Blog Archives

Gallery: Executive promotions, departures for July

Supermarket News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Criminal Trial of Former PCA Executives Postponed Until July 28

The trial of the three former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) executives that was to begin Monday is being delayed two weeks to give defense attorneys more time to review late-arriving documents from prosecutors.

Jury selection is now scheduled to begin July 28 for a trial likely to take about eight weeks. U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands ordered the delay Friday after hearing defense motions to both dismiss all charges in the case and to postpone the trial.

At issue in Friday’s pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Albany, GA, was the July 1 delivery of a computer file from the prosecution that contains an estimated 100,000 documents.

Defense attorneys said the information was useless to them because the volume of documents could not be adequately reviewed in the remaining time before trial. A range of “remedies” were available to Sands to resolve the issue, including dismissing the entire 76-count federal felony indictment.

The trial postponement puts on hold close to 200 jurors who were summoned to appear on Monday, along with relatives of the victims and defendants and their families.

Stewart Parnell, the former PCA chief executive officer, expressed concerns in a July 3 affidavit to the court about the financial burdens he’ll face with a trial continuation.

“Should my case be continued, I will be placed in the untenable position of completely exhausting the resources of myself, my wife, and my children (who have borne much of the recent cost) or accepting a plea to a crime I have steadfastly denied committing,” Parnell wrote.

The former PCA executive says he deserves his day in court after being “charged with serious offenses and publicly ridiculed … .” He says continuance of the case violates his right to speedy trial.

The other two former PCA executives facing indictment are Michael Parnell, a former peanut broker, and Mary Wilkerson, quality control officer for the Blakely, GA, PCA plant. The Parnells are charged with fraud and conspiracy, along with placing misbranded and adulterated food into interstate commerce. Wilkerson is charged with obstruction of justice.

(Editor’s Note: Dallas Carter was the courtroom observer for Food Safety News and assisted in compiling this report.)

Food Safety News

Safe Grilling Tips for the Fourth of July

Since the Fourth of July is the high point of summer grilling season for many American families, we at Food Safety News like to remind everyone this time of year of a few simple safety tips to keep your Independence Day free of foodborne illness.

The two biggest safety concerns when grilling involve the threat of cross-contamination and undercooked meat. Both of those issues are addressed by remembering four key concepts outlined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture: Clean, separate, cook, and chill.

Clean

Start with clean surfaces and clean hands. Be sure that you and your guests wash your hands before preparing or handling food. Most importantly, make sure that the surfaces that come in contact with raw and cooked foods are clean before you start and are washed frequently.

Separate

Any potential pathogens on uncooked meat can easily be transferred to other foods or surfaces. Raw meats and poultry should be prepared separately from vegetables and cooked foods. As you chop meats and veggies, be sure to use separate cutting boards, knives and utensils. If you have handled raw meat with your hands, make sure to wash them thoroughly before handling any other food or utensils.

Cook

Make sure meat is cooked thoroughly all the way through. When cooked on a grill, meat and poultry often brown quickly and may appear done on the outside, but still may not have reached a safe minimum internal temperature to kill any harmful bacteria. Use a meat thermometer to make sure you’ve reached the recommended internal temperatures:

145° F for whole cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal, and fish.

160° F for hamburgers and other ground beef.

165° F for all poultry and pre-cooked meats like hot dogs.

Place cooked meats on a clean surface, not on the dish that held them when they were raw. The juices left on the plate from raw meat can spread bacteria to cooked food.

If you are smoking meats, the temperature in the smoker should be maintained between 225° F and 300° F for safety. Again, check the internal temperature of the smoked meat with a meat thermometer to ensure it’s fully cooked.

Chill

Bacteria grow most rapidly between 40° F and 140° F, so perishable food should never sit out for more than two hours. If the temperature outside is higher than 90°F, food should not sit out more than one hour. Refrigerate or freeze leftovers promptly and discard any food that has been sitting out too long.

Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Hot foods can be kept hot on the grill and cold foods can be kept chilled with ice packs or ice sources in a cooler.

Enjoy

With those four key concepts in mind, have a great — and safe — Fourth of July!

Food Safety News

Retailers gear up for July 4

July 4 is less than a week away and supermarkets are reaching out to customers on Twitter to encourage them to purchase their celebration supplies from their stores. Retailers are establishing their brands as experts on food preparation and pointing out their accessibility.

