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Hawaii Hepatitis A cases up to 74; vaccine being redistributed

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has updated to 74 its confirmed case count in the ongoing Hepatitis A outbreak, which is an increase of 22 new cases since the department’s previous update last week.

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-images-person-receiving-vaccine-close-up-vaccination-protection-image34491574All of the sickened individuals are Oahu residents, DOH noted, except for two people who live on the islands of Hawaii and Maui but were on Oahu during their exposure period.

Twenty-six of the 74 people have been hospitalized. Onset of the illnesses ranges from June 12 to July 14.

DOH is calling the following two local businesses “places of interest” because an employee at each of them has been diagnosed with Hepatitis A infection:

  • Baskin-Robbins at Waikele Center, where possible exposure dates were June 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 25, 27, 30 and July 1 and 3, and,
  • Taco Bell at 94-790 Ukee St. in Waipio, where possible exposure dates were June 16, 17, 20, 21, 24, 25, 28, 29, 30 and July 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 11.

Department officials cautioned that this doesn’t indicate that these businesses are sources of the outbreak, and that no Hepatitis A infections have so far been linked to exposure at the two businesses.

“The likelihood that patrons of these businesses will become infected is very low,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park, adding, “However, persons who have consumed food or drink products from these businesses during the identified dates of service should contact their healthcare provider for advice and possible preventive care.”

“Identifying the source of infection continues to be a challenge because of the long incubation period of the disease and the difficulty patients have in accurately recalling the foods consumed and locations visited during the period when infection could have taken place,” according to a DOH website page about the outbreak.

Meanwhile, some pharmacies on Oahu have apparently run low on supplies of the Hepatitis A vaccine and are either having to redistribute on the island or get additional supplies from the mainland.

“What we’re telling people is that we have a list on our website of vaccinating pharmacies and to call before they go in because some pharmacies might be temporarily out but have requested or ordered more,” said Gail Ogawa, a public health educator with DOH in Honolulu.

A single dose of single-antigen Hepatitis A vaccine, or immune globulin, may provide some protection against the disease if administered within the first two weeks after exposure. A list of frequently asked questions about Hepatitis A can be found here.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A infection include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, diarrhea, and yellow skin and eyes, and symptoms typically last several weeks to as long as two months. Most people will recover without complications.

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Hepatitis A Outbreak Numbers Rise Again: 127 Sick in 8 States

The Hepatitis A outbreak linked to pomegranate seeds from Turkey continues to grow. On Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said five more illnesses have been confirmed as part of the outbreak, bringing the total to 127 ill in 8 states.

According to CDC, all of the confirmed victims became ill after eating Townsend Farms Organic Anti-oxidant Blend, a frozen berry blend sold across the country in Costco stores. Harris Teeter also sold the now recalled product, but so far no illnesses have been linked to the retailer.

The updated case count by state is as follows: Arizona (17), California (64), Colorado (25), Hawaii (7), New Mexico (5), Nevada (5), Utah (2), and Wisconsin (2). [Note: The cases reported from Wisconsin resulted from exposure to the product in California.] Nearly 60 percent of those sickened are women. The ages in the outbreak range from 2 to 84 and include 6 children under the age of 18. CDC said none of the children had been vaccinated. More than half of those ill required hospitalization.

The outbreak strain of hepatitis A virus, belonging to genotype 1B, is rarely seen in the Americas but circulates in North Africa and the Middle East, according to CDC.

Three weeks ago, Townsend Farms Inc. recalled certain lots of the product linked to the outbreak because it has the potential to be contaminated. This week, Scenic Fruit Company recalled certain lots of Woodstock Frozen Organic Pomegranate Kernels, also thought to be at risk for contamination. Both companies are based in Oregon.

Food Safety News

NJ Health Officials Confirm 2 More Hepatitis A Cases

On Thursday, health officials in Hamilton, NJ, confirmed two more cases of Hepatitis A in the township about a month after a food service worker at Rosa’s Restaurant and Catering in Hamilton first became infected with the virus.

Health officials said that an employee of the Hair Port Salon in Hamilton had been diagnosed with Hepatitis A infection. The employee has been released from the hospital and is recovering at home, they added.

Staff and customers who visited the salon between Dec. 4 and Dec. 30 may be at risk of contracting the virus and should be vaccinated if they have not already done so, officials said.

Hepatitis A was also confirmed Thursday in a fitness instructor at a Hamilton-area YMCA. The instructor is recovering at home, official said.

