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Oneonta Starr Ranch Growers’ pears to start first week of August

A new crop of pears is coming on in the Northwest, and Oneonta Starr Ranch Growers will soon be shipping exceptional fruit in all varieties. OSRG Marketing Director Scott Marboe said Bartlett harvest will start the first week of August, with first loads going out the week of Aug. 8.SR-Bartlett

“The Bartletts are beautiful this year,” Marboe said in a press release. “They’re clean, with great size, and we have lots of 90 and larger fruit. Also, our Starkrimson will start close to the same harvest window, giving consumers a great selection of snack-perfect pears.”

 In addition to the earlier varieties, Marboe said the Anjous are exceptionally clean this year.  “We did have a drop during the spring heat, so volume will be down in the Hood River area,” he said. “However, the great size and clean crop will make up for that.”

The Bosc crop, which is expected to start shipping the first week of September, “looks great,” Marboe said. “Comice are down in volume, but the fruit look to have excellent size, and they will start Aug. 29.”

Red and Green Anjous will start Sept. 12, followed by Seckels and Forelles Sept. 19. For the Seckel variety, a new two-pound pouch bag is being offered this year.

“A number of people were asking for additional varieties in pouch bags to add to displays,” Marboe said. “Pouch is proving to be a great impulse buy in the pear category, and many of our top retail customers are seeing added sales and category increases when displayed,” he added.

“We’re looking forward to a great pear season, and we have some exciting promotions lined up for this fall,” Marboe said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Superfresh Growers expects large sized apples and pears for new crop year

Yakima, WA- July 15, 2016 Domex Superfresh Growers is gearing up for new crop northwest apples and pears. They expect a promotable crop of large sized, flavorful fruit, thanks to optimal spring and summer growing conditions.

“Cell division has been terrific, due to another early bloom and moderate spring and summer temperatures,” says Mike Preacher, director of marketing and customer relations for Domex Superfresh Growers. “We expect apples to peak on 88-count and larger, and D’anjou pears will peak on larger sizes this season. Additionally, we expect the fruit to have good color and flavor. All of this means great sales opportunities for retailers, and great eating experiences for customers.”

“With large sizes on the horizon, retailers should also consider adding or moving to five pound bags,” Preacher said.

Bartlett pear harvest is expected to begin the last week of July, and apple harvest will start the first week of August.

The timing of this year’s crop is early, similar to last season. “This allows for Labor Day and Back-to-School promotions of apples and pears,” says Preacher. He added that “with the northwest cherry crop potentially ending a couple weeks earlier than normal, apples and pears will make a great choice for filling promotional space.”

Domex Superfresh Growers is a leading grower and shipper of both conventional and organic apples, pears, cherries and apricots from the Pacific Northwest.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Do alternate varieties offer opportunities for California avocado growers?

It’s no secret that the Hass avocado is the darling of the world. More than 50 years ago, California growers began planting the variety and Mexico followed suit as it eyed the U.S. market, as did Peru and Chile. Colombia began adding Hass acreage to its prodigious supply of native avocados about a decade ago, and it is now also trying to gain access to the lucrative U.S. marketplace.

But is the Hass avocado really the only avocado that consumers will eat?

BellamoreTom BellamoreIn fact, Florida does grow and market its thin-skinned, large green fruit with some success. And at this time of year, some California shippers do have alternate varieties and have experienced good success.

California Avocado Commission President Tom Bellamore believes alternative varieties may offer at least a niche market for California growers as they continue to compete against the growing tide of Hass avocados from various sources.

While California growers argue that their Hass avocado is better during much of their season in the late spring to early fall vs. fruit that travels to the United States from thousands of miles away, no such argument is needed with the other varieties.

Currently only the Hass variety can be imported from Mexico or the other countries.

Bellamore said there is very little worry that a California avocado of the Reed variety, for example, will face direct competition of the same variety from foreign soil. He said CAC board members, as well as others in the industry, are discussing opportunities with other varieties and the concept has some strong advocates.

Bellamore said California is already attempting to distinguish its avocados to discriminating customers by touting its freshness and local appeal, especially to U.S. consumers in the West.

He said adding varieties would expand the portfolio — because they are often harvested at a different time of the year — and also add some year-round marketing punch to the California avocado brand.

“From a marketing perspective, it would be very advantageous to be able to continue talking to consumers all year round about our brand,” he said. “Right now it is very difficult to do that because we don’t have avocados all year round.”

A few shippers are already experiencing success with these “off” varieties.

Jared Bray who handles sales for Stehly Farms Organic in Valley Center, CA, said his packingshed does very well with five different avocado varieties: Zutanos, Bacons, Fuertes, Reeds and Pinkertons.

