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Import of Gold by Nominated Banks /Agencies

RBI/2012-13/557 A.P. (DIR Series) Circular No. 122 June 27, 2013 To All Scheduled Commercial Banks which are Authorised Dealers (ADs) in Foreign Exchange/ All agencies nominated for import of gold Madam/Sir Import of Gold by Nominated Banks /Agencies Attention of Authorised Persons is drawn to our A.P. (DIR Series) Circular No. 103 dated May 13, 2013 & A.P. [...]

The post Import of Gold by Nominated Banks /Agencies appeared first on Corporate Law Reporter.

TX Distributor Recalls Australian Lamb for Lack of Import Inspection

Houston, TX-based AMD Imports Inc. is recalling approximately 35,275 pounds of Australian lamb products because the meat imports were not presented at the U.S. point of entry for inspection, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

Without the benefit of full inspection, FSIS says a possibility of adverse health consequences exists. The recall involves a high health risk.

The following product are subject to recall:

  • Lot A, 17,500 lbs.: 416 containers of Australian Bone-In Lamb Shoulder weighing from 36 to 51 lbs. each with package code “730030.” The product was packaged by Wagstaff Canbourne on dates ranging from Sept. 8, 2014, to Oct. 10, 2014.
  • Lot B, 17,775 lbs.: 416 containers of Australian Bone-In Lamb Shoulder weighing from 36 to 51 lbs. each with package code “730030.” The product was packaged by Wagstaff Canbourne on dates ranging from Sept. 8, 2014, to Oct. 10, 2014.

The recalled lamb bears the Australian mark of inspection with establishment number “2773.” The product was shipped to AMD Imports Inc., a meat distributor in Houston, which was also the point of entry and further distributed to other distributors and retail locations.

The problem was discovered using the Public Health Information System (PHIS) when FSIS import staff reviewed records and discovered that the independent third-party carrier did not present the products for USDA inspection at the U.S. point of entry.

FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider. FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Food Safety News

Hefty decrease Russian import

Macedonia and Bosnia-Herzegovina also suspected of illegal export
Hefty decrease Russian import

Several European countries that fall outside the boycott, are facing possible sanctions. Russia suspects these countries of illegal export of European produce, and has requested clarification regarding increased export volumes. On the other hand, Russia is willing to negotiate with Moldova on lifting the sanctions. In that case, the country does have to guarantee that no illegal export will occur. South American countries still see potential in trade with Russia, and Lebanon also looked into the export requirements.

In Russian media, prime minister Medvedev said that it’s possible for the sanctions to be extended. The sanctions were announced for a year, but the prime minister pointed out this doesn’t mean that trade can get started again in August 2015. The prime minister also admitted that not all products could be replaced.

At the European side, the consequences are also felt in sectors that don’t come directly under the boycott. Because of price decreases in agricultural products, growers are postponing investments, which is felt by the machine builders. When it comes to logistics, the consequences are also noticeable. Cooling trucks that used to go to Russia with fresh produce, are now used with other products. Consequence: lower prices for transports to Russia.

Russian import halved
Statistics for October show that the vegetable import amounted to 62.7 million dollars. In September, 33.8 million dollars’ worth was imported. In October 2013, the import value amounted to 126.9 million dollars. That was 64.2 million more than this year. Nut and fruit import also went down from 437 million dollars in 2013 to 345 million dollars in October this year. Figures show how hard it is to replace the import. According to several specialists, other countries with large volumes, like China and Turkey, are not able to replace the lost import. That’s also reflected in prices. Studies show that prices went up by 30-40%, and 75% of Russians say they have seen prices go up.


Incidentally, supermarkets indicate that they succeed in replacing the import. Domestic cultivation, Turkey and Azerbaijan are named as new suppliers. For a supermarket chain such as X5, the boycott meant that 25% of horticultural products had to be replaced. For certain products, like iceberg lettuce and leek, it’s more difficult to find new suppliers.


Boycott opportunity for Poland
Prices for the Polish Idared have reached a low point. The apples yield between 7-11 cents per kilo, the past five years the price hasn’t been so low. The variety was particularly popular in Russia. According to WAPA estimates, the Idared volume in Poland will amount to 750,000 tonnes, 7% more than a year before. According to experts, however, the boycott also offers opportunities for the sector. They point out that with earlier sanctions, the sector was also able to switch fast, and that the boycott gives the opportunity of entering new markets and investing more in existing relations.


Macedonia and Bosnia-Herzegovina called to task
The Russian phytosanitary service suspects Macedonia and Bosnia-Herzegovina of illegal export of European produce. Macedonia was asked for clarification regarding the export. The country has to prove that no European products were exported illegally. Bosnia-Herzegovina had already been asked for clarification regarding the significantly increased export. Montenegro and Albania were also asked for clarification. These countries are facing possible sanctions if the Russians cannot be convinced that the export is legal.