Anyone who visited any of those locations between Dec. 5 and Dec. 29 may be at risk.

Officials confirmed during routine questioning that both individuals had eaten at, or from, Rosa’s during the first illnesses, but they were not certain that the subsequent cases were related.

They planned to hold a press conference Friday at 2 p.m. EST at the HamStat Call Center Training Room at 5 Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. Way in Hamilton to provide information and answer questions from the community and the media.

Health officials urged anyone with concerns or who develops symptoms to call a doctor. The symptoms of Hepatitis A infection include mild fever, loss of appetite, nausea, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, dark urine and yellowing of the skin or eyes.

The disease varies in severity, with mild cases lasting two weeks or less and more severe cases lasting four to six weeks.

Food Safety News

Two More Cases Added to Hepatitis A Outbreak: 122 Sick in 8 States

The number of confirmed illnesses part of the multistate Hepatitis A outbreak linked to Townsend Farms Organic Anti-Oxident Berry Blend continues to creep up. On Wednesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that there are now 122 confirmed cases, up two cases from the previous day and three more than the agency had confirmed on Monday. This week the outbreak also went from affecting 7 states to affecting 8, Wisconsin being the latest addition.

Arizona has 17 cases, California has 62, Colorado 25, Hawaii 5, New Mexico 5, Nevada 5, Utah 2 and Wisconsin 1, but the exposure in Wisconsin resulted from exposure to the product in California, according to CDC.

Nearly 60 percent of the victims are women. Illnesses onset dates range from the end of March to the middle of June and 45 percent of the reported illnesses have resulted in hospitalization. No deaths have been reported.

 

“Investigation by state and local health departments, FDA, and CDC is ongoing,” according to CDC. “FDA is inspecting the processing facilities of Townsend Farms of Fairview, Oregon.”

The outbreak strain of hepatitis A virus (HAV), belonging to genotype 1B, was found in clinical specimens of 36 people in six states. According to CDC, “this strain is rarely seen in the Americas but circulates in North Africa and the Middle East.”

Hepatitis A is a human disease and usually occurs when an infected food handler prepares food without appropriate hand hygiene.  However, food contaminated with HAV, as is suspected in this outbreak, can cause outbreaks of disease among persons who eat or handle food. Anyone concerned about exposure or foodborne illness should contact their health provider or their local health department.

Food Safety News

Maine CDC: Patrons of Unnamed Restaurant May Have Been Exposed to Hepatitis A

A food service worker with an acute Hepatitis A infection has been identified in Cumberland County, according to the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC). The worker served food while infectious from Sept. 29 to Oct. 11, 2014. Officials did not disclose the name of the Cumberland County restaurant that employed the infected food service worker.

A public health assessment by Maine CDC of the employee’s illness and food and beverage preparation practices determined that patrons of the unnamed restaurant might be at risk for Hepatitis A infection. The agency was notified of the illness beyond the 14-day window of opportunity for post-exposure prophylaxis to be effective.

Maine CDC said health care providers are encouraged to remain vigilant for Hepatitis A infection in persons with consistent symptoms. The fecal-oral route, commonly through consumption of contaminated food or water, transmits the Hepatitis A virus.

Persons will begin to exhibit symptoms 15-50 days after exposure to the virus. A person is considered infectious approximately two weeks prior to symptom onset until one week after onset of symptoms.

Exposed persons can receive post-exposure prophylaxis up to 14 days after exposure. Prophylaxis includes Hepatitis A vaccine for individuals 12 months to 40 years or immune globulin (IG) for individuals younger than than 12 months or 41 years of age and older (vaccine can be given to individuals 41 and older if IG is unavailable).

Healthcare providers should consider testing for Hepatitis A if patients present with any of the following symptoms: fever, jaundice, nausea, clay-colored stool, dark urine, malaise, abdominal discomfort, or anorexia.

Maine requires all suspected and confirmed cases of Hepatitis A to be reported to the state’s disease reporting and consultation line at 1-800-821-5821 on a 24/7 basis.

Food Safety News

Hepatitis A Outbreak Linked to Frozen Berries Has Now Sickened 119

The ongoing outbreak of hepatitis A linked to a frozen berry mix sold at Costco is now known to have sickened 119 people in the western United States, according to an update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Of these victims, 53 have been hospitalized as a result of their infections. CDC last reported 50 hospitalizations and 113 cases, meaning that 3 of the 6 newly reported cases were hospitalizations.