“It’s a very nice niche for us,” he said. “We actually have a huge following for our Reed avocados.”

Though there are not accurate numbers concerning the total California production of these “off” varieties, some estimate that it could be as high as 5 percent of total volume at this point. This year, that could represent as much as 25 million pounds. Currently much of that production ends up in farmers markets.

Stehly is a producer of organic avocados and Bray said much of the company’s production of organic Reed avocados is sold to Whole Foods, which apparently is very happy with that variety. Bray said it grows larger than the typical Hass with some of the fruit getting as large as two pounds.

“It is my favorite avocado,” he said. “It is nutty and buttery.”

Stehly leaves its Reed variety avocados on the tree as long as possible and tries to market them in the September-through-November time frame, which is at the back end of the California deal.

“By then the oil content is very good and it is just a great piece of fruit,” he said. “I could absolutely ship more if I had them.”

And he added that he always gets a premium for that fruit. He said the other varieties also do well, but the Reed is the real star.

Singing the same tune was Bob Lucy, a partner at Del Rey Avocado Co. in Fallbrook, CA.

“The non-Hass varieties are a very important part of our program,” he said.

Del Rey sells both organic and conventional avocados, and Lucy said the organic production of Reeds is also sold mostly to Whole Foods. But he also has conventional production, which sells for a premium to other retailers predominantly on the West Coast, but there is interest everywhere.

Lucy called the Reed “a big Florida-looking avocado with a pulp that doesn’t quite get as green as the Hass.”

He said the Reed variety has been around for a while but his firm, as well as others, did it a disservice by initially picking it too early.

“We picked it way too early and it didn’t do well,” said Lucy. “Now we keep it on the tree until at least late June and market it in July and August, and it does very well.”

Lucy is quick to say that it has its flaws, including the yellow pulp color that needs to be blended with a Hass for the right guacamole colors. But he said it does offer a niche opportunity for California growers fighting for market share and better pricing.

In fact, Del Rey has made a commitment to that variety, as well as other “off” varieties, by investing in its own nursery to grow root stock.

“One-third of the acreage in that nursery is devoted to Reed,” he said.

Rob Wedin, who is in charge of fresh sales for Calavo Growers in Santa Paula, CA, believes in the concept of expanding California’s variety diversity, but he doesn’t believe the state’s growers have found the right variety yet.

Wedin said most California growers have converted their acreage of Reeds and Fuertes and other varieties to Hass simply because of the economics.

“All other varieties are extremely minor and I don’t really see much opportunity, but I know people are working on some new things and we’d like to see that,” he said. “I just don’t think it is anything we already have.”

He was quick to point out that he does not put the Lamb Hass in that category.

The Lamb Hass is different than the regular Hass, as it has a slightly smoother skin and does tend to grow larger in the early part of the season. But by late June and into July, it behaves like a Hass and is marketed as such.

During the middle of the season, Wedin said the Lamb Hass can account for as much as 15 percent of Calavo’s volume during that period. But again it is largely marketed as a Hass avocado and doesn’t seem to qualify for “off” variety status.

Bellamore said he would like to see more growers add small acreage of the Reed variety precisely to expand the marketing opportunities for growers and the commission.

He said it will take several years to ramp up the volume “even if we start today,” but he added that could coincide perfectly with a growing of that market by shippers and the commission.

And at the end of the day, it could give the “California Avocado” brand an additional way to differentiate itself in the marketplace.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Israeli pepper growers under pressure from Russian crisis

Israeli pepper growers under pressure from Russian crisis

The quick devaluation of the Russian currency is taking a big toll on exporters and will put huge pressure on many of them. Mr Avi Kadan, of the Israeli company Adafresh, states that “the big question is who will survive and who will not, depending on how much the Rouble will fall.”

This situation has coincided with yet another bad start for Israel’s pepper campaign. “The problem is that I don’t see alternative crops in the Arava Valley, but luckily, it’s only the start of the season; we have another four months to go, and if pepper prices are still reasonable with the new Rouble rates, we will be ok,” affirms Avi.

The key aspect to take into account is that Russia is a very important market for Israeli pepper growers, and Avi assures that Government funds may be needed to help palliate their debts. “The situation for exporters will depend on the percentage that the Russian market represented for them and who their clients were. Those trading with supermarkets in U.S. dollars, for example, will be in a good position.”

For Adafresh, the impact of the Russian crisis will not be as bad, as overall, Russia only accounts for 5% of the company’s business. “We have a strong partner with us and are Europe-oriented, but for sure, other companies lacking marketing channels may suffer.”

