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Israel ready for avocado season

Israel ready for avocado season

Yonatan Packing & Marketing is a 20 year old Israeli packing house owned by two moshavs and devoted mostly to the cultivation of mangoes, as well as avocados and citrus in the winter. “We produce 10,000 tons per year and deal with clients in Europe (the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and the UK), Russia, and Jordan and, of course, the local market, as well as Gaza and the West Bank,” explains owner CEO Moshe Meiri.

The mango varieties exported by Yonatan include the Tommy Atkins, Keitt, Kent, Maya, Shelly and Omer. According to Mr. Moshe, Europe prefers the Kent and the Omar, as well as “a really good new variety called Castory-Omer, which is fibreless and reaches calibres between 8 and 10. It is a mango with a longer shelf life than the Kent, but shorter than the Keitt.”

In the European retail market, the convenience of ready-to-eat products is increasingly appreciated, and according to Mr. Moshe, this is a trend that can certainly be capitalized in order to boost sales. “Mangoes are available in all colours, but the green Omer and Shelly are the most commonly used varieties for the ready-to-eat European ripening program, while the red are for fresh consumption.”

Retail sales are in fact of paramount importance for Yonatan, as the company’s produce is mostly targeted at this market, where it competes directly with producers from countries like Brazil, Peru and the Dominican Republic. “Spain is also currently becoming a big player, and we were sure that it would arrive with very big quantities this campaign, but it ended up not being a big issue during our season,” says Mr. Moshe Meiri.

This, in any case, does not mean that the campaign was easy for Yonatan. Mr. Moshe Meiri actually affirms that “I have been in the business for more than 20 years and this has been one of the hardest I remember, so I look forward to some rest before we start again in February.”

Meanwhile, the avocado season is only just starting and prospects are good. One of the key factors, which Mr. Moshe Meiri states is very important in this game, is the weather. “In the winter, we do 3 to 4 containers of avocado a week, while in the summer we do that amount per day.”

Another important aspect when it comes to exports, taking into account the shelf life of both mangoes and avocados, are shipping times. The firm has managed to enter the South African market, and Mr. Moshe Meiri assures that Russia has also been good. “Four or five years ago, we started with class 2 and low quality to Russia, and now they demand the highest quality. It is a market that knows exactly what it wants, with specific requirements that need to be met.”

Lastly, there are big differences in consumption habits between different countries that need to be taken into account in terms of marketing. “European retailers, for example, have been switching from green skin varieties to the Hass, which for them are much easier to handle, with a much lower waste percentage, but Israeli growers still prefer the Ettinger, as it is huge in the domestic market and generates much more revenue,” concludes Moshe Meiri.

More information:
Moshe Meiri
[email protected]
www.yonatanpm.com

Publication date: 12/19/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Israel ready for avocado season

Israel ready for avocado season

Yonatan Packing & Marketing is a 20 year old Israeli packing house owned by two moshavs and devoted mostly to the cultivation of mangoes, as well as avocados and citrus in the winter. “We produce 10,000 tons per year and deal with clients in Europe (the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and the UK), Russia, and Jordan and, of course, the local market, as well as Gaza and the West Bank,” explains owner CEO Moshe Meiri.

The mango varieties exported by Yonatan include the Tommy Atkins, Keitt, Kent, Maya, Shelly and Omer. According to Mr. Moshe, Europe prefers the Kent and the Omar, as well as “a really good new variety called Castory-Omer, which is fibreless and reaches calibres between 8 and 10. It is a mango with a longer shelf life than the Kent, but shorter than the Keitt.”

In the European retail market, the convenience of ready-to-eat products is increasingly appreciated, and according to Mr. Moshe, this is a trend that can certainly be capitalized in order to boost sales. “Mangoes are available in all colours, but the green Omer and Shelly are the most commonly used varieties for the ready-to-eat European ripening program, while the red are for fresh consumption.”

Retail sales are in fact of paramount importance for Yonatan, as the company’s produce is mostly targeted at this market, where it competes directly with producers from countries like Brazil, Peru and the Dominican Republic. “Spain is also currently becoming a big player, and we were sure that it would arrive with very big quantities this campaign, but it ended up not being a big issue during our season,” says Mr. Moshe Meiri.

