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Asia Fruit Logistica registers highest ever demand

Asia Fruit Logistica registers highest ever demand

Meeting top-quality buyers, suppliers and service providers in one place is a challenge. But consider the number and value of the business opportunities that present themselves when that challenge is met. Asia Fruit Logistica is the unique fresh fruit and vegetable business hub to achieve this goal in Asia.

Asia’s leading trade show for the fresh fruit and vegetable business, which takes place at AsiaWorld-Expo Center in Hong Kong on 4-6 September 2013, is seeing more demand for stand space than ever before.

Companies from 34 countries and all five continents have already registered to exhibit at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, with exhibitors from Ecuador, Morocco and Cyprus making their debut appearance at the show.

Vietnam will also have a national pavilion at this year’s event for the very first time. Coordinated by the country’s fruit and vegetable association, Vinafruit, the Vietnam pavilion will feature eight exhibitors including exporters and importers from the country.

“We believe that exhibiting at Asia Fruit Logistica is a great opportunity to promote Vietnamese fresh fruit to the world and to all our partners in Asia,” said Vinafruit’s Nauyen Van Ky. “Our exporters are looking forward to securing contracts, and to meeting potential quality partners and clients in Asia and worldwide as well as exchanging experience and know-how.”

With its diverse climate and capacity to produce a wide variety of fruit and vegetables year-round, Vietnam boasts significant export potential. The country has set an ambitious target to increase the value of its overall fruit and vegetable exports to US$ 1.2bn by 2020, from US$ 829m last year.

Dragon fruit, pomelo, mangoes and pineapples as well as sweet potato and other vegetables will be among the key products displayed at the Vietnam pavilion.

Many countries are joining Vietnam with national pavilions at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, including Argentina, Australia, China, Chile, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Greece, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa, Taiwan and the US.

“It’s amazing how big Asia Fruit Logistica has become and how quickly it’s grown,” said Joon Hong Choi of major South Korean importer Sooil Commerce, a regular visitor to the trade show. “Many Korean importers and retailers are visiting to meet with Asian buyers and suppliers as well their suppliers from other parts of the world like Chile and the US. They can meet everybody they need to see at this event.”

With only a few stands still available at Asia Fruit Logistica 2013, book now to secure your access to Asia’s leading buyers. Visitors who register online now (www.asiafruitlogistica.com/tickets) save up to 35 per cent on their admission fee.

For more information:
Sinenart Baramirattanachai
Tel: +66 2 941 4600
[email protected] 
www.asiafruitlogistica.com

Publication date: 6/27/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Study: Highest Pathogen Levels on Raw Pet Foods, Jerky Treats

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network (Vet-LIRN), in collaboration with the Food Emergency Response Network (FERN) and its Microbiology Cooperative Agreement Program (MCAP) laboratories, has conducted a study to evaluate the prevalence of selected microbial organisms in various types of pet foods.

The goal of this blinded study, published in the September issue of Foodborne Pathogens and Disease, was to help the Center for Veterinary Medicine prioritize potential future pet food testing efforts.

The study also increased the FERN laboratories’ screening capabilities for foodborne pathogens in animal feed matrices since such pathogens may also be a significant health risk to consumers who come into contact with pet foods.

Six U.S. Food and Drug Administration FERN MCAP laboratories analyzed approximately 1,056 samples over two years. Laboratories tested for Salmonella, Listeria, E. coli O157:H7, and Shiga toxin-producing strains of E. coli (STEC).

Dry and semi-moist dog and cat foods purchased from local stores were tested during Phase 1 (October 2010 to September 2011). Canned and wet pet foods were not collected as part of this project. Raw dog and cat foods, exotic animal feed, and jerky-type treats purchased through the Internet were tested in Phase 2 (October 2011 to July 2012).

Raw foods were usually frozen and consisted of ground meat or sausage-type tubes of products made from animals such as rabbits and cows. It is unknown how long frozen samples had been frozen prior to shipping.

Dry foods excluded cat and dog foods, but included hamster, gerbil, rabbit, amphibian, or bird food and pellets. Jerky-type
treats included chicken jerky products, pig ears, and bully stick types of products. All samples were tested within four months of receipt. Overall, 576 samples were analyzed in Phase 2.

The study was not a regulatory surveillance program, and the manufacture information was blinded, researchers noted.

