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“Russian importers are currently under great pressure”

Gabriel Berard, Bretonskiy Koupets:
“Russian importers are currently under great pressure”

Gabriel Berard is a specialised intermediary between producers or traders and Russian companies. With the firm Bretonskiy Koupets, he acts as A local helpdesk for exporters to Russia. He is currently going through a difficult time because all fruit and vegetable exports from the EU have stopped. “Luckily, I am a very flexible agent and have few costs. Now that EU exports have stopped I focus on overseas suppliers shipping to Russia. I invite these exporters to connect on my platform and I offer also new services, such as market monitoring for traders. Currently, I already offer a weekly market report on tomatoes and citrus and I hope to find more customers for this service to expand in the future.”


The Russian apple-corner in Auchan hypermarket in Moscow last Sunday. (1 Euro = 58 rub)

Less work for importers
According to Gabriel, the situation for Russian fruit and vegetable traders is very hard. “Russian importers are tense because the volumes and margins are under great pressure. The import ban is just one of the many factors that make the situation difficult; there is also a drop in the value of the Rouble, the cancellation of credit lines, the decline in consumer spending and the development of direct imports by discounters. For example, the Russian discounters ‘Dixy’ and ‘Tander’ make a lot of imports themselves. The Russian import of fruits and vegetables in September 2014 dropped by 10% in volume compared to September 2013. During the same period, the volumes of fruit and vegetables imported directly by retailers has increased by 7%. This has resulted in traders having a lot less work.”

Self-sufficiency
Russia is not yet self-sufficient, but there is now a stronger focus on local production. Investments are made in Russian orchards and greenhouses and the boycott works as an additional incentive. “The demand for quality local produce is high; in September, Russian imports of tomatoes and apples dropped by 44% and 41% respectively compared to September last year. Russian growers are doing very well. To capitalise on this trend, Bretonskiy Koupets invited the owner of a modern Russian orchard to use my platform.” (see picture below)


Alma Fruits, a modern Russian Orchard

“Everyone notices a paradigm shift in the Russian market. Import margins are smaller and it is very difficult for traditional importers to stay afloat. For Russian traders, the most important long-term effects of this growth are: large-scale changes in integrated logistics, the modernisation of trade, expansion in the region and localisation of supplies. European traders in the future will also have the opportunity to play a role in Russia’s consolidation through modern, high-capacity traders.”

He strongly believes that Russia and Europe will work together again in the future. “When this crisis is over, I hope that European products will find their way back to the shopping basket of Russian consumers.” The ban is supposed to last for one year, but that’s not certain. “The ban on EU products was imposed by the Russian Government on 7 August in response to economic sanctions against Russia that were taken by the EU on 31 July. We can reasonably expect that the Russian boycott will be lifted if Europe also puts and end to its own sanctions.”

For more information:
Gabriel Berard
SAS Bretonskiy Koupets
Parc d’Innovation Bretagne Sud
Place Albert Einstein – CP 125
56038 Vannes – Frankrijk
Skype ID: gabrielberard
[email protected]

Publication date: 11/21/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Russian importers need to look for other sources

Russian importers need to look for other sources

Today Russia announced it will ban all fruit and vegetables from the United States, the European Union, Australia, Canada and Norway for one year. This ban is a reaction on the sanctions imposed on Russia by these countries.

Now the question is what will be the affects on all parties? Larissa Khachikyan from Russian importer Friend Fruits said they are hoping it will be only for a short time. “We now have to look for imports from South Africa, Latin America and China.” The difficulties to source for example apples out of China, is that they have different products. “We will stay in contact with our good relations in Western Europe and hope it will be solved very soon.”

Europe
According to IHS, Russia is the largest export market for fruit and vegetables from the EU, at €2billion a year. Belgium exported last year €490 million in food exports, primarily fruit, to Russia. The Netherlands export approximately €600 million a year to Russia.

United States
Russia is a big market for U.S. specialty crops. In 2013, Russia imported $ 138 million in almonds, $ 31 million in pistachios, $ 13 million in fresh apples, $ 12 million in pears and $ 2.7 million in grapes, reported the Packer. The total amount of Russian food imports are $ 1.6 billion out of the United States.

Countries that benefit
China, South Africa, Serbia, Azerbeijan, Turkey and Latin American countries have to fill the gaps in the local market in Russia. Whether consumer prices in Russia will go up is something that only time will tell, but Medvedev warned against possible attempts to use the situation to drive up prices.

