Blog Archives

Early stonefruit season hampers South African imports

Early stonefruit season hampers South African imports

The early start to this year’s stonefruit harvest in South Africa made for a lighter crop and smaller sizes this year. But shippers expect volumes will pick up going into 2015.

Harvesting of stone fruit in South Africa got off to a very early start this year, with picking getting underway as much as 3 weeks earlier than normal. The quick start to the season resulted in smaller sizes, so growers had trouble filling out boxes. Apricots, in particular, were not as plentiful as expected, so early estimates as to how much fruit would be picked and shipped were not met.

Plums and peaches
Plum volumes were also off, with fruit sets not going well in some areas. As with apricots, smaller sizes made it harder to fill out boxes and meet early volume estimates. Peaches recovered from early deficiencies in the season and peak volumes are currently coming out of South Africa. Sizing on peaches has also been good.

Nectarines
Nectarines have also fared well in terms of sizes, but variability in maturity and sugar content made it a challenge to choose the right fruit for export early in the season. In general, the nectarine crop is looking very promising, according to one South African exporter.

Quality of stonefruit
Despite challenges with sizing and volumes, quality of fruit has been good. Good weather throughout the growing season resulted in high sugar levels in most fruit. Good sugar content helps fruit store well, so shelf life should be good. While the early part of the stone fruit season was characterized by a shortage of fruit, the last week has brought increased volumes, and exporters hope those volumes will continue going into January.

Prices
A early shortage of fruit resulted in higher prices, but those prices are starting to come down now that volumes are filling out. One exporter was concerned with how quickly prices rose earlier in the year because the subsequent drop might also come very quickly. Pricing trends have been similar to those from the 2011 season, but returns have been better because of a more favorable exchange rate. Prices in the United Kingdom, in particular, have been good when compared to the rest of Europe. Sales in Europe this time of year are usually pretty sluggish, but shippers expect demand to pick up in January.

Flat varieties
A stone fruit variety that has drawn a lot of interest in Europe has been the flat peach. While the uptick in attention to the variety has made South African exporters take note, South African growers cannot plant the variety commercially for at least another three years because of quarantine regulations. But if interest in flat stone fruit persists, growers will likely plant and export the fruit to Europe in the future.

Middle and Far East
Volumes of stone fruit in the Middle East and Far East have been very good this year, but prices there have been under pressure and are currently trending downward. While South African exporters don’t ship most of their fruit to those markets, those areas remain important, so exporters are watching those markets closely.

Publication date: 12/24/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam will stop importing fruit from Australia from next year because of insect issues, an official from the Plant Protection Department under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed Tuesday.

The department will also stop granting plant quarantine certificates for Australian fruit from January 1, 2015, according to department head Nguyen Xuan Hong.

Hong attributed the import ban to the fact that fruits in Australia have been hit by Mediterranean Sea fruit flies, which could spread to Vietnam via the imports.

Australia is among the top five largest fruit exporters to Vietnam, besides China, the U.S., New Zealand, and South Africa. Vietnam mostly imports Australian cherries, apples, oranges, and grapes.

The Southeast Asian country purchased more than 2,000 tons of fruit from Australia in the first ten months of this year, according to the agriculture ministry.

News about Vietnam’s decision to block Australian fruit shipments emerged as early as November as Vietnamese importers began informing their Australian partners that they will not be permitted to import any fresh fruit from Australia.

Australian broadcaster ABC News reported on November 4 that the country’s Department of Agriculture had confirmed that Vietnam “raised concerns with Australia’s fruit fly management systems and is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit.”

The Vietnamese market is worth US$ 40 million to Australia’s fruit exporting sector, according to ABC News.

Nguyen Thai Dung, deputy general director of Big C, said the supermarket chain imports a large amount of Australian fruit but has yet to be informed of the import ban. “Big C will consider importing pears, oranges and apples from alternative markets such as Japan, New Zealand and the U.S.,” he told the ministry-run newspaper.

Australian fruits are competitive with similar imports in Vietnam thanks to the close geographical proximity between the two countries.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam will stop importing fruit from Australia from next year because of insect issues, an official from the Plant Protection Department under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed Tuesday.

The department will also stop granting plant quarantine certificates for Australian fruit from January 1, 2015, according to department head Nguyen Xuan Hong.

Hong attributed the import ban to the fact that fruits in Australia have been hit by Mediterranean Sea fruit flies, which could spread to Vietnam via the imports.

Australia is among the top five largest fruit exporters to Vietnam, besides China, the U.S., New Zealand, and South Africa. Vietnam mostly imports Australian cherries, apples, oranges, and grapes.

The Southeast Asian country purchased more than 2,000 tons of fruit from Australia in the first ten months of this year, according to the agriculture ministry.

News about Vietnam’s decision to block Australian fruit shipments emerged as early as November as Vietnamese importers began informing their Australian partners that they will not be permitted to import any fresh fruit from Australia.

Australian broadcaster ABC News reported on November 4 that the country’s Department of Agriculture had confirmed that Vietnam “raised concerns with Australia’s fruit fly management systems and is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit.”