Of the 480 dry and semi-moist samples, only two tested positive: one for Salmonella and one for Listeria greyii. However, of the 576 samples analyzed during Phase 2, 66 samples were positive for Listeria (32 of those were Listeria monocytogenes) and 15 samples tested positive for Salmonella. These pathogens were isolated from raw foods and jerky-type treats, not the exotic animal dry feeds.

Authors noted that this was the first report of Listeria monocytogenes contamination of commercial pet foods.

The study showed that raw pet foods may harbor food safety pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella. Consumers should handle these products carefully, being mindful of the potential risks to human and animal health.

FDA has been investigating pet jerky treats since 2007 due to thousands of reported pet illnesses and deaths that may be related to their consumption. According to the agency, these reports involve more than 5,600 dogs, 24 cats, three humans and more than 1,000 canine deaths.

While FDA has tested the pet jerky treats for many contaminants and continues to investigate the problem, it has not been able to pinpoint the cause of the illnesses.

Food Safety News

Liberty Fruit attains highest food-safety rating

Liberty Fruit Co. Inc. has earned the highest-possible food-safety rating, according to Scott Danner, the firm’s chief operating officer.

“We have passed the SQF 2000 Level 3 certification,” Danner told The Produce News April 21. “This is the highest food-safety certification one can achieve.”

Beyond offering Liberty Fruit customers the highest-possible confidence level in its food-safety management, Danner noted that another benefit is internal efficiency.DeshpandeDannerAna Deshpande, quality assurance manager of Liberty Fruit Co. Inc., in Kansas City, KS, with Scott Danner, the firm’s chief operating officer. Under Deshpande’s leadership, Liberty recently achieved the SQF 2000 Level 3 food safety certification.

In prior years, various customers requested specific audits, which could number 15 or 20 a year. Liberty’s quality assurance managers needed to dedicate roughly a month’s worth of work each year to accommodate those specific audits. The new Level 3 certification in recent weeks has already cut out two customers’ needs for special audits, and Danner hopes that number continues to decline.

The Level 3 certification meets the requirements of the Global Food Safety Initiative, which is demanded by the nation’s largest retailers.

Danner said meeting the highest standards involves intensive training for all employees. He said all employees must pass individual tests for the correct food-safety protocols. Such questions may be as basic as, “What do you do if milk spills in the lunch room.” If someone in the organization doesn’t have the right answer, “We fail the audit,” said Danner.

Danner noted, “The hardest part of the process is to communicate with the rank-and-file. Without our loyal employees, we could not have done this. But they wanted to get involved.”

Danner particularly saluted the work of Ana Deshpande, who became quality-assurance manager at the Kansas City, KS-based produce distributor in November, following a national search. Danner described her as “beyond smart. And, she is very passionate for food safety.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Liberty Fruit attains highest food-safety rating

Liberty Fruit Co. Inc. has earned the highest-possible food-safety rating, according to Scott Danner, the firm’s chief operating officer.

“We have passed the SQF 2000 Level 3 certification,” Danner told The Produce News April 21. “This is the highest food-safety certification one can achieve.”

Beyond offering Liberty Fruit customers the highest-possible confidence level in its food-safety management, Danner noted that another benefit is internal efficiency.DeshpandeDannerAna Deshpande, quality assurance manager of Liberty Fruit Co. Inc., in Kansas City, KS, with Scott Danner, the firm’s chief operating officer. Under Deshpande’s leadership, Liberty recently achieved the SQF 2000 Level 3 food safety certification.

In prior years, various customers requested specific audits, which could number 15 or 20 a year. Liberty’s quality assurance managers needed to dedicate roughly a month’s worth of work each year to accommodate those specific audits. The new Level 3 certification in recent weeks has already cut out two customers’ needs for special audits, and Danner hopes that number continues to decline.

The Level 3 certification meets the requirements of the Global Food Safety Initiative, which is demanded by the nation’s largest retailers.

Danner said meeting the highest standards involves intensive training for all employees. He said all employees must pass individual tests for the correct food-safety protocols. Such questions may be as basic as, “What do you do if milk spills in the lunch room.” If someone in the organization doesn’t have the right answer, “We fail the audit,” said Danner.

Danner noted, “The hardest part of the process is to communicate with the rank-and-file. Without our loyal employees, we could not have done this. But they wanted to get involved.”

Danner particularly saluted the work of Ana Deshpande, who became quality-assurance manager at the Kansas City, KS-based produce distributor in November, following a national search. Danner described her as “beyond smart. And, she is very passionate for food safety.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

IRI: Tide Pods top highest revenue nonfood launches

Tide Pods leads the list with $ 324.6 million in first-year, multioutlet dollar sales.