Click here to read more about Russia

Publication date: 8/7/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

“The impact of Citrus Black Spot measures on importers is currently not very big”

Joep van Lierop, of De Groot International:
“The impact of Citrus Black Spot measures on importers is currently not very big”

According to Joep van Lierop, of De Groot International, the impact of Citrus Black Spot measures on importers is currently not very big. He affirms that “measures are currently in place to stop citrus from Black Spot areas, but for now this has not had great consequences for importers. However, until Today (Thursday) there have already been four detections, and a fifth will probably soon follow; if this happens, additional measures will probably be taken, and these may well have a greater impact on the market. “

Market Picture
“Regarding grapefruit, the largest volumes from South Africa have already been shipped. Prices have been under pressure in the first few weeks due to the large volumes available and because demand was not big enough. The market for lemons is good, among other reasons, because no large volumes have arrived from South Africa and also partly because of the Black Spot measures and the late arrival of Argentinian lemons,” explains the importer. “Mandarin prices and demand have been under great pressure for a few weeks. Now the largest volumes of clementines have already been sold and within a few weeks the Nadorcott will enter the market.  The orange market has almost completely moved now to South African produce, which registers good sales and stable prices.”

When asked how important Europe is for South African producers, Joep answered that “Europe is important for South Africa, but it is not as if South Africa couldn’t go on without Europe, as it has plenty of alternative markets. The shipment of the entire volume to these areas, however, would put prices in those markets under pressure.” According to the importer, South America would be an alternative in case no oranges and other citrus could be exported from South Africa to Europe. De Groot International also has access to citrus from Zimbabwe, so it is not fully dependent on South Africa and South America.

“In the coming weeks, all eyes in the citrus market will be on Black Spot, as the possible introduction of stricter measures would have a major impact on the market,” concludes Joep.

For more information:
Joep van Lierop
De Groot International

T +31 (0) 73-599 88 04
E [email protected]
http://www.degroot-int.nl

Publication date: 7/25/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russia is a great importer of all sorts of fruit and vegetables from many countries, including Europe, South Africa, Israel or China. The former is a great source of business, and as a result, Russian importers fear the effects of the possible sanctions that may close the Russian borders to European products, although they are also optimistic and hope the situation will not escalate.

Asif Jafarov, of Akhmed Fruit Company, explains that at the moment “numerous products are imported from Europe, so a ban would cause a great disturbance,” but he believes that it will all be fine by September, perhaps even by mid-August.

For her part, Larissa Khachikyan, of the Russian company Friend Fruits, explains that “the summer campaign is a period of low imports, but we continue to work with suppliers with whom we have collaborated for years and the situation is fine. Right now, for example, we are working with exporters from Italy, Spain, France and South Africa. The country we work with depends on the season.” Overall, Europe accounts for around 50% of the company’s imports.

Larissa affirms that even though there are some rumours about Chile being currently afraid to work with Russia, her firm relies on both its long-term business relationships and its reputation to overcome any hurdles that may come.

Publication date: 7/24/2014
Author: Juan Zea Estellés
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russia is a great importer of all sorts of fruit and vegetables from many countries, including Europe, South Africa, Israel or China. The former is a great source of business, and as a result, Russian importers fear the effects of the possible sanctions that may close the Russian borders to European products, although they are also optimistic and hope the situation will not escalate.

Asif Jafarov, of Akhmed Fruit Company, explains that at the moment “numerous products are imported from Europe, so a ban would cause a great disturbance,” but he believes that it will all be fine by September, perhaps even by mid-August.

For her part, Larissa Khachikyan, of the Russian company Friend Fruits, explains that “the summer campaign is a period of low imports, but we continue to work with suppliers with whom we have collaborated for years and the situation is fine. Right now, for example, we are working with exporters from Italy, Spain, France and South Africa. The country we work with depends on the season.” Overall, Europe accounts for around 50% of the company’s imports.

Larissa affirms that even though there are some rumours about Chile being currently afraid to work with Russia, her firm relies on both its long-term business relationships and its reputation to overcome any hurdles that may come.

Publication date: 7/24/2014
Author: Juan Zea Estellés
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russia is a great importer of all sorts of fruit and vegetables from many countries, including Europe, South Africa, Israel or China. The former is a great source of business, and as a result, Russian importers fear the effects of the possible sanctions that may close the Russian borders to European products, although they are also optimistic and hope the situation will not escalate.

Asif Jafarov, of Akhmed Fruit Company, explains that at the moment “numerous products are imported from Europe, so a ban would cause a great disturbance,” but he believes that it will all be fine by September, perhaps even by mid-August.

For her part, Larissa Khachikyan, of the Russian company Friend Fruits, explains that “the summer campaign is a period of low imports, but we continue to work with suppliers with whom we have collaborated for years and the situation is fine. Right now, for example, we are working with exporters from Italy, Spain, France and South Africa. The country we work with depends on the season.” Overall, Europe accounts for around 50% of the company’s imports.