Sanctions Moldova possibly lifted
While a number of countries are facing possible sanctions, the Russian inspection announced its willingness to negotiate with Moldova on lifting the sanctions. The sanctions were imposed after Moldova signed a free trade agreement with the EU. A condition for lifting the sanctions is that the country needs to take measures to prevent illegal export.


Peru biggest exporter South America
The Peruvian Association of Agricultural Producers said that the South American country leads the continent in terms of fruit and vegetable export to Russia. The boycott helps Peru increase its export by 10 million dollars a year. Between January and June of this year, export already went up by 16%. Reports say the total export value this year will amount to 80 million dollars. The products mainly go to the cities of Moscow and St Petersburg.


Ecuador still sees a lot of growth opportunities
The Ecuadorian ambassador in Russia says that the country utilizes 20% of the trade potential between the countries. The country has a direct sea route across the Atlantic Ocean to Russia, a journey of 21 days. According to the ambassador, trade amounts to 1.5 million dollars this year, 15% more than in 2013.


Kyrgyzstan exports more apples
According to the latest statistics, export from Kyrgyzstan to Russia increased over the past eight months. For apples, the export increased to a value of 85 million dollars. The volume amounted to 15,000 tonnes. 63 tonnes of potatoes and onions were also reported to be exported, that is 13% more than a year before.


Kaliningrad going to grow blueberries
The Kaliningrad region is investing in blueberry cultivation. The first harvest will have to go to market early next year. The newly established company cultivates the berries on an acreage of 3.3 hectares. According to the initiator of the project, only Argentinian and Chilean blueberries are available. How much the blueberries would cost wasn’t announced, but in neighbouring Belarus, a kilo of blueberries yields between 11 and 12 dollars per kilo. Birds do pose a threat for the cultivation, and a solution is being looked for.


Lebanon invests in export
The Investment Development Authority of Lebanon published a report with the standards to which products have to comply to be eligible for export to Russia. In the report, subjects like hygiene requirements, inspection of products, packaging and the status of importers can be found. According to the organization, Russia is an attractive market for Lebanese exporters. Lebanon hopes to profit from the import stop from Western countries.


Ukrainian cucumbers very expensive
The cucumber price keeps going up. Within a week, cucumbers yield 70-80% more, and the price is 1.68-1.86 dollars per kilo. That’s 50% more than in the same period a year before. Prices and fluctuations vary a bit from one wholesale market to another, but in general cucumbers got a lot more expensive. Prices are at the highest level in the past ten years. Because the Ukrainian season is drawing to a close and import is lagging behind due to the unstable foreign exchange market, prices went up.

Publication date: 11/20/2014
Author: Rudolf Mulderij
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Hefty decrease Russian import

Macedonia and Bosnia-Herzegovina also suspected of illegal export
Hefty decrease Russian import

Several European countries that fall outside the boycott, are facing possible sanctions. Russia suspects these countries of illegal export of European produce, and has requested clarification regarding increased export volumes. On the other hand, Russia is willing to negotiate with Moldova on lifting the sanctions. In that case, the country does have to guarantee that no illegal export will occur. South American countries still see potential in trade with Russia, and Lebanon also looked into the export requirements.

In Russian media, prime minister Medvedev said that it’s possible for the sanctions to be extended. The sanctions were announced for a year, but the prime minister pointed out this doesn’t mean that trade can get started again in August 2015. The prime minister also admitted that not all products could be replaced.

At the European side, the consequences are also felt in sectors that don’t come directly under the boycott. Because of price decreases in agricultural products, growers are postponing investments, which is felt by the machine builders. When it comes to logistics, the consequences are also noticeable. Cooling trucks that used to go to Russia with fresh produce, are now used with other products. Consequence: lower prices for transports to Russia.

Russian import halved
Statistics for October show that the vegetable import amounted to 62.7 million dollars. In September, 33.8 million dollars’ worth was imported. In October 2013, the import value amounted to 126.9 million dollars. That was 64.2 million more than this year. Nut and fruit import also went down from 437 million dollars in 2013 to 345 million dollars in October this year. Figures show how hard it is to replace the import. According to several specialists, other countries with large volumes, like China and Turkey, are not able to replace the lost import. That’s also reflected in prices. Studies show that prices went up by 30-40%, and 75% of Russians say they have seen prices go up.


Incidentally, supermarkets indicate that they succeed in replacing the import. Domestic cultivation, Turkey and Azerbaijan are named as new suppliers. For a supermarket chain such as X5, the boycott meant that 25% of horticultural products had to be replaced. For certain products, like iceberg lettuce and leek, it’s more difficult to find new suppliers.


