apples now the subject of a 10-state Listeria outbreak responsible for five deaths so far.

The wrongful death action naming Safeway Inc. as the defendant was filed by James Raymond Frey on behalf of his late wife, Shirlee Jean Frey, 81, and her estate. The lawsuit claims she was a victim of the deadly outbreak. She and Mr. Frey, 87, were both longtime residents of California.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports the 10-state outbreak of a genetically indistinguishable strain of the Listeria pathogen had infected 29 people as of Monday, Dec. 22, and all have required hospitalization.

States with illnesses associated with the outbreak strain are: Arizona (4), California (1), Minnesota (4), Missouri (5), New Mexico (5), North Carolina (1), Texas (4), Utah (1) Washington (1), and Wisconsin (3).

CDC’s investigation has found that the packaged caramel apples are the mostly likely source of the Listeria contamination. The agency reports that state and local health officials who have interviewed 18 of the sickened individuals say 83 percent remembered eating the suspect caramel apples.

The investigation is not over. “At this time, no illnesses related to this outbreak have been linked to apples that are not caramel-coated and not prepackaged or to caramel candy,” states the complaint filed Monday in California Superior Court in Santa Clara County.

Lawyers for Mr. Frey also stated in the complaint that CDC is working to identify specific brands that produced and packaged the caramel apples.

In the meantime, attorneys Harry Stern of San Francisco’s Rains Lucia Stern and William D. Marler of Marler Clark, the national food-safety law firm based in Seattle, say that CDC has warned the public not to eat any caramel apples. This warning extends to plain caramel apples and those with nuts or other toppings. (Marler Clark also underwrites Food Safety News.)

The wrongful death lawsuit seeks a jury trial for unspecified financial damages plus attorneys’ fees. Among its causes of action is a claim of “strict liability” that a Safeway ready-to-eat product tainted with the bacteria was sold to a customer. “Strict liability” means that a company is responsible whether or not it knew about the problem.

Meanwhile, it was reported Monday that Safeway had removed the caramel apples from its shelves.

“We are aware of the issue regarding caramel apples and have proactively removed the product from sale in our stores,” said Brian Dowling, the company’s vice president of public affairs, adding, “However, we are currently not aware of any illness tied to items purchased at our stores.”

Listeria is one of the more deadly pathogens. The last Listeria outbreak causing multiple deaths came three years ago when Colorado-grown cantaloupe was contaminated with the bacteria, causing three dozen deaths. The so-called “opportunistic pathogen” is a significant danger to the elderly, pregnant woman, and others with compromised immune systems.

Food Safety News

First Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed in Listeria Outbreak Linked to Caramel Apples

The first wrongful death lawsuit has been filed in California against Safeway Inc. over those commercially produced and prepackaged caramel apples now the subject of a 10-state Listeria outbreak responsible for five deaths so far.

The wrongful death action naming Safeway Inc. as the defendant was filed by James Raymond Frey on behalf of his late wife, Shirlee Jean Frey, 81, and her estate. The lawsuit claims she was a victim of the deadly outbreak. She and Mr. Frey, 87, were both longtime residents of California.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports the 10-state outbreak of a genetically indistinguishable strain of the Listeria pathogen had infected 29 people as of Monday, Dec. 22, and all have required hospitalization.

States with illnesses associated with the outbreak strain are: Arizona (4), California (1), Minnesota (4), Missouri (5), New Mexico (5), North Carolina (1), Texas (4), Utah (1) Washington (1), and Wisconsin (3).

CDC’s investigation has found that the packaged caramel apples are the mostly likely source of the Listeria contamination. The agency reports that state and local health officials who have interviewed 18 of the sickened individuals say 83 percent remembered eating the suspect caramel apples.

The investigation is not over. “At this time, no illnesses related to this outbreak have been linked to apples that are not caramel-coated and not prepackaged or to caramel candy,” states the complaint filed Monday in California Superior Court in Santa Clara County.

Lawyers for Mr. Frey also stated in the complaint that CDC is working to identify specific brands that produced and packaged the caramel apples.

In the meantime, attorneys Harry Stern of San Francisco’s Rains Lucia Stern and William D. Marler of Marler Clark, the national food-safety law firm based in Seattle, say that CDC has warned the public not to eat any caramel apples. This warning extends to plain caramel apples and those with nuts or other toppings. (Marler Clark also underwrites Food Safety News.)

The wrongful death lawsuit seeks a jury trial for unspecified financial damages plus attorneys’ fees. Among its causes of action is a claim of “strict liability” that a Safeway ready-to-eat product tainted with the bacteria was sold to a customer. “Strict liability” means that a company is responsible whether or not it knew about the problem.

Meanwhile, it was reported Monday that Safeway had removed the caramel apples from its shelves.

“We are aware of the issue regarding caramel apples and have proactively removed the product from sale in our stores,” said Brian Dowling, the company’s vice president of public affairs, adding, “However, we are currently not aware of any illness tied to items purchased at our stores.”

