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France to strengthen controls on Spanish horticultural exports

France to strengthen controls on Spanish horticultural exports

After the French Minister of Agriculture, Stéphane Le Foll, announced he would “intervene” after meeting with representatives of the major agricultural unions and fruit and vegetable organisations, a statement from his department has pointed out that “controls will be strengthened” on both trucks and markets, in particular to make sure they carry order forms with the agreed price. So far the Minister has announced that in the last two weeks 150 trucks have been controlled and 10 violations have been detected which “shall be punished.” 

This strengthening in the controls of imported fruits and vegetables arrives in response to protests from producers about the arrival of goods at lower prices, particularly from Spain. 

Le Foll, who met at the ministry with the main agricultural unions and fruit and vegetable organisations, stated that the price gap “is not justified” and affirmed that he will intervene.

Le Foll reminded that on 21 July the authorities launched a campaign on French television to promote the consumption of local fruits and vegetables. He also brought attention to a “common action between Spain, Italy, Greece and France asking the European Commission to consider measures for the withdrawal of a production that now comes to disturb the overall balance of the market.” 

The main French sectorial organisations (FNSEA, JA, FNPF) have complained that they have to deal with “unusually high import volumes of fruits and vegetables at prices that harm the French market” and lead to unfair competition. 

According to his argument, “French products are subject to much stricter social and environmental rules than those of its neighbours.”

Source: Hortoinfo

Publication date: 8/15/2014


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The future of the horticultural sector; focus of PMA Fresh Connections Netherlands

Photo report of conference and a lecture from Cindy van Rijswick (Rabobank)
The future of the horticultural sector; focus of PMA Fresh Connections Netherlands

In partnership with Frugi Venta, the Produce Marketing Association (PMA) set foot on European soil for the first time this year to organise a conference in Rotterdam under the title PMA’s Fresh Connections. Around a hundred interested professionals from the fresh produce sector attended yesterday the event at the Hilton Hotel, with keynote speakers such as Jose Antonio Gomez (Camposol), Boet Mouton (Mouton Citrus), Andrew Reynolds (Total Produce), Elliott Grant (Harvest Mark), Gé Happe (Ahold), Oleen Smethurst (Costco) and Cindy Van Rijswick (Rabobank). Today, the company will arrange a tour including visits to Red Star, Koppert Cress and Wageningen University.

Van Rijswick, Fresh Produce Analyst at Rabobank, kicked off the event with an introduction to Europe’s place in the global trade of fruit and vegetables. She highlighted innovation as the main engine for economic growth in Europe, pointing out that, particularly in emerging countries, the gap in terms of innovation seems to be narrowing. She pointed out that further innovation is needed to reactivate the consumption of fruits and vegetables with stagnant sales; however, the analyst also said to be optimistic about the long term future for the sector, partly due to the growth of convenience products, the focus on the health benefits of fruits and vegetables and the greater weight given by professional chefs to vegetables on their menus.

Click here for the photo report

Van Rijswick stated that consumers are difficult to classify into groups. “One and the same person may be a one-time buyer of cheap products at Lidl, but also of an expensive salad another time. Lidl, for example, is doing well in the sale of fruits and vegetables at low prices, but there is also a strong growth in products with higher added value, such as fruit salads. Over the past five years, the fresh-cut market has experienced an annual growth of around 10% (4% in Germany and 7% in the UK, despite the economic crisis. Processed vegetables have also grown by 4% in volume (2.7% in UK and 11% in Germany).”

This growth, according to Cindy, is taking place especially in online, discount and convenience. “Online food trade will double in the coming years and this will have an impact on fruit and vegetable traders.” She also talked about the returns of greenhouse vegetable growers; currently well under pressure, and about the changes in trade flows, which complicate the sourcing. “The fruit and vegetable exporting countries growing the most are mostly outside Western Europe, although in absolute terms, Europe is still a great place for trade. The largest exporter of fresh fruits and vegetables is still Spain, followed by Mexico, Chile, China, Turkey and the Netherlands. In terms of import volumes, Germany tops the list, followed by Russia, Japan, France, Canada, Hong Kong and the United States.”

In conclusion, Western Europe is not the market growing the most, but it remains a large and attractive market. Growth in Europe is only possible through innovation in logistics and efficiency in the value chain and in retail and consumer solutions. Outside Europe, the main growth opportunities for Western European fruit producers lie in the local production and marketing of knowledge-intensive products and in the development of export platforms in producing countries for the worldwide delivery of specific European products.

Later this week there will be reports of other conferences.