Boycott opportunity for Poland
Prices for the Polish Idared have reached a low point. The apples yield between 7-11 cents per kilo, the past five years the price hasn’t been so low. The variety was particularly popular in Russia. According to WAPA estimates, the Idared volume in Poland will amount to 750,000 tonnes, 7% more than a year before. According to experts, however, the boycott also offers opportunities for the sector. They point out that with earlier sanctions, the sector was also able to switch fast, and that the boycott gives the opportunity of entering new markets and investing more in existing relations.


Macedonia and Bosnia-Herzegovina called to task
The Russian phytosanitary service suspects Macedonia and Bosnia-Herzegovina of illegal export of European produce. Macedonia was asked for clarification regarding the export. The country has to prove that no European products were exported illegally. Bosnia-Herzegovina had already been asked for clarification regarding the significantly increased export. Montenegro and Albania were also asked for clarification. These countries are facing possible sanctions if the Russians cannot be convinced that the export is legal.


Sanctions Moldova possibly lifted
While a number of countries are facing possible sanctions, the Russian inspection announced its willingness to negotiate with Moldova on lifting the sanctions. The sanctions were imposed after Moldova signed a free trade agreement with the EU. A condition for lifting the sanctions is that the country needs to take measures to prevent illegal export.


Peru biggest exporter South America
The Peruvian Association of Agricultural Producers said that the South American country leads the continent in terms of fruit and vegetable export to Russia. The boycott helps Peru increase its export by 10 million dollars a year. Between January and June of this year, export already went up by 16%. Reports say the total export value this year will amount to 80 million dollars. The products mainly go to the cities of Moscow and St Petersburg.


Ecuador still sees a lot of growth opportunities
The Ecuadorian ambassador in Russia says that the country utilizes 20% of the trade potential between the countries. The country has a direct sea route across the Atlantic Ocean to Russia, a journey of 21 days. According to the ambassador, trade amounts to 1.5 million dollars this year, 15% more than in 2013.


Kyrgyzstan exports more apples
According to the latest statistics, export from Kyrgyzstan to Russia increased over the past eight months. For apples, the export increased to a value of 85 million dollars. The volume amounted to 15,000 tonnes. 63 tonnes of potatoes and onions were also reported to be exported, that is 13% more than a year before.


Kaliningrad going to grow blueberries
The Kaliningrad region is investing in blueberry cultivation. The first harvest will have to go to market early next year. The newly established company cultivates the berries on an acreage of 3.3 hectares. According to the initiator of the project, only Argentinian and Chilean blueberries are available. How much the blueberries would cost wasn’t announced, but in neighbouring Belarus, a kilo of blueberries yields between 11 and 12 dollars per kilo. Birds do pose a threat for the cultivation, and a solution is being looked for.


Lebanon invests in export
The Investment Development Authority of Lebanon published a report with the standards to which products have to comply to be eligible for export to Russia. In the report, subjects like hygiene requirements, inspection of products, packaging and the status of importers can be found. According to the organization, Russia is an attractive market for Lebanese exporters. Lebanon hopes to profit from the import stop from Western countries.


Ukrainian cucumbers very expensive
The cucumber price keeps going up. Within a week, cucumbers yield 70-80% more, and the price is 1.68-1.86 dollars per kilo. That’s 50% more than in the same period a year before. Prices and fluctuations vary a bit from one wholesale market to another, but in general cucumbers got a lot more expensive. Prices are at the highest level in the past ten years. Because the Ukrainian season is drawing to a close and import is lagging behind due to the unstable foreign exchange market, prices went up.

Publication date: 11/20/2014
Author: Rudolf Mulderij
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Citrus import demand up and growing in the United States

While per capita consumption of fresh citrus has declined since 1980, total U.S. consumption of citrus fruits has increased 20 percent since that time, according to a report titled “U.S. Citrus Import Demand: Seasonality and Substitution,” compiled by Katherine L. Baldwin, formerly of the Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, was presented at the Southern Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting in Birmingham, AL, in February 2012.

Imported-Navels-cut-fruitImported summer Navel oranges from DNE World Fruit.Over the same period, total U.S. production of citrus fruits has been flat to declining, including the virtual disbandment of the U.S. commercial lime industry.

In order to fulfill domestic fresh citrus demand, imported citrus has increased in importance, accounting for more than 20 percent of total domestic consumption in the 2009-10 crop year.

Today citrus fruits make up one-fifth of all fresh fruit consumed in the United States.

Using quarterly U.S. import data for several citrus commodities, researchers for the report employed a demand model and evaluated aspects of seasonality.

All citrus fruits exhibit some seasonality in their imports, which is a result of peak harvesting schedules of exporters.

