Blog Archives

Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

77 million dollars
Peru exports 23% more tangerines in first half of 2014

Peruvian tangerine exports between January and August this year amounted to US $ 77 million, 23.1% more than in the same period of 2013, when they totalled $ 62.5 million, stated the management of ADEX Agro. 

According to them, shipments of this product were divided into two batches, fresh or dried mandarins, with shipments that amounted to $ 54 million (70.3% of the total exports), and fresh or dried tangelo tangerines, with shipments that amounted to $ 22.8 million (29.6% of total exports). 

According to the Business Intelligence System ADEX Data Trade, Peruvian tangerines were sent to 27 countries. The main target was the United States, which accounts for 30.4% of total exports with orders worth USD $ 23 million, i.e. a 62.4% increase. 

The UK ranked second with $ 18.4 million, +17.5% and 23.8% of total exports, followed by the Netherlands ($ 12.9 million), Canada (11.1 million) Ireland (2.9 million), Russia, Colombia, Sweden and Finland, among others. 

It’s worth noting that, even though Russia didn’t present a significant amount of orders ($ 2.3 million), exports to that country in the first half of 2014 increased by 30.1% over the same period last year. Exports to Colombia and Sweden also increased by 54.8% and 52.7%, respectively. 

The management of ADEX Agro stressed that the increase in tangerine exports was due to the increase in production caused by the alternating production this year. 

They also noted that this year the fruit had a great taste and quality, which is the one that has the most demand. They also stated that the tangerine harvest lasted all year, but that there was a peak between April and August. 

44 companies, led by Laran SAC Processing, Fruit Products Consortium SA, Agricultural Norsur SAC, Chincha Fruit Corporation SAC, Procesadora Torre Blanca SA, Camposol SA and Huamaní SAC, export the tangerines 

Source: agraria.pe

Publication date: 10/31/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Walmart Canada launches Half Your Plate program

Walmart Canada has joined Half Your Plate, the Canadian Produce Marketing Association’s healthy eating campaign designed to get Canadians of all ages to eat more fruits and veggies to improve their health. After a successful launch on social media this summer, Half Your Plate is now making its way onto produce packaging and into retail stores across Canada.cpma halfyourplate logo 4cl

“We are excited to be the first major retailer to promote Half Your Plate in our stores and flyers,” said Sam Silvestro, senior director of fresh foods for Walmart Canada, said in a press release. “We believe that healthy eating starts with getting enough servings of fruits and vegetables every day, and Half Your Plate provides an easy message for consumers to understand and keep in mind when doing their grocery shopping.”

“Rather than having people count servings or worry about serving size, our messaging is that at every meal, make half your plate fruit and vegetables. By the end of the day, you’ll have your recommended number of servings,” Ron Lemaire, president of CPMA, said in the release. “That also translates when you’re at the grocery store. Half your cart should be fruit and veggies, and having retailers promote the campaign re-emphasizes the importance of making healthier choices at the store.”

Half Your Plate offers a simple, consistent way to help consumers navigate the many different messages they hear each day about healthy eating. “It can be a bit confusing for some consumers to know what makes up a healthy meal,” added Lemaire. “What we hear most from consumers is that they’re struggling with what a serving is in a lot of instances and are looking for ways to make healthy choices fast, easy and affordable.”

Although Canadians are becoming more conscious of what they eat, studies show that the average person only consumes 3.5-4.5 servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Yet Canada’s Food Guide recommends that adults get seven to 10 servings per day, depending on gender. Half Your Plate encourages people to take it one meal at a time, analyzing the make-up of their plate rather than specific servings that can be confusing to many.

The Half Your Plate campaign was developed in collaboration with health partners the Canadian Cancer Society, the Canadian Public Health Association and the Heart and Stroke Foundation. More information can be found at www.halfyourplate.ca or by following @halfyourplate on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest. Other retailers are expected to start using the campaign in the coming months.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Walmart Canada launches Half Your Plate program

Walmart Canada has joined Half Your Plate, the Canadian Produce Marketing Association’s healthy eating campaign designed to get Canadians of all ages to eat more fruits and veggies to improve their health. After a successful launch on social media this summer, Half Your Plate is now making its way onto produce packaging and into retail stores across Canada.cpma halfyourplate logo 4cl

“We are excited to be the first major retailer to promote Half Your Plate in our stores and flyers,” said Sam Silvestro, senior director of fresh foods for Walmart Canada, said in a press release. “We believe that healthy eating starts with getting enough servings of fruits and vegetables every day, and Half Your Plate provides an easy message for consumers to understand and keep in mind when doing their grocery shopping.”