Larissa affirms that even though there are some rumours about Chile being currently afraid to work with Russia, her firm relies on both its long-term business relationships and its reputation to overcome any hurdles that may come.

Publication date: 7/24/2014
Author: Juan Zea Estellés
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russia is a great importer of all sorts of fruit and vegetables from many countries, including Europe, South Africa, Israel or China. The former is a great source of business, and as a result, Russian importers fear the effects of the possible sanctions that may close the Russian borders to European products, although they are also optimistic and hope the situation will not escalate.

Asif Jafarov, of Akhmed Fruit Company, explains that at the moment “numerous products are imported from Europe, so a ban would cause a great disturbance,” but he believes that it will all be fine by September, perhaps even by mid-August.

For her part, Larissa Khachikyan, of the Russian company Friend Fruits, explains that “the summer campaign is a period of low imports, but we continue to work with suppliers with whom we have collaborated for years and the situation is fine. Right now, for example, we are working with exporters from Italy, Spain, France and South Africa. The country we work with depends on the season.” Overall, Europe accounts for around 50% of the company’s imports.

Larissa affirms that even though there are some rumours about Chile being currently afraid to work with Russia, her firm relies on both its long-term business relationships and its reputation to overcome any hurdles that may come.

Publication date: 7/24/2014
Author: Juan Zea Estellés
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russian importers hope situation will not escalate

Russia is a great importer of all sorts of fruit and vegetables from many countries, including Europe, South Africa, Israel or China. The former is a great source of business, and as a result, Russian importers fear the effects of the possible sanctions that may close the Russian borders to European products, although they are also optimistic and hope the situation will not escalate.

Asif Jafarov, of Akhmed Fruit Company, explains that at the moment “numerous products are imported from Europe, so a ban would cause a great disturbance,” but he believes that it will all be fine by September, perhaps even by mid-August.

For her part, Larissa Khachikyan, of the Russian company Friend Fruits, explains that “the summer campaign is a period of low imports, but we continue to work with suppliers with whom we have collaborated for years and the situation is fine. Right now, for example, we are working with exporters from Italy, Spain, France and South Africa. The country we work with depends on the season.” Overall, Europe accounts for around 50% of the company’s imports.

Larissa affirms that even though there are some rumours about Chile being currently afraid to work with Russia, her firm relies on both its long-term business relationships and its reputation to overcome any hurdles that may come.

Publication date: 7/24/2014
Author: Juan Zea Estellés
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Mexican exporters meet with Philly importers to discuss weekly liner service

Driven by Mexico’s expanding economy, 10 major fruit exporters from Mexico toured the Philadelphia Port complex and one of the nation’s largest produce-storage and packing facilities in Vineland, NJ. The exporters also met in small groups with 15 importers from the Philadelphia region — speed-dating style — in an effort to find the right business match for their perishable products.

“We came here to find the right people to take care of our product. We are proud of what we produce and we need to know it will be treated well,” Jose Garibay, a berry grower and exporter from Mexico, said in a press release. “I’m certain — with consolidation — we can make this work.”

The tour is the culmination of a year-long effort spearheaded by Ship Philly First, a non-profit, membership organization of private business owners who operate port-related companies in the Delaware Valley, the Mexican consulate of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Regional Port Authority and ProMexico, the economic development arm of Mexico.

Together they are working to create weekly liner service between Philadelphia and Veracruz, Mexico, to generate more business for both ports and to bypass crippling congestion for trucks at the border. While the proposed five-day ocean crossing is cheaper, faster, cleaner and safer than traveling the countries’ highways, a regular shipping service between the two cities has not been available for an estimated 40 years.

Ship Philly First President Larry Antonucci, president of 721 Logistics, and former President Fred Sorbello, chief executive officer of Mullica Hill Group Cos., welcomed the visitors, along with Carlos Giralt, Mexican consul of Philadelphia, and Martin Caro, deputy trade and investment commissioner for ProMexico. Jack Murphy of Maersk and Anthony DeBari of MSC — shipping lines that have an interest in creating an ocean route between the two cities — also attended.

“10 billion a year in bilateral trade already exists between Mexico and our region. An ocean route makes a lot of sense,” said Sorbello, whose company is one of the largest meat importers in the United States. The next step, he added, is a trade mission for regional importers to Veracruz in July, which should solidify professional relationships.

Rusty Lucca, president of Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage, hosted approximately 80 guests at his 325,000-square-foot facility in Vineland. Visitors watched clementines from Chile and avocados from Mexico rumble down spotless assembly lines before being bagged, labeled and readied for distribution to major retailers, such as Walmart, Costco, ShopRite, Acme and Krogers.

