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Whole Foods Market Recalls Made-in-Store Items Containing Recalled Fruit

Whole Foods Market has announced that it has recalled made-in-store items prepared with organic and conventional stone fruit, including peaches, nectarines and plums, from Wawona Packing Co. because of possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

Made-in-store items that contained one or more fruits subject to the Wawona Packing Co. recall were sold between June 1 and July 21. Not all items or all products were sold in all store locations. Affected made-in-store items such as cakes, tarts, salsas and prepared salads were sold in Whole Foods Market stores using Whole Foods Market scale labels in all states where Whole Foods Market stores are located except Florida, Washington and Oregon.

Additionally, Whole Foods Market pulled and destroyed the recalled stone fruit sold in all regions where it was available, which may have been labeled with a “Sweet 2 Eat” sticker. For a list of made-in-store items that have been affected by state, please check this web page.

Whole Foods Market was notified by Wawona Packing Co. that the various stone fruits were recalled due to a positive test result for Listeria monocytogenes.

Signage is posted in Whole Foods Market stores to notify customers of this recall. Customers who have purchased recalled product from Whole Foods Market should discard it and may bring in their receipt for a full refund. Consumers with questions may call 512-477-5566, extension 20060, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CDT.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

Whole Foods Market Recalls Made-in-Store Items Containing Recalled Fruit

Whole Foods Market has announced that it has recalled made-in-store items prepared with organic and conventional stone fruit, including peaches, nectarines and plums, from Wawona Packing Co. because of possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

Made-in-store items that contained one or more fruits subject to the Wawona Packing Co. recall were sold between June 1 and July 21. Not all items or all products were sold in all store locations. Affected made-in-store items such as cakes, tarts, salsas and prepared salads were sold in Whole Foods Market stores using Whole Foods Market scale labels in all states where Whole Foods Market stores are located except Florida, Washington and Oregon.

Additionally, Whole Foods Market pulled and destroyed the recalled stone fruit sold in all regions where it was available, which may have been labeled with a “Sweet 2 Eat” sticker. For a list of made-in-store items that have been affected by state, please check this web page.

Whole Foods Market was notified by Wawona Packing Co. that the various stone fruits were recalled due to a positive test result for Listeria monocytogenes.

Signage is posted in Whole Foods Market stores to notify customers of this recall. Customers who have purchased recalled product from Whole Foods Market should discard it and may bring in their receipt for a full refund. Consumers with questions may call 512-477-5566, extension 20060, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CDT.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

Whole Foods Market Recalls Made-in-Store Items Containing Recalled Fruit

Whole Foods Market has announced that it has recalled made-in-store items prepared with organic and conventional stone fruit, including peaches, nectarines and plums, from Wawona Packing Co. because of possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

Made-in-store items that contained one or more fruits subject to the Wawona Packing Co. recall were sold between June 1 and July 21. Not all items or all products were sold in all store locations. Affected made-in-store items such as cakes, tarts, salsas and prepared salads were sold in Whole Foods Market stores using Whole Foods Market scale labels in all states where Whole Foods Market stores are located except Florida, Washington and Oregon.

Additionally, Whole Foods Market pulled and destroyed the recalled stone fruit sold in all regions where it was available, which may have been labeled with a “Sweet 2 Eat” sticker. For a list of made-in-store items that have been affected by state, please check this web page.

Whole Foods Market was notified by Wawona Packing Co. that the various stone fruits were recalled due to a positive test result for Listeria monocytogenes.

Signage is posted in Whole Foods Market stores to notify customers of this recall. Customers who have purchased recalled product from Whole Foods Market should discard it and may bring in their receipt for a full refund. Consumers with questions may call 512-477-5566, extension 20060, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CDT.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

Whole Foods Market Recalls Made-in-Store Items Containing Recalled Fruit

Whole Foods Market has announced that it has recalled made-in-store items prepared with organic and conventional stone fruit, including peaches, nectarines and plums, from Wawona Packing Co. because of possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

Made-in-store items that contained one or more fruits subject to the Wawona Packing Co. recall were sold between June 1 and July 21. Not all items or all products were sold in all store locations. Affected made-in-store items such as cakes, tarts, salsas and prepared salads were sold in Whole Foods Market stores using Whole Foods Market scale labels in all states where Whole Foods Market stores are located except Florida, Washington and Oregon.

Additionally, Whole Foods Market pulled and destroyed the recalled stone fruit sold in all regions where it was available, which may have been labeled with a “Sweet 2 Eat” sticker. For a list of made-in-store items that have been affected by state, please check this web page.

Whole Foods Market was notified by Wawona Packing Co. that the various stone fruits were recalled due to a positive test result for Listeria monocytogenes.