“Rather than having people count servings or worry about serving size, our messaging is that at every meal, make half your plate fruit and vegetables. By the end of the day, you’ll have your recommended number of servings,” Ron Lemaire, president of CPMA, said in the release. “That also translates when you’re at the grocery store. Half your cart should be fruit and veggies, and having retailers promote the campaign re-emphasizes the importance of making healthier choices at the store.”

Half Your Plate offers a simple, consistent way to help consumers navigate the many different messages they hear each day about healthy eating. “It can be a bit confusing for some consumers to know what makes up a healthy meal,” added Lemaire. “What we hear most from consumers is that they’re struggling with what a serving is in a lot of instances and are looking for ways to make healthy choices fast, easy and affordable.”

Although Canadians are becoming more conscious of what they eat, studies show that the average person only consumes 3.5-4.5 servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Yet Canada’s Food Guide recommends that adults get seven to 10 servings per day, depending on gender. Half Your Plate encourages people to take it one meal at a time, analyzing the make-up of their plate rather than specific servings that can be confusing to many.

The Half Your Plate campaign was developed in collaboration with health partners the Canadian Cancer Society, the Canadian Public Health Association and the Heart and Stroke Foundation. More information can be found at www.halfyourplate.ca or by following @halfyourplate on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest. Other retailers are expected to start using the campaign in the coming months.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Illegal land clearing for commercial agriculture responsible for half of tropical deforestation

A comprehensive new analysis released today says that nearly half (49%) of all recent tropical deforestation is the result of illegal clearing for commercial agriculture. The study also finds that the majority of this illegal destruction was driven by overseas demand for agricultural commodities including palm oil, beef, soy, and wood products. In addition to devastating impacts on forest-dependent people and biodiversity, the illegal conversion of tropical forests for commercial agriculture is estimated to produce 1.47 gigatonnes of carbon each year — equivalent to 25% of the EU’s annual fossil fuel-based emissions.

“We’ve known that the production of agricultural commodities is a principal driving force behind deforestation, but this is the first report to show the outsize role that illegal activities play in the production of hundreds of food and household products consumed worldwide,” said Michael Jenkins, President and CEO of Forest Trends, a Washington-based NGO that published the report.

“Increased agricultural production will be necessary for food security and to meet the demand of the emerging global middle class. However, the world must also wake up to the scale of how much of this agricultural production is taking place on land that has been illegally cleared. Urgent action is needed to help countries where these agricultural products are being grown, both for governments to enforce their own laws and regulations, and for businesses aiming to produce commodities legally and sustainably.”

According to the study, Consumer Goods and Deforestation: An Analysis of the Extent and Nature of Illegality in Forest Conversion for Agriculture, 90% of the deforestation in Brazil from 2000 to 2012 was illegal, primarily due to the failure to conserve a percentage of natural forests in large-scale cattle and soy plantations, as required by Brazilian law. (Much of this occurred prior to 2004, when the Brazilian government took steps to successfully reduce deforestation.) And in the forests of Indonesia, 80% of deforestation was illegal — mostly for large-scale plantations producing palm oil and timber, 75% of which is exported. While other countries also experience high levels of illegal deforestation, Brazil and Indonesia produce the highest level of agricultural commodities destined for global markets, many of which wind up in cosmetics or household goods (palm oil), animal feed (soy), and packaging (wood products).

Illegal deforestation is also rampant in most other countries across Asia, Latin America, and Africa losing large areas of tropical forest. Examples include the following:

  • In Papua New Guinea, millions of hectares of forest have been illegally licensed for deforestation in recent years; a recent Parliamentary inquiry in the country found that 90% of these licenses were issued by corrupt or fraudulent means.
  • In Tanzania, forests have been illegally razed to make way for jatropha, a plant commonly used to produce biofuels.
  • Cambodia, along with neighboring Laos, is experiencing unprecedented growth in commercial agriculture. By the end of 2012, the government handed 2.6 million hectares of land, much of it forested, to large-scale agriculture producers.
  • In Bolivia, soy — 75% of which is exported — is the main engine behind illegal deforestation in the country’s stretch of Amazon.