According to the USDA Economic Research Service, oranges in both fresh and juice form alone account for nearly 10 percent of total per capita fruit consumption.

Orange imports in 2009-10 were 10 times higher than levels seen in 1980-81. Regardless, imports still only account for a minute 6 percent share of U.S. consumption, up from only 1 percent in 1980-81. The motivation for increased imports is largely a matter of seasonality. Peak import season begins in July after the end of the California Navel season and ends in October when the harvesting of Florida’s early-season varieties begins.

South Africa, Chile, Mexico and Australia are the top sources for U.S. orange imports. South Africa has been the largest supplier of fresh oranges to the U.S. market essentially since 2003. Its entrance into the U.S. market began with the 2000 passage of the African Growth Opportunity Act, under which all imports of oranges from South Africa enter the U.S. duty-free. Interestingly, the top four fresh orange suppliers receive preferential trade status, and all but South Africa export under free trade agreements.

Amongst all citrus fruits produced in the United States, grapefruit is unique in that both domestic production and consumption are falling. Indeed, the long-term decline in U.S. grapefruit production is a product of weak U.S. consumer demand. Even with declining domestic demand, the U.S. remains the world’s second-largest producer of grapefruit.

Around 70 percent of the U.S. grapefruit crop is grown in Florida, with Texas and California accounting for 20 and 10 percent, respectively. Bearing acreage has declined an average of 7 percent each year since 2005-06 in Florida, but seems to have stabilized in California and Texas. In total, U.S. grapefruit production has declined by 50 percent since the 2000-01 marketing year. The report noted numerous reasons for the decline in demand, including fear of drug interaction.

Although tariffs vary seasonally for grapefruit, more than 99 percent of grapefruit imports enter the U.S. under duty-free status. With declining consumer demand, it is not surprising that imports of grapefruit are small, accounting for around 3 percent of U.S. fresh grapefruit consumption.

U.S. production of lemons remains strong, supplying more than 90 percent of domestic consumption needs and even making the U.S. the fifth-largest exporter of fresh lemons and limes in the world. Nearly all U.S. lemons are produced in California and Arizona, with the season running from August through July, and with Californian producers able to store production long enough to partially supply the high-demand summer season. Imports tend to be highest during the summer months. However, U.S. production is just gearing up for harvest at that time, and domestic supplies are at their lowest. Despite rising import demand during the summer months, imports only account for around 10 percent of U.S. consumption. Mexico and Chile are the primary sources of U.S. lemon imports, with both countries able to ship lemons duty-free through free trade agreements.

As with lemons, the U.S. mandarin and tangerine industry is on a trend of increasing both production and consumption. However, imports make up a significant portion of U.S. mandarin consumption, and the fruits are typically consumed fresh.

Worldwide, mandarins are known for being easy to peel and readily separating into different sections, which makes them convenient to eat in fresh form. Moreover, many different countries in the world produce their own particular varieties of mandarins, including Satsumas, clementines and numerous tangerine hybrids.

While most mandarins consumed in the U.S. are domestically grown, seasonal imports account for nearly 30 percent of consumption. Unlike other citrus varieties, mandarins do not store well on the tree and should be harvested soon after maturity. For this reason, the U.S. marketing season for mandarins is shorter than it is for other citrus varieties. Nearly half of U.S. mandarin imports come from Spain, with Chile, Morocco and Peru accounting for most of the remainder.

Imports from Spain represent nearly all of the clementine variety, which are in high demand by U.S. consumers because they are seedless. Total U.S. imports tend to peak November through January when the bulk of Spain’s crop is marketed. A smaller peak occurs in July and August when Chilean clementine and Peruvian tangelos enter the market.

More than 80 percent of citrus imports enter the U.S. under duty-free status due to various trade agreements.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Russia: More expensive import products; rouble devalued 22%

Russian economy affected by sanctions
Russia: More expensive import products; rouble devalued 22%

Although Putin is convinced that the country can become increasingly self-sufficient, Russian economists also point to the impact of potential budget shortfalls. Economists see that it is difficult for companies to attract enough investment. Because of Western sanctions, access to capital has become more difficult. Economists warn of the possibility of recession due to high inflation, disappointing consumption, difficult access to capital and declining exports.

To curb the rising inflation, the Russian Central Bank sold $ 420 million worth of foreign currency on Tuesday. In total, the bank spent $ 2 billion in October on interventions. The Rouble is performing poorly this year. Its value has already fallen by nearly 22% against the dollar and 12% against the Euro. Russia has a huge financial buffer of $ 460 billion in foreign currency. Thus, it has sufficient room for manoeuvre for further interventions.

