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Chile pepper grower seeks support for improved grades and standards for category

A Florida-based grower-shipper of chile peppers is lobbying the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Specialty Crop Division to establish a USDA Grade and Delivery standard for the category, positing that it will benefit the industry at large.IMG 3585

Steve Veneziano, vice president of sales and operations for Oakes Farms, based in Immokalee, FL, said the company grades its own chile peppers as everyone else does Bell peppers, with grades of Fancy, No. 1 and No. 2 quality. He believes that if all shippers followed similar guidelines, the chile pepper category would benefit.

“With no grade contract established, the chile pepper category is fairly stagnant because they don’t have the proper sell-through, they have a lot of shrink, and produce managers don’t want to merchandise them because it’s a high-shrink category,” he said. “And especially during transitional times, some shippers mix No. 2s and poor-quality peppers in the box and they get away with it. Having a grade contract would eliminate that and help the entire industry. The chile pepper category has evolved tremendously over the past five years, and this is what it needs to continue moving forward.”

Veneziano said he recently contacted Jeffrey Davis, business development specialist with the USDA’s specialty crop program, who confirmed that grades and standards currently exist only for sweet peppers, and was told he would need to drum up support from the industry to move forward with his petition.

John Guerra, head of Eastern vegetable sales for S. Katzman Produce in the Bronx, NY, said he is in “100 percent in support of the petition.”

Guerra said the lack of quality standards for various hot peppers has really affected what the consumer thinks a hot pepper or varietal pepper should look like because there is very little restriction.

“Particularly from a terminal market point of view, on a tightly allocated market, everything goes into a box without any consideration on quality or grading, and you pass this along to a consumer who is expecting a certain quality, and it is frustrating,” said Guerra. “We went through a winter of some very unusual weather patterns in Florida, which created some limited availability. While many other grower-shippers were putting anything and everything into a box, Steve was separating them and giving us differentiated product. I feel very lucky that we had Oakes in our portfolio. It’s all about integrity, and Oakes is upholding something that isn’t being followed by all of the industry.”

Guerra said he would be interested in petitioning USDA in support of this movement.

Alan Goldberg, owner of A&B Tropical Produce in Miami, is another proponent of the concept, stating it is “long overdue” to have grading standards for the chile pepper industry.

“When issues come up, there needs to be something solid that people can rely on,” said Goldberg. “The chile pepper category is a growing category and the industry needs this. Really, every item should have a grade standard.”

Asked what benefit the grading standards would bring to the chile pepper industry, Goldberg said, “I think it will create confidence all across the board with both buyers and sellers, who will feel better that there is some protection down the line when it comes to settling disputes. It will limit the grey area. To me, anyone not in favor of implementing grade standards is unscrupulous. Why wouldn’t you want law and order?”

Goldberg said that he, too, is planning to contact USDA in support of this initiative. “I’ll do whatever I can to help promote this situation,” he said.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Improved security solutions coming down the pipeline

A major issue confronting retail grocers in 2015 is protecting customer data and payment information. Data security is critical to protecting a company’s point-of-sale systems and information assets, and more importantly, shoppers expect it whenever they enter the check-out lane.

Right now, total data security is a goal — not yet a reality. But solutions are in the pipeline, and they couldn’t be coming at a better time.

The impact of data hacking on consumers has been huge. In 2013, more than 550 million people had their identities stolen, according to Symantec. The Target and Home Depot data breaches grabbed headlines for the magnitude and extent of stolen data. But, most people might be surprised to learn that data security incidents occur more often at financial institutions (34%), than retail merchants (10.8%), according to a Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report.

Despite the bad headlines, there are reasons to be encouraged that improved security solutions are becoming available. After years of relative indifference to the problem, consumers now demand assurance that their personal identifiable information is protected. As a result, companies are investing in additional resources to find solutions. This energy, in turn, is fueling innovation to counter the sophisticated strategies of hackers.