In most cases, the companies that illegally razed forests to grow these crops had some form of government permit in hand. However, the report finds that it was also often the case that these permits were corruptly issued or fraudulently obtained; that these companies were missing additional required permits and licenses; or that these companies violated laws when clearing and planting, causing significant negative impacts on the environment and the rights of local people who have lived in these forests for generations and who depend on them for their food and incomes.

“All over the tropics, companies are bribing officials to obtain permits, trampling the legal or customary rights of Indigenous Peoples and other forest-dwelling communities, clearing more forest than they are allowed, and causing pollution and environmental devastation by flouting the law,” said Sam Lawson, the report author.

Export Agriculture a Key Driver of Illegal Deforestation

According to the report, the international trade in agricultural commodities (beef, leather, soy, palm oil, and wood products, including paper) produced on land illegally converted from tropical forest is worth an estimated US$ 61 billion per year. The EU, China, India, Russia, and the US are among the largest buyers of these commodities.

Overall, exports of agricultural commodities produced on land where forests were illegally cleared drove 25% of all tropical deforestation between 2000 and 2012. The study estimates that almost 40% of all palm oil, 20% of all soy, nearly 33% of tropical timber, and 14% of all beef traded internationally comes from land that had been illegally deforested. Nearly one-fifth (17%) of Brazilian beef, 75% of Brazilian soy, and 70-80% of the palm oil and plantation wood and pulp from Indonesia were destined for foreign markets.

“Five football fields of tropical forest are being destroyed every minute to supply these export commodities,” said Lawson, noting that the report’s figures were obtained using conservative estimates based on documented violations of significant impact. “There is hardly a product on supermarket shelves that is not potentially tainted,” he added.

A Growing Problem

While the study highlights Brazil’s recent success in reducing illegal forest clearance, the report also cautions that the problem of illegal deforestation for the production of commodities intended for export is now expanding to new areas of the tropics where deforestation rates have traditionally been low — and that the same illegalities seen elsewhere are being repeated. In the Congo Basin, for instance, two out of the three largest new oil palm projects currently under development have been found to be operating illegally; one of these plantations, in the Republic of Congo, is set to double that country’s deforestation rate.

Action Needed

The report documents governance failures that undermine broader efforts to tackle tropical deforestation, including private sector initiatives on sustainable commodities and efforts by tropical forested countries to reduce legal deforestation. It argues that while the recent spate of “zero deforestation” commitments by major consumer goods companies involved in producing, trading, or consuming relevant commodities is to be applauded, illegalities relating to consumer agriculture and timber plantations can ultimately only be fully addressed by governments, and efforts to go further than legality will be held back by the need to compete with products that were illegally produced.

“Without investing in governance, our collective investments in halting deforestation and promoting forest stewardship will fail,” concluded Jenkins. “Responsible companies and environmental and human rights groups are likely to be supportive of processes to reform the complex, conflicting, and unclear laws and regulations that currently govern the forest and agricultural sectors. This is a critical step, alongside improving the enforcement and compliance of national and international laws. All must be prioritized if global commitments to stop tropical deforestation are going to be achieved.”

The report includes a range of recommendations for countries that both produce and import agricultural commodities, as well as corporations and investors in the commodity trade. The report advises producer countries, for example, to simplify and harmonize contradictory laws and regulations, including those pertaining to land use and securing tenure for Indigenous Peoples and other local communities to reduce conflicts. It asserts that governments should enforce these laws and hold companies investing in these countries accountable. Another set of recommendations call for actions by the governments of countries that import the commodities concerned.

The report notes that important lessons can be learned from previous successful initiatives to combat the trade in illegally sourced timber. Producer countries — particularly those developing trade agreements with the EU (FLEGT VPAs) — are clarifying regulatory frameworks that improve their ability to demonstrate the legality of wood products to their citizens. Consumer countries are instituting measures that have been shown to support the enforcement of producer countries’ own laws and regulations, including the development of importing trade legislation (such as the EU Timber Regulation), public procurement policies, and investment standards. However, there has been limited analysis to date on how similar mechanisms for agricultural commodities could leverage credible legal compliance, support sustainable land use policies, and increase transparency.