This, in any case, does not mean that the campaign was easy for Yonatan. Mr. Moshe Meiri actually affirms that “I have been in the business for more than 20 years and this has been one of the hardest I remember, so I look forward to some rest before we start again in February.”

Meanwhile, the avocado season is only just starting and prospects are good. One of the key factors, which Mr. Moshe Meiri states is very important in this game, is the weather. “In the winter, we do 3 to 4 containers of avocado a week, while in the summer we do that amount per day.”

Another important aspect when it comes to exports, taking into account the shelf life of both mangoes and avocados, are shipping times. The firm has managed to enter the South African market, and Mr. Moshe Meiri assures that Russia has also been good. “Four or five years ago, we started with class 2 and low quality to Russia, and now they demand the highest quality. It is a market that knows exactly what it wants, with specific requirements that need to be met.”

Lastly, there are big differences in consumption habits between different countries that need to be taken into account in terms of marketing. “European retailers, for example, have been switching from green skin varieties to the Hass, which for them are much easier to handle, with a much lower waste percentage, but Israeli growers still prefer the Ettinger, as it is huge in the domestic market and generates much more revenue,” concludes Moshe Meiri.

More information:
Moshe Meiri
[email protected]
www.yonatanpm.com

Publication date: 12/19/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Israel ready for avocado season

Israel ready for avocado season

Yonatan Packing & Marketing is a 20 year old Israeli packing house owned by two moshavs and devoted mostly to the cultivation of mangoes, as well as avocados and citrus in the winter. “We produce 10,000 tons per year and deal with clients in Europe (the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and the UK), Russia, and Jordan and, of course, the local market, as well as Gaza and the West Bank,” explains owner CEO Moshe Meiri.

The mango varieties exported by Yonatan include the Tommy Atkins, Keitt, Kent, Maya, Shelly and Omer. According to Mr. Moshe, Europe prefers the Kent and the Omar, as well as “a really good new variety called Castory-Omer, which is fibreless and reaches calibres between 8 and 10. It is a mango with a longer shelf life than the Kent, but shorter than the Keitt.”

In the European retail market, the convenience of ready-to-eat products is increasingly appreciated, and according to Mr. Moshe, this is a trend that can certainly be capitalized in order to boost sales. “Mangoes are available in all colours, but the green Omer and Shelly are the most commonly used varieties for the ready-to-eat European ripening program, while the red are for fresh consumption.”

Retail sales are in fact of paramount importance for Yonatan, as the company’s produce is mostly targeted at this market, where it competes directly with producers from countries like Brazil, Peru and the Dominican Republic. “Spain is also currently becoming a big player, and we were sure that it would arrive with very big quantities this campaign, but it ended up not being a big issue during our season,” says Mr. Moshe Meiri.

This, in any case, does not mean that the campaign was easy for Yonatan. Mr. Moshe Meiri actually affirms that “I have been in the business for more than 20 years and this has been one of the hardest I remember, so I look forward to some rest before we start again in February.”

Meanwhile, the avocado season is only just starting and prospects are good. One of the key factors, which Mr. Moshe Meiri states is very important in this game, is the weather. “In the winter, we do 3 to 4 containers of avocado a week, while in the summer we do that amount per day.”

Another important aspect when it comes to exports, taking into account the shelf life of both mangoes and avocados, are shipping times. The firm has managed to enter the South African market, and Mr. Moshe Meiri assures that Russia has also been good. “Four or five years ago, we started with class 2 and low quality to Russia, and now they demand the highest quality. It is a market that knows exactly what it wants, with specific requirements that need to be met.”

Lastly, there are big differences in consumption habits between different countries that need to be taken into account in terms of marketing. “European retailers, for example, have been switching from green skin varieties to the Hass, which for them are much easier to handle, with a much lower waste percentage, but Israeli growers still prefer the Ettinger, as it is huge in the domestic market and generates much more revenue,” concludes Moshe Meiri.