For example, First Data, an industry partner with the National Grocers Association, has developed a data security solution that is of particular relevance to the grocery industry. TransArmor is a payment card security system that combines the flexibility of encryption with random-number tokenization to protect merchants and their customers from the consequences of a payment card data breach. (Tokenization is the security solution behind the new Apple Pay mobile app.) Mobile payment systems are also beginning to emerge that perform the dual function of protecting customer data, while limiting the impact of swipe fees.

Retailers already go to great lengths to prevent data breaches, but effective merchant solutions are on the horizon that will put hackers out of business.

Supermarket News

Our Ability to Cope With Foodborne Outbreaks Hasn’t Improved Much

(This article was initially published May 6, 2014, by The Conversation. Dr. Pennington is Emeritus Professor of Bacteriology at the University of Aberdeen.)

On May 7, 1964, a catering-size can of corned beef from Rosario, Argentina, was opened in a supermarket in central Aberdeen. Half the contents were put on a shelf behind the cold meat counter and the other half went into the window.

The weather was warm. The sun shone on the meat. Corned beef is cooked in the can and should be sterile. But it wasn’t. It had been contaminated after cooking when the can was cooled with untreated water from the River Parana.

Into this river, 66 tons of human feces and 250,000 gallons of urine were discharged every day from Rosario, where typhoid was common. The bacteria in the corned beef in the window grew vigorously.

Toll rising

The first person to fall ill developed symptoms on May 12. Making an initial diagnosis is not easy; it usually starts with a high fever, which can have many causes.

In Aberdeen, the first definitive diagnoses were made on May 20. By midnight, 12 were in the hospital, and, until June 13, daily hospitalizations never fell below double figures. The outbreak then fizzled out. At its end, 503 had been admitted to the hospital with typhoid, 403 with bacteriological confirmation.

Among those affected, there was a significant over-representation of women aged 15 to 25 living in the more prosperous west end of the city. The probable explanation is that a slimming regime incorporating cold meats and salad was popular at the time.

Nobody died from typhoid in the outbreak, thanks to antibiotics, so in that regard it was modern. Its media coverage, by TV, would be recognizable today, too. But some aspects of its management were conducted as though World War II was still in progress. The names and addresses of those admitted to the hospital were published in the local paper and the end of the outbreak was announced as the “all clear.”

Dr. Ian MacQueen, then Aberdeen’s medical officer of health, took control of the outbreak. Opinion in Aberdeen is still divided about how he handled it. Some say he saved the city, others say that his antics verged on the ridiculous.

I belong to the latter camp. MacQueen believed that dramatic statements of risk were necessary to prevent the spread of infection. Thus Aberdeen became, in his description, the “beleaguered city,” and beef cattle raisers in Paraguay, Kenya and Tanzania suffered economically as importing meat came to be seen as high risk in the initial panic about the source.

MacQueen recommended that nobody should paddle in the sea, and the main thoroughfare, Union Street, was sprayed with disinfectant. There was an obsession with “wave after wave of infections” occurring because of poor personal hygiene.

In truth, this was always very improbable. There was no person-to-person spread. All the infections were caused by eating contaminated corned beef or cold meats cut with the same slicer. New cases continued to appear not because the source of infection was still active but because the incubation period — the time between being infected and falling ill — was often long.

The modern picture

Could the kind of events that happened in Aberdeen 50 years ago be repeated? Cans of food are unlikely to be the source nowadays because canning practices are almost certainly better (even if, as we saw in the horse meat scandal, the label does not always accurately describe the contents). Typhoid is still common in countries whose drinking water is regularly contaminated with human feces – the 2004-2005 outbreak in Kinshasa affected 42,564 and killed 214.

But an even nastier organism caused the most recent big foodborne outbreak in Europe. Like the Aberdeen outbreak, it started in May and went on until the end of June, and, like Aberdeen, it also affected women much more commonly than men. But it happened in 2011 in Germany.