“The current unfettered access to international markets for commodities from illegally cleared land is undermining the efforts of tropical countries to enforce their own laws” concluded Lawson. “Consumer countries have a responsibility to help halt this trade.”

http://www.forest-trends.org/illegal-deforestation.php

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Illegal land clearing for commercial agriculture responsible for half of tropical deforestation

A comprehensive new analysis released today says that nearly half (49%) of all recent tropical deforestation is the result of illegal clearing for commercial agriculture. The study also finds that the majority of this illegal destruction was driven by overseas demand for agricultural commodities including palm oil, beef, soy, and wood products. In addition to devastating impacts on forest-dependent people and biodiversity, the illegal conversion of tropical forests for commercial agriculture is estimated to produce 1.47 gigatonnes of carbon each year — equivalent to 25% of the EU’s annual fossil fuel-based emissions.

“We’ve known that the production of agricultural commodities is a principal driving force behind deforestation, but this is the first report to show the outsize role that illegal activities play in the production of hundreds of food and household products consumed worldwide,” said Michael Jenkins, President and CEO of Forest Trends, a Washington-based NGO that published the report.

“Increased agricultural production will be necessary for food security and to meet the demand of the emerging global middle class. However, the world must also wake up to the scale of how much of this agricultural production is taking place on land that has been illegally cleared. Urgent action is needed to help countries where these agricultural products are being grown, both for governments to enforce their own laws and regulations, and for businesses aiming to produce commodities legally and sustainably.”

According to the study, Consumer Goods and Deforestation: An Analysis of the Extent and Nature of Illegality in Forest Conversion for Agriculture, 90% of the deforestation in Brazil from 2000 to 2012 was illegal, primarily due to the failure to conserve a percentage of natural forests in large-scale cattle and soy plantations, as required by Brazilian law. (Much of this occurred prior to 2004, when the Brazilian government took steps to successfully reduce deforestation.) And in the forests of Indonesia, 80% of deforestation was illegal — mostly for large-scale plantations producing palm oil and timber, 75% of which is exported. While other countries also experience high levels of illegal deforestation, Brazil and Indonesia produce the highest level of agricultural commodities destined for global markets, many of which wind up in cosmetics or household goods (palm oil), animal feed (soy), and packaging (wood products).

Illegal deforestation is also rampant in most other countries across Asia, Latin America, and Africa losing large areas of tropical forest. Examples include the following:

  • In Papua New Guinea, millions of hectares of forest have been illegally licensed for deforestation in recent years; a recent Parliamentary inquiry in the country found that 90% of these licenses were issued by corrupt or fraudulent means.
  • In Tanzania, forests have been illegally razed to make way for jatropha, a plant commonly used to produce biofuels.
  • Cambodia, along with neighboring Laos, is experiencing unprecedented growth in commercial agriculture. By the end of 2012, the government handed 2.6 million hectares of land, much of it forested, to large-scale agriculture producers.
  • In Bolivia, soy — 75% of which is exported — is the main engine behind illegal deforestation in the country’s stretch of Amazon.

In most cases, the companies that illegally razed forests to grow these crops had some form of government permit in hand. However, the report finds that it was also often the case that these permits were corruptly issued or fraudulently obtained; that these companies were missing additional required permits and licenses; or that these companies violated laws when clearing and planting, causing significant negative impacts on the environment and the rights of local people who have lived in these forests for generations and who depend on them for their food and incomes.

“All over the tropics, companies are bribing officials to obtain permits, trampling the legal or customary rights of Indigenous Peoples and other forest-dwelling communities, clearing more forest than they are allowed, and causing pollution and environmental devastation by flouting the law,” said Sam Lawson, the report author.

Export Agriculture a Key Driver of Illegal Deforestation

According to the report, the international trade in agricultural commodities (beef, leather, soy, palm oil, and wood products, including paper) produced on land illegally converted from tropical forest is worth an estimated US$ 61 billion per year. The EU, China, India, Russia, and the US are among the largest buyers of these commodities.