Meanwhile, in Europe, the situation is similar, and even a little better than last year. However, “a lot of peppers that were intended for Russia will now end up in Europe, so there is a risk the market may collapse,” states Avi.

This naturally has led Adafresh to look for opportunities in alternative markets, namely in America. “We used to be very strong there, until the air freight price became too expensive for us, but with the current oil price sea freight is an option and the U.S. is certainly becoming again a good option for November December, with the advantage that we won’t need to develop it from scratch,” concludes Avi Kadan.

For more information:
Avi Kadan
Adafresh
Email: [email protected]
www.adafresh.co.il

Publication date: 12/24/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $26m

NZ: Turners & Growers to buy tomato firms for $ 26m

New Zealand’s biggest fresh-produce company, Turners & Growers, is set to grow even larger following the acquisition of two tomato-growing businesses for a combined price of nearly $ 26 million.

But because T&G is largely German-owned (72.5 per cent), the purchase of Great Lake Tomatoes in the Bay of Plenty and Rianto in Waikato is subject to consent from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO).

T&G chief executive Alastair Hulbert said covered crops such as tomatoes had been singled out as a growth opportunity. “These acquisitions enable us to look at further sales opportunities in New Zealand and also our international markets.”

The largest of the acquisitions is for Great Lake Tomatoes, based in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, which has a 4.9 hectare glasshouse producing about 3000 tonnes of tomatoes annually. The total land being bought is 74.4 hectares, for a total price of $ 17.3m.

Great Lake managing director Ton Zwetsloot said the purchase was good news.

The other purchase is of Rianto, a family owned tomato grower in Ohaupo, which operates a 3.13ha glasshouse producing about 1600 tonnes of tomatoes annually.

The assets being acquired include a residential property and nearly 19ha of land, including the glasshouse. The total purchase price is about $ 8.5m.

Rianto managing director Frank van Rijen has been working with T&G for many years, using its packing and marketing.

An OIO decision on the deals is expected in mid-2015.

Source: stuff.co.nz

Publication date: 12/16/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Good news for California citrus growers

Good news for California citrus growers

Toward the end of 2011, Mark Hoddle, an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside, first released into a citrus grove on campus a batch of Pakistani wasps that are natural enemies of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), the vector of a bacterium that causes Huanglongbing (HLB), a lethal citrus disease.

Now on Tuesday, Dec. 16, Hoddle, the director of UCR’s Center for Invasive Species Research, is poised to release in the same grove the wasp Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis, a second species of ACP natural enemy, also from the Punjab region of Pakistan.  Shortly after 9 a.m., Chancellor Kim A. Wilcox will release the first set of the new wasps from a vial into the grove. Media representatives may arrive as early as 8:30 a.m.

The new wasp attacks the second and third developmental stages of immature ACP (called nymphs) whereas Tamarixia attacks the larger nymphs in the fourth and fifth stages of development. ACP nymphs have five developmental stages, or instars, after they hatch from the egg.

Successful biocontrol of citrus pests in California sometimes requires more than one species of natural enemy because citrus is grown in a variety of different habitats – hot desert areas like Coachella, cooler coastal zones like Ventura, and intermediate areas like Riverside/Redlands and northern San Diego County.

Around 300 male and female wasps will be released on Dec. 16. Hoddle and his team will open vials of the wasps to allow them to fly into the citrus orchard to start hunting for ACP nymphs.

Source: ucr.edu

Publication date: 12/10/2014


FreshPlaza.com

“European retailers want programs with Israeli growers”

Oron Ziv from Befresh Europe
“European retailers want programs with Israeli growers”


Oron Ziv checking the grapefruit

After a bad season last year for Israeli citrus exports, the start to this year’s citrus export season has been promising. BeFresh, an importer and exporter of fresh produce based in Tel Aviv, has benefited from the good prices in Europe for their grapefruit. With low avocado consumption in Europe, they also see potential in expanding the market for that product across the continent.


Workers in the pack house, packing the grapefruit
 
“It was a tough season for grapefruit last year, but we started in a much better market situation this year,” said Oron Ziv of BeFresh. “Prices were low and there was no demand this spring, so shipments from South Africa stopped around August. Because there was a lack of grapefruit, we came into a good market.” The dearth of fruit on the market, a result of an early exit by South African exporters who weren’t getting good returns, cleared the pipeline for Israel’s exports in September.

“Historically, November is a dead month for us for grapefruit, and we usually find ourselves with a big stock of fruit,” explains Ziv. “But nobody has fruit in stock this year.” That lean pipeline is encouraging to Israeli shippers, because when the market for their grapefruit warms up again there won’t be a glut of product on the market bringing down prices.