The organism was E.coli O104:H4, a brand-new bacterium that had evolved as a hybrid of two other disease-causing E.coli strains. More than 3,500 fell ill, 855 developed serious complications and 53 died.

Just as in Aberdeen, the organism was imported. It came on the surface of fenugreek seeds, which had left Egypt by boat on Nov. 24, 2009, and eventually arriving at an organic sprout producer near Hamburg on Feb. 10, 2011.

Seed sprouting is ideal for bacterial growth. But identifying the seed sprouts as the cause of the outbreak was difficult and slow because they were used as a salad garnish and many victims were not aware that they had eaten them. That women were more commonly ill pointed to salads, but photographs taken at meals were invaluable.

It was all very embarrassing for the German public health authorities, particularly when the Hamburg health minister mistakenly announced that the organism that had caused the outbreak had been found on Spanish cucumbers, causing serous economic damage to that industry. Shades of Dr. MacQueen!

Lessons from Hamburg

This mistake illustrated the limits of modern lab technology. We might now be in a position where we could genome-sequence E.coli 0104:H4 quickly, but because it was a new strain, the authorities initially confused it for the more prevalent E.coli 0157:H7. When they found this latter bug on the cucumbers, they thought they had found the culprit. New bugs will always make life difficult for scientists.

The German outbreak also pointed to another unavoidable issue: the Egyptians initially denied responsibility. Whatever your technological advances, politics is still likely to slow you down. One bright spot here, though, is that the Chinese are much more cooperative than they once were. This is vital given that the country’s size and relative concentration of people makes it quite a likely source for outbreaks.

Another important step forward has been global food safety standards. The worldwide adoption of the hazard analysis critical control points system – HACCP — originally developed by NASA to protect astronauts from food poisoning, makes it less likely that the world food supply could lead to a major epidemic — even if some countries are still more diligent than others.

Having said that, food poisoning is more common than a century ago (albeit not dysentry spreading from person-to-person or tuberculosis in milk). The Ministry of Health for England and Wales recorded 59 food poisoning incidents during the years 1931-1935, compared to more than 73,000 in 2012, itself a gross underestimate because most people with food poisoning don’t seek medical advice.

The number of sufferers from the UK’s number-one cause, Campylobacter, has been convincingly estimated at 500,000 people each year. To some extent this is down to better diagnosis, but probably not entirely. The realities of 21st century mass production of cheap meat are likely to have driven up infection, for example.

Above all else, the big lesson from Germany was that a major outbreak could still take us completely by surprise. With microbes evolving as they do, we can be certain it will happen again.

Food Safety News

Our Ability to Cope With Foodborne Outbreaks Hasn’t Improved Much

(This article was initially published May 6, 2014, by The Conversation. Dr. Pennington is Emeritus Professor of Bacteriology at the University of Aberdeen.)

On May 7, 1964, a catering-size can of corned beef from Rosario, Argentina, was opened in a supermarket in central Aberdeen. Half the contents were put on a shelf behind the cold meat counter and the other half went into the window.

The weather was warm. The sun shone on the meat. Corned beef is cooked in the can and should be sterile. But it wasn’t. It had been contaminated after cooking when the can was cooled with untreated water from the River Parana.

Into this river, 66 tons of human feces and 250,000 gallons of urine were discharged every day from Rosario, where typhoid was common. The bacteria in the corned beef in the window grew vigorously.

Toll rising

The first person to fall ill developed symptoms on May 12. Making an initial diagnosis is not easy; it usually starts with a high fever, which can have many causes.

In Aberdeen, the first definitive diagnoses were made on May 20. By midnight, 12 were in the hospital, and, until June 13, daily hospitalizations never fell below double figures. The outbreak then fizzled out. At its end, 503 had been admitted to the hospital with typhoid, 403 with bacteriological confirmation.