Additionally, the Russian government has been trying for some time now to switch from dollars to roubles in international trade transactions. Already in 2008, media reports appeared on the subject, discussed in relation to the oil market. Trade between North Korea and Russia is already carried out in roubles; the value of trade is equivalent to $ 500 million. But more important trading partners, such as China and Iran, would also welcome trade in domestic currencies. This, however, also entails risks, as Ukrainian traders already experienced. Because of the fact that Russians purchase on credit, the value of the rouble may have already fallen before payments are made, resulting in exporters receiving relatively less for their products.

Consumer prices continue rising in Russia 

At the moment, exporters dealing mainly in dollars, especially in the energy sector, are the only ones that are significantly profiting from the low rouble. Consumers face rising prices, which are growing by about 0.2% per week. Although this is a low overall percentage, some products have become significantly more expensive. In a week’s time, cucumber prices have grown by 7.6%, tomatoes have become 3.6% more expensive, and potato prices have increased by 2.8%. The Central Bank is now taking into account an inflation rate of 8% for 2014, well above the ceiling set by the bank of 6.5%.

Sverdlovsk swapping potatoes for cattle 

Russia’s Sverdlovsk region produces about twice as many potatoes as it can consume. According to the regional government, two years ago it started a project to expand its storage capacity, which resulted in the opening of eight new warehouses last year, bringing its total number up to fifteen. In order to develop the sector further, the government will invest 12 billion roubles ($ 240 million). Where the region has a deficit is in cattle; therefore, Sverdlovsk launched a plan to cooperate with neighbouring Belarus and Kazakhstan, which will provide livestock in exchange for vegetables and potatoes and knowledge about their cultivation. 

Peru signs contracts 

The Peruvian firm Passionfrut Company has gained access to the Russian market with mandarins and mineolas. The agreement was signed during the fair Expoalimentaria in Lima. Russian companies were interested in the mandarin varieties W Murcott and Malvasia and the Minneola tangelo. The Peruvian company is working with a Russian partner to ship two containers of mandarins to St. Petersburg. 

Passionfrut Company is still seeking access to new markets. Besides Russia, the firm wants to export to the Middle East, North America and Europe.

Publication date: 10/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Russia: More expensive import products; rouble devalued 22%

Russian economy affected by sanctions
Russia: More expensive import products; rouble devalued 22%

Although Putin is convinced that the country can become increasingly self-sufficient, Russian economists also point to the impact of potential budget shortfalls. Economists see that it is difficult for companies to attract enough investment. Because of Western sanctions, access to capital has become more difficult. Economists warn of the possibility of recession due to high inflation, disappointing consumption, difficult access to capital and declining exports.

To curb the rising inflation, the Russian Central Bank sold $ 420 million worth of foreign currency on Tuesday. In total, the bank spent $ 2 billion in October on interventions. The Rouble is performing poorly this year. Its value has already fallen by nearly 22% against the dollar and 12% against the Euro. Russia has a huge financial buffer of $ 460 billion in foreign currency. Thus, it has sufficient room for manoeuvre for further interventions.

Additionally, the Russian government has been trying for some time now to switch from dollars to roubles in international trade transactions. Already in 2008, media reports appeared on the subject, discussed in relation to the oil market. Trade between North Korea and Russia is already carried out in roubles; the value of trade is equivalent to $ 500 million. But more important trading partners, such as China and Iran, would also welcome trade in domestic currencies. This, however, also entails risks, as Ukrainian traders already experienced. Because of the fact that Russians purchase on credit, the value of the rouble may have already fallen before payments are made, resulting in exporters receiving relatively less for their products.

Consumer prices continue rising in Russia 

At the moment, exporters dealing mainly in dollars, especially in the energy sector, are the only ones that are significantly profiting from the low rouble. Consumers face rising prices, which are growing by about 0.2% per week. Although this is a low overall percentage, some products have become significantly more expensive. In a week’s time, cucumber prices have grown by 7.6%, tomatoes have become 3.6% more expensive, and potato prices have increased by 2.8%. The Central Bank is now taking into account an inflation rate of 8% for 2014, well above the ceiling set by the bank of 6.5%.

Sverdlovsk swapping potatoes for cattle 

Russia’s Sverdlovsk region produces about twice as many potatoes as it can consume. According to the regional government, two years ago it started a project to expand its storage capacity, which resulted in the opening of eight new warehouses last year, bringing its total number up to fifteen. In order to develop the sector further, the government will invest 12 billion roubles ($ 240 million). Where the region has a deficit is in cattle; therefore, Sverdlovsk launched a plan to cooperate with neighbouring Belarus and Kazakhstan, which will provide livestock in exchange for vegetables and potatoes and knowledge about their cultivation. 