The Vietnamese market is worth US$ 40 million to Australia’s fruit exporting sector, according to ABC News.

Nguyen Thai Dung, deputy general director of Big C, said the supermarket chain imports a large amount of Australian fruit but has yet to be informed of the import ban. “Big C will consider importing pears, oranges and apples from alternative markets such as Japan, New Zealand and the U.S.,” he told the ministry-run newspaper.

Australian fruits are competitive with similar imports in Vietnam thanks to the close geographical proximity between the two countries.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam to block Australian 2015 fruit imports

Vietnam will stop importing fruit from Australia from next year because of insect issues, an official from the Plant Protection Department under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed Tuesday.

The department will also stop granting plant quarantine certificates for Australian fruit from January 1, 2015, according to department head Nguyen Xuan Hong.

Hong attributed the import ban to the fact that fruits in Australia have been hit by Mediterranean Sea fruit flies, which could spread to Vietnam via the imports.

Australia is among the top five largest fruit exporters to Vietnam, besides China, the U.S., New Zealand, and South Africa. Vietnam mostly imports Australian cherries, apples, oranges, and grapes.

The Southeast Asian country purchased more than 2,000 tons of fruit from Australia in the first ten months of this year, according to the agriculture ministry.

News about Vietnam’s decision to block Australian fruit shipments emerged as early as November as Vietnamese importers began informing their Australian partners that they will not be permitted to import any fresh fruit from Australia.

Australian broadcaster ABC News reported on November 4 that the country’s Department of Agriculture had confirmed that Vietnam “raised concerns with Australia’s fruit fly management systems and is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit.”

The Vietnamese market is worth US$ 40 million to Australia’s fruit exporting sector, according to ABC News.

Nguyen Thai Dung, deputy general director of Big C, said the supermarket chain imports a large amount of Australian fruit but has yet to be informed of the import ban. “Big C will consider importing pears, oranges and apples from alternative markets such as Japan, New Zealand and the U.S.,” he told the ministry-run newspaper.

Australian fruits are competitive with similar imports in Vietnam thanks to the close geographical proximity between the two countries.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Publication date: 12/19/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Vietnam ban on AU produce imports likely

Vietnam ban on AU produce imports likely

Vietnam has decided to suspend imports of fruits from Australia for concerns over fruit fly, according to the Department of Plant Protection under Vietnam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development on Wednesday.

Nguyen Xuan Hong, director of the department, said imports of all 38 kinds of Australian fruits will be suspended from Jan. 1, 2015 to prevent fruit fly infestation as Australia is facing outbreaks of fruit fly which attack and damage fruits and vegetables.

Vietnam has sent an announcement to the Australian side in accordance with international regulations, said Hong.

He said quarantine work will be strengthened for fruit shipments on the way to Vietnam.

The imports will be resumed when no fruit fly outbreak is reported in Australia and if the country’s fruits meet quarantine requirements of Vietnam, reported the website of the Vietnamese government on Wednesday.

According to statistics by the Department of Plant Protection, in the first 10 months of 2014, Vietnam imported some 2,000 tons of fruits from Australia, mainly apples, pears, grapes and cherries.

Source: www.shanghaidaily.com

Publication date: 12/17/2014


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

US: Mango imports behind last year’s volumes

The amount of mangos imported into the United States from Ecuador and Peru this season lag behind the volumes brought into the country last year.

At the end of the first week in December, the total volume of imported mangos from Ecuador reached 6.8 million boxes, which is 1.4 million fewer boxes than were imported by the same week last year. The projected total amount of fruit received from Ecuador this import season, which is expected to last into January, is 8.6 million boxes.

As of the end of last week, prices for a box of Tommy Atkins 7s from Ecuador were between $ 6.00 and $ 7.00 at the Philadelphia port of entry, between $ 5.00 and $ 7.00 at the South Florida ports of entry and between $ 6.50 and $ 7.50 at the Southern California ports of entry.

Arrivals from Peru have also trailed imports from last season. While just over 441,000 boxes of mangos had arrived from Peru by the end of the first week of December in 2013, shipments from Peru were 11,000 boxes by the end of the first week of this month. But unlike Ecuador, the Peruvian import window is just getting underway, so there’s still time before April, when the Peruvian season is expected to wrap up, for total imports to reach the 9.0 million boxes which are expected to enter the United States.

Publication date: 12/16/2014
Author: Carlos Nunez / Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Export Import Offer

 

Rupee is down by 35% in last 2 years

Find new Export Opportunities

Find new ways to save on Imports

 

Export Opportunities

  • Weekly data on latest exports with Products, Price & Target countries
  • Alerts on new export opportunities in your sector
  • Further use our services to find export leads, access latest benefits under export policies

Import Opportunities

  • Weekly data on latest imports with Products, Price & Suppliers
  • Alerts on other importers, lower cost products, Price reductions and consolidation opportunities
  • Further use our services of Import club, Reduce import cost by 20%