Signage is posted in Whole Foods Market stores to notify customers of this recall. Customers who have purchased recalled product from Whole Foods Market should discard it and may bring in their receipt for a full refund. Consumers with questions may call 512-477-5566, extension 20060, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CDT.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

Whole Foods Market Recalls Made-in-Store Items Containing Recalled Fruit

Whole Foods Market has announced that it has recalled made-in-store items prepared with organic and conventional stone fruit, including peaches, nectarines and plums, from Wawona Packing Co. because of possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

Made-in-store items that contained one or more fruits subject to the Wawona Packing Co. recall were sold between June 1 and July 21. Not all items or all products were sold in all store locations. Affected made-in-store items such as cakes, tarts, salsas and prepared salads were sold in Whole Foods Market stores using Whole Foods Market scale labels in all states where Whole Foods Market stores are located except Florida, Washington and Oregon.

Additionally, Whole Foods Market pulled and destroyed the recalled stone fruit sold in all regions where it was available, which may have been labeled with a “Sweet 2 Eat” sticker. For a list of made-in-store items that have been affected by state, please check this web page.

Whole Foods Market was notified by Wawona Packing Co. that the various stone fruits were recalled due to a positive test result for Listeria monocytogenes.

Signage is posted in Whole Foods Market stores to notify customers of this recall. Customers who have purchased recalled product from Whole Foods Market should discard it and may bring in their receipt for a full refund. Consumers with questions may call 512-477-5566, extension 20060, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CDT.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Food Safety News

In the trenches: Drive produce sales with leading-edge items

Are your produce sales vs. a year ago kind of flat? If so, then it may be time to take a good wise look at where your operation has been for the past five years and where it now needs to start heading. After doing that, plan on how you will start turning those flat sales around.

The past few years have been an experience of dramatic changes for the majority of businesses. The retail supermarket activity was no exception, as it went through multiple stages of cost-cutting, including some unpleasant labor losses. Emphasis was placed on trying to salvage the business rather than expand it.

Tomato-Display1Promoting key drivers in the produce department, like tomatoes, will make the difference in boosting sales levels and profit dollars.Now that most grocery stores have pulled through the financial crisis and business has started on an upward swing, it’s a good time to start focusing on moving produce sales from a survival mode to a growth mode once again.

There are several sales-boosting strategies that can be applied, but it should always be for profitability purposes other than just sales. Always remember that sales without a profit is like eating soup with a fork.

Much of the grocery store advertising programs have been to promote popular items at rock bottom prices to protect the customer base and also keep the company from declining during the weak economic period. Those attractive low retails may have accomplished that urgent need, but it managed to just about even out sales while reducing the profit in the long run.

Normally, produce retailers often look at the gross profit percentage of an item first, while the more important aspect is the gross profit dollars. Obviously, the more product that is sold, the more gross profit dollars are generated. Those valuable profit dollars are mainly built from high-volume items.

Promoting the key drivers in the produce department will make the difference in boosting sales levels and profit dollars faster than the less-demanding items. Therefore, putting a heavy emphasis on the major items throughout the produce department will get companies back to building that profit growth again.

Concentrate on these volume items to drive sales and turn faster profit dollars: Berries, grapes, bananas, apples, stone fruit, melons, citrus, cherries, tomatoes, Iceberg lettuce, packaged salad mixes, asparagus, potatoes, onions, peppers, carrots, cucumbers and mushrooms.

When setting displays, expand the space allocation of these listed items whether advertised or unadvertised. Build some massive waterfall displays to create a visual impact in attracting shoppers. Set up wing displays alongside table endcaps and auxiliary displays for incremental sales.

Nothing captures customers more during this time of the season than a very attractive berry display. A front entrance display of California strawberries along with red raspberries, blackberries, blueberries and other varieties will surely score big in sales and pump up those profit dollars.

Summer stone fruit, grapes, cherries and melons are all huge sales generators. Asparagus, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes and lettuce should also be planned for display space expansion. Large-scale commodities like these deserve massive displays on table endcaps and entrance locations in order to capture customers’ attention and draw them over to make ample purchases.

Just consider that the vast choices of tomatoes and peppers made available to consumers today are bringing in some hefty supplemental sales. Recognize also that most of the red, orange and yellow peppers are retailing at an average of a dollar each in most markets. Those dollar sales add up fast and return more profit to a company.

The other area to look at is the case retail of each item. For example, while an 18-pound case of grapes at $ 1.99 per pound generates $ 35.82 worth of sales, a case of 14 one-pound bag radishes selling for $ 1.49 will return $ 20.86. When planning your merchandising, make sure to calculate the dollar value of each display.