Peru signs contracts 

The Peruvian firm Passionfrut Company has gained access to the Russian market with mandarins and mineolas. The agreement was signed during the fair Expoalimentaria in Lima. Russian companies were interested in the mandarin varieties W Murcott and Malvasia and the Minneola tangelo. The Peruvian company is working with a Russian partner to ship two containers of mandarins to St. Petersburg. 

Passionfrut Company is still seeking access to new markets. Besides Russia, the firm wants to export to the Middle East, North America and Europe.

Publication date: 10/9/2014


FreshPlaza.com

United Fresh focuses on transportation, import rules at Washington Conference

WASHINGTON — The United Fresh Produce Association met with federal lawmakers recently carrying a short list of must-haves at its Washington Conference, but the three-day meeting also delved into a list of regulations the produce industry is closely scrutinizing.

The Food Safety Modernization Act’s proposed regulation for sanitary transportation includes a provision that could easily render shipments adulterated if records show a variation in temperature controls, Jon Samson of the Agricultural & Food Transporters Conference said at a Sept. 9 session, here.

“This could substantially increase cargo claims,” he warned. “We want more flexibility in the rule.”

The Food & Drug Administration’s first federal rule for hauling food underestimates compliance costs and exempts small trucking companies, which could hurt their businesses in the long run, he warned. More than 90 percent of trucking companies operate six trucks or fewer, and refrigerated truck companies are even smaller, he said.

The FDA needs to provide details on a range of issues, including how and who will maintain records, before the rule becomes final by March 2016.

Samson said the American Trucking Association also is working with Congress to suspend some provisions of the hours-of-service changes that were implemented in July 2013. The rule requires a 30-minute break during the first eight-hour shift. But depending on the shifts, carriers could end up having to take two 30-minute rest periods to comply with the rule, and that’s costly, he said.

Legislation that would delay enforcement of the rules for at least a year while a study is undertaken is moving through Congress, Samson said.

Imports have their own issues, and Lance Jungmeyer, president of the Fresh Produce Association, said changes are needed to ease the flow of trade.

More Customs officials are needed on the U.S. side for the nation’s busiest ports of entry, and a memorandum of understanding that would have the U.S. government recognize Mexico’s food safety and quality inspections would go a long way, Jungmeyer said.

Importers are keeping a close eye on the FDA’s plans to collect importer fees to pay for FSMA, a move that would affect border crossings, he said.

“Each new fee may invite retaliatory measures by foreign governments,” Jungmeyer warned.

Other changes on the produce industry’s plate include the Animal Plant & Health Inspection Service’s proposed user fees for inspection services to prevent pests and diseases and changes to container inspections.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

United Fresh focuses on transportation, import rules at Washington Conference

WASHINGTON — The United Fresh Produce Association met with federal lawmakers recently carrying a short list of must-haves at its Washington Conference, but the three-day meeting also delved into a list of regulations the produce industry is closely scrutinizing.

The Food Safety Modernization Act’s proposed regulation for sanitary transportation includes a provision that could easily render shipments adulterated if records show a variation in temperature controls, Jon Samson of the Agricultural & Food Transporters Conference said at a Sept. 9 session, here.

“This could substantially increase cargo claims,” he warned. “We want more flexibility in the rule.”

The Food & Drug Administration’s first federal rule for hauling food underestimates compliance costs and exempts small trucking companies, which could hurt their businesses in the long run, he warned. More than 90 percent of trucking companies operate six trucks or fewer, and refrigerated truck companies are even smaller, he said.

The FDA needs to provide details on a range of issues, including how and who will maintain records, before the rule becomes final by March 2016.

Samson said the American Trucking Association also is working with Congress to suspend some provisions of the hours-of-service changes that were implemented in July 2013. The rule requires a 30-minute break during the first eight-hour shift. But depending on the shifts, carriers could end up having to take two 30-minute rest periods to comply with the rule, and that’s costly, he said.

Legislation that would delay enforcement of the rules for at least a year while a study is undertaken is moving through Congress, Samson said.

Imports have their own issues, and Lance Jungmeyer, president of the Fresh Produce Association, said changes are needed to ease the flow of trade.

More Customs officials are needed on the U.S. side for the nation’s busiest ports of entry, and a memorandum of understanding that would have the U.S. government recognize Mexico’s food safety and quality inspections would go a long way, Jungmeyer said.

Importers are keeping a close eye on the FDA’s plans to collect importer fees to pay for FSMA, a move that would affect border crossings, he said.

“Each new fee may invite retaliatory measures by foreign governments,” Jungmeyer warned.

Other changes on the produce industry’s plate include the Animal Plant & Health Inspection Service’s proposed user fees for inspection services to prevent pests and diseases and changes to container inspections.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

United Fresh focuses on transportation, import rules at Washington Conference

WASHINGTON — The United Fresh Produce Association met with federal lawmakers recently carrying a short list of must-haves at its Washington Conference, but the three-day meeting also delved into a list of regulations the produce industry is closely scrutinizing.