More information:
Moshe Meiri
[email protected]
www.yonatanpm.com

Publication date: 12/19/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Israel: Carrot market depends on Rouble

Israel: Carrot market depends on Rouble

The Israeli carrot market is waiting to see what the Rouble will to do. This will likely affect the demand for Russian importers. There is enough Israeli volume, as 90% is already in the ground, and the last 10% is for the end of January and will go to the local market.

Although there might be more demand in Europe, because of high temperatures the last couple of months and problems with mice, Israel is still waiting on Russia. “We have enough volume and we can supply Europe if there is demand, but Russia is 50% of our exports in a normal year,” says Rony Baruch from Gezer Shallit.

So if the rouble keeps going down, it may ask for a different approach to the export market for Israeli carrot exporters. “If we have to sell more to Europe we need to be flexible and meet their demands, which might ask us to harvest earlier to meet the sizes they prefer.” Not only size matters also the packing to Europe goes in big bags, while we send to Russia in 18 kilo.

Gezer Shallit also sends shipments to the United States, a market that still asks for a good volume. “We just have to wait and see if we have to go left or right.”

Meet Gezer Shallit at Fruit Logistica 2015 in Hall 3.2, Booth B20-7.

For more information:
Mr. Rony Baruch
Gezer Shallit
Tel: +972-54-7976003
Email: [email protected]                                                         
www.shallit.co.il

Publication date: 12/18/2014
Author: Sander Bruins Slot
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


FreshPlaza.com

Israel allows export of produce to the West Bank

Israel allows export of produce to the West Bank

For the first time since the start of the Gaza conflict, the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories (COGAT), the IDF branch responsible for civil Palestinian affairs, is allowing Gazan agriculturists and fishermen to market their produce in the West Bank.

In the coming days, Israel will also enable the export of 15 tons of agricultural produce from Gaza to the West Bank, including sweet potatoes, dates and fish. Prior to 2007, the West Bank was Gaza’s primary marketing destination after Israel, together comprising 85% of its market. A spokesperson for COGAT told The Times of Israel that produce will be allowed to move into the West Bank based on local demand.

Source: timesofisrael.com

Publication date: 10/15/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Israel: Fig demand this year higher than anticipated

Israel: Fig demand this year higher than anticipated

For the Israeli company Avniv Israel, the fig campaign is divided in two stages, with the first starting in May and going on with a continuous harvest at several locations until August, “when we normally stop due to the start of the Turkish season and also because we cannot compete with the domestic production in destinations like Italy, Spain or France,” explains Niva Ben Zion, founder and CEO of the firm.

After the Turkish season is over, around October, Avniv Israel kicks off the autumn-winter campaign, with a variety that is harvested between October and January, depending on weather conditions. “The last winter campaign was a bit of a disaster, as Israel had a lot of rain in December, as well as some snow and hail. This year, so far, we have had a very nice season with high levels of demand, despite some small temporary difficulties with supply that drove prices down,” says Mrs Ben Zion.

In terms of volumes, the company this season has exported around 20% more than last year, while Israel’s shipments as a whole have remained stable. Demand has also been higher than anticipated. Niva Ben Zion explains that “I work with some pretty big growers, and I will only take more when I know I have programmes to support them with. This year I literally needed much more than I had due to the great levels of demand.”

Avniv Israel also offers pitahaya, whose season normally starts around July-August. According to Mrs Ben Zion, “pitahaya is a tricky business, as it is very unpredictable when it comes to the timespan between pollination and harvest. Supply volumes are also unstable, because they work in cycles (or waves). The season is like a rocking chair. This year there may be additional issues, as the war is taking place close to the main production areas.”

Regarding the next fig season, the company expects a very good campaign throughout the winter, “as in that period we will have a large production and very few competitors. Brazil will also be in the market, although supermarkets & some importers tend to prefer the Israeli produce, which is usually considered to be safer, as our figs are produced naturally and contain no residues,” concludes Niva Ben Zion.