“Exporters need to know their perishable products are taken care of, that they are placed in a clean, secure facility with state-of-the-art temperature control,” said Lucca, who provided a Mexican lunch for all in his 100-seat on-site cafeteria. “They also need to know their produce will be repacked in the most attractive way. This visit is an insurance policy. I am not the only game in town, but I am representative of the quality of warehousing and value-added service that is available in this region.”

Located on 44-acres in Vineland, Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage receives more than 200,000 pallets of fruit annually from around the world.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Mexican exporters meet with Philly importers to discuss weekly liner service

Driven by Mexico’s expanding economy, 10 major fruit exporters from Mexico toured the Philadelphia Port complex and one of the nation’s largest produce-storage and packing facilities in Vineland, NJ. The exporters also met in small groups with 15 importers from the Philadelphia region — speed-dating style — in an effort to find the right business match for their perishable products.

“We came here to find the right people to take care of our product. We are proud of what we produce and we need to know it will be treated well,” Jose Garibay, a berry grower and exporter from Mexico, said in a press release. “I’m certain — with consolidation — we can make this work.”

The tour is the culmination of a year-long effort spearheaded by Ship Philly First, a non-profit, membership organization of private business owners who operate port-related companies in the Delaware Valley, the Mexican consulate of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Regional Port Authority and ProMexico, the economic development arm of Mexico.

Together they are working to create weekly liner service between Philadelphia and Veracruz, Mexico, to generate more business for both ports and to bypass crippling congestion for trucks at the border. While the proposed five-day ocean crossing is cheaper, faster, cleaner and safer than traveling the countries’ highways, a regular shipping service between the two cities has not been available for an estimated 40 years.

Ship Philly First President Larry Antonucci, president of 721 Logistics, and former President Fred Sorbello, chief executive officer of Mullica Hill Group Cos., welcomed the visitors, along with Carlos Giralt, Mexican consul of Philadelphia, and Martin Caro, deputy trade and investment commissioner for ProMexico. Jack Murphy of Maersk and Anthony DeBari of MSC — shipping lines that have an interest in creating an ocean route between the two cities — also attended.

“10 billion a year in bilateral trade already exists between Mexico and our region. An ocean route makes a lot of sense,” said Sorbello, whose company is one of the largest meat importers in the United States. The next step, he added, is a trade mission for regional importers to Veracruz in July, which should solidify professional relationships.

Rusty Lucca, president of Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage, hosted approximately 80 guests at his 325,000-square-foot facility in Vineland. Visitors watched clementines from Chile and avocados from Mexico rumble down spotless assembly lines before being bagged, labeled and readied for distribution to major retailers, such as Walmart, Costco, ShopRite, Acme and Krogers.

“Exporters need to know their perishable products are taken care of, that they are placed in a clean, secure facility with state-of-the-art temperature control,” said Lucca, who provided a Mexican lunch for all in his 100-seat on-site cafeteria. “They also need to know their produce will be repacked in the most attractive way. This visit is an insurance policy. I am not the only game in town, but I am representative of the quality of warehousing and value-added service that is available in this region.”

Located on 44-acres in Vineland, Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage receives more than 200,000 pallets of fruit annually from around the world.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Mexican exporters meet with Philly importers to discuss weekly liner service

Driven by Mexico’s expanding economy, 10 major fruit exporters from Mexico toured the Philadelphia Port complex and one of the nation’s largest produce-storage and packing facilities in Vineland, NJ. The exporters also met in small groups with 15 importers from the Philadelphia region — speed-dating style — in an effort to find the right business match for their perishable products.

“We came here to find the right people to take care of our product. We are proud of what we produce and we need to know it will be treated well,” Jose Garibay, a berry grower and exporter from Mexico, said in a press release. “I’m certain — with consolidation — we can make this work.”

The tour is the culmination of a year-long effort spearheaded by Ship Philly First, a non-profit, membership organization of private business owners who operate port-related companies in the Delaware Valley, the Mexican consulate of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Regional Port Authority and ProMexico, the economic development arm of Mexico.

Together they are working to create weekly liner service between Philadelphia and Veracruz, Mexico, to generate more business for both ports and to bypass crippling congestion for trucks at the border. While the proposed five-day ocean crossing is cheaper, faster, cleaner and safer than traveling the countries’ highways, a regular shipping service between the two cities has not been available for an estimated 40 years.

Ship Philly First President Larry Antonucci, president of 721 Logistics, and former President Fred Sorbello, chief executive officer of Mullica Hill Group Cos., welcomed the visitors, along with Carlos Giralt, Mexican consul of Philadelphia, and Martin Caro, deputy trade and investment commissioner for ProMexico. Jack Murphy of Maersk and Anthony DeBari of MSC — shipping lines that have an interest in creating an ocean route between the two cities — also attended.