Among those affected, there was a significant over-representation of women aged 15 to 25 living in the more prosperous west end of the city. The probable explanation is that a slimming regime incorporating cold meats and salad was popular at the time.

Nobody died from typhoid in the outbreak, thanks to antibiotics, so in that regard it was modern. Its media coverage, by TV, would be recognizable today, too. But some aspects of its management were conducted as though World War II was still in progress. The names and addresses of those admitted to the hospital were published in the local paper and the end of the outbreak was announced as the “all clear.”

Dr. Ian MacQueen, then Aberdeen’s medical officer of health, took control of the outbreak. Opinion in Aberdeen is still divided about how he handled it. Some say he saved the city, others say that his antics verged on the ridiculous.

I belong to the latter camp. MacQueen believed that dramatic statements of risk were necessary to prevent the spread of infection. Thus Aberdeen became, in his description, the “beleaguered city,” and beef cattle raisers in Paraguay, Kenya and Tanzania suffered economically as importing meat came to be seen as high risk in the initial panic about the source.

MacQueen recommended that nobody should paddle in the sea, and the main thoroughfare, Union Street, was sprayed with disinfectant. There was an obsession with “wave after wave of infections” occurring because of poor personal hygiene.

In truth, this was always very improbable. There was no person-to-person spread. All the infections were caused by eating contaminated corned beef or cold meats cut with the same slicer. New cases continued to appear not because the source of infection was still active but because the incubation period — the time between being infected and falling ill — was often long.

The modern picture

Could the kind of events that happened in Aberdeen 50 years ago be repeated? Cans of food are unlikely to be the source nowadays because canning practices are almost certainly better (even if, as we saw in the horse meat scandal, the label does not always accurately describe the contents). Typhoid is still common in countries whose drinking water is regularly contaminated with human feces – the 2004-2005 outbreak in Kinshasa affected 42,564 and killed 214.

But an even nastier organism caused the most recent big foodborne outbreak in Europe. Like the Aberdeen outbreak, it started in May and went on until the end of June, and, like Aberdeen, it also affected women much more commonly than men. But it happened in 2011 in Germany.

The organism was E.coli O104:H4, a brand-new bacterium that had evolved as a hybrid of two other disease-causing E.coli strains. More than 3,500 fell ill, 855 developed serious complications and 53 died.

Just as in Aberdeen, the organism was imported. It came on the surface of fenugreek seeds, which had left Egypt by boat on Nov. 24, 2009, and eventually arriving at an organic sprout producer near Hamburg on Feb. 10, 2011.

Seed sprouting is ideal for bacterial growth. But identifying the seed sprouts as the cause of the outbreak was difficult and slow because they were used as a salad garnish and many victims were not aware that they had eaten them. That women were more commonly ill pointed to salads, but photographs taken at meals were invaluable.

It was all very embarrassing for the German public health authorities, particularly when the Hamburg health minister mistakenly announced that the organism that had caused the outbreak had been found on Spanish cucumbers, causing serous economic damage to that industry. Shades of Dr. MacQueen!

Lessons from Hamburg

This mistake illustrated the limits of modern lab technology. We might now be in a position where we could genome-sequence E.coli 0104:H4 quickly, but because it was a new strain, the authorities initially confused it for the more prevalent E.coli 0157:H7. When they found this latter bug on the cucumbers, they thought they had found the culprit. New bugs will always make life difficult for scientists.

The German outbreak also pointed to another unavoidable issue: the Egyptians initially denied responsibility. Whatever your technological advances, politics is still likely to slow you down. One bright spot here, though, is that the Chinese are much more cooperative than they once were. This is vital given that the country’s size and relative concentration of people makes it quite a likely source for outbreaks.

Another important step forward has been global food safety standards. The worldwide adoption of the hazard analysis critical control points system – HACCP — originally developed by NASA to protect astronauts from food poisoning, makes it less likely that the world food supply could lead to a major epidemic — even if some countries are still more diligent than others.