Stapling the boxes that are ready
 
Most competition on grapefruit comes from Turkey. Though fruit from Florida and Spain is also available when Israel exports their fruit, they don’t compete for the same share of the market that Israel seeks. Florida fruit is the gold standard when it comes to grapefruit, and it commands prices that put it on a different level from any other fruit, and the Spanish season doesn’t overlap significantly with the Israeli season. But Turkish fruit is, roughly, on the same level as Israeli fruit in terms of price and quality, though Ziv believes Israeli fruit still holds an edge.


The forklift brings the pallets that are ready to the palletizer

“Turkey has large quantities, so they need to sell their fruit, and they do it at low prices during the winter,” said Ziv. “But I think people are willing to pay more for Israeli fruit because of the taste and appearance of our grapefruit.”


Oron Ziv holds a box of Sweetie

Easy Peelers
Easy peelers have also been good for Israeli exporters, though there have been some markets lost to competing products in other countries. Spanish and Moroccan mandarins have edged out Israeli fruit in Europe. The cheaper production costs in both those countries make it hard to compete, and the shorter transit times for Spain gives that country’s exporters an advantage. As a result, Israeli exporters have largely ceded Europe in that category.
 
The bright spot for Israel, when it comes to easy peelers, has been the Or clementine. The wildly successful product has spurred increased acreage for a product that is in demand and commands premium prices. The challenge, as more growers look to cash in with the Or, is in the marketing.


 
“The acreage of new plantings is massive for the Or,” said Ziv. “There are more and more plantings every year. In that past few seasons, Israel has exported about 50,000 to 60,000 tons, but this season’s forecast is around 100,000 tons of fruit that is ready for export. If this figure is realistic, then it will be a big challenge to market the Or.” But he added that even if Israel produces enough Or clementines to fully satisfy European demand, North America and Asia are also potential markets for expansion. The qualities of the Or have made it a hit in Europe, and it’s reasonable to believe that those same qualities can make it a hit in other markets.
 
Avocado
An area in which BeFresh sees much potential is their avocado program. It’s estimated that avocado consumption in Europe has grown by 25% over the last five years, and there are signs that consumption will continue to rise. Ziv noted that while per capita annual consumption of avocados in Israel is about seven kilograms, it’s only about two or three kilograms in Spain and France, and it’s under one kilogram in Holland. That leaves a lot of room for more avocados.
 
“If you can make avocados more available in Europe, there’s huge room to develop that market,” said Ziv. Most European consumers prefer Hass avocados, which leaves the green-skinned variety that Israeli consumers prefer, out of export programs. The slow-maturing nature of avocado trees, however, could slow expansion, as it takes over seven years for an avocado tree to bear its full yield potential.


 
Melons
Melons were a tough product for BeFresh last season, with the traditional gap between Spanish production and Brazilian production greatly diminished. While Spanish shipments of melons to Europe usually come to a halt near the end of August, supplies lasted into September last season. At the same time, Brazilian supplies, which don’t typically arrive in Europe until October, hit the European market much sooner. That meant that the September and October window that Israeli shippers use to sell their melons in Europe was largely gone last season. But this year looks better.
 
“It was not a big success for the Galia melon season for us last year because we were squeezed out,” said Ziv. “But we produced less this year, due to our bad experiences last year, and we’re now enjoying a good situation.” While they shipped about 30% less volume of melons this year, a sharp drop from last year’s shipments, their profits were much better because of higher prices.


 
BeFresh’s success with melons this year was also due to their partnership with the largest melon grower in Israel. That gave them direct access to a steady supply of melons with consistent quality. Though BeFresh is a small company, they are able to consistently deliver melons to retailers. Large supermarkets appreciate that, and Ziv explained that those ties give them an advantage when dealing with retailers.
 
“The advantage is that I work with the grower, so the retailer is getting product straight from the farm,” said Ziv. “But you also need a combination of supermarket programs and open market selling.” While the retailer programs are attractive because they offer steady payments for a set period of time, retailers typically only ask for a few sizes. Ziv’s job with BeFresh, is to find a home for all of the product he receives from growers, not just for the handful of sizes supermarkets want. That’s where the open market comes in.
 
“You need a good combination with the packing house, the local market and the export market,” said Ziv. “It’s like a puzzle, to find the right market for each segment of your produce. It’s easy to sell just the best sizes, but it doesn’t help the grower if you can only sell 20 percent of his produce.”