For instance, Kings Super Markets proudly tweeted that stores would be open until 9pm on the holiday.

Meanwhile, a Stew Leonard’s chef went on a local news station to give ideas for the 4th.

Whole Foods Market and Hy-Vee are linking to offbeat, yet festive recipes for the holiday.

Bashas’ is taking Independence Day as an opportunity to hold a campaign benefiting charity. Bashas’ also utilized local media for publicity.

Supermarket News

America’s ‘first pear’, the Bartlett, to begin harvest July 7

America’s ‘first pear’, the Bartlett, to begin harvest July 7

The first Bartlett pears of the season are set to harvest in California’s Sacramento River growing region July 7. According to the official crop estimate set by the California Pear Advisory Board at its June 12th meeting, the state’s total crop of Bartlett pears is expected to be just over 2.6 million 36-pound packages, slightly down from the four-year average crop size of 2.9 million packages.

The majority of the state’s Bartletts, 1.5 million packages, will come from the early harvesting Delta River growing district, with harvest in Mendocino County expected on August 4 and on August 11 in Lake County.

California pear farmers are expecting an additional 550,000 packages of other pear varieties this season including 220,000 Golden Russet Bosc and 80,000 Starkcrimson along with smaller quantities of Bosc, Sunsprites, Comice, Forrelle, Seckel, French Butter and other red varieties.

In addition to setting its official crop estimate and harvest dates during its most recent Board meeting, the California Pear Advisory Board (CPAB) adopted a new brand positioning for Bartlett pears from California calling them “America’s First Pear.”

“We realized that Bartlett pears from California are unique because they have been produced in California since the very beginnings of the state’s commercial fruit industry dating all the way back to the California Gold Rush in the 1850s,” said Chris Zanobini, Executive Director of the CPAB.  “California Bartletts are also the very first pear of the season to be harvested in the U.S. each year and consumer research shows Bartlett pears are the first choice of consumers when it comes to selecting a flavorful pear variety.  The title of ‘America’s First Pear’ just seemed to be a good fit.”

“California Bartlett pears fit a highly desirable image because they are produced by the kind of artisan farmers that today’s consumers want growing their food,” said Zanobini.  “California Bartletts are grown by about 60 pear farming families, most of whom have been growing pears on the same land for generations.  The average size of California pear farm is 130 acres and the average age of the orchards are between 30 and 100 years.

“California Bartletts provide consumers with an heirloom experience because this is the same product people can find in their local farmers market.  They have been sustainably-grown for over 100 years by smaller, family farmers who are trusted and safe,” said Zanobini.

The California pear industry’s claims about sustainability are not just marketing hype, but are backed by research.  During the past three years, the CPAB has participated in a program with the independent sustainability program design firm, SureHarvest, to assess the level of sustainable farming practices utilized by farmers. SureHarvest has found an exceptionally high level of adoption amongst California pear farmers of sustainable practices like non-chemical treatments for pests.  According to the SureHarvest assessment, well over 90 percent of California pear farmers utilize practices like pheromone-mating disruption, scouting for pests and other Integrated Pest Management practices.

CPAB plans to launch an initial trade education effort this summer to communicate with grocery stores the benefits of selecting and staying with California Bartlett pears for the duration of the California pear season.

For more information:
Chris Zanobini
California Pear Advisory Board
Tel: +1 (916) 441-0432
www.calpear.com

Publication date: 6/26/2014


FreshPlaza.com

CMI declares July the month of jumbo cherries

Cherries from the Pacific Northwest are sizing larger than years past, with sugar levels at the top of the charts, according to Columbia Marketing International. Retailers are reporting positive feedback from consumers, but CMI anticipates that the best is yet to come.

The company has declared July the month of jumbo cherries and is setting up retail programs with its retail customers to make sure that they have adequate supplies in stores to cover consumer demand. CMI-Cherry-Shipper-at-RetaiCMI’s high-graphic cherry display ships with two boxes of red or Rainier cherries and can be set up in less than 30 seconds.

“We have an incredible opportunity with this year’s Northwest cherry crop,” Steve Lutz, vice president of marketing at CMI, said in a press release. “After low cherry production out of California this season, consumers are hungry for cherries. With our estimated 22 million-box crop out of the Northwest this year, consumers can expect great eating cherries, with larger-than-normal sizing.”