“10 billion a year in bilateral trade already exists between Mexico and our region. An ocean route makes a lot of sense,” said Sorbello, whose company is one of the largest meat importers in the United States. The next step, he added, is a trade mission for regional importers to Veracruz in July, which should solidify professional relationships.

Rusty Lucca, president of Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage, hosted approximately 80 guests at his 325,000-square-foot facility in Vineland. Visitors watched clementines from Chile and avocados from Mexico rumble down spotless assembly lines before being bagged, labeled and readied for distribution to major retailers, such as Walmart, Costco, ShopRite, Acme and Krogers.

“Exporters need to know their perishable products are taken care of, that they are placed in a clean, secure facility with state-of-the-art temperature control,” said Lucca, who provided a Mexican lunch for all in his 100-seat on-site cafeteria. “They also need to know their produce will be repacked in the most attractive way. This visit is an insurance policy. I am not the only game in town, but I am representative of the quality of warehousing and value-added service that is available in this region.”

Located on 44-acres in Vineland, Lucca Freezer & Cold Storage receives more than 200,000 pallets of fruit annually from around the world.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Mango importers looking for price rebound

The mango market hit rock-bottom prices this spring, but U.S. importers are expecting a better market as the summer wears on.

It appears that there were a number of factors leading to the low prices, including many different production areas, growers pushing the price too high too early and new players in the deal.

Larry Nienkerk, manager of Splendid Products LLC in Burlingame, CA, saw some encouraging marketplace signs in mid-May. Ecuador-mango-cuttingMangos being cut from a tree during harvesting in Ecuador.“I see a little bit more strength in the market,” he said May 16.

Through the early part of May, the mango was as low as it gets with $ 3 buying a carton of mangos more often than not during the first two weeks of the month.

But Nienkerk said Guatemala and Nicaragua were winding down and Mexican producers should have a good opportunity to gradually increase the f.o.b. and maintain a nice market through the rest of the summer.

The longtime mango importer said that conflicting reports were coming out of Sinaloa, which provides much of Mexico’s mangos during the second half of the year and throughout the summer. “It’s too early to tell for northern Sinaloa but in southern Sinaloa we have been told there was a pretty good bloom drop and they could be down in volume quite a bit.”

Ronald Cohen, vice president of sales-member for Vision Import Group in River Edge, NJ, has heard the same reports but tends to take them with a grain of salt. “You just don’t know,” he said May 19. “Sometimes, the growers tell you that but they are only looking at their own trees. There are new trees coming into production and others that are a year older and are going to produce more. They aren’t necessarily being deceptive. They just don’t know. We just have to wait and see.”

He agreed that the drop in volume from competing countries should allow an upward movement on the f.o.b. price. Cohen believes there will be fairly priced mangos at values conducive for retail promotions for the rest of the summer.

Though volume has been down so far this year, he believes “at the end of the deal, we will see another record crop of mangos from Mexico.”

Gary Clevenger, managing member for Freska Produce International in Oxnard, CA, told The Produce News May 16 “that the market is about as low as I have seen it in a long time. But there is light at the end of the tunnel. Right now supply exceeds demand and there is a lot of fruit out there.”

But he said retailers are starting to respond to the very low price. “We are seeing some promotion for three, four and even five mangos for a dollar in some circumstances.”

Clevenger said the promotions should move the mangos through the pipeline and create a better marketing situation moving forward. Like the others, he said the elimination of several production areas should help the market firm up. At one point, he said five production areas — Nicaragua, Guatemala, Brazil, Haiti and Mexico — all had fruit vying for customers. That in itself created a downward pressure on the price.

Isabel Freeland, vice president at Coast Tropical in San Diego, blamed low-cost sellers for the below-cost pricing. She said some sellers were offering mangos at below $ 3 per carton, even though there is no way to make money at the price.

But like the others, Freeland does expect the market to rise as summer approaches.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

UK importers ask government to reverse ban on Indian mangoes

UK importers ask government to reverse ban on Indian mangoes

Importers and distributors in the United Kingdom are signing an e-petition, stating that the ban on import from India was imposed in haste and should be lifted

Mango exporters who were upset about the ban on alphonsos from India imposed by the UK government this year, have now found support from UK importers themselves.

Importers from UK have come together to sign an e-petition, requesting their government to reverse the import ban on the fruit. According to the city exporters, UK is an immense market and the ban will not only effect them, but also the importers and distributors of UK.