Overall, exports of agricultural commodities produced on land where forests were illegally cleared drove 25% of all tropical deforestation between 2000 and 2012. The study estimates that almost 40% of all palm oil, 20% of all soy, nearly 33% of tropical timber, and 14% of all beef traded internationally comes from land that had been illegally deforested. Nearly one-fifth (17%) of Brazilian beef, 75% of Brazilian soy, and 70-80% of the palm oil and plantation wood and pulp from Indonesia were destined for foreign markets.

“Five football fields of tropical forest are being destroyed every minute to supply these export commodities,” said Lawson, noting that the report’s figures were obtained using conservative estimates based on documented violations of significant impact. “There is hardly a product on supermarket shelves that is not potentially tainted,” he added.

A Growing Problem

While the study highlights Brazil’s recent success in reducing illegal forest clearance, the report also cautions that the problem of illegal deforestation for the production of commodities intended for export is now expanding to new areas of the tropics where deforestation rates have traditionally been low — and that the same illegalities seen elsewhere are being repeated. In the Congo Basin, for instance, two out of the three largest new oil palm projects currently under development have been found to be operating illegally; one of these plantations, in the Republic of Congo, is set to double that country’s deforestation rate.

Action Needed

The report documents governance failures that undermine broader efforts to tackle tropical deforestation, including private sector initiatives on sustainable commodities and efforts by tropical forested countries to reduce legal deforestation. It argues that while the recent spate of “zero deforestation” commitments by major consumer goods companies involved in producing, trading, or consuming relevant commodities is to be applauded, illegalities relating to consumer agriculture and timber plantations can ultimately only be fully addressed by governments, and efforts to go further than legality will be held back by the need to compete with products that were illegally produced.

“Without investing in governance, our collective investments in halting deforestation and promoting forest stewardship will fail,” concluded Jenkins. “Responsible companies and environmental and human rights groups are likely to be supportive of processes to reform the complex, conflicting, and unclear laws and regulations that currently govern the forest and agricultural sectors. This is a critical step, alongside improving the enforcement and compliance of national and international laws. All must be prioritized if global commitments to stop tropical deforestation are going to be achieved.”

The report includes a range of recommendations for countries that both produce and import agricultural commodities, as well as corporations and investors in the commodity trade. The report advises producer countries, for example, to simplify and harmonize contradictory laws and regulations, including those pertaining to land use and securing tenure for Indigenous Peoples and other local communities to reduce conflicts. It asserts that governments should enforce these laws and hold companies investing in these countries accountable. Another set of recommendations call for actions by the governments of countries that import the commodities concerned.

The report notes that important lessons can be learned from previous successful initiatives to combat the trade in illegally sourced timber. Producer countries — particularly those developing trade agreements with the EU (FLEGT VPAs) — are clarifying regulatory frameworks that improve their ability to demonstrate the legality of wood products to their citizens. Consumer countries are instituting measures that have been shown to support the enforcement of producer countries’ own laws and regulations, including the development of importing trade legislation (such as the EU Timber Regulation), public procurement policies, and investment standards. However, there has been limited analysis to date on how similar mechanisms for agricultural commodities could leverage credible legal compliance, support sustainable land use policies, and increase transparency.

“The current unfettered access to international markets for commodities from illegally cleared land is undermining the efforts of tropical countries to enforce their own laws” concluded Lawson. “Consumer countries have a responsibility to help halt this trade.”

http://www.forest-trends.org/illegal-deforestation.php

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Over half of cherry harvest lost in France

Over half of cherry harvest lost in France

At the end of June the strong rain damaged Rousoux Plants cherry production in Berloz.  Over half of the harvest has been lost as the cherries full of water exploded.  “We had 60mm of rain within a few hours” says Nicolas Goffin.  

With no way of selling the cherries they are either left on the tree or the ground.  “We must have harvested 30-40% of our total harvest”.  With damaged strawberries they must sort through them at harvest and manual labour is expensive.  “When all is well, depending on their status, a person costs €8-10 an hour and a good picker can do 15kg an hour, so there there is a way of earning a living.  But as soon as they must start selecting, they are twice as slow and pick 2kg an hour, it is no longer possible”.  Following the first small harvest the Goffins have decided to stop picking and to leave the fruits to rot on the trees.  Nicolas Goffin says that “If they are not good, then it is pointless as our reputation is founded on the quality of our products”.  