Having said that, food poisoning is more common than a century ago (albeit not dysentry spreading from person-to-person or tuberculosis in milk). The Ministry of Health for England and Wales recorded 59 food poisoning incidents during the years 1931-1935, compared to more than 73,000 in 2012, itself a gross underestimate because most people with food poisoning don’t seek medical advice.

The number of sufferers from the UK’s number-one cause, Campylobacter, has been convincingly estimated at 500,000 people each year. To some extent this is down to better diagnosis, but probably not entirely. The realities of 21st century mass production of cheap meat are likely to have driven up infection, for example.

Above all else, the big lesson from Germany was that a major outbreak could still take us completely by surprise. With microbes evolving as they do, we can be certain it will happen again.

Food Safety News

Plant welfare is improved by fungi in soil

A University of York biologist is part of an international team of scientists that has discovered how plants use fungi to help them to gather vital nutrients from the soil.

The team of Dr Michael Schultze, of the Department of Biology at York, working with colleagues in China, France and USA as well as the John Innes Centre at Norwich, studied the symbiosis between fungus and the roots of Medicago truncatula.

The research may point the way to the development of higher yield crops using plants’ own organic tools rather than fertilizers.

The researchers found that a protein, known as a proton pump, at the interface of fungus and root cells energises cell membranes creating a pathway into the plant cell for nutrients such as phosphorus.

Most plant species are able to exploit an intimate relationship with beneficial fungi in the soil to form mycorrhizas (fungal roots). Since fine fungal filaments called hyphae can grow beyond the root system, they help the plant to acquire mineral nutrients, such as phosphorus, more efficiently.

Using rice and Medicago trunculata, the research, which is published in the journal The Plant Cell, shows that the proton pump is essential for plants using fungus in improving nutrient uptake.

Dr Schultze said: “We envisage that the mycorrhiza-specific proton pump could be an interesting target for plant breeders in an effort to increase crop yield with minimal input of fertilizers.”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of York. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Plant welfare is improved by fungi in soil

A University of York biologist is part of an international team of scientists that has discovered how plants use fungi to help them to gather vital nutrients from the soil.

The team of Dr Michael Schultze, of the Department of Biology at York, working with colleagues in China, France and USA as well as the John Innes Centre at Norwich, studied the symbiosis between fungus and the roots of Medicago truncatula.

The research may point the way to the development of higher yield crops using plants’ own organic tools rather than fertilizers.

The researchers found that a protein, known as a proton pump, at the interface of fungus and root cells energises cell membranes creating a pathway into the plant cell for nutrients such as phosphorus.

Most plant species are able to exploit an intimate relationship with beneficial fungi in the soil to form mycorrhizas (fungal roots). Since fine fungal filaments called hyphae can grow beyond the root system, they help the plant to acquire mineral nutrients, such as phosphorus, more efficiently.

Using rice and Medicago trunculata, the research, which is published in the journal The Plant Cell, shows that the proton pump is essential for plants using fungus in improving nutrient uptake.

Dr Schultze said: “We envisage that the mycorrhiza-specific proton pump could be an interesting target for plant breeders in an effort to increase crop yield with minimal input of fertilizers.”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of York. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

MAF Roda’s improved machines

MAF Roda’s improved machines

At Fruit Logistica, French machinery manufacturers, MAF Roda Agrobotic, presented their selection of improved fruit and vegetable machines. Within a few seconds, machines can scan and grade different qualities and colour. Frederic Scellier, sales manager, explains that machines are equipped with advanced technology, which makes it easy to remove fruit and vegetables with internal and external defects. MAF Roda displayed four types of machines.


Frederic Scellier with Globalscan 6

Improved machines

The Globalscan 6 is a machine which grades several kinds of fruit and vegetables on quality and colour, as well as the diameter, length and shape. Frederic said: “It checks for external defects on apples, citrus and peaches. A camera containing RGB and NIR infrared makes this possible. It also has a high resolution making it is easy to see small defects.”