Warm, sunny days and cool, crisp nights have provided optimal growing conditions for the Northwest cherry crop this season, leading to high sugar development and great flavor. Unlike the 2013 cherry season, which was hit by several adverse weather events, 2014 is shaping up to be a huge, successful crop year with minimal rain, hail and wind events that can damage cherries in their final growing stages.

Packouts continue to be high, and this trend looks like it will continue through the end of the season, offering a great retail opportunity for stores looking to increase incremental sales in their produce section now through the beginning of August.

As part of its cherry promotions this season, CMI is tooling its customers with a high-graphic instant cherry display that ships with two boxes of red or Rainier cherries. The pictured display can be assembled in less than 30 seconds. CMI has produced a brief video of how easy this shipper is to set up.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Early start for Sonora grapes will assure promotable volumes for Memorial Day and Fourth of July

Virtually every year retailers can count on having Sonora spring grapes available in good supplies for the Fourth of July pull. Memorial Day, however, is generally another story. While some grapes from Mexico are usually in the market by Memorial Day, there is rarely sufficient volume for promotions in the period approaching that holiday.

This year, the earliness of the season will provide retailers with an unusual opportunity, as an anticipated early start to the Sonora grape deal, as much as two weeks ahead of normal, should assure promotable volumes for both holidays.

That should be welcome news to retailers who may have been concerned over reports that the Chilean season is coming up short and may finish earlier than expected, according to handlers who are involved in both deals.

The weather during the growing season in Sonora has been “pretty outstanding,” said Allison Moore, director of legislative and regulatory affairs for the Fresh Produce Association of the Americas in Nogales, AZ, in an interview with The Produce News April 7. Days have been warmer than usual, but evenings have still been chilly, providing the necessary chilling hours for the vines.

“I am hearing that [the harvest] is actually going to be pretty early,” with some shipments crossing into Nogales as early as late April, she said. There were still three weeks of April “to get through” before then, so “we’ll see where we end up toward the end of the month, but what I am hearing is that there are going to be promotable volumes” in “plenty of time” for Memorial Day ads this year. “And as usual, we will have ad volumes for the Fourth of July weekend.” In all, there should be “seven really great weekends” with promotable volumes of Sonora grapes, “and that is, I think, going to be for all three colors.”

Having the Fourth of July fall on a Friday this year will “help drive sales at the store” and give “lots of opportunities for good promotions,” she added.

Shaun Ricks, vice president of Eagle Eye Grape Guys LLC in Visalia, CA, said that he has visited the growing areas in Sonora at least once a month for the past six months. “I have been able to watch the crop push out. I think I have a pretty good idea of what to expect. What I see is early, maybe earlier than we have seen it in a long time.”

Most growers think the crop size should be close to normal overall but may be a little lighter than normal on the front end and a bit heavier than usual on the back end, Ricks said. “When it is all said and done, I think it is going to be a good deal. I think May is going to be very strong in pricing, quality and volume. In June, I think there will be heavier volumes and better opportunities to promote.”

“We are going to be early. We are going to have promotable volumes for Memorial Day and Fourth of July. Crop size and quality look ideal,” said Louie Galvan, a partner in Fruit Royale in Delano, CA, April 1. “We are excited about getting the advantage of another holiday to toss in the mix. Where last year, we didn’t get our first fruit off the vine until May 15, this year it will give us another 10 or maybe 15 days to sell the product.” He said he expects good quality and good volume “all the way through the month of June” and possibly through the first week of July.

The Arvin district in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California, which typically follows the Sonora grape deal, also appeared to be early, Galvan noted. “Normally, when we are early, it gives us an advantage. It gives us more time to sell the product.”

Jared Lane, vice president of sales and marketing for Los Angeles-based Stevco Inc. said that the grape crop in Mexico appears to be a normal-sized crop, with good opportunities for Memorial Day promotions because of the extreme earliness of the season.

That earliness could also bring an earlier end to the deal, Lane said. “We should finish Flames around the 15th of June, which might cause a bit of a shortage going into the Arvin district.”

“An early season bodes well for everybody,” said Atomic Torosian, a partner in Crown Jewels Produce LLC in Fresno, CA, April 1. “We will be able to set a few Memorial Day ads and obviously Fourth of July ads. Overall, the crop looks good right now. The clusters look good and the quality looks really good,” but “we are dealing with a little bit lighter” crop of Sugraones.