Click here for the photo report

Publication date: 4/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

The future of the horticultural sector; focus of PMA Fresh Connections Netherlands

Photo report of conference and a lecture from Cindy van Rijswick (Rabobank)
The future of the horticultural sector; focus of PMA Fresh Connections Netherlands

In partnership with Frugi Venta, the Produce Marketing Association (PMA) set foot on European soil for the first time this year to organise a conference in Rotterdam under the title PMA’s Fresh Connections. Around a hundred interested professionals from the fresh produce sector attended yesterday the event at the Hilton Hotel, with keynote speakers such as Jose Antonio Gomez (Camposol), Boet Mouton (Mouton Citrus), Andrew Reynolds (Total Produce), Elliott Grant (Harvest Mark), Gé Happe (Ahold), Oleen Smethurst (Costco) and Cindy Van Rijswick (Rabobank). Today, the company will arrange a tour including visits to Red Star, Koppert Cress and Wageningen University.

Van Rijswick, Fresh Produce Analyst at Rabobank, kicked off the event with an introduction to Europe’s place in the global trade of fruit and vegetables. She highlighted innovation as the main engine for economic growth in Europe, pointing out that, particularly in emerging countries, the gap in terms of innovation seems to be narrowing. She pointed out that further innovation is needed to reactivate the consumption of fruits and vegetables with stagnant sales; however, the analyst also said to be optimistic about the long term future for the sector, partly due to the growth of convenience products, the focus on the health benefits of fruits and vegetables and the greater weight given by professional chefs to vegetables on their menus.

Click here for the photo report

Van Rijswick stated that consumers are difficult to classify into groups. “One and the same person may be a one-time buyer of cheap products at Lidl, but also of an expensive salad another time. Lidl, for example, is doing well in the sale of fruits and vegetables at low prices, but there is also a strong growth in products with higher added value, such as fruit salads. Over the past five years, the fresh-cut market has experienced an annual growth of around 10% (4% in Germany and 7% in the UK, despite the economic crisis. Processed vegetables have also grown by 4% in volume (2.7% in UK and 11% in Germany).”

This growth, according to Cindy, is taking place especially in online, discount and convenience. “Online food trade will double in the coming years and this will have an impact on fruit and vegetable traders.” She also talked about the returns of greenhouse vegetable growers; currently well under pressure, and about the changes in trade flows, which complicate the sourcing. “The fruit and vegetable exporting countries growing the most are mostly outside Western Europe, although in absolute terms, Europe is still a great place for trade. The largest exporter of fresh fruits and vegetables is still Spain, followed by Mexico, Chile, China, Turkey and the Netherlands. In terms of import volumes, Germany tops the list, followed by Russia, Japan, France, Canada, Hong Kong and the United States.”

In conclusion, Western Europe is not the market growing the most, but it remains a large and attractive market. Growth in Europe is only possible through innovation in logistics and efficiency in the value chain and in retail and consumer solutions. Outside Europe, the main growth opportunities for Western European fruit producers lie in the local production and marketing of knowledge-intensive products and in the development of export platforms in producing countries for the worldwide delivery of specific European products.

Later this week there will be reports of other conferences.

Click here for the photo report

Publication date: 4/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

The Netherlands, Spain and China, largest horticultural importers

TGF-FruitImageThe Netherlands, Spain and China, largest horticultural importersIn the period between 2009 and 2012, the Netherlands became the largest worldwide exporter and re-exporter of fruit and vegetables (including citrus), according to data provided by the Statistics Division of the United Nations.

Taking 2012′s exports and re-exports into account, the Netherlands handled 14.6% of the world’s total, followed by Spain, with 12.1%, and China, with 10.9%.

The fourth place in the ranking was for Mexico (9.7%), followed by the United States (8.3%), Canada (5%), France (4.4%), Belgium (3.7%), Italy (2.8%) and Germany, with 1.9%. The remaining 26.5% is distributed between other countries.


Clients

If we take a close look at these exporters’ main clients, the Netherlands covers 34.9% of Germany’s imports, 15.7% of the United Kingdom’s, 7.6% of Belgium’s, 3.8% of Sweden’s and 3.6% of France’s. Only 1.4% of its exports are shipped to Spain.

For its part, Spain covers 24.4% of Germany’s fruit and vegetable needs, while 16.8% is exported to France, 15.8% to the United Kingdom, 11.9% to the Netherlands and 5.4% to Italy.Meanwhile, China covers 17.8% of Japan’s fruit and vegetable imports, 8% of Indonesia’s, 7.2% of Vietnam’s, 6.8% of Malaysia’s and 6.6% of South Korea’s. Only 0.6% of its horticultural exports are shipped to Spain.

Mexico supplies 92.9% of the United State’s horticultural imports, 2% of Canada’s, 0.9% of Guatemala’s, 0.7% of Algeria’s, 0.6% of Turkey’s and around 0.5% of Spain’s.Finally, the United States covers 66.2% of Canada’s horticultural imports, 7.1% of Japan’s, 7.1% of Mexico’s, 2.6% of the United Kingdom’s and 0.7% of Spain fruit and vegetable imports, including citrus.

Source: hortoinfo

Publication date: 1/10/2014

 

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