For more information:
Niva Ben Zion
Avniv
Tel: +972-2-9941047
Fax:+972-2-9941374
Mobile: +972-52-4399800
Sales: [email protected]

Publication date: 7/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Israel: Fig demand this year higher than anticipated

Israel: Fig demand this year higher than anticipated

For the Israeli company Avniv Israel, the fig campaign is divided in two stages, with the first starting in May and going on with a continuous harvest at several locations until August, “when we normally stop due to the start of the Turkish season and also because we cannot compete with the domestic production in destinations like Italy, Spain or France,” explains Niva Ben Zion, founder and CEO of the firm.

After the Turkish season is over, around October, Avniv Israel kicks off the autumn-winter campaign, with a variety that is harvested between October and January, depending on weather conditions. “The last winter campaign was a bit of a disaster, as Israel had a lot of rain in December, as well as some snow and hail. This year, so far, we have had a very nice season with high levels of demand, despite some small temporary difficulties with supply that drove prices down,” says Mrs Ben Zion.

In terms of volumes, the company this season has exported around 20% more than last year, while Israel’s shipments as a whole have remained stable. Demand has also been higher than anticipated. Niva Ben Zion explains that “I work with some pretty big growers, and I will only take more when I know I have programmes to support them with. This year I literally needed much more than I had due to the great levels of demand.”

Avniv Israel also offers pitahaya, whose season normally starts around July-August. According to Mrs Ben Zion, “pitahaya is a tricky business, as it is very unpredictable when it comes to the timespan between pollination and harvest. Supply volumes are also unstable, because they work in cycles (or waves). The season is like a rocking chair. This year there may be additional issues, as the war is taking place close to the main production areas.”

Regarding the next fig season, the company expects a very good campaign throughout the winter, “as in that period we will have a large production and very few competitors. Brazil will also be in the market, although supermarkets & some importers tend to prefer the Israeli produce, which is usually considered to be safer, as our figs are produced naturally and contain no residues,” concludes Niva Ben Zion.

For more information:
Niva Ben Zion
Avniv
Tel: +972-2-9941047
Fax:+972-2-9941374
Mobile: +972-52-4399800
Sales: [email protected]

Publication date: 7/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com

Israel: Fig demand this year higher than anticipated

Israel: Fig demand this year higher than anticipated

For the Israeli company Avniv Israel, the fig campaign is divided in two stages, with the first starting in May and going on with a continuous harvest at several locations until August, “when we normally stop due to the start of the Turkish season and also because we cannot compete with the domestic production in destinations like Italy, Spain or France,” explains Niva Ben Zion, founder and CEO of the firm.

After the Turkish season is over, around October, Avniv Israel kicks off the autumn-winter campaign, with a variety that is harvested between October and January, depending on weather conditions. “The last winter campaign was a bit of a disaster, as Israel had a lot of rain in December, as well as some snow and hail. This year, so far, we have had a very nice season with high levels of demand, despite some small temporary difficulties with supply that drove prices down,” says Mrs Ben Zion.

In terms of volumes, the company this season has exported around 20% more than last year, while Israel’s shipments as a whole have remained stable. Demand has also been higher than anticipated. Niva Ben Zion explains that “I work with some pretty big growers, and I will only take more when I know I have programmes to support them with. This year I literally needed much more than I had due to the great levels of demand.”

Avniv Israel also offers pitahaya, whose season normally starts around July-August. According to Mrs Ben Zion, “pitahaya is a tricky business, as it is very unpredictable when it comes to the timespan between pollination and harvest. Supply volumes are also unstable, because they work in cycles (or waves). The season is like a rocking chair. This year there may be additional issues, as the war is taking place close to the main production areas.”

Regarding the next fig season, the company expects a very good campaign throughout the winter, “as in that period we will have a large production and very few competitors. Brazil will also be in the market, although supermarkets & some importers tend to prefer the Israeli produce, which is usually considered to be safer, as our figs are produced naturally and contain no residues,” concludes Niva Ben Zion.

For more information:
Niva Ben Zion
Avniv
Tel: +972-2-9941047
Fax:+972-2-9941374
Mobile: +972-52-4399800
Sales: [email protected]

Publication date: 7/30/2014


FreshPlaza.com