“I think retailers are ready to switch out of the Chilean grape deal,” Torosian added. “I don’t see the overlap as much as we had last year.”

The earliness of the grape season in Sonora and in Arvin as well is only partly due to weather, according to John Pandol, a director at Pandol Bros. in Delano, CA. “Part of it is technique.”

He expressed hope that those who are pushing for the earliest start dates “pick them with the same discipline that everyone else does and they don’t ruin the whole deal for everybody.” In the excitement to get going early, “one hopes for prudence and discipline and harvesting according to the refractometer and not the calendar.”

That said, “everything is early,” Pandol continued. Not only in Mexico, but “all crops we are seeing in the San Joaquin Valley are tracking two weeks ahead of time.”

He expected to see Chilean grapes this year clean up “sometime during May,” in contrast to the “very late arrivals” in 2013. “We don’t expect to see a lot of Chilean Crimsons in the market well into June, which is what we saw last year,” he said.

Grape growers in the Sonora Desert are “much less concerned about the front end” of the season than they are the back end and the transition into the San Joaquin Valley, Pandol said. If the San Joaquin Valley grapes come into play too soon and there is too much of an overlap with the late Sonora deal, “it is very difficult for the desert grapes to compete, and they will basically have to resort to their domestic market earlier than they would normally plan.”

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines – The Produce News – Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897.

Marketing campaign to promote Fourth of July avocado consumption

The California Avocado Commission will look to build on the success of last year’s integrated marketing program designed to put California avocados on picnic tables, at barbecues and everywhere consumers are gathered for Fourth of July celebrations.

The program includes television advertising in California, general market radio, print and online advertising, public relations outreach, in-store retail support, new recipes, online and social media activities.

CAC-Cherry-Tomato-BombsCherry tomato bombs“Last year we set a goal for the Fourth of July to become one of the top avocado-consumption events of the year,” Jan DeLyser, vice president of marketing for the commission, said in a press release. “We were blown away when the Fourth of July consumption in 2012 skyrocketed to the top avocado consumption occasion. We thought it might take some time to get there, but with growing consumer demand and availability of consistent quality fruit in season, we have a winning combination. This year the industry is forecasting a whopping 96.4 million pounds of avocados for Fourth of July consumption.”

The commission’s consumer advertising for the Fourth of July encourages shoppers to “add a little green to your red, white and blue,” featuring an all-American rendition of the Commission’s California Avocado Grower Campaign.

The TV commercial in California markets evokes a nostalgic, all-American mood and features California avocados in traditional American fare, such as burgers, hot dogs and picnic salads.

Print ads also showcase a recipe on its way to becoming a holiday classic, Firecracker Guacamole, which is served in a hollowed-out mini watermelon.

Consumers in CAC’s advertised markets will hear radio commercials, see the advertisements in outdoor media and experience in-store promotion.

California avocado recipes for picnics and barbecues encourage usage in favorite American summer holiday dishes.

A new recipe for Guacamole Potato Salad, one of several new recipes that encourage a higher produce ring with most of their ingredients coming from the produce department, is already one of the top CAC recipes shared by consumers online. It is included in CAC’s Have a Blast with California Avocados recipe booklet, now available for order on CaliforniaAvocado.com/retailers-pos-order-form, along with customizable point-of-sale materials supporting American summer holidays.

The recipe booklet features patriotic/fireworks-themed recipes such as California Avocado Red, White and Blueberry Salsa, one of several included in the Commission’s co-marketing promotion with Naturipe berries.

Third-party registered dietitians are promoting the nutritional benefits of California avocados for Fourth of July and American summer holidays through media appearances, recipe development, social media promotion and blog posts.

Liz Weiss and Janice Newell Bissex, known as The Meal Makeover Moms, created a delicious beef and black bean hamburger and nutritious pasta salad recipe featuring California avocados, which are perfect for Fourth of July celebrations.

CAC’s huge Fourth of July push includes online and mobile marketing with an email recipe newsletter, themed microsite reflecting the print advertising campaign creative and a consumer recipe contest featuring prize packages including Weber grills and California avocado gift boxes. Social media outreach also is an integral part of CAC’s communication plan.