Ruchi exporters at the APMC market in Vashi who have shipped 2,500 kgs of mango to date, claim they are treating every fruit with Vapour Heat Treatment (VHT). Ruchi Chaudhary Mehra said, “We have been following the norms prescribed by the UK government. We are also treating every fruit with vapour heat just to be doubly sure. There is a big market of Indian consumers in UK who demand the fruit and if the ban comes into force, it will affect both suppliers and consumers. As only UK residents can sign the petition, we are circulating the e-petition link to all our clients in the country and requesting them to sign it.”

The e-petition states that the ban was undertaken in haste, and proven treatments like hot water treatment, irradiation (approved for import in USA) and vapour heat treatment were not considered before enforcing it.

Sanjay Pansare, director of APMC fruit market, said, “The ban was enforced after fruit flies were found in a few imports from India.

We are now treating every fruit before sending the produce to stick to norms. We are supporting the e-petition and trying to circulate it to as many clients as possible. We hope the UK government considers reversing the ban.”

Source: mid-day.com

Publication date: 4/17/2014


FreshPlaza.com

NMB to host ripening webinar for retailers and importers

The National Mango Board — in conjunction with the department of plant science at the University of California-Davis — will be hosting a free mango-ripening webinar on Thursday, April 24 at 4 p.m. Eastern time. The webinar will discuss why mango ripening is important to the U.S. consumer and how to utilize the NMB’s new Mango Handling & Ripening Protocol.mangolo

To enhance consumers’ mango-eating experience, the NMB has invested in its Ripe Ready to Eat Mango program to help the mango industry deliver a ripened fruit for U.S. consumers to enjoy.

“The NMB provides an abundant amount of tools for the industry to consider if they want to develop their own ripening system,” WIlliam Watson, NMB’s executive director, said in a press release. During the webinar, the NMB will showcase its new ripening tool, Mango Handling & Ripening Protocol, which will be available to the industry.

In addition, Carlos Crisosto of the department of plant science at the University of California-Davis will discuss the benefits of implementing a ripening program and share insights on the positive effects ripening has on mango consumers and acceptance.

Mango importers, wholesalers and brokers, as well as retail distribution center and quality assurance experts are encouraged to attend, as are buyers, category managers and merchandisers.

For more information or to register for this webinar, visit www.mango.org/webinar.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Chilean Fresh Fruit Association keeping North American importers abreast of movements and volumes

In mid-January, Karen Brux, the North America managing director for the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association and the marketing director for the Chilean Avocado Importers Association, headquartered in San Carlos, CA, provided The Produce News with import data on Chilean produce exports for the current season, adding comments on products that have notable volume changes.

Beginning with blueberries, Brux said that 22,516 tons had been exported from Chile this year, compared to 34,000 during the same time period last year.CFFAaconex Puah FAA5254In Cherries, Chile exported 8,356 tons so far this season compared to 7,998 last year.

“Our original forecast for blueberries was that exports would be up by seven percent,” she said. “But blueberry shipments are still behind last year. This is due primarily to fumigation requirements put in place after multiple detections of the European Grapevine Moth.”

She noted that in late December, it was announced that fumigation would be required in Chile prior to shipping, but in early January that was amended. Fumigation is now taking place upon arrival into the United States, and the volume of blueberries departing Chile for the United States is starting to increase.

In Cherries, Chile exported 8,356 tons so far this season compared to 7,998 last year. Plum exports are exactly in line with last year’s figures.

Other stone fruits have not fared as well, however. Chile had exported 2,252 tons of peaches so far this season compared to 6,425 tons last year. Nectarines are down from 5,411 tons a year ago compared to 2,828 tons this year. Apricots have also felt a drop this year to 232 tons compared to 822 during the same period last year.

“An unusual succession of frosts hit Chile in September 2013, with stone fruit and kiwifruit suffering the most,” said Brux. “As of mid-January, estimates projected industry-wide losses of 64 percent for Chilean peaches, 59 percent for nectarines and 63 percent for plums. The Chilean Kiwifruit Committee has reported losses of 60 percent.”

She added that the latest obstacle is the port strike at San Antonio. According to a Jan. 27 article by Michele Labrut  in Seatrade Global, over a dozen ports, including San Antonio — Chile’s largest port in the central region of the country — and Iquique, Tocopilla, Huasco, Caldera and Chañaral in the north have all shut down in a protest that has hurt fruit, copper and other exports estimated so far to be $ 400 million in value.

The first strike broke out in December in the northern port Angamos after operator Ultraport declined to include non-union workers in salary talks. The terminal was completely paralyzed for 16 days.

In late January, workers at five northern ports halted their activities to support Angamos workers. Now southern port workers have walked out in support of a strike at northern terminals for benefits and union rights.

It’s a hard hit for perishable goods from Chile because of the short shelf life.