The number of cases by state is as follows: Arizona (16), California (61), Colorado (24), Hawaii (5), New Mexico (5), Nevada (5), and Utah (3).

CDC is now reporting that 5 cases have been in children under age 18, and that none of these cases resulted in hospitalization.

The frozen berry mix pinpointed as the outbreak source – “Organic Anti-Oxidant Berry Blend” distributed by Townsend Farms of Oregon – was sold at Costco stores in the West and at Harris Teeter stores in the East, but so far no illnesses have been connected to the product sold at Harris Teeter.

Costco distributed the product in 12 states, but to date no illnesses have been reported in 5 of these states, including Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.

Costco said it sold approximately 330,000 bags of the recalled product between February 2013 and the recall date in late May. The retailer said it contacted approximately 240,000 customers via phone and letters to inform them of the recall.

Food Safety News

Case Count Climbs to 120 in Frozen Berry Mix Hepatitis A Outbreak

The hepatitis A outbreak linked to a frozen berry mix sold at Costco has now sickened 120 people in 8 states, reported the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Tuesday.

This count includes one more case than Monday’s count of 119. The new case was reported in Wisconsin, a state that had previously reported no victims in the outbreak; however health officials say the Wisconsin patient had eaten the frozen berry mix in California, a state that’s reporting 62 illnesses.

The Townsend Farms “Organic Anti-Oxidant Berry Blend” linked to the hepatitis A outbreak was distributed through Costco and Harris Teeter stores nationwide, but illnesses have only been linked to the products sold at Costco to date. The Costco product was sold at stores in 12 western states, including Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah and Washington, but no illnesses have been reported in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon or Washington.

For the states affected, case counts are as follows: Arizona (16), California (62), Colorado (24), Hawaii (5), New Mexico (5), Nevada (5), Utah (2) and Wisconsin (1).

Of the 120 victims, 54 (or 45 percent) have been hospitalized; 61 percent are between the ages of 40 and 64. Illness onset dates range from March 31 through June 16, 2013.

FDA is continuing its investigation at the processing facility at Townsend Farms, located in Fairview, OR, in an attempt to determine the source of the contamination.

The implicated berry mix included berries from the U.S., Argentina and Chile, as well as pomegranate seeds processed in Turkey. 

Food Safety News

Officials Warn Public of Possible Hepatitis A Exposure at Texas Burger Restaurant

Health officials in Austin, TX, have alerted the public about possible Hepatitis A exposure at a Whataburger restaurant in central Austin after a restaurant employee at the 2800 Guadalupe St. location was diagnosed with the virus.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that is usually spread when a person ingests something that has been contaminated with the feces of an infected person, including contaminated food or water.

Signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A can include the following: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, clay-colored bowel movements, joint pain and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Signs and symptoms usually appear two to four weeks after exposure, although they may happen up to two to seven weeks after exposure. Children younger than 6 with Hepatitis A often do not have, or show few, signs and symptoms. Children, however, are least likely to get sick because they are typically immunized.

While health officials say transmission of the infection to customers is unlikely, the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department is recommending that people contact their doctor if they ate at that specific Whataburger restaurant between Aug. 7 and Aug. 19 and fit the following criteria:

  • Are 75 years old or older
  • Are immune-compromised
  • Have chronic liver disease or have had a liver transplant
  • Have clotting-factor disorders
  • Are experiencing Hepatitis A symptoms

If you do not fall into these risk categories but are still worried or are needing more guidance, officials recommend that you should visit your doctor or call the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department at 512-972-4372. The city’s Public Health Department is also working with the Whataburger Corporation to make sure employees are using the proper control measures at the Guadalupe location.

Whataburger has established a hotline for anyone with questions about the situation. That number is:  844-569-5555. The company released the following statement:

“This report of one employee’s Hepatitis A diagnosis at our 2800 Guadalupe St. location is top priority for us, which is why we have set up a dedicated hotline at 844-569-5555 to answer questions from the community. We invest a tremendous amount of time and effort to ensure food safety, so we have a team actively managing the situation, and we are working closely with the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department. We remain committed to a safe and clean dining experience for our employees and customers, and we have taken several precautionary measures, including providing all of our team members who work at this restaurant a Hepatitis A vaccine at Whataburger’s expense. Again, we encourage those with questions to contact our hotline at 844-569-5555.”