Viotec

“The Viotec is complementary to Globalscan 6. This machine is able to detect the start of rotting in citrus, by using specific UV(Ultra-violet LED) and IR lighting. It can separate the citrus that have areas of mould which is invisible to the naked eye. Damage can generate big losses for the producers of citrus.” The Globalscan 6 and Viotec are machines that treat the external imperfections of fruit and vegetables.


Insight 2

“Insight 2 is a scanner with a spectrometer for sugar, which analyses the brix level and acidity of citrus.” This machine is based on an analysis of the development between the light emitting near-infrared using halogen lamps and the analysis of different wavelengths received by a sensitive spectrometer.


IDD2

IDD2 arranges the fruit in various ways. First the products go to Pomone 100/112, which is a grading machine for apples, onions and melons. Afterwards, the fruit or vegetables then go to the IDD2. This machine sizes the fruit or vegetables according to internal defects. “This is a new technology without a spectrometer. Therefore MAF Roda’s clients can use all varieties, without the need to change it for another variety.”

For more information:
Frédéric Scellier
Maf Roda Agrobotic
Tel : +33 5 63 63 27 70
Email: [email protected]

 

Publication date: 2/17/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Strategies for improved management of fresh market spinach

Sep. 16, 2013 — Throughout California’s fertile central coast region, fresh spinach is a high-production, high-value crop. Spinach can be finicky, requiring sufficient nitrogen fertilizer and irrigation to ensure ideal growth, and to meet industry quality standards such as its defining deep green color. These production practices–combined with a shallow root system and the crop’s intensive production cycle–can increase the potential of detrimental nitrate leaching. Recent water quality monitoring in the region has found widespread incidents of NO3 levels that exceed the Federal Drinking Water standard. As a result, growers have come under increasing pressure to improve crop nutrient use efficiency (NUE), and thereby minimize NO3 losses from production fields. In an effort to inform future spinach production practices, scientists Aaron Heinrich, Richard Smith, and Michael Cahn evaluated spinach nutrient uptake and water use in the Salinas and San Juan Valleys of California.

The team explained that spinach producers can improve nitrogen use efficiency by applying fertilizer at the optimal time and rate to match crop nitrogen uptake, but that data needed to make these critical fertilizer decisions was not available prior to their study. “No studies had evaluated high-density planting of clipped or bunched spinach grown on 80-inch beds,” said lead author Aaron Heinrich. “Our study was specifically designed to provide data on the nitrogen uptake characteristics of spinach and to evaluate ways to improve nitrogen fertilizer management.”

Heinrich, Smith, and Cahn evaluated grower fertilizer programs, and measured spinach nitrogen uptake over an entire production season with a range of soil conditions, climatic conditions, and cropping histories. They also conducted four replicated fertilizer trials of first- and second-cropped fields.

“Over the growing season, NO3 levels in the soil can build up due to a combination of unused fertilizer and mineralization of crop residue and soil organic matter,” the team reported “Our evaluations showed that soil NO3 testing can be used to improve the nutrient use efficiency of spinach. We found that soil testing would be most effective in spinach production at two critical points: at-planting, and before the midseason fertilizer application when nitrogen use by spinach greatly increases.” The comprehensive report, including additional implications for nitrogen fertilizer management of fresh market spinach, can be found in the June 2013 issue of HortTechnology.

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Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Horticultural Science.

Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.


Journal Reference:

  1. Aaron Heinrich, Richard Smith, And Michael Cahn. Nutrient and Water Use of Fresh Market Spinach. HortTechnology, June 2013

Note: If no author is given, the source is cited instead.

