Blog Archives

AALPUM to hold second grape symposium

The Asociación Agricola Local de Productores de Uva de Mesa, known commonly by the acronym AALPUM, announced that it will hold its second International Table Grape Symposium Feb. 5-6 in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

The organization said it hopes to improve on the quality and impact of the first event, which was held in January 2013. The event will cover a variety of topics suggested by producers, researchers and technical advisers, including best practices for producing early crops. In all, 18 presentations are planned for the two-day event.

Sonora is the largest production area for table grapes in Mexico, and product is primarily intended for the export market. As such, farmers there have a particular focus on quality and sustainability.

For more information or to register for the symposium, log on to www.simposium.aalpum.org.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

L.A. port truckers strike; dock worker talks on hold

Some drivers for three of the largest drayage companies serving the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began “an indefinite strike” on Monday, July 7, as dock worker officials took a three-day hiatus in their negotiations with West Coast port officials on a new labor contract.

The effect of the trucker strike on the movement of cargo around the port complex of the adjacent Long Beach and Los Angeles ports was initially minimal, but the threat grew larger Wednesday morning after the drivers set up picket lines outside two of the main port terminals.

Initially, dock workers honored those picket lines; however, almost immediately an arbitrator ruled that members of the International Long Shore Workers Union must return to work because of that group’s earlier agreement with the ports. The ILWU and port officials have been in labor negotiations continuously since before their latest contract expired on July 1. On July 7, the two sides agreed to a 72-hour hiatus as ILWU officials tended to an unrelated matter in the Pacific Northwest.

There has been a news blackout on those negotiations, which are scheduled to resume on July 11. If the ILWU members go on strike major disruptions could occur at all 13 West Coast ports. If they honor the truck driver strike in the two Los Angeles area ports, movement of cargo from those two ports could be severely hampered.

The truckers are striking because they believe they have been unfairly labeled independent contractors, which has prevented them from unionizing as employees of the three largest area drayage companies. The truckers argue that their pay is often below minimum wage. They have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

On Monday about 120 of the 400 registered truckers were estimated to be on strike.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

L.A. port truckers strike; dock worker talks on hold

Some drivers for three of the largest drayage companies serving the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began “an indefinite strike” on Monday, July 7, as dock worker officials took a three-day hiatus in their negotiations with West Coast port officials on a new labor contract.

The effect of the trucker strike on the movement of cargo around the port complex of the adjacent Long Beach and Los Angeles ports was initially minimal, but the threat grew larger Wednesday morning after the drivers set up picket lines outside two of the main port terminals.

Initially, dock workers honored those picket lines; however, almost immediately an arbitrator ruled that members of the International Long Shore Workers Union must return to work because of that group’s earlier agreement with the ports. The ILWU and port officials have been in labor negotiations continuously since before their latest contract expired on July 1. On July 7, the two sides agreed to a 72-hour hiatus as ILWU officials tended to an unrelated matter in the Pacific Northwest.

There has been a news blackout on those negotiations, which are scheduled to resume on July 11. If the ILWU members go on strike major disruptions could occur at all 13 West Coast ports. If they honor the truck driver strike in the two Los Angeles area ports, movement of cargo from those two ports could be severely hampered.

The truckers are striking because they believe they have been unfairly labeled independent contractors, which has prevented them from unionizing as employees of the three largest area drayage companies. The truckers argue that their pay is often below minimum wage. They have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

On Monday about 120 of the 400 registered truckers were estimated to be on strike.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

L.A. port truckers strike; dock worker talks on hold

Some drivers for three of the largest drayage companies serving the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began “an indefinite strike” on Monday, July 7, as dock worker officials took a three-day hiatus in their negotiations with West Coast port officials on a new labor contract.

The effect of the trucker strike on the movement of cargo around the port complex of the adjacent Long Beach and Los Angeles ports was initially minimal, but the threat grew larger Wednesday morning after the drivers set up picket lines outside two of the main port terminals.

Initially, dock workers honored those picket lines; however, almost immediately an arbitrator ruled that members of the International Long Shore Workers Union must return to work because of that group’s earlier agreement with the ports. The ILWU and port officials have been in labor negotiations continuously since before their latest contract expired on July 1. On July 7, the two sides agreed to a 72-hour hiatus as ILWU officials tended to an unrelated matter in the Pacific Northwest.

There has been a news blackout on those negotiations, which are scheduled to resume on July 11. If the ILWU members go on strike major disruptions could occur at all 13 West Coast ports. If they honor the truck driver strike in the two Los Angeles area ports, movement of cargo from those two ports could be severely hampered.

The truckers are striking because they believe they have been unfairly labeled independent contractors, which has prevented them from unionizing as employees of the three largest area drayage companies. The truckers argue that their pay is often below minimum wage. They have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

On Monday about 120 of the 400 registered truckers were estimated to be on strike.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

L.A. port truckers strike; dock worker talks on hold

Some drivers for three of the largest drayage companies serving the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began “an indefinite strike” on Monday, July 7, as dock worker officials took a three-day hiatus in their negotiations with West Coast port officials on a new labor contract.

The effect of the trucker strike on the movement of cargo around the port complex of the adjacent Long Beach and Los Angeles ports was initially minimal, but the threat grew larger Wednesday morning after the drivers set up picket lines outside two of the main port terminals.

Initially, dock workers honored those picket lines; however, almost immediately an arbitrator ruled that members of the International Long Shore Workers Union must return to work because of that group’s earlier agreement with the ports. The ILWU and port officials have been in labor negotiations continuously since before their latest contract expired on July 1. On July 7, the two sides agreed to a 72-hour hiatus as ILWU officials tended to an unrelated matter in the Pacific Northwest.