Food Safety News

Officials Warn Public of Possible Hepatitis A Exposure at Texas Burger Restaurant

Health officials in Austin, TX, have alerted the public about possible Hepatitis A exposure at a Whataburger restaurant in central Austin after a restaurant employee at the 2800 Guadalupe St. location was diagnosed with the virus.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that is usually spread when a person ingests something that has been contaminated with the feces of an infected person, including contaminated food or water.

Signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A can include the following: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, clay-colored bowel movements, joint pain and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Signs and symptoms usually appear two to four weeks after exposure, although they may happen up to two to seven weeks after exposure. Children younger than 6 with Hepatitis A often do not have, or show few, signs and symptoms. Children, however, are least likely to get sick because they are typically immunized.

While health officials say transmission of the infection to customers is unlikely, the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department is recommending that people contact their doctor if they ate at that specific Whataburger restaurant between Aug. 7 and Aug. 19 and fit the following criteria:

  • Are 75 years old or older
  • Are immune-compromised
  • Have chronic liver disease or have had a liver transplant
  • Have clotting-factor disorders
  • Are experiencing Hepatitis A symptoms

If you do not fall into these risk categories but are still worried or are needing more guidance, officials recommend that you should visit your doctor or call the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department at 512-972-4372. The city’s Public Health Department is also working with the Whataburger Corporation to make sure employees are using the proper control measures at the Guadalupe location.

Whataburger has established a hotline for anyone with questions about the situation. That number is:  844-569-5555. The company released the following statement:

“This report of one employee’s Hepatitis A diagnosis at our 2800 Guadalupe St. location is top priority for us, which is why we have set up a dedicated hotline at 844-569-5555 to answer questions from the community. We invest a tremendous amount of time and effort to ensure food safety, so we have a team actively managing the situation, and we are working closely with the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department. We remain committed to a safe and clean dining experience for our employees and customers, and we have taken several precautionary measures, including providing all of our team members who work at this restaurant a Hepatitis A vaccine at Whataburger’s expense. Again, we encourage those with questions to contact our hotline at 844-569-5555.”

Food Safety News

Officials Warn Public of Possible Hepatitis A Exposure at Texas Burger Restaurant

Health officials in Austin, TX, have alerted the public about possible Hepatitis A exposure at a Whataburger restaurant in central Austin after a restaurant employee at the 2800 Guadalupe St. location was diagnosed with the virus.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that is usually spread when a person ingests something that has been contaminated with the feces of an infected person, including contaminated food or water.

Signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A can include the following: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, clay-colored bowel movements, joint pain and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Signs and symptoms usually appear two to four weeks after exposure, although they may happen up to two to seven weeks after exposure. Children younger than 6 with Hepatitis A often do not have, or show few, signs and symptoms. Children, however, are least likely to get sick because they are typically immunized.

While health officials say transmission of the infection to customers is unlikely, the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department is recommending that people contact their doctor if they ate at that specific Whataburger restaurant between Aug. 7 and Aug. 19 and fit the following criteria:

  • Are 75 years old or older
  • Are immune-compromised
  • Have chronic liver disease or have had a liver transplant
  • Have clotting-factor disorders
  • Are experiencing Hepatitis A symptoms

If you do not fall into these risk categories but are still worried or are needing more guidance, officials recommend that you should visit your doctor or call the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department at 512-972-4372. The city’s Public Health Department is also working with the Whataburger Corporation to make sure employees are using the proper control measures at the Guadalupe location.

Whataburger has established a hotline for anyone with questions about the situation. That number is:  844-569-5555. The company released the following statement:

“This report of one employee’s Hepatitis A diagnosis at our 2800 Guadalupe St. location is top priority for us, which is why we have set up a dedicated hotline at 844-569-5555 to answer questions from the community. We invest a tremendous amount of time and effort to ensure food safety, so we have a team actively managing the situation, and we are working closely with the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department. We remain committed to a safe and clean dining experience for our employees and customers, and we have taken several precautionary measures, including providing all of our team members who work at this restaurant a Hepatitis A vaccine at Whataburger’s expense. Again, we encourage those with questions to contact our hotline at 844-569-5555.”

Food Safety News

Colorado Restaurant to Stay Closed for Weeks After Hepatitis A Scare

Tortilla Marissa’s, a Mexican restaurant in Fort Collins, CO, will not reopen until August 9 because of the Hepatitis A scare that the restaurant faced at the end of June, according to the Coloradoan.