ScienceDaily: Agriculture and Food News

Strategies for improved management of fresh market spinach

Sep. 16, 2013 — Throughout California’s fertile central coast region, fresh spinach is a high-production, high-value crop. Spinach can be finicky, requiring sufficient nitrogen fertilizer and irrigation to ensure ideal growth, and to meet industry quality standards such as its defining deep green color. These production practices–combined with a shallow root system and the crop’s intensive production cycle–can increase the potential of detrimental nitrate leaching. Recent water quality monitoring in the region has found widespread incidents of NO3 levels that exceed the Federal Drinking Water standard. As a result, growers have come under increasing pressure to improve crop nutrient use efficiency (NUE), and thereby minimize NO3 losses from production fields. In an effort to inform future spinach production practices, scientists Aaron Heinrich, Richard Smith, and Michael Cahn evaluated spinach nutrient uptake and water use in the Salinas and San Juan Valleys of California.

The team explained that spinach producers can improve nitrogen use efficiency by applying fertilizer at the optimal time and rate to match crop nitrogen uptake, but that data needed to make these critical fertilizer decisions was not available prior to their study. “No studies had evaluated high-density planting of clipped or bunched spinach grown on 80-inch beds,” said lead author Aaron Heinrich. “Our study was specifically designed to provide data on the nitrogen uptake characteristics of spinach and to evaluate ways to improve nitrogen fertilizer management.”

Heinrich, Smith, and Cahn evaluated grower fertilizer programs, and measured spinach nitrogen uptake over an entire production season with a range of soil conditions, climatic conditions, and cropping histories. They also conducted four replicated fertilizer trials of first- and second-cropped fields.

“Over the growing season, NO3 levels in the soil can build up due to a combination of unused fertilizer and mineralization of crop residue and soil organic matter,” the team reported “Our evaluations showed that soil NO3 testing can be used to improve the nutrient use efficiency of spinach. We found that soil testing would be most effective in spinach production at two critical points: at-planting, and before the midseason fertilizer application when nitrogen use by spinach greatly increases.” The comprehensive report, including additional implications for nitrogen fertilizer management of fresh market spinach, can be found in the June 2013 issue of HortTechnology.

Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:

Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Horticultural Science.

Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.


Journal Reference:

  1. Aaron Heinrich, Richard Smith, And Michael Cahn. Nutrient and Water Use of Fresh Market Spinach. HortTechnology, June 2013

Note: If no author is given, the source is cited instead.

ScienceDaily: Agriculture and Food News

UK: Much improved potato season but still short volumes

UK: Much improved potato season but still short volumes

After one of the worst years in a long time, the UK potato growers are enjoying a spell of ideal weather for a change. Warm weather with showers is bringing the crop on nicely, although with such a late start due to late planting, it won’t catch up entirely.

Colin Galbraith from Moorhouse and Mohan explains, “Supplies are bulking-up nicely, prices are variable, it is very dependent on the kind of potato but a tonne is going for between £200 and £300, with varieties for frying demanding the highest price.”

In general demand for potatoes fell as temperatures rose, but the salad potato has seen good demand.

At the moment the overall feeling is good but as always it is totally weather dependent and it is very early days. Initially volumes will be good, but later in the season they might fall a bit short. So far there have only been few problems with blight in some areas, black leg is also being seen in the North and West of the country, at the moment disease is very limited but if there is a lot of rain more instances could occur.

“Although this season is much improved on last year it will still not be a ‘normal’ year. Planting was delayed, the good weather just now is helping, it is going in the right direction. Volumes will be short and it will be a supplier’s market.”

Earlier this year Moorhouse and Mohan launched the Norfolk Peer brand of potatoes of which they are the exclusive marketer. Launched on the 24th of June, they are available washed 10kg bags) and unwashed (15kg bags). 1kg pre-packs are being sold exclusively sold to Tesco to be sold at 100 stores in the east of the country.

The variety, Maris Peer, is a new season salad potato washed in boxes and distributed same day ready to cook.

For more information:
Colin Galbraith
Moorehouse & Mohan
Tel: +44 1354 602860
Email: [email protected]
www.moorhouseandmohan.com

Publication date: 7/31/2013
Author: Nichola Watson
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com