There has been a news blackout on those negotiations, which are scheduled to resume on July 11. If the ILWU members go on strike major disruptions could occur at all 13 West Coast ports. If they honor the truck driver strike in the two Los Angeles area ports, movement of cargo from those two ports could be severely hampered.

The truckers are striking because they believe they have been unfairly labeled independent contractors, which has prevented them from unionizing as employees of the three largest area drayage companies. The truckers argue that their pay is often below minimum wage. They have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

On Monday about 120 of the 400 registered truckers were estimated to be on strike.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

L.A. port truckers strike; dock worker talks on hold

Some drivers for three of the largest drayage companies serving the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began “an indefinite strike” on Monday, July 7, as dock worker officials took a three-day hiatus in their negotiations with West Coast port officials on a new labor contract.

The effect of the trucker strike on the movement of cargo around the port complex of the adjacent Long Beach and Los Angeles ports was initially minimal, but the threat grew larger Wednesday morning after the drivers set up picket lines outside two of the main port terminals.

Initially, dock workers honored those picket lines; however, almost immediately an arbitrator ruled that members of the International Long Shore Workers Union must return to work because of that group’s earlier agreement with the ports. The ILWU and port officials have been in labor negotiations continuously since before their latest contract expired on July 1. On July 7, the two sides agreed to a 72-hour hiatus as ILWU officials tended to an unrelated matter in the Pacific Northwest.

There has been a news blackout on those negotiations, which are scheduled to resume on July 11. If the ILWU members go on strike major disruptions could occur at all 13 West Coast ports. If they honor the truck driver strike in the two Los Angeles area ports, movement of cargo from those two ports could be severely hampered.

The truckers are striking because they believe they have been unfairly labeled independent contractors, which has prevented them from unionizing as employees of the three largest area drayage companies. The truckers argue that their pay is often below minimum wage. They have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

On Monday about 120 of the 400 registered truckers were estimated to be on strike.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

L.A. port truckers strike; dock worker talks on hold

Some drivers for three of the largest drayage companies serving the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began “an indefinite strike” on Monday, July 7, as dock worker officials took a three-day hiatus in their negotiations with West Coast port officials on a new labor contract.

The effect of the trucker strike on the movement of cargo around the port complex of the adjacent Long Beach and Los Angeles ports was initially minimal, but the threat grew larger Wednesday morning after the drivers set up picket lines outside two of the main port terminals.

Initially, dock workers honored those picket lines; however, almost immediately an arbitrator ruled that members of the International Long Shore Workers Union must return to work because of that group’s earlier agreement with the ports. The ILWU and port officials have been in labor negotiations continuously since before their latest contract expired on July 1. On July 7, the two sides agreed to a 72-hour hiatus as ILWU officials tended to an unrelated matter in the Pacific Northwest.

There has been a news blackout on those negotiations, which are scheduled to resume on July 11. If the ILWU members go on strike major disruptions could occur at all 13 West Coast ports. If they honor the truck driver strike in the two Los Angeles area ports, movement of cargo from those two ports could be severely hampered.

The truckers are striking because they believe they have been unfairly labeled independent contractors, which has prevented them from unionizing as employees of the three largest area drayage companies. The truckers argue that their pay is often below minimum wage. They have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

On Monday about 120 of the 400 registered truckers were estimated to be on strike.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

CA: Prices hold for Ontario apples

While the size of this season’s Ontario apple crop has meant prices have been lower than they were last season, pricing has held steady, and the market has been stronger than it was in 2011.

“The market has been fairly good,” said Tom O’Neill, general manager of Norfolk Fruit Growers and co-chair of the Apple Marketers’ Association of Ontario. “It’s been receptive after a year with very little product.” Volume of fruit for the previous season was significantly diminished due to inclement weather. So, while prices were high because of a lack of fruit, growers had little fruit to sell. With a return to more normal production this season, prices have been lower than they were last season, but not especially so.

“Pricing this season is sitting above 2011 levels,” said O’Neill. “So the crop will market well.”

for more information:

Tom O’Neill

Norfolk Fruit Growers

+1 519 426 0640

FreshPlaza.com

Florida citrus forecast put on hold indefinitely

Florida citrus forecast put on hold indefinitely

The USDA’s widely anticipated initial citrus forecast, originally scheduled for release Friday, has been delayed until President Barack Obama and congressional leaders resolve their federal budget impasse, which has shut down dozens of government agencies since Oct. 1.

The USDA usually releases its first citrus forecast in the middle of October, and it influences the negotiations between Florida growers and juice processors on farm prices for their fruit. Processors buy 95 percent of Florida’s orange crop and more than 60 percent of the state’s grapefruit harvest each season.

Growers are already seeing high drop on their greening-infected trees, said McKenna and Jay Clark, a Wauchula-based grower and Citrus Commission member, but it remains unclear whether drop levels will repeat the 2012-13 rates. “The big thing is the drop and how much of it is built in” to the USDA estimate, Clark said.

USDA officials in September said their forecast model is based on drop rates over the past five to 10 seasons, not including 2004-04 and 2005-06 impacted by hurricane-related drop. Changing the model’s drop rates based on a single season’s experience would be statistically unsound, they added.

Not all the information needed for the forecast was entered into USDA computers before Oct. 1, said Candi Erick, state administrator at the USDA’s Florida Field Office in Maitland, which also shut down. Staff would need “about a week” after the federal government re-opens to finish that job and issue the first forecast, she said.

Source: theledger.com

Publication date: 10/8/2013


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