The Food Safety Modernization Act’s proposed regulation for sanitary transportation includes a provision that could easily render shipments adulterated if records show a variation in temperature controls, Jon Samson of the Agricultural & Food Transporters Conference said at a Sept. 9 session, here.

“This could substantially increase cargo claims,” he warned. “We want more flexibility in the rule.”

The Food & Drug Administration’s first federal rule for hauling food underestimates compliance costs and exempts small trucking companies, which could hurt their businesses in the long run, he warned. More than 90 percent of trucking companies operate six trucks or fewer, and refrigerated truck companies are even smaller, he said.

The FDA needs to provide details on a range of issues, including how and who will maintain records, before the rule becomes final by March 2016.

Samson said the American Trucking Association also is working with Congress to suspend some provisions of the hours-of-service changes that were implemented in July 2013. The rule requires a 30-minute break during the first eight-hour shift. But depending on the shifts, carriers could end up having to take two 30-minute rest periods to comply with the rule, and that’s costly, he said.

Legislation that would delay enforcement of the rules for at least a year while a study is undertaken is moving through Congress, Samson said.

Imports have their own issues, and Lance Jungmeyer, president of the Fresh Produce Association, said changes are needed to ease the flow of trade.

More Customs officials are needed on the U.S. side for the nation’s busiest ports of entry, and a memorandum of understanding that would have the U.S. government recognize Mexico’s food safety and quality inspections would go a long way, Jungmeyer said.

Importers are keeping a close eye on the FDA’s plans to collect importer fees to pay for FSMA, a move that would affect border crossings, he said.

“Each new fee may invite retaliatory measures by foreign governments,” Jungmeyer warned.

Other changes on the produce industry’s plate include the Animal Plant & Health Inspection Service’s proposed user fees for inspection services to prevent pests and diseases and changes to container inspections.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Aphis proposes the import of Chinese fresh citrus into US

Aphis proposes the import of Chinese fresh citrus into US

Aphis is proposing to amend the fruits and vegetables regulations to allow the importation into the continental United States of commercial consignments of five species of fresh citrus fruit from China.

As a condition of entry, the citrus fruit would have to be produced in accordance with a systems approach that includes requirements for registration of places of production and packinghouses, sourcing of pest-free propagative material, inspection for quarantine pests at set intervals by the national plant protection organization (NPPO) of China, bagging of fruit, safeguarding, post-harvest processing and sampling, and importation in commercial consignments.

Additionally, Aphis would require places of production to trap for several species of Bactrocera fruit flies, and would require the fruit to be treated for those species of fruit flies. In addition, consignments would have to be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by the NPPO of China that declares that the conditions for importation have been met and that the consignments have been inspected and found free of quarantine pests.

Finally, the NPPO of China would have to provide an operational workplan to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture that details the activities that the NPPO of China will carry out to meet these requirements. This proposed rule would allow for the importation of fresh citrus from China into the continental United States while providing protection against the introduction of plant pests.

Aphis will consider all comments that we receive on or before October 27, 2014.

Supporting documents and any comments received on this docket may be viewed by clicking here.

For more information: 
Claudia Ferguson
APHIS
Tel: +1 (301) 851-2352.

Publication date: 8/29/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Aphis proposes the import of Chinese fresh citrus into US

Aphis proposes the import of Chinese fresh citrus into US

Aphis is proposing to amend the fruits and vegetables regulations to allow the importation into the continental United States of commercial consignments of five species of fresh citrus fruit from China.

As a condition of entry, the citrus fruit would have to be produced in accordance with a systems approach that includes requirements for registration of places of production and packinghouses, sourcing of pest-free propagative material, inspection for quarantine pests at set intervals by the national plant protection organization (NPPO) of China, bagging of fruit, safeguarding, post-harvest processing and sampling, and importation in commercial consignments.

Additionally, Aphis would require places of production to trap for several species of Bactrocera fruit flies, and would require the fruit to be treated for those species of fruit flies. In addition, consignments would have to be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by the NPPO of China that declares that the conditions for importation have been met and that the consignments have been inspected and found free of quarantine pests.

Finally, the NPPO of China would have to provide an operational workplan to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture that details the activities that the NPPO of China will carry out to meet these requirements. This proposed rule would allow for the importation of fresh citrus from China into the continental United States while providing protection against the introduction of plant pests.

Aphis will consider all comments that we receive on or before October 27, 2014.

Supporting documents and any comments received on this docket may be viewed by clicking here.

For more information: 
Claudia Ferguson
APHIS
Tel: +1 (301) 851-2352.