For more information:
Oron Ziv
BeFresh Europe Ltd.
Phone: +972 3 968 2929
Fax: +972 4 672 5001
Email: [email protected]
www.befreshcorp.com
 

Publication date: 11/21/2014


FreshPlaza.com

China reopens market access to Washington apple growers

On Oct. 29, the Washington Apple Commission announced the reinstatement of market access to China for Red and Golden Delicious apples. “Shipments of Washington apples to China stopped in August of 2012, when the Chinese government refused to issue import permits to Chinese importers, citing concerns with a recently discovered fungus they claimed was not in China,” the commission said in its statement.

Following two years of negotiations, three Chinese officials conducted an on-site visit in September, allaying these fears.

“The agreement calls for stepped-up control measures through improved horticultural, packing and sampling procedures in Washington,” according to the statement.

WA-AppleOverviewFollowing two years of negotiation, officials in China reinstated market access for Washington apple growers to move Red and Golden Delicious varieties. The Washington Apple Commission continues to work to gain full varietal access in China in the coming years. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Apple Commission)WAC President Todd Fryhover said the market reopening is a significant step. “The long-term goal is to get full varietal access in China,” he told The Produce News.

He said historically 2.5 million cartons of apples, valued at $ 20 per box, have been shipped to the region. “China and Hong Kong are one promotional activity,” he explained. “Hong Kong is a free port. China is not.”

As a result of the agreement, Fryhover said Reds and Golds will move directly into China. “We hope in the first year of full varietal access to have 500,000 to 1 million boxes,” he added. “Regaining access to China is very important to Washington growers.”

Jon DeVaney, president of the Washington State Tree Fruit Association, agreed. “The re-opening of China to Washington apples is great news, and it is particularly welcome as we complete the harvest of a large crop since one-third of the Washington apple crop is exported.

“Through Sunday, Oct. 26, 20.681 million boxes of apples have been shipped in Washington,” DeVaney continued. “This is 34.5 percent above last year’s shipments through this date, and 42 percent above shipments to the same date in 2012 when we had our last record crop. Given that our August crop forecast was for a crop of 140.2 million, which would be 21.8 percent higher than the 2013 crop, our shipments to date are clearly on track to successfully move this year’s crop even if it comes in above the August forecast.”

He said apple quality is excellent and sizing is trending larger this season. “The only mild surprise was that the Oct. 1 estimate for Honeycrisp came in 4.9 percent lower than the August estimate, although at 7.422 million boxes the Honeycrisp crop is still substantially above last year’s 4.513 million boxes.”

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

China reopens market access to Washington apple growers

On Oct. 29, the Washington Apple Commission announced the reinstatement of market access to China for Red and Golden Delicious apples. “Shipments of Washington apples to China stopped in August of 2012, when the Chinese government refused to issue import permits to Chinese importers, citing concerns with a recently discovered fungus they claimed was not in China,” the commission said in its statement.

Following two years of negotiations, three Chinese officials conducted an on-site visit in September, allaying these fears.

“The agreement calls for stepped-up control measures through improved horticultural, packing and sampling procedures in Washington,” according to the statement.

WA-AppleOverviewFollowing two years of negotiation, officials in China reinstated market access for Washington apple growers to move Red and Golden Delicious varieties. The Washington Apple Commission continues to work to gain full varietal access in China in the coming years. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Apple Commission)WAC President Todd Fryhover said the market reopening is a significant step. “The long-term goal is to get full varietal access in China,” he told The Produce News.

He said historically 2.5 million cartons of apples, valued at $ 20 per box, have been shipped to the region. “China and Hong Kong are one promotional activity,” he explained. “Hong Kong is a free port. China is not.”

As a result of the agreement, Fryhover said Reds and Golds will move directly into China. “We hope in the first year of full varietal access to have 500,000 to 1 million boxes,” he added. “Regaining access to China is very important to Washington growers.”

Jon DeVaney, president of the Washington State Tree Fruit Association, agreed. “The re-opening of China to Washington apples is great news, and it is particularly welcome as we complete the harvest of a large crop since one-third of the Washington apple crop is exported.

“Through Sunday, Oct. 26, 20.681 million boxes of apples have been shipped in Washington,” DeVaney continued. “This is 34.5 percent above last year’s shipments through this date, and 42 percent above shipments to the same date in 2012 when we had our last record crop. Given that our August crop forecast was for a crop of 140.2 million, which would be 21.8 percent higher than the 2013 crop, our shipments to date are clearly on track to successfully move this year’s crop even if it comes in above the August forecast.”

He said apple quality is excellent and sizing is trending larger this season. “The only mild surprise was that the Oct. 1 estimate for Honeycrisp came in 4.9 percent lower than the August estimate, although at 7.422 million boxes the Honeycrisp crop is still substantially above last year’s 4.513 million boxes.”

 

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.