The Larimer County Health Department has advised the owners to keep the restaurant closed that long due to the virus’ relatively long incubation period, which averages 28 days but can last up to 50 days in some cases.

The restaurant originally closed on June 27, a day after an employee tested positive for the virus, which has a high risk of being spread when an infected person handles food. In total, the restaurant will be closed 43 days.

The only way the owners could legally open before that would be to hire an entirely new staff.

The county health department administered roughly 800 vaccines to restaurant patrons following the incident, but many did not opt to receive a vaccine. No other cases of Hepatitis A have been reported in connection to Tortilla Marissa’s.

The restaurant received an “inadequate” rating after an inspection in late May, a month before the incident. In two follow-up inspections, the restaurant earned “good” and “excellent” ratings.

The owners say that the closure time will allow them to address the remaining concerns presented by the inspections.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease resulting from infection by the Hepatitis A virus. Symptoms of infection include fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, dark urine and jaundice.

Those who believe they have been exposed to Hepatitis A are encouraged to seek medical attention. Receiving a vaccination within two weeks of exposure could prevent any illness from occurring, and those who have received a vaccination in the past are immune to the virus.

Food Safety News

Colorado Health Officials Warn of Possible Hepatitis A Exposure at Fort Collins Restaurant

The Larimer County Department of Health and Environment in Fort Collins, CO, notified the public on Friday about a possible exposure to the Hepatitis A virus through Tortilla Marissa’s restaurant at 2635 S. College Ave. in Fort Collins.

Health officials said that a food worker employed at Tortilla Marissa’s had tested positive for Hepatitis A, a disease that might be passed to others through food directly handled by the employee before any symptoms appeared. The restaurant is cooperating fully in the investigation and has agreed to voluntarily close until approved by the department to reopen.

The risk of transmission occurred primarily in June 2014, health officials said, but there is a very low risk that transmission might extend back to May of this year. As of Friday, officials said that no secondary cases had been reported by any customers, but the disease has a long incubation period (time from infection to illness) of 14-50 days.

Customers who consumed food or drinks (either dine-in or take-out) from the restaurant in the past 14 days could benefit from getting a Hepatitis A vaccination or Immune Globulin (IG) injection to reduce the risk of illness.

The health department is recommending vaccine or IG shots for people who have eaten any food prepared at Tortilla Marissa’s if they can obtain preventive treatment within 14 days of their exposure. Shots can be obtained from private health care providers or at two special clinics the department will be holding on Sunday and Monday specifically for those potentially exposed  to Hepatitis A through this restaurant.

The department will provide free shots at the Larimer County Health Department, 1525 Blue Spruce Dr., Fort Collins, on Sunday, June 29, from noon to 5 p.m., and on Monday, June 30, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. These clinics are only for customers who have eaten food prepared at Tortilla Marissa’s since June 15 (for the Sunday clinic) or since June 16 (for the Monday clinic.)

Information about signing up for the two clinics will be posted on the Larimer County website by Saturday afternoon, June 28, or by calling (970) 498-6706. Online pre-registration for the clinics is strongly encouraged as it will significant reduce wait times to receive services.

Some pharmacies may be able to provide Hepatitis A vaccine, with a physician’s order, for those customers whose 14-day window will expire on June 27 or 28, if they cannot get into their provider’s office. People who have had at least one vaccination for Hepatitis A or have had the illness in the past are protected from Hepatitis A infection and do NOT need to receive any shots.

People who recently ate at Tortilla Marrisa’s and who are not currently in the Larimer County area are urged to contact their state or local public health department or their health care provider to obtain necessary shots if they can do so within the 14-day window.

Those who ate at the restaurant more than 14 days ago might have been exposed, but a shot would not offer protection from any potential exposure through food from this restaurant.  They should monitor their health and contact their health care provider if hepatitis symptoms develop.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A may include fever, tiredness, loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, gray or white stools, and jaundice (yellowing of the eyes and/or skin). Symptoms are more severe in adults than children. For most people, symptoms usually appear about four weeks after ingesting the virus.

Anyone who develops symptoms should contact their health care provider and NOT prepare food for others. This is especially important for food workers, health care workers, and day care workers.

Hepatitis A virus is shed in the stool and can be spread when an infected person does not properly wash his or her hands after using the bathroom and then touches food or objects that others will put into their mouth. It is NOT spread by kissing, hugging, sneezing, or casual contact.