Listeria is one of the more deadly pathogens. The last Listeria outbreak causing multiple deaths came three years ago when Colorado-grown cantaloupe was contaminated with the bacteria, causing three dozen deaths. The so-called “opportunistic pathogen” is a significant danger to the elderly, pregnant woman, and others with compromised immune systems.

Food Safety News

South Africa: First apples to China in January

South Africa: First apples to China in January

Last week Hortgro announced that South African apples would gain entry to the Chinese market, the authorities on both sides are just finalising the list of certified producers and packhouses and carrying out inspections.

Any grower in South Africa is free to send apples to China as long as they have registered and have the correct certifications.

Jacques du Preez from Hortgro said, all going well, the first shipments will start in January 2015, in line with the export season for South African apples, “As with any new market, we will most likely start off slowly and build up the volumes.” 

The varieties being shipped will most likely be Royal Gala, Fuji and Granny Smiths. Du Preez said that China would not be an easy market as they already produce huge volumes of apples domestically.

He hopes that now that everything is in place China will soon be open to pears as well, “Most of the growers who are already registered for apples also produce pears.”

As for volumes, South Africa should see a normal production this year after an off year last season. “We will most likely send a bit less to Europe due to the abundance on the market already because of high European production and the Russian ban, but the volumes to the UK should be back to normal after being down last season due to Chile’s abundance of small fruit.”

“Africa is also a growing market so we will send more there too.” Russia is also open to South African exporters but Du Preez does not expect exports there to significantly increase.

For more information:
Jacques du Preez
HORTGRO
Eamil: [email protected]
Tel: +27 82 864 8149

Publication date: 12/9/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First seafreight Ataulfo mangoes to UK

First seafreight Ataulfo mangoes to UK

UK importer Pacific Produce is shipping Ataulfo mangoes to the UK, for the first time Pacific Produce will do this via seafreight instead of the normal airfreight.

Robert Cullum from the company said, “We are bringing Ataulfo Mango, normally an airfreight variety, by sea. This is a difficult process to manage but after several years of tests we are now more confident with the correct maturity at harvest to enable us to ripen in the UK,” he explains.

The Ataulfo mango is a smaller super sweet / fragrant variety, hugely popular in Mexico and the USA, which has not really made its way to Europe in any volume due mainly to the prohibitive cost of airfreight.

Pacific Produce have now been able to overcome that problem, partly due to a faster shipping service and perfecting the harvest time of the fruit.

“The result is an extremely tasty mango with a reasonable price level which would normally only be available at very high air prices,” explains Cullum. Compared to the airfreighted fruit this is nearly half the price.

Pacific Produce are half way through a 4 week season with sales concluding in the Christmas week. They will ship 1 container per week at this stage.

As for demand, Cullum said that this is a new product so they are not to sure but, he says from a personal point of view if you eat one of these it is easy to become addicted.

In addition to the Ataulfo, Pacific Produce have Tommy and Haden from Peru and are waiting for the Kent which will be late this year.

For more information:
Robert Cullum
Pacific Produce
+44 (0) 1865877801
+44 (0) 7554880327
Email: [email protected]
www.pacificproduce.co.uk

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First seafreight Ataulfo mangoes to UK

First seafreight Ataulfo mangoes to UK

UK importer Pacific Produce is shipping Ataulfo mangoes to the UK, for the first time Pacific Produce will do this via seafreight instead of the normal airfreight.

Robert Cullum from the company said, “We are bringing Ataulfo Mango, normally an airfreight variety, by sea. This is a difficult process to manage but after several years of tests we are now more confident with the correct maturity at harvest to enable us to ripen in the UK,” he explains.

The Ataulfo mango is a smaller super sweet / fragrant variety, hugely popular in Mexico and the USA, which has not really made its way to Europe in any volume due mainly to the prohibitive cost of airfreight.

Pacific Produce have now been able to overcome that problem, partly due to a faster shipping service and perfecting the harvest time of the fruit.

“The result is an extremely tasty mango with a reasonable price level which would normally only be available at very high air prices,” explains Cullum. Compared to the airfreighted fruit this is nearly half the price.

Pacific Produce are half way through a 4 week season with sales concluding in the Christmas week. They will ship 1 container per week at this stage.

As for demand, Cullum said that this is a new product so they are not to sure but, he says from a personal point of view if you eat one of these it is easy to become addicted.

In addition to the Ataulfo, Pacific Produce have Tommy and Haden from Peru and are waiting for the Kent which will be late this year.

For more information:
Robert Cullum
Pacific Produce
+44 (0) 1865877801
+44 (0) 7554880327
Email: [email protected]
www.pacificproduce.co.uk

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First seafreight Ataulfo mangoes to UK

First seafreight Ataulfo mangoes to UK

UK importer Pacific Produce is shipping Ataulfo mangoes to the UK, for the first time Pacific Produce will do this via seafreight instead of the normal airfreight.