For the first time, three home-care products — Tide Pods, Ajax Triple Action and Downy Infusions — made it onto IRI’s Top 10 list of the most successful nonfood product launches.

Tide Pods was No. 1 with $ 324.6 million in first-year, multioutlet dollar sales, according to IRI’s 2013 “New Product Pacesetters” list.

Average year-one dollar sales for the top 100 nonfood brands were $ 34 million.

Earning $ 2 billion in aggregate year-one launch sales, 48 out of the top 100, non-food Pacesetters deliver some type of wellness offering.

“Interest in health and wellness is everywhere, from food and beverages to beauty care and home care,” Susan Viamari, IRI’s Thought Leadership editor, told SN.

2013 New Product Pacesetters: Top 10 Non-Food Brands (Total Year-One Dollar Sales, Multi-Outlet)

1. Tide Pods $ 324.6 million

2. L’Oréal Advanced Haircare $ 141.8 million

3. ZzzQuil $ 121.1 million

4. Vidal Sassoon Pro Series $ 96.0 million 


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Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


5. Clear Scalp & Hair Therapy $ 92.7 million 

6. Downy Infusions $ 90.2 million 

7. Ajax Triple Action $ 84.2 million 

8. Always/Tampax Radiant $ 83.0 million 

9. Secret Outlast $ 82.4 million 

10. Puffs Basic $ 74.5 million 

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Supermarket News

Spain: Almeria obtains highest fruit and vegetable prices in 2013

Spain: Almeria obtains highest fruit and vegetable prices in 2013

The Foreign Trade Institute (ICEX) has provided data regarding Spain’s fruit and vegetable exports in 2013. The first place in the ranking was for Almeria, with a total of 1,817.42 million kilos; 38.33% of the total shipped by Spain (4,741.10 million kilos). The second largest exporter was Murcia, with 1,123.33 million kilos; 23.69% of Spain’s total, and the third was Valencia, with 421.12 million kilos; 8.88% of the total.

If we add up the total volumes of fresh fruit and vegetables exported, Valencia takes the lead, with 2,833.65 million kilos; 23.75% of the total, followed by Murcia with 2,215.69 million kilos (18.70%) and Almeria, with 2,204 million kilos (18.47%).

The total value of all exports amounted to 10,769.85 million Euro, which entails an average price for all fresh horticultural products of 0.90 Euro/kilo.

Fruit and vegetables

In this case, Almeria was the province obtaining the best prices for its fruits and vegetables, with an average of 0.92 Euro/kilo and a total of 2,028.36 million Euro in revenue, followed by Murcia, with 0.89 Euro/kilo (2,104.08 million Euro) and Valencia, which reached an average of 0.80 Euro/kilo (2,279.66 million Euro).

Vegetables

As for vegetables alone, Spain reached a total of 4,409.81 million Euro in revenue, with an average of 0.93 Euro/kilo. Almeria obtained the highest income and the best prices for its fresh vegetables, totalling 1,779.02 million Euro; an average of 0.98 Euro/kilo.

In second place we find Murcia, which obtained a total of 1,024.21 million Euro; an average of 0.91 Euro/kilo. Lastly, Valencia made 359.33 million Euro, selling its vegetables at an average of 0.85 Euro/kilo.


Source: Almeria360.com

Publication date: 3/7/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Study Finds Kosher Chicken Has Highest Rate of Antibiotic-Resistant E. Coli

Raw chicken marketed as kosher may harbor up to twice as much antibiotic-resistant E. coli as poultry raised conventionally, according to a new study funded by Northern Arizona University.

The study’s results may fly in the face of the generally accepted notion that kosher meat is safer than meat raised to other standards. According to a survey cited by The New York Times in 2010, 62 percent of those who buy kosher foods do so for quality reasons, compared to 15 percent who buy kosher for religious reasons.

Between April and June 2012, NAU researchers purchased 213 samples of raw chicken from 15 retail locations in New York City among four categories: conventional, organic, raised without antibiotics (RWA) and kosher. After screening each sample for E. coli and then testing that E. coli’s resistance to 12 common antibiotics, the team was a little surprised by what they found, said Jack Millman, the study’s lead author.

First, it’s important to note that the majority of E. coli strains, including those found on raw chicken, are not harmful to humans. Millman said the study screened for all strains of E. coli, and he was not certain what percentage was Shiga toxin-producing strains – the variety harmful to human health. While some harmful E. coli has been associated with chicken in previous studies and outbreaks, chicken is far more commonly associated with pathogens such as Salmonella and Campylobacter.