Publication date: 8/29/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Chinese Citrus Fruit Could be Cleared for U.S. Import: APHIS Invites Comments

China will have to jump through some hoops, but it may soon be able to sell previously barred citrus fruit in the United States, specifically fresh pomelo, mandarin orange, ponkan (tangerine), sweet orange and Satsuma mandarin fruit.

On Thursday, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) published the proposed rule, which would allow the importation of fresh citrus fruit from China into the continental U.S. The agency invited public comment on the rule for 60 days, ending on Oct. 27, 2014.

Currently, APHIS rules on fruits and vegetables do not permit the import of fresh citrus from China into the U.S. out of concern about certain plant pests. APHIS has received a request from China’s national plant protection organization (NPPO) to allow importation of five citrus fruit species into the U.S.

APHIS proposes to let the Chinese fruit into the U.S. under a condition of entry that includes registration of places of production and packing houses, sourcing of pest-free propagative material, inspection for quarantine pests at set intervals by the NPPO, bagging of fruit, safeguarding post-harvest processing and sampling, and importation in commercial consignment.

Chinese fruit growers would also have to trap for several species of Bactrocera fruit flies, and the fruit would have to be treated for those species of fruit flies. Only fruit that was inspected and found free of pests could be shipped to the U.S.

A pest risk assessment conducted by APHIS identified 22 quarantine pests that could use packed citrus from China as a pathway to the U.S. The NPPO in China will have to provide an operational work plan with detailed procedures, including treatment details.

The importation notice contains no information on the actual distribution of Chinese-grown citrus fruit in the U.S. Comments on the proposed rule are being accepted here.

Food Safety News

Chinese Citrus Fruit Could be Cleared for U.S. Import: APHIS Invites Comments

China will have to jump through some hoops, but it may soon be able to sell previously barred citrus fruit in the United States, specifically fresh pomelo, mandarin orange, ponkan (tangerine), sweet orange and Satsuma mandarin fruit.

On Thursday, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) published the proposed rule, which would allow the importation of fresh citrus fruit from China into the continental U.S. The agency invited public comment on the rule for 60 days, ending on Oct. 27, 2014.

Currently, APHIS rules on fruits and vegetables do not permit the import of fresh citrus from China into the U.S. out of concern about certain plant pests. APHIS has received a request from China’s national plant protection organization (NPPO) to allow importation of five citrus fruit species into the U.S.

APHIS proposes to let the Chinese fruit into the U.S. under a condition of entry that includes registration of places of production and packing houses, sourcing of pest-free propagative material, inspection for quarantine pests at set intervals by the NPPO, bagging of fruit, safeguarding post-harvest processing and sampling, and importation in commercial consignment.

Chinese fruit growers would also have to trap for several species of Bactrocera fruit flies, and the fruit would have to be treated for those species of fruit flies. Only fruit that was inspected and found free of pests could be shipped to the U.S.

A pest risk assessment conducted by APHIS identified 22 quarantine pests that could use packed citrus from China as a pathway to the U.S. The NPPO in China will have to provide an operational work plan with detailed procedures, including treatment details.

The importation notice contains no information on the actual distribution of Chinese-grown citrus fruit in the U.S. Comments on the proposed rule are being accepted here.

Food Safety News

Chinese Citrus Fruit Could be Cleared for U.S. Import: APHIS Invites Comments

China will have to jump through some hoops, but it may soon be able to sell previously barred citrus fruit in the United States, specifically fresh pomelo, mandarin orange, ponkan (tangerine), sweet orange and Satsuma mandarin fruit.

On Thursday, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) published the proposed rule, which would allow the importation of fresh citrus fruit from China into the continental U.S. The agency invited public comment on the rule for 60 days, ending on Oct. 27, 2014.

Currently, APHIS rules on fruits and vegetables do not permit the import of fresh citrus from China into the U.S. out of concern about certain plant pests. APHIS has received a request from China’s national plant protection organization (NPPO) to allow importation of five citrus fruit species into the U.S.

APHIS proposes to let the Chinese fruit into the U.S. under a condition of entry that includes registration of places of production and packing houses, sourcing of pest-free propagative material, inspection for quarantine pests at set intervals by the NPPO, bagging of fruit, safeguarding post-harvest processing and sampling, and importation in commercial consignment.

Chinese fruit growers would also have to trap for several species of Bactrocera fruit flies, and the fruit would have to be treated for those species of fruit flies. Only fruit that was inspected and found free of pests could be shipped to the U.S.

A pest risk assessment conducted by APHIS identified 22 quarantine pests that could use packed citrus from China as a pathway to the U.S. The NPPO in China will have to provide an operational work plan with detailed procedures, including treatment details.

The importation notice contains no information on the actual distribution of Chinese-grown citrus fruit in the U.S. Comments on the proposed rule are being accepted here.

Food Safety News