The Produce News | Today’s Headlines

July 29, 2013: Parenthood Changes Millennial Buying Habits

Registering for Premium Content on Supermarket News will give you INSTANT access to invaluable articles and media content that industry professionals rely on. You will have access to our special reports, feature articles, and industry analysis. It’s FREE, easy and quick.

Already registered? here.

Supermarket News

July 15, 2013: Shoppers Seek Healthy Beverages

Shoppers would be willing to spend up to 31% more for healthy versions of carbonated beverages, according to a survey of 1,985 consumers conducted in May by Phil Lempert, chief executive officer of SupermarketGuru.com and SN contributing editor. That could represent an opportunity to increase sales and margins in the category through reformulation, he explained.

Registering for Premium Content on Supermarket News will give you INSTANT access to invaluable articles and media content that industry professionals rely on. You will have access to our special reports, feature articles, and industry analysis. It’s FREE, easy and quick.

Already registered? to view your content.

Supermarket News

July 15, 2013: Shoppers Seek Healthy Beverages

Shoppers would be willing to spend up to 31% more for healthy versions of carbonated beverages, according to a survey of 1,985 consumers conducted in May by Phil Lempert, chief executive officer of SupermarketGuru.com and SN contributing editor. That could represent an opportunity to increase sales and margins in the category through reformulation, he explained.

Registering for Premium Content on Supermarket News will give you INSTANT access to invaluable articles and media content that industry professionals rely on. You will have access to our special reports, feature articles, and industry analysis. It’s FREE, easy and quick.

Already registered? to view your content.

Supermarket News

Have a Happy Fourth of July, with No Foodborne Illness Fallout

When it comes to food safety, hosting a Fourth of July cookout is different from hosting a winter holiday meal, for a variety of reasons. To begin with, summer cookouts are typically held outdoors, the food table is often set up outside, the sun is shining down, and people are in a festive mood. Once the the food has been eaten, your guests usually go off to enjoy other endeavors — swimming, volleyball, or croquet, just to name a few seasonal favorites. That means that the food that has been set out is often “out of sight, out of mind.”

But food should only be left out for about two hours after it’s been prepared, and only an hour if the temperature is 90 degrees or higher. The reason for that is that if there is any bacteria in the food, it will start to multiply rapidly at temperatures in the “danger zone” — between 40 and 140 degrees F. You don’t want any of the food you’re serving to be harboring foodborne pathogens such as E. colii or Salmonella, which can trigger symptoms such as abdominal cramps, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, or even death.

As the host or hostess, you also need to keep in mind that young children, pregnant women, the elderly, and anyone who has health problems are the most vulnerable to food poisoning. So whether you’re hosting the event, or a guest, do make sure that the food hasn’t been left out without keeping it at the proper temperatures. (If you’re hosting the event, you can always put the food back into the refrigerator or into a cooler and pull it out when guests come back for seconds.)
See Food Safety News’s previous coverage on grill-out safety for more tips on keeping summer meals safe.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Ad Council have launched a campaign to promote Fourth of July food safety this year. Advice “from the founding fathers” can be found on the info sheet to the right.
The Fourth of July sparks get-togethers that bring family and friends together. The person grilling the food is the star of the show. But don’t let anyone pressure you to pull the meat, poultry or fish off the grill before it’s thoroughly cooked. Yes, people are hungry and want to eat as soon as possible — and sometimes the line to the grill can get pretty long. Kids can start fretting, and adults can start showing signs of impatience. No matter. Take some deep breaths, stand your ground and make sure that each and every item on the grill is cooked to the proper temperature. (Of course, Uncle Harry may insist on a rare burger. That’s his choice. But don’t let anyone but you make food-safety choices for the children and other vulnerable guests).

And, yes, using a thermometer to check the temperature of the grilled meats, poultry and fish is essential. Don’t run the risk, for example, of thinking that you can tell if a burger is cooked well enough by checking to see that it’s brown in the center. According to USDA research, one out of every four hamburgers turns brown inside before it has been cooked to the safe internal temperature of 160 degrees F.
Here’s a toast to food safety…and to a wonderful Fourth of July!! 