In other words, if it takes 15 cases of grapes at $ 1.99 per pound to set up a nice massive display, then the value of that display is $ 537.30. Always know how much in sales each display will be contributing to your overall department sales. Make the labor effort you put into each display pay off.

It’s time now to think bigger and expand on the top items that drive most of the sales dollar volume. High-volume strategy is the key to produce growth. Always measure your key drivers to find out how they are performing. It will tell you where and how to focus your efforts for increasing sales.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Overcoming diners’ aversion to new items

About 70% of restaurant diners won’t try a new menu item, according to a new report from the NPD Group. For supermarket foodservice to overcome those odds, the steps seem simple, but many retailers don’t execute them well, according to Warren Solochek, NPD’s vice president of client development for the foodservice division. “So maybe for a supermarket it’s advertising it in their weekly flyer. And then setting it off someplace within the case so that people can …

Supermarket News

Fresh Farms adds new items to winter lineup, doubles cucumber volume

Fresh Farms in Nogales, AZ, has just finished its seventh year in business. “We are still growing and have plans to continue to grow,” said Jerry Havel, director of sales and marketing.

This year, the company has added “several new items that we think will really add to our mix and make stopping at Fresh Farms more attractive,” he said.

Fresh Farms has also increased volume on some items. Most notably, “we have doubled our cucumber production,” Havel said. “We were big in cucumbers. Fresh-FarmsAt the Fresh Farms sales office in Rio Rico, AZ, with Jerry Havel (front) are Mayra Beltran, Robert Hernandez, Martha Noriega, Al Voll and Marco Serrano. (Photo by John Groh)Now we are very large in cucumbers.”

The cucumbers and most of the other items are grown by the Molina family of Hermosillo, Sonora, who own Fresh Farms and who have substantial farming operations in Mexico.

“Eggplant, Roma tomatoes and pickles are from outside growers,” he said.

While there have been weather issues in some growing areas in Mexico, “in our area we were fine. We had no issues” with inclement weather, Havel said. “We are in Sonora, and most of the bad weather was in Sinaloa.”

Several other items, including some of the new additions, started before the end of November. Among those were English cucumbers, eggplant, Roma tomatoes, fresh pickles and hard shell squash, including Butternut, Acorn, Spaghetti and Kabocha.

“Our eggplant, green bean and Roma tomato programs are all out of Culiacan, Sinaloa,” Havel said. The hard shell squash is “all out of Sonora,“ some coming from Hermosillo and some from Guaymas.

Fresh Farms started its fresh pickle program last year, but it was just for the latter half of the season. This year, the program started at the beginning of the season, in November, and will run through the winter and into April, Havel said.

The same is true of the Roma tomato program. This year, “we are starting at the beginning of the season rather than the end of the season.” That not only gives Fresh Farms Romas for a more extended period but also increases the overall volume the company is shipping.

Eggplant this year started in November and will run clear through into May, he said.

Fresh Farms’ soft squash program is about the same this year as it has been in the past, Havel said. “Our big increases are in cucumbers and the new items that we will be doing.”

The company will also have an increase in bell pepper volume this winter, he said. Those had already started and would continue into April. They are grown in shade houses in Hermosillo and Guaymas.

In green beans, as in cucumbers, “we have doubled” the volume for the current season.

In summary, Havel said, “we just have more volume of great quality product,” and that growth is driven by demand “from our clients.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

Publix Flags New Items

LAKELAND, Fla. — Publix is debuting a “New Item” icon that’s designed to call attention to recently-introduced products on shelf.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


“It’s your sign to discover exciting new products introduced by your favorite brands,” states the retailer in promotional materials. “Whether it’s flavors, formulas, or product design, when the emphasis is on NEW, you can find it at Publix.”

Among the highlighted products:

  • Vicks Nyquil Severe Cold & Flu Medicine
  • Advil Film Coated Tabs Pain Reliever
  • Willow Tree Premium Chicken Pie
  • Bertolli Rustico Bakes Ricotta & Spinach Cannelloni
Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News

Publix Flags New Items

LAKELAND, Fla. — Publix is debuting a “New Item” icon that’s designed to call attention to recently-introduced products on shelf.


CONNECT WITH SN ON TWITTER

Follow @SN_News for updates throughout the day.


“It’s your sign to discover exciting new products introduced by your favorite brands,” states the retailer in promotional materials. “Whether it’s flavors, formulas, or product design, when the emphasis is on NEW, you can find it at Publix.”

Among the highlighted products:

  • Vicks Nyquil Severe Cold & Flu Medicine
  • Advil Film Coated Tabs Pain Reliever
  • Willow Tree Premium Chicken Pie
  • Bertolli Rustico Bakes Ricotta & Spinach Cannelloni
Suggested Categories More from Supermarketnews

Supermarket News