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Greek citrus season starting later due to wam nights

Biojournaal visits organic Greek growers
Greek citrus season starting later due to wam nights

The contrast was huge: from sunny Greece to cold and wet in the Netherlands. Organic Greek citrus growers would love to switch places. The start to the citrus season is late in coming, due to the relatively warm nights. Lenneke Schot, edotor for FreshPlaza’s sister website for the organic sector, Biojournaal, visited various organic growers in Western Greece between the 18th and the 21st of October. She was invited by Gerasimos Karantinos

Gerasimos is leading Bio Net West Hellas, with approximately 300 participating farmers, the largest group of organic producers in Greece. The trip was coordinated from the Netherlands, by Alexis van Erp from Eosta. Alexis handles the organic fruit and vegetable products from Bio Net West Hellas in Europe.

The oranges are still green
Most of the trip was taken up by looking at the citrus, but the group also took a quick look at two kiwi orchards. They also visited a carrot and potato grower, and they got a tour of Bio Net West Hellas’ own organic fruit packing station. It was obvious the the citrus season will start later this year. Most of the oranges and mandarins are still green. To stimulate the ripening process the fruits urgently need some cold nights. The results of a recent hailstorm were clearly seen with one of the citrus growers, but Georgios Kyziakopoulos (third photo below), a kiwi grower, expects a much better harvest than last year.

In the coming weeks various articles will be published on FreshPlaza following this press trip.

Publication date: 10/24/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rain cuts Greek grape season short

Rains in Greece will likely force growers to cut their grape season short this year. Despite the setback, growers are expecting decent yields and a receptive European market for their fruit.
 
“The grape season in Greece started during the second week of August, and, despite several rains, quality has been good,” said George Frangistas. “The unfortunate consequence of the rains will be a short season, so we expect to wrap things up in the next few weeks.”
 
Gefra, which, over its 60 years of existence, has become one of the largest fruit exporters in Greece. With almost a third of their crop going to Germany, that country is the main export destination for their grapes. The United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Scandinavia split almost evenly the rest of Gefra’s export volume.
 
In spite of difficult weather, George expects they’ll export about 3,000 tons of Thompson grapes, which would be a record for them. That kind of volume is very welcome, considering the strong demand that is expected this season.
 
“From the onset of the Greek campaign, it has been obvious that both Spain and Italy, each for different reasons, will be short of fruit and would not count for much on the white seedless markets of August and September,” said George. “These have clearly been favourable conditions for Greek suppliers. Gefra grabbed this opportunity and is aiming for a record year.”
 
Crimson varieties are still being harvested in amounts consistent with a trial run. George emphasized the importance of trying out new varieties and branching out from the kinds of grapes grown in the past.
 
“It has become more than apparent to all parties involved that some varietal development is necessary to extend the period of sale and marketing options,” noted George. “To reach any commercially interesting scale will take a few years, but there are certainly plans to expand and diversify.”

For more information:
George Frangistas
Gefra
Direct: +30-210-9636382
Skype: george.frangistas
www.gefra.gr

Publication date: 10/3/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Greek cherries extremely good this year

Greek cherries extremely good this year

The Greek cherry season at Olympic fruit is in full swing again. Just like last year Greece profits from the late Dutch and Belgian harvest because of the cold weather. “The harvest in Greece is very good, but the cherries are small this year. Especially the Tragana – which of its itself is a small variety – hardly showed itself in the Netherlands this season. In its place there are, however, sufficient other varieties. Those are sold under the combined name Pella, named after the area from where most of the Greek cherries originate and also the area where Alexander the Great was born” Andre Nieuwenhuis says.


The weather in Greece has been very good up to now, except with an occasional hail storm, which last week damaged a considerable part of the peach harvest,” the importer continues. The coming week picking will start in the mountain villages. Neaexfrut SA is the cherry specialist in Greece since the sixties and their modern warehouse is close to Edessa in the center of the cherry area. With the assistance of a very advanced machine the cherries are sorted on size and colour. As previously the larger part was sold in the Netherlands and Germany, the cherries now are also very popular with the Russians”

Olympic Fruit hope to have Greek cherries available up to and including week 29,. After that the season is extended with Belgian cherries, which are expected  in week 28.

For more infoprmation:
Olympic Fruit BV
André Nieuwenhuis
Handelscentrum ZHZ 40-A
2991 LD Barendrecht
Tel. +31 180 64 62 03
www.olympicfruit.com

Publication date: 6/21/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Recent Greek strikes not as bad as previous incidents

Recent Greek strikes not as bad as previous incidents

Recent protests by striking civil servants in Greece may remind some of similar manifestations in past years, but the fallout from these incidents has not impacted trade within the country like previous strikes did.


“We don’t really feel an impact from the strikes,” said George Frangistas from Gefra. “There have been a couple of reactions from growers and from transport companies, but in reality, there have been no side effects.” Frangistas was referring to the road blocks and sometimes violent altercations that sprang up on Greece’s roads in previous years. But, unlike in past years, where manifestations seriously hampered the transport of fresh produce within the country, this year’s activities have not been major. But that’s not to say growers and shippers haven’t had other issues to deal with.