Food Safety News

July 3, 2013: The Week in Stocks

Advertisement

Jul. 3, 2013

Advertisement

                 
    WEEK ENDING 07/03/13          
   52-Week     Sales       Amt. Pct.
High  Low Retailers (00′s) High Low Close Change Change
    ——————–            
17.02 11.32 Ahold 10154.23 15.14 14.86 15.05 0.28 1.90
113.36 82.60 Arden Group 700.17 113.36 109.67 111.10 2.74 2.53
115.77 93.11 Costco Cos. 92531.29 112.35 110.32 110.91 -0.27 -0.24
62.75 32.50 Delhaize (ADR) 2102.39 62.75 60.98 61.68 0.29 0.47
77.40 53.12 Empire 0 77.40 73.06 77.40 4.34 5.94
48.96 35.25 Harris Teeter 23027.19 48.40 47.68 48.23 0.90 1.90
27.10 14.93 Ingles 7394.67 27.10 24.85 25.20 -0.09 -0.36
36.29 20.98 Kroger 310723.72 36.29 35.60 35.60 1.12 3.25
48.91 30.71 Loblaw Cos. 36 45.11 45.00 45.11 0.11 0.24
70.85 51.56 Metro 14300.51 70.85 69.29 68.75 -0.94 -1.35
34.91 17.20 Natural Grocers 11830.69 34.91 33.12 34.41 1.10 3.30
24.85 20.09 North West Co. 0 23.68 23.68 23.68 0.00 -0.01
10.78 3.69 Roundy’s 42431.14 9.43 9.10 9.35 1.06 12.79
28.42 14.73 Safeway 203129.88 24.09 23.42 23.58 0.02 0.08
7.11 1.68 Supervalu 290711.07 6.76 6.56 6.71 0.45 7.19
70.36 56.70 Target 306852.96 70.36 68.96 69.38 0.26 0.38
65.69 36.51 The Fresh Market 47320.59 52.40 48.72 50.60 -0.38 -0.75
38.30 32.69 Village 10422.6 34.25 33.50 34.07 1.02 3.09
77.60 70.23 Wal-Mart 649247.06 76.11 74.10 74.76 -0.25 -0.33
47.92 37.65 Weis Markets 3264.75 47.92 45.26 45.50 -0.89 -1.92
101.86 52.11 Whole Foods 21782.35 53.10 52.11 53.03 0.17 0.32
                 
    Wholesalers            
    ——————–            
22.99 18.77 Nash Finch 3094.24 22.99 22.33 22.41 0.19 0.86
19.73 13.44 Spartan Stores 5185.79 19.30 18.92 19.19 0.80 4.35
61.26 47.20 United Natural Foods 15705.72 54.92 53.78 54.55 0.66 1.22
                 
    Indices Last This Pct.      
    ——- Week Week Change      
                 
    Dow Jones 14910.14 14988.55 0.53      
    S&P 500 1603.26 1615.41 0.76      
                 
    SN Composite 2318.98 2321.28 0.10      
                 
    Retailers 2098.27 2100.12 0.09      
    Wholesalers 913.06 927.41 1.57      
                 
        Pct        
    Leading Gainers Close Change        
    —————            
    Roundy’s 9.35 12.79        
    Supervalu 6.71 7.19        
    Empire 77.40 5.94        
                 
        Pct        
    Leading Decliners Close Change        
    —————            
    Weis Markets 45.50 -1.92        
    Metro 68.75 -1.35        
    The Fresh Market 50.60 -0.75        
                 
    Most Active by Volume          
    —————            
    Wal-Mart 64924706          
    Kroger 31072372          
    Target 30685296          
                 
    Most Active            
    as Percent of SHO            
    —————            
    Supervalu 11.30          
    The Fresh Market 9.80          
    Roundy’s 9.08          
                 
    Gainers 17          
    Unchanged 0          
    Decliners 7          
                 
  COMPILED BY DATA NETWORK, HUNTINGTON, NY  (631) 549-1014      
  -INFORMATION AND DATA HEREIN THOUGH BELIEVED ACCURATE IS NOT GUARANTEED.    
   DATA NETWORK SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INACCURACIES.      