The study found that resistance rates were lowest among RWA chicken meat, while conventional and organic had virtually the same frequency. Kosher chicken, on the other hand, had nearly twice as much resistant E. coli as conventional and organic.

More than half of all the E. coli strains collected exhibited resistance to at least one antibiotic. Antibiotic resistance of E. coli on conventional chicken was at 55 percent, RWA at 58 percent, organic at 60 percent, and kosher at 76 percent.

Across the board, resistant strains taken from kosher chicken were also resistant to a significantly larger variety of antibiotics in comparison to the other three categories.

The study results call to question the husbandry practices of kosher chicken production, Millman said. Because kosher certifications are privately regulated according to religious doctrine, he said it was impossible to know how kosher products may end up harboring more resistant E. coli than the other categories. However, the data suggest that antibiotic use may be even more prevalent in kosher chicken meat production than conventional, Millman said.

Generally, the major requirements for kosher meat are that it come from animals with split hooves who chew their cud. Also, the meat must not be mixed with dairy products, must be processed with equipment exclusively used for kosher food, and must be slaughtered “humanely.” For obvious reasons, traditional doctrine does not mention antibiotics.

For chicken to receive USDA certification as RWA, it must never have been exposed to antibiotics in its life, from conception to slaughter. Chicken meat may be certified organic if it has not been exposed to antibiotics after the first 24 hours of its life, meaning it could be given antibiotics via an injection into the egg or within the first day after hatching.

The authors note that several past studies have found statistically lower levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in organic and RWA chicken meat compared to conventionally raised meat, while others – including this one – found little difference.

Many of the brands sampled in the study were sold in grocery chains nationally, Millman said.

Millman added that he felt the study could help make an argument for more openness about the use of antibiotics in agriculture.

“There’s just such a large lack of access to information,” he said. “Are consumers really getting what they think they’re getting?”

Food Safety News

“Highest average prices ever for New Zealand apples”

Tony Fissette, Enzafruit: “Unique and great season”
“Highest average prices ever for New Zealand apples”

The last New Zealand apples will be available at the end of August. Tony Fissette of Enzafruit tells us how satisfied they are with the season. “It was very unique and we had the highest average prices over for all sizes and varieties. Last year we already had reasonably high prices, but this year broke all records! The average price for the whole season is slightly over 29 Euro for 18 kilos. And that’s for all sizes and varieties, so it’s absolutely unique. In a normal season we’re happy with prices of 23/24 Euro and we’d call it a good season. Prices under 20 is a bad season. Now the price is around 30, in short: a unique and great season with unbelievable prices! The only downside is the rate of the New Zealand dollar, which is still far too high compared to the Euro.”


Prospects are good
“The largest cause of the high prices is the fact that there were a lot less European apples on the market,” Fissette explains. “Last August we had established that there would be less apples. There was a 25% decrease estimated, especially for the big producers. That’s when you know you’re pretty much set, but you still have to wait and see.” According to the manager it looks good for next season too. “The European harvest has been estimated to be slightly bigger, but we still expect good prices. Over the last few weeks there has been heavy hail in Germany, Italy and France, so this could influence the total figures. The European harvest is expected by mid September and then there will be an empty market. This means that the high prices will be around for a while.”


He indicates that the New Zealand growers are also satisfied. “They are going to make their highest prices in years, the only problem is the rate. These prices should have meant that they got their weight gold in New Zealand but it’s not happening. The dollar is too high. Or the Euro is too low, it depends on how you look at it. That’s a shame, because they could have made up for the damage done in previous years. Now they’re happy with a good season, but they’re still missing out due to the exchange rate.”


Customer stop
Tony would rather have had the New Zealand Jazz season to connect to the French and Italian season. “But the demand was bigger than the supply, so we couldn’t do it. Of course, it’s great that there’s so much interest, but it’s very frustrating that you can’t meet the demand as a company. We can supply our current customers but have to disappoint new ones. When building up Royal Gala and Braeburn in Europe we could see no problem, but we have had to do a customer stop on the Jazz apple for two years. We won’t let down our current customers, but others can also see that we have a fantastic product. We can’t have a new retailer for the next 3 or 4 years. We expect and extension in production in Europe within the next three years and within five years in New Zealand. It takes longer there because it’s hard to convince growers. The cost price for cultivation is high. That’s why Europe is growing faster. They don’t have the exchange rate problem.”