Robert Cullum from the company said, “We are bringing Ataulfo Mango, normally an airfreight variety, by sea. This is a difficult process to manage but after several years of tests we are now more confident with the correct maturity at harvest to enable us to ripen in the UK,” he explains.

The Ataulfo mango is a smaller super sweet / fragrant variety, hugely popular in Mexico and the USA, which has not really made its way to Europe in any volume due mainly to the prohibitive cost of airfreight.

Pacific Produce have now been able to overcome that problem, partly due to a faster shipping service and perfecting the harvest time of the fruit.

“The result is an extremely tasty mango with a reasonable price level which would normally only be available at very high air prices,” explains Cullum. Compared to the airfreighted fruit this is nearly half the price.

Pacific Produce are half way through a 4 week season with sales concluding in the Christmas week. They will ship 1 container per week at this stage.

As for demand, Cullum said that this is a new product so they are not to sure but, he says from a personal point of view if you eat one of these it is easy to become addicted.

In addition to the Ataulfo, Pacific Produce have Tommy and Haden from Peru and are waiting for the Kent which will be late this year.

For more information:
Robert Cullum
Pacific Produce
+44 (0) 1865877801
+44 (0) 7554880327
Email: [email protected]
www.pacificproduce.co.uk

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First seafreight Ataulfo mangoes to UK

First seafreight Ataulfo mangoes to UK

UK importer Pacific Produce is shipping Ataulfo mangoes to the UK, for the first time Pacific Produce will do this via seafreight instead of the normal airfreight.

Robert Cullum from the company said, “We are bringing Ataulfo Mango, normally an airfreight variety, by sea. This is a difficult process to manage but after several years of tests we are now more confident with the correct maturity at harvest to enable us to ripen in the UK,” he explains.

The Ataulfo mango is a smaller super sweet / fragrant variety, hugely popular in Mexico and the USA, which has not really made its way to Europe in any volume due mainly to the prohibitive cost of airfreight.

Pacific Produce have now been able to overcome that problem, partly due to a faster shipping service and perfecting the harvest time of the fruit.

“The result is an extremely tasty mango with a reasonable price level which would normally only be available at very high air prices,” explains Cullum. Compared to the airfreighted fruit this is nearly half the price.

Pacific Produce are half way through a 4 week season with sales concluding in the Christmas week. They will ship 1 container per week at this stage.

As for demand, Cullum said that this is a new product so they are not to sure but, he says from a personal point of view if you eat one of these it is easy to become addicted.

In addition to the Ataulfo, Pacific Produce have Tommy and Haden from Peru and are waiting for the Kent which will be late this year.

For more information:
Robert Cullum
Pacific Produce
+44 (0) 1865877801
+44 (0) 7554880327
Email: [email protected]
www.pacificproduce.co.uk

Publication date: 12/8/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

First quality then volumes

Sakkara on shipping oranges to China
First quality then volumes

Sakkara, originally a Jordanian group founded two generations ago, has expanded over the years, first stepping out to the Omani market, setting up storage and distribution facilities there, and “then to Egypt in 2002 with a very small packing station, from which we managed to grow,” explains Aziz Hyder.

The company’s export business is currently based in Egypt; it imports fruit from Oman and other parts of the world and then distributes it. According to Aziz, “the business expanded, and in 2012 we built a huge, brand new packing house with cold storage facilities and high end packing lines with Dutch technology.”


Aziz Hyder from Sakkara and Samer Saadedin

In addition to shipping 58 to 60,000 tonnes of oranges per season, rendering it one of Egypt’s largest distributors, Sakkara also works with grapes, pomegranates, potatoes or onions, and after introducing carrots three years ago it has also become one of the country’s biggest players. “We have distribution in Kuwait, Oman (by far the largest), Jordan, Saudi Arabia and we have started this year in Russia,” affirms Aziz.

As a group, Sakkara is also one of the largest importers of bananas into Egypt. Aziz says that “we also do apples, pears or plums from countries like South Africa, Chile, the U.S. or New Zealand. Additionally, oranges for juicing are shipped to Europe, to destinations like the Netherlands, the UK, Germany or Sweden.”

Given this huge expansion, China’s signing of an export protocol with Egypt two years ago was perceived by Sakkara as a chance to enter this market. Aziz explains that “this year, when we were in Hong Kong, we had a lot of enquiries from Chinese buyers, but we decided to understand the market before doing any business. Demand is there, but they are looking for really premium fruit.”

According to Aziz, Sakkara’s challenge, if it is to supply this top quality, is to reach the required volume. “We will thereby start with limited volumes, making sure that we first get the quality right, and then go from there. In Asia, we already do good volumes in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia, and we do really well in Dubai, with 400 containers of oranges per season.”

Publication date: 12/5/2014
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com