“Greece is in dire straits,” said Frangista. “People are sad and depressed, so they don’t want to do anything, and I think that’s why nothing serious has happened at the moment.” Poor morale probably has to do with poor economic conditions, which, in turn, have made for low domestic demand for fresh produce. In fact, Frangista noted that most produce that’s grown in Greece heads directly for the export market because of sluggish demand at home.


“Our company is 100 percent exports, so we’re not affected by the domestic situation,” said Frangista. “We focus on the big European supermarkets, so we haven’t felt the effects of the crisis.” But he also warned that the export market has significant barriers to entry for those wishing to escape bad conditions at home. While there might be produce available in Greece, it’s hard to set up the packing houses and trade relationships necessary to successfully export goods. Even if those things can be attained, Frangista noted that Europe can be a tough market to crack because of the relatively few large clients.


“Most retailers go with central buying, so there are only about 10 supermarket groups, so you’re really trying to sell to the same ten people all over Europe,” said Frangista. “They will listen to us about citrus, because we are experts in citrus, but they won’t buy kiwis from us, for example, because they already have experts in kiwis they buy from. So, in the end, Europe is not so big a market.”

For more information:

George Frangistas
Gefra
Tel: +30-210-9636382
Fax: +30-210-9607092
Email: [email protected]
www.gefra.gr
 

Publication date: 3/14/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Recent Greek strikes not as bad as previous incidents

Recent Greek strikes not as bad as previous incidents

Recent protests by striking civil servants in Greece may remind some of similar manifestations in past years, but the fallout from these incidents has not impacted trade within the country like previous strikes did.


“We don’t really feel an impact from the strikes,” said George Frangistas from Gefra. “There have been a couple of reactions from growers and from transport companies, but in reality, there have been no side effects.” Frangistas was referring to the road blocks and sometimes violent altercations that sprang up on Greece’s roads in previous years. But, unlike in past years, where manifestations seriously hampered the transport of fresh produce within the country, this year’s activities have not been major. But that’s not to say growers and shippers haven’t had other issues to deal with.


“Greece is in dire straits,” said Frangista. “People are sad and depressed, so they don’t want to do anything, and I think that’s why nothing serious has happened at the moment.” Poor morale probably has to do with poor economic conditions, which, in turn, have made for low domestic demand for fresh produce. In fact, Frangista noted that most produce that’s grown in Greece heads directly for the export market because of sluggish demand at home.


“Our company is 100 percent exports, so we’re not affected by the domestic situation,” said Frangista. “We focus on the big European supermarkets, so we haven’t felt the effects of the crisis.” But he also warned that the export market has significant barriers to entry for those wishing to escape bad conditions at home. While there might be produce available in Greece, it’s hard to set up the packing houses and trade relationships necessary to successfully export goods. Even if those things can be attained, Frangista noted that Europe can be a tough market to crack because of the relatively few large clients.


“Most retailers go with central buying, so there are only about 10 supermarket groups, so you’re really trying to sell to the same ten people all over Europe,” said Frangista. “They will listen to us about citrus, because we are experts in citrus, but they won’t buy kiwis from us, for example, because they already have experts in kiwis they buy from. So, in the end, Europe is not so big a market.”

For more information:

George Frangistas
Gefra
Tel: +30-210-9636382
Fax: +30-210-9607092
Email: [email protected]
www.gefra.gr
 

Publication date: 3/14/2014


FreshPlaza.com

First Greek snack tomato Tomaccini wins award

First Greek snack tomato Tomaccini wins award

1st place in the award category “Research & Development” has been taken by “TOMACCINI” as the first Snack Tomato in the Greek market. Tomaccini received the prize as a joint award for the three companies that contributed to its creation; Hellenic Greenhouses SA, AB Vassilopoulos SA and DKG Consulting Ltd. The investment costs of this project reached 1.5 million Euro (1.5 Ha glasshouse construction, crop, marketing and packaging expenses).

On Thursday, July 11, 2013, at Athens Intercontinental at a glittering ceremony attended by representatives of the major executives in the Retail Market Chains the Winners of the Self-Service Excellence Awards 2013 were announced.


Chris D. Katsanos (DKG Group), Hercules Christodoulakis (AB Vassilopoulos) and Gregory Gerasimou (Hellenic Greenhouses ).

TOMACCINI say the tomato grabbed the attention of the jury having been marketed as a fruit, with strong branding, as opposed to be placed in the vegetable category.

The innovation points of Tomaccini according to the jury:

•    Olive type snack tomatoes (7-10gr)
•    Crunchy bite, avoiding too much juice in the mouth
•    Sour-sweet instead of sweet taste
•    Convenient packaging
•    Clever exit hole
•    Pay what you consume (pricing per unit not kilo)


Dimitris Gartzonikas (TROPOS Branding Co) & Christos D. Katsanos (DKG Group).

The awards were backed by SEVT, ECR Hellas and IELKA, who were represented on the jury, and under the auspices of the Greek Ministry of Development and Competitiveness.

For more information: http://www.slideshare.net/ChristosDKatsanos/tomaccini-1rst-snack-sexy-tomato-changing-the-rules-innoforum-31-05-2013

www.tomaccini.gr

Publication date: 7/25/2013


FreshPlaza.com