Advertisement

Supermarket News

July 3, 2013: The Week in Stocks

Advertisement

Jul. 3, 2013

Advertisement

                 
    WEEK ENDING 07/03/13          
   52-Week     Sales       Amt. Pct.
High  Low Retailers (00′s) High Low Close Change Change
    ——————–            
17.02 11.32 Ahold 10154.23 15.14 14.86 15.05 0.28 1.90
113.36 82.60 Arden Group 700.17 113.36 109.67 111.10 2.74 2.53
115.77 93.11 Costco Cos. 92531.29 112.35 110.32 110.91 -0.27 -0.24
62.75 32.50 Delhaize (ADR) 2102.39 62.75 60.98 61.68 0.29 0.47
77.40 53.12 Empire 0 77.40 73.06 77.40 4.34 5.94
48.96 35.25 Harris Teeter 23027.19 48.40 47.68 48.23 0.90 1.90
27.10 14.93 Ingles 7394.67 27.10 24.85 25.20 -0.09 -0.36
36.29 20.98 Kroger 310723.72 36.29 35.60 35.60 1.12 3.25
48.91 30.71 Loblaw Cos. 36 45.11 45.00 45.11 0.11 0.24
70.85 51.56 Metro 14300.51 70.85 69.29 68.75 -0.94 -1.35
34.91 17.20 Natural Grocers 11830.69 34.91 33.12 34.41 1.10 3.30
24.85 20.09 North West Co. 0 23.68 23.68 23.68 0.00 -0.01
10.78 3.69 Roundy’s 42431.14 9.43 9.10 9.35 1.06 12.79
28.42 14.73 Safeway 203129.88 24.09 23.42 23.58 0.02 0.08
7.11 1.68 Supervalu 290711.07 6.76 6.56 6.71 0.45 7.19
70.36 56.70 Target 306852.96 70.36 68.96 69.38 0.26 0.38
65.69 36.51 The Fresh Market 47320.59 52.40 48.72 50.60 -0.38 -0.75
38.30 32.69 Village 10422.6 34.25 33.50 34.07 1.02 3.09
77.60 70.23 Wal-Mart 649247.06 76.11 74.10 74.76 -0.25 -0.33
47.92 37.65 Weis Markets 3264.75 47.92 45.26 45.50 -0.89 -1.92
101.86 52.11 Whole Foods 21782.35 53.10 52.11 53.03 0.17 0.32
                 
    Wholesalers            
    ——————–            
22.99 18.77 Nash Finch 3094.24 22.99 22.33 22.41 0.19 0.86
19.73 13.44 Spartan Stores 5185.79 19.30 18.92 19.19 0.80 4.35
61.26 47.20 United Natural Foods 15705.72 54.92 53.78 54.55 0.66 1.22
                 
    Indices Last This Pct.      
    ——- Week Week Change      
                 
    Dow Jones 14910.14 14988.55 0.53      
    S&P 500 1603.26 1615.41 0.76      
                 
    SN Composite 2318.98 2321.28 0.10      
                 
    Retailers 2098.27 2100.12 0.09      
    Wholesalers 913.06 927.41 1.57      
                 
        Pct        
    Leading Gainers Close Change        
    —————            
    Roundy’s 9.35 12.79        
    Supervalu 6.71 7.19        
    Empire 77.40 5.94        
                 
        Pct        
    Leading Decliners Close Change        
    —————            
    Weis Markets 45.50 -1.92        
    Metro 68.75 -1.35        
    The Fresh Market 50.60 -0.75        
                 
    Most Active by Volume          
    —————            
    Wal-Mart 64924706          
    Kroger 31072372          
    Target 30685296          
                 
    Most Active            
    as Percent of SHO            
    —————            
    Supervalu 11.30          
    The Fresh Market 9.80          
    Roundy’s 9.08          
                 
    Gainers 17          
    Unchanged 0          
    Decliners 7          
                 
  COMPILED BY DATA NETWORK, HUNTINGTON, NY  (631) 549-1014      
  -INFORMATION AND DATA HEREIN THOUGH BELIEVED ACCURATE IS NOT GUARANTEED.    
   DATA NETWORK SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INACCURACIES.      

Advertisement

Supermarket News

July 1, 2013: Supermarkets, Online Retailers Seen Growing Share

Although the supermarket channel will lag some other retail channels in growth during the next five years, grocers will still capture nearly a fifth of the incremental increase in consumer spending, according to research presented at the Kantar Retail Mid-Year Forum last month. The presentations also indicated that consumers may be becoming more attuned to value overall and less focused specifically on price.

Registering for Premium Content on Supermarket News will give you INSTANT access to invaluable articles and media content that industry professionals rely on. You will have access to our special reports, feature articles, and industry analysis. It’s FREE, easy and quick.

Already registered? to view your content.

Supermarket News