Despite its current challenges, few would argue but that Chile continues to stand at the top of the professional ladder when it comes to producing high-quality fruits and vegetables and knowing how to properly export them. The country’s counter-seasonal harvest of produce complements U.S. production and provides North Americans with year-round access to a wide variety of fresh fruit.

Chile is also a world leader in safe agricultural and environmental practices. From growing, harvesting and packing practices, to worker safety and environmental stewardship, safety is paramount to Chilean producers, to the point that fruit exports meet or exceed the strictest North American, European and Asian standards.

The Chilean fresh fruit industry has developed a program called Good Practices for sustainability and a set of vigorous guidelines for protecting air, water and soil resources. State-of-the-art drip irrigation systems and access to real-time climate data minimize water consumption.

Use of pesticides is strictly regulated according to international guidelines, and Chile ranks among the top ten countries in the world with the most Good Agricultural Practices certificates according to both United Nations and U.S. standards.

GAP standards were established to ensure that food meets global standards for safety, nutrition and sustainability.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

The Netherlands, Spain and China, largest horticultural importers

TGF-FruitImageThe Netherlands, Spain and China, largest horticultural importersIn the period between 2009 and 2012, the Netherlands became the largest worldwide exporter and re-exporter of fruit and vegetables (including citrus), according to data provided by the Statistics Division of the United Nations.

Taking 2012′s exports and re-exports into account, the Netherlands handled 14.6% of the world’s total, followed by Spain, with 12.1%, and China, with 10.9%.

The fourth place in the ranking was for Mexico (9.7%), followed by the United States (8.3%), Canada (5%), France (4.4%), Belgium (3.7%), Italy (2.8%) and Germany, with 1.9%. The remaining 26.5% is distributed between other countries.


Clients

If we take a close look at these exporters’ main clients, the Netherlands covers 34.9% of Germany’s imports, 15.7% of the United Kingdom’s, 7.6% of Belgium’s, 3.8% of Sweden’s and 3.6% of France’s. Only 1.4% of its exports are shipped to Spain.

For its part, Spain covers 24.4% of Germany’s fruit and vegetable needs, while 16.8% is exported to France, 15.8% to the United Kingdom, 11.9% to the Netherlands and 5.4% to Italy.Meanwhile, China covers 17.8% of Japan’s fruit and vegetable imports, 8% of Indonesia’s, 7.2% of Vietnam’s, 6.8% of Malaysia’s and 6.6% of South Korea’s. Only 0.6% of its horticultural exports are shipped to Spain.

Mexico supplies 92.9% of the United State’s horticultural imports, 2% of Canada’s, 0.9% of Guatemala’s, 0.7% of Algeria’s, 0.6% of Turkey’s and around 0.5% of Spain’s.Finally, the United States covers 66.2% of Canada’s horticultural imports, 7.1% of Japan’s, 7.1% of Mexico’s, 2.6% of the United Kingdom’s and 0.7% of Spain fruit and vegetable imports, including citrus.

Source: hortoinfo

Publication date: 1/10/2014

 

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NMB offers mango-handling advice to importers, wholesalers and brokers

image001-6The National Mango Board hosted its second free Mango Temperature Management & Ripening Webinar Aug. 22 for retailers and importers. It focused on providing attendees with information on how to best handle mangos and the importance of proper temperature management to enhance consumers’ mango-eating experience.

In conjunction with the University of California-Davis department of plant science and the University of Florida IFAS Center for Food Distribution & Retailing, the NMB hosted this free webinar to share its initial findings of the Ripe & Ready to Eat mango program initiative with the industry. Preliminary findings suggest that mangos stored in cold temperatures prevent the tropical fruit to ripen in the appropriate time for consumers to purchase and enjoy. The webinar also gave insight on consumer preferences to help determine the minimum quality standards consumers will accept.

During the webinar, ripening expert Dennis Kihlstadius of Produce Technical Services shared his preliminary findings and recommendations for stores and distribution centers. Kihlstadius’ recommendations included improving temperature management at all distribution levels during transportation and storage, as well as mango displays at store level. He emphasized that mangos should not be refrigerated and should not be transported or stored below 54 degrees.

Jeffrey Brecht of the University of Florida shared his preliminary findings and recommendations for importers’ and retailers’ warehouses and stores. Brecht recommended choosing appropriate temperatures when trying to slow ripening and avoid chilling (55 degrees), and to help promote ripening (68-72 degrees). Another key suggestion for stores is to display mangos at room temperature to allow mangos’ aroma to develop.