Thorough hand-washing can prevent the spread of Hepatitis A virus. As a prevention measure, people should always wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water after using the bathroom, after diapering, before preparing food and before eating.

For information about Hepatitis A, contact the Colorado Health Emergency Line for Public Information (CO-HELP) at 1-877-462-2911, or (303) 389-1687. Additional information about Hepatitis A can also be found on the CDC website.

Food Safety News

5,000 Customers Potentially Exposed to Hepatitis A at Missouri Red Robin

The Springfield-Greene County Health Department is vaccinating customers of a Red Robin restaurant in Springfield, MO, who may have been exposed to Hepatitis A between May 8-16.

Health officials are worried that 5,000 people may have been exposed after a restaurant worker was diagnosed with the virus.

In order for the vaccine to work, it must be taken within 14 days of exposure, so the department is working fast to inform the public about its vaccination clinics being held May 22-26.

The restaurant now is considered safe, health department officials said.

Hepatitis A is a viral infection of the liver that can result in sickness ranging from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to severe symptoms lasting several months. Symptoms include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, clay-colored bowel movements, joint pain, and jaundice.

Food Safety News

Potential Hepatitis A Exposure at 2 Colorado Restaurants

Patrons of two Colorado food establishments — Groovy Greens in Niwot and Sweet Pea Restaurant in Steamboat Springs — may have been exposed to hepatitis A, according to the Colorado Department of Public Health.

Smoothies made at both establishments may have contained berries from Townsend Farms Organic Antioxidant Blend, the frozen berry mix at the center of a recall and hepatitis A outbreak that has sickened at least 118 people in eight western states.

To date, no illnesses have been connected to either restaurant. At least 22 people in Colorado have fallen ill in the outbreak.

The “Berry Blast” smoothie at Sweet Pea Restaurant, located at 729 Yampa St. in Steamboat Springs, contained the recalled berries between May 24 and June 8, 2013. Groovy Greens’ delivery service sold smoothies containing recalled berries between April 15 and May 31.

Food Safety News

Final Report: No Source Identified in 2013 NYC Hepatitis A Outbreak

A final report on last summer’s Hepatitis A outbreak at New Hawaii Sea restaurant in the Bronx, NY, reveals that there were a total of nine cases (eight patrons and one employee).

No definite source of the infection was ever found, according to the report from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Health officials stated that they first became aware on Sept. 17, 2013, that a host working at the restaurant had tested positive for Hep A. The department subsequently warned customers who had eaten at New Hawaii Sea or through their catering service between Sept. 7-19, 2013, to get a vaccination.

Inspectors then found “critical violations” at the restaurant on two different visits and instructed the restaurant operator to thoroughly clean and sanitize all equipment and, before reopening, discard any food that had been in contact with bare hands. In addition, the restaurant was temporarily closed until all staff and employees were tested and vaccinated for Hep A.

The department’s report stated that no additional Hep A cases associated with food from the New Hawaii Sea restaurant were reported after Sept. 22, 2013.

“The lack of secondary cases among the food handlers suggests that the outbreak was over by the time it was identified by the health department,” the report states.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A infection include fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite.

Food Safety News

Final Report: No Source Identified in 2013 NYC Hepatitis A Outbreak

A final report on last summer’s Hepatitis A outbreak at New Hawaii Sea restaurant in the Bronx, NY, reveals that there were a total of nine cases (eight patrons and one employee).

No definite source of the infection was ever found, according to the report from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Health officials stated that they first became aware on Sept. 17, 2013, that a host working at the restaurant had tested positive for Hep A. The department subsequently warned customers who had eaten at New Hawaii Sea or through their catering service between Sept. 7-19, 2013, to get a vaccination.

Inspectors then found “critical violations” at the restaurant on two different visits and instructed the restaurant operator to thoroughly clean and sanitize all equipment and, before reopening, discard any food that had been in contact with bare hands. In addition, the restaurant was temporarily closed until all staff and employees were tested and vaccinated for Hep A.

The department’s report stated that no additional Hep A cases associated with food from the New Hawaii Sea restaurant were reported after Sept. 22, 2013.

“The lack of secondary cases among the food handlers suggests that the outbreak was over by the time it was identified by the health department,” the report states.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A infection include fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite.