American market
The American market has also been very good this year. “Our new variety Envy made a record price of 60 dollars per colli in America. Enzafruit had a great season there. The price ratios were as follows: first there was Envy with 60 dollars, then Jazz with 50, then Pink Lady with 40 dollars, and finally Braeburn with 35. So you’re not going to send a variety like Envy to Europe. Of course we can’t say that we just supply the markets on which we get better prices. As Enzafruit we decided that we will continue to supply our regular customers every year and split our turnover. This is very important to us and our customers.”

Potential for Jazz and Envy
It’s obvious that there is potential for the Jazz apples to grow. “Customers all think it’s a great apple and want to buy more every year. We want to grow faster, but we can’t at the moment. We have high hopes for Envy too. There’s not enough volume for Europe yet and we’re getting good prices in America and Asia. But they will be available in Europe in a few years. Envy has also been planted in Italy, and we expect them to be on the market there within two years. This variety is slightly darker in colour and a little sweeter than the Jazz apple. The reactions that we’re getting already are very enthusiastic. There’s not really anything negative to report about our products or the season. We’re going to enjoy it for now,” concludes the manager, laughing.


For more information:
Enzafruit New Zealand
Tongersesteenweg 135
3800 Sint-Truiden
Belgium
Tel: +32 11 68.99.41
Fax: +32 11 68.81.09
[email protected]
www.enzafruit.be

Publication date: 8/15/2013


FreshPlaza.com

Highest winter losses in recent years for honey bees in Scotland

Aug. 13, 2013 — Soaring numbers of honey bees died last winter, University of Strathclyde research has revealed.

A survey, run by Strathclyde academics on behalf of the Scottish Beekeepers’ Association, indicated 31.3 per cent of managed honey bee colonies in Scotland failed to survive last winter — almost double the previous year’s loss rate of 15.9 per cent.

Dr Alison Gray and Magnus Peterson, of Strathclyde’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics, warn the figures ought to be of major concern because bees play a pivotal role in crop pollination, agricultural yields and, therefore, food supply and prices.

Last winter’s figures represent 156 colonies lost during the winter of 2012-13, out of a total of 498 colonies being managed by beekeepers taking part in the survey. Furthermore, 67 of the 117 beekeepers who provided useable data reported losing at least some of their colonies between 1 October 2012 and 1 April 2013.

Dr Gray said: “This is an extremely high loss rate.

“In fact, the loss rate last winter is the highest we have found since these surveys began in 2006 — and is similar to that over the winter of 2009-10, when we estimate that 30.9 per cent of colonies were lost.

“Results from European colleagues conducting similar surveys show that the loss rate in Scotland is amongst the highest in Europe this year, while similarly high losses have been reported recently from England and Wales.”

The results were based on responses to online and postal questionnaires from a random sample of 300 members of the Scottish Beekeepers’ Association, which is thought to represent most of the country’s estimated 1,300 beekeepers.

Since the spring of 2008, Mr Peterson has also been collecting data twice a year, from a network of volunteers across Scotland, on wild honey bees — those not managed by beekeepers and which instead live in habitats such as hollow trees and the roofs of old buildings. Last winter, 11 out of 20 wild honey bee colonies known to be alive last September — and reported on this spring — are known to have died.

Mr Peterson said: “The latest results indicate a low survival rate, of just 45 per cent, amongst feral colonies over this last winter. This is the worst winter survival rate amongst the feral colonies known to the volunteers since they started monitoring them five years ago.”

Dr Gray told how bees face many challenges internationally. She said: “Honey bees worldwide are having to contend with habitat loss and reduction in variety of forage sources due to pressures of intensifying land use, increasing spread of new and old pests — caused by globalisation of trade in bees and bee products — as well as possible adverse effects of agricultural pesticides.

“For bees in northern Europe, poor weather conditions — combined with these various other factors which impact adversely on bees — are certainly making beekeeping a challenge and survival difficult for honey bees generally.

“The difficult weather conditions are a particular problem in Scotland, with severe winters followed by long cold wet springs being a problem, especially if it comes after a poor wet summer as in this last year.”

In April, Rural Affairs Secretary Richard Lochhead announced the Scottish Government was making £200,000 available to help commercial bee farmers to restock and rebuild their colonies, which were devastated by prolonged winter weather conditions.

ScienceDaily: Agriculture and Food News