They could invest in an anti-rain cover, but this costs around €40,000-70,000 /ha.  The Goffins own about 15 ha of sweet and acid cherry orchards, so it would be a heavy investment.  

Publication date: 8/8/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Cyclospora Outbreak Reaches 202 Cases; More Than Half are in Texas

Just like last summer, illnesses involving prolonged watery diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms caused by the parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis are spreading across the country from Texas. Public health officials suspect the parasite is riding into the United States on contaminated fresh produce grown in Mexico for the U.S. market. They just don’t yet know the exact source, where it’s grown, and how it’s being distributed here.

During the past week, the outbreak has expanded by several states, with the number of confirmed cases growing to 202, up from the 61 illnesses reported nationally as recently as July 23.  With 110 illnesses, the Lone Star State accounts for more than half of the nation’s current cases, with illnesses being reported in 29 of the 254 counties in Texas.

“Though a source has yet to be identified, past outbreaks have been traced to fresh imported produce,” the Texas Department of State Health Services said. “DSHS encourages people to wash produce thoroughly, though that may not entirely eliminate the risk because Cyclospora can be difficult to wash off.”

Last summer, a June-peaking national outbreak of Cyclosporiasis ultimately saw 631 people sickened in 25 states. Last year’s Cyclospora outbreak caused some confusion and contention among the state’s investigating it. Iowa and Nebraska thought the infections were caused by bagged mixed salads served by restaurants, while Texas officials named fresh cilantro grown in Puebla, Mexico.

This year, interviews conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have attributed about 25 illnesses to foreign travel. Before last summer, Cyclospora outbreaks from food or water sources in the U.S. have been sporadic since imported raspberries arrived here two decades ago.

Carried by food or water contaminated by feces, the illness is cause by a parasite that’s common in tropical or subtropical counties. The onset of illness typically occurs within two to 14 days after the oocytes are consumed. It results in profuse diarrhea that can last for a couple weeks to several months. Other symptoms are a low-grade fever, nausea and vomiting, bloating and gas, anorexia and fatigue.

Food Safety News

Stemilt packing new ‘Half Mile Closer to the Moon’ cherry pouch bag

Stemilt has started packing its premium high-altitude cherries in a new Half Mile Closer to the Moon pouch bag. The cherries for this bag come from fourth generation cherry grower Kyle Mathison’s unique Amigos Orchards, which is located between 2,800 and 3,200 feet above sea level — literally a half-mile closer to the moon.

This is the second year Stemilt has packed “Moon” cherries, but the first in pouch bags. The new Moon bag features midnight blue skies dotted with stars and a large full moon to designate the unique locale in which these cherries are grown. MoonCherriesPouchStemilt is now packing its Half Mile Closer to the Moon cherries in a pouch bag.It has a QR code on it to share more information about where and how the special cherries are grown with consumers. It also carries the Kyle’s Pick program seal. Kyle’s Pick is Stemilt’s program for premium cherries grown primarily on Stemilt Hill and the Amigos. The Half Mile Closer to the Moon bag is the second bag in the Kyle’s Pick series and will be used for cherries that pack now through the end of the season.

“The idea behind the Moon cherry bag is to share Kyle’s passion for cherries and the unique Amigos orchard locale. The size, flavors and quality of these late-season cherries will leave a lasting impression on shoppers, and we wanted the bag these cherries come in to emulate that. Consumers will rave about Half Mile Closer to the Moon cherries,” said Roger Pepperl, Stemilt marketing director.

Named after the Spanish word for friends, the Amigos orchards overlook the Columbia River and town of Wenatchee, WA, not too far from the family’s original homestead on Stemilt Hill. In the cherry world, any orchard planted above 1,800 feet is considered high-elevation. Having already surpassed that height, Mathison began planting cherries at even higher elevations in 2002 in order to stretch the availability of Stemilt cherries.

“My dream is to be able to provide consumers with fresh world famous Stemilt cherries as long as possible,” said Mathison. “Amigos not only extends the availability of cherries well into August, but it sits on the best growing ground in the world. The mild climate stays cool during the hot summer while the volcanic soils fuel trees and help produce large, perfect-tasting cherries.”