In addition, Carlos Crisosto of the University of California-Davis is helping the NMB to create a complete descriptive analysis of Tommy Atkins, Kent, Ataulfo, Keitt, Haden and Francis mango cultivars from the top six producing countries. A minimum quality index will be developed to help determine the minimum quality standards consumers will accept; engaging them to purchase mangos and increase consumer satisfaction. Crisosto shared during the webinar that ripe mangos have higher consumer acceptance than mature mangos. He also indicated that ripe soluble solids concentration and dry matter are great predictors for consumer acceptance. DM can predict consumer acceptance in both mature and ripe mangos.

Furthermore, Wendy McManus, NMB retail program manager, highlighted the wealth of tools available at www.mango.org/retail. Retailers can find an extensive amount of resources under its handling and merchandising tab, which includes the Mango Maturity & Ripeness Guide for receiving, the Mango Backroom Poster for store-level training and the Mango Postharvest Best Management Practices Manual.

Also available on its website is a newly designed back room piece titled “Treat me like a banana!” to help inform retail produce departments that — like bananas — mango should not be refrigerated in the back room or on display. It also states that mangos can suffer chill damage and loss of flavor if held below 54 degrees. The new back room piece can be ordered using the point-of-sale order form at www.mango.org/industry/point-sale-materials.

The NMB’s Mango Temperature Management & Ripening Program Webinar for retailers and importers is now available on its website for viewing at www.mango.org/retail/best-practices. Speaker presentations are also available for download.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Importers donate citrus to The Bowery Mission

South African Summer Citrus joins United Nations, Consulate for Mandela International Day
Importers donate citrus to The Bowery Mission

The growers of South Africa Summer Citrus joined with the United Nations and the South African Consulate General of New York to celebrate Nelson Mandela International Day, July 18th, Nelson Mandela’s birthday.


The growers and importers were joined by members of the South Africa Consulate to offload the fruit at the Mission. (Left to Right) Lebogang Mokwena, Consul, Political, Gerard Stone, Director of Western Cape Citrus Producers Forum, George Monyemangene, South African Consulate General, and Piet Smit, Director of Western Cape Citrus Producers Forum.

“As South Africans, we are proud that Mr. Mandela set an example to make the world a better place for everyone,” said Ms. Suhanra Conradie, CEO of the Western Cape Citrus Producers Forum (W.C.C.P.F.). “It is a privilege to export our fine fruit to the US and around the world, and an equal privilege that our fruit can honor Mr. Mandela.”

As part of the week’s Nelson Mandela International Day programs, South African Summer Citrus growers joined United Nations and the South African Consulate General of New York personnel to distribute oranges and solicit pledges from people in New York, asking them to commit 67 minutes toward making their world better.


Steve Tursi of Seald Sweet and George Monyemangene, Consulate General of South African Consulate to New York join associates of The Bowery Mission in New York to receive South African Summer Citrus.

The number 67 is the number of years Nelson Mandela is considered to have been in service to his country. The Mandela Day campaign asked that individuals, groups and businesses donate 67 minutes of time on or around July 18th to give back to their community and the world.

On Thursday, July 18th, the Bowery Mission received 67 cartons of South African Summer Citrus donated by the growers and importers AMC, Capespan, DNE World, and Seald Sweet.  In presenting the fruit to the Mission, the importers and the growers joined with Mr. George Monyemangene, South African Consul General of New York and Ms. Lebogang Mokwena, Consul Political to offload the cartons from the delivery truck. In a bucket brigade-like line, the cartons were passed hand to hand in symbolic multi-cultural and multi-national unity toward easing the pain of hunger.

“We are grateful to the four importers who have joined us in this effort,” said Ms. Conradie. “And we are ever appreciative of the support we receive from the South African Consulate General of New York in support of the citrus program to the US.”


(Left to Right) Miles Fraser-Jones of AMC, Lebogang Mokwena, Consul, Political, Gerard Stone, Director of Western Cape Citrus Producers Forum, George Monyemangene, South African Consulate General, and Piet Smit, Director of Western Cape Citrus Producers Forum formed a brigade like line to offload fruit for The Bowery Mission in a symbol of multi-national and multi-racial unity against hunger.

The Bowery Mission has served homeless and hungry New Yorkers since 1879 and over the last year has provided more than 376,700 meals, 35,400 bags of groceries, 79,900 nights of shelter and 57,400 articles of clothing to those in need.

South African citrus sold in the United States comes primarily from the region near Citrusdal about two hours Northwest of Cape Town, the Northern Cape near Kimberly, and the Northwest along the Orange River, near Upington.

The W.C.C.P.F. facilitates logistical, marketing and sales support coordination of products for its members.  Its mission is to maintain and expand its role as the preferred and reliable supplier of safe Summer citrus for the US.

 
For more information:
Lisa Packer
Tel: +1 (610) 688-3164
Email: [email protected]

 

Publication date: 7/22/2013


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