Food Safety News

Final Report: No Source Identified in 2013 NYC Hepatitis A Outbreak

A final report on last summer’s Hepatitis A outbreak at New Hawaii Sea restaurant in the Bronx, NY, reveals that there were a total of nine cases (eight patrons and one employee).

No definite source of the infection was ever found, according to the report from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Health officials stated that they first became aware on Sept. 17, 2013, that a host working at the restaurant had tested positive for Hep A. The department subsequently warned customers who had eaten at New Hawaii Sea or through their catering service between Sept. 7-19, 2013, to get a vaccination.

Inspectors then found “critical violations” at the restaurant on two different visits and instructed the restaurant operator to thoroughly clean and sanitize all equipment and, before reopening, discard any food that had been in contact with bare hands. In addition, the restaurant was temporarily closed until all staff and employees were tested and vaccinated for Hep A.

The department’s report stated that no additional Hep A cases associated with food from the New Hawaii Sea restaurant were reported after Sept. 22, 2013.

“The lack of secondary cases among the food handlers suggests that the outbreak was over by the time it was identified by the health department,” the report states.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A infection include fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite.

Food Safety News

Final Report: No Source Identified in 2013 NYC Hepatitis A Outbreak

A final report on last summer’s Hepatitis A outbreak at New Hawaii Sea restaurant in the Bronx, NY, reveals that there were a total of nine cases (eight patrons and one employee).

No definite source of the infection was ever found, according to the report from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Health officials stated that they first became aware on Sept. 17, 2013, that a host working at the restaurant had tested positive for Hep A. The department subsequently warned customers who had eaten at New Hawaii Sea or through their catering service between Sept. 7-19, 2013, to get a vaccination.

Inspectors then found “critical violations” at the restaurant on two different visits and instructed the restaurant operator to thoroughly clean and sanitize all equipment and, before reopening, discard any food that had been in contact with bare hands. In addition, the restaurant was temporarily closed until all staff and employees were tested and vaccinated for Hep A.

The department’s report stated that no additional Hep A cases associated with food from the New Hawaii Sea restaurant were reported after Sept. 22, 2013.

“The lack of secondary cases among the food handlers suggests that the outbreak was over by the time it was identified by the health department,” the report states.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A infection include fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite.

Food Safety News

Final Report: No Source Identified in 2013 NYC Hepatitis A Outbreak

A final report on last summer’s Hepatitis A outbreak at New Hawaii Sea restaurant in the Bronx, NY, reveals that there were a total of nine cases (eight patrons and one employee).

No definite source of the infection was ever found, according to the report from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Health officials stated that they first became aware on Sept. 17, 2013, that a host working at the restaurant had tested positive for Hep A. The department subsequently warned customers who had eaten at New Hawaii Sea or through their catering service between Sept. 7-19, 2013, to get a vaccination.

Inspectors then found “critical violations” at the restaurant on two different visits and instructed the restaurant operator to thoroughly clean and sanitize all equipment and, before reopening, discard any food that had been in contact with bare hands. In addition, the restaurant was temporarily closed until all staff and employees were tested and vaccinated for Hep A.

The department’s report stated that no additional Hep A cases associated with food from the New Hawaii Sea restaurant were reported after Sept. 22, 2013.

“The lack of secondary cases among the food handlers suggests that the outbreak was over by the time it was identified by the health department,” the report states.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A infection include fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite.

Food Safety News

Final Report: No Source Identified in 2013 NYC Hepatitis A Outbreak

A final report on last summer’s Hepatitis A outbreak at New Hawaii Sea restaurant in the Bronx, NY, reveals that there were a total of nine cases (eight patrons and one employee).

No definite source of the infection was ever found, according to the report from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Health officials stated that they first became aware on Sept. 17, 2013, that a host working at the restaurant had tested positive for Hep A. The department subsequently warned customers who had eaten at New Hawaii Sea or through their catering service between Sept. 7-19, 2013, to get a vaccination.

Inspectors then found “critical violations” at the restaurant on two different visits and instructed the restaurant operator to thoroughly clean and sanitize all equipment and, before reopening, discard any food that had been in contact with bare hands. In addition, the restaurant was temporarily closed until all staff and employees were tested and vaccinated for Hep A.

The department’s report stated that no additional Hep A cases associated with food from the New Hawaii Sea restaurant were reported after Sept. 22, 2013.

“The lack of secondary cases among the food handlers suggests that the outbreak was over by the time it was identified by the health department,” the report states.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A infection include fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite.

Food Safety News