Typically, harvest at Amigos lasts into late August and even September; however, this year is an anomaly. Across Washington state, fruit is harvesting earlier than normal due to an early bloom and warm summer temperatures. As a result, Stemilt will wrap up cherry harvest in mid-August this year.

The varieties that Mathison grows at Amigos also make Moon cherries stand out. He calls Sweetheart, Skeena and Staccato his “three loves” in the cherry world because of their ability to consistently grow into large-sized, firm and super-sweet fruits.

“The cherries grown at Amigos are second to none,” said Pepperl. “The location, climate, varieties, and Kyle’s passion and expertise all combine to deliver a true dessert eating experience. We’re excited to deliver consumers with this final and memorable taste of Stemilt cherries in our new Half Mile Closer to the Moon packaging. It’s an exciting way to finish off another cherry season.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers, the fruit marketer controlled by Germany’s BayWa, more than doubled first-half profit as its export business reaped bigger sales from North America.

Net profit gained to $ 17.8 million, or 14.2 cents per share, in the six months ended June 30, from $ 7.1 million, or 4.7 cents, a year earlier, the Auckland-based company said in a statement.

Sales rose 9.4 percent to $ 369 million, led by a 15 percent gain in export sales to $ 213.6 million.

Source: tvnz.co.nz

Publication date: 8/8/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers, the fruit marketer controlled by Germany’s BayWa, more than doubled first-half profit as its export business reaped bigger sales from North America.

Net profit gained to $ 17.8 million, or 14.2 cents per share, in the six months ended June 30, from $ 7.1 million, or 4.7 cents, a year earlier, the Auckland-based company said in a statement.

Sales rose 9.4 percent to $ 369 million, led by a 15 percent gain in export sales to $ 213.6 million.

Source: tvnz.co.nz

Publication date: 8/8/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers, the fruit marketer controlled by Germany’s BayWa, more than doubled first-half profit as its export business reaped bigger sales from North America.

Net profit gained to $ 17.8 million, or 14.2 cents per share, in the six months ended June 30, from $ 7.1 million, or 4.7 cents, a year earlier, the Auckland-based company said in a statement.

Sales rose 9.4 percent to $ 369 million, led by a 15 percent gain in export sales to $ 213.6 million.

Source: tvnz.co.nz

Publication date: 8/8/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers, the fruit marketer controlled by Germany’s BayWa, more than doubled first-half profit as its export business reaped bigger sales from North America.

Net profit gained to $ 17.8 million, or 14.2 cents per share, in the six months ended June 30, from $ 7.1 million, or 4.7 cents, a year earlier, the Auckland-based company said in a statement.

Sales rose 9.4 percent to $ 369 million, led by a 15 percent gain in export sales to $ 213.6 million.

Source: tvnz.co.nz

Publication date: 8/8/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers, the fruit marketer controlled by Germany’s BayWa, more than doubled first-half profit as its export business reaped bigger sales from North America.

Net profit gained to $ 17.8 million, or 14.2 cents per share, in the six months ended June 30, from $ 7.1 million, or 4.7 cents, a year earlier, the Auckland-based company said in a statement.

Sales rose 9.4 percent to $ 369 million, led by a 15 percent gain in export sales to $ 213.6 million.

Source: tvnz.co.nz

Publication date: 8/8/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers, the fruit marketer controlled by Germany’s BayWa, more than doubled first-half profit as its export business reaped bigger sales from North America.

Net profit gained to $ 17.8 million, or 14.2 cents per share, in the six months ended June 30, from $ 7.1 million, or 4.7 cents, a year earlier, the Auckland-based company said in a statement.

Sales rose 9.4 percent to $ 369 million, led by a 15 percent gain in export sales to $ 213.6 million.

Source: tvnz.co.nz

Publication date: 8/8/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers hikes first half profit

Turners & Growers, the fruit marketer controlled by Germany’s BayWa, more than doubled first-half profit as its export business reaped bigger sales from North America.

Net profit gained to $ 17.8 million, or 14.2 cents per share, in the six months ended June 30, from $ 7.1 million, or 4.7 cents, a year earlier, the Auckland-based company said in a statement.

Sales rose 9.4 percent to $ 369 million, led by a 15 percent gain in export sales to $ 213.6 million.

Source: tvnz.co.nz

Publication date: 8/8